Page 1

RAMADAAN 1438 l MAY 2017

Vol. 31 No. 5 EXCLUSIVE TO MUSLIM VIEWS

Looking to the future: Hamas’s new political document In this exclusive interview for Muslim Views, SURAYA DADOO spoke to Hamas leader, Khaled Meshaal, about the movement’s vision for Palestine.

FTER exchanging the customary Islamic greeting, Khaled Meshaal raises a clenched fist and offers an ‘Amandla!’ ‘Isn’t that how political discussions begin in your country,’ Hamas’s political chief asked, fondly recalling his whirlwind visit to South Africa in 2015. The gesture reminded me how Meshaal’s combination of wit, charisma and razor-sharp political acumen has transformed the Islamic resistance movement into a formidable liberation movement and a serious Palestinian political actor. In what was eventually his last act as Politburo head, Meshaal unveiled the organisation’s ‘Document of General Principles and Policies’ in the Qatari capital, Doha, on May 1. The 42-point political platform presents Hamas’s vision and strategy for Palestinian liberation, and wipes away its outdated founding charter. That document – written by one man during the first intifada – conceived of the occupation of Palestine primarily as a religious strife between Muslims and Jews. Hamas’s new political manifesto, however, is about the here and now, dealing with the current facts on the ground. According to Meshaal, ‘This is a plan of action that reflects our current thinking and vision.’ International law, Meshaal explains, was a major focus of the document, and he had spent over nine hours with international law experts scrutinising the document in Arabic and English. The document is the product of four years of dialogue among Hamas leadership in Gaza, in prison and in exile. It is, according to Meshaal, ‘a reflection of the natural progression and evolution of Hamas’. The biggest change comes in the redefinition of Hamas’s enemy. Article 16 affirms that it is the occupation, rather than Judaism, that Hamas is fighting.

consequence of your position on the ground and the balance of power. Right now, there is no balance of power. It is simply a surrender of the weaker side.’ ‘Peace cannot be achieved between a weak party and a strong one. Negotiations serve the strong but not the weak. We will only enter negotiations when there is sufficient balance of power. Regrettably, the Palestinians are in an extremely sorry state of affairs, negotiating without any real manoeuvres or leverage.’

A

The two-state solution The document reminds the

Resistance ‘Peace talks are not the only strategic option,’ says Meshaal. ‘If your enemies know that you do not possess anything except negotiations, you don’t speak about anything except negotiations and you don’t possess any other option, why should they make concessions to you?’ he asks earnestly. It is for this reason that Hamas will not renounce its armed struggle and the right to resist occupation.

Prospects for unity

Having served two terms as political head of Hamas, Khaled Meshaal steps down, and is replaced by Ismail Haniyeh. Photo SUPPLIED

world that the Palestinian people can never be forced to give up the dream of returning to their homeland from which they were expelled in 1948. According to the platform, however, Hamas supports the establishment of a fully sovereign and independent Palestinian state with Jerusalem as its capital along the lines of June 4, 1967. The right of Palestinian refugees to return is not negotiable. While significant, this is not as radical a change as it might first appear. As early as 1997, Hamas leaders publicly stated their readiness to explore political solutions based on 1967 borders. They were ignored by Israel and the Middle East Quartet consisting of the UN, the US, the EU and Russia. The main feature separating Hamas’s two state solution from the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) is the question of refugees. Hamas clearly states that refugees have an unconditional right of return. The PLO stresses finding ‘a just solution to

the refugee issue’ without ever specifying what this looks like or if it includes a return at all.

Recognising Israel Although the new manifesto captures Hamas’s current political evolution, the movement has retained its core principles. Chief amongst these is Hamas’s refusal to recognise Israel’s right to exist. I asked Meshaal why. ‘We acknowledge Israel’s existence but we will not recognise its right to exist,’ says Meshaal. ‘For us to recognise Israel’s ‘right to exist’ means that we would be legitimising our own ethnic cleansing and dispossession. We cannot make legitimate what is illegitimate,’ explains Meshaal. Does this non-recognition mean that Hamas wants to destroy Israel? ‘We do not advocate the destruction of anyone. We are simply recognising that Israel was not established on just grounds.’ ‘How can there be justice if there is a denial of the Nakba, the crimes perpetrated against Pales-

tinians?’ asks Meshaal.

Negotiations Will Hamas enter into negotiations with Israel? ‘The policy of Hamas at this time is not to negotiate directly with Israel,’ Meshaal answers emphatically. ‘Netanyahu does not want peace. Israel does not recognise the basic right of our people to self-determination.’ According to Meshaal, ‘Israel uses negotiations as a public relations exercise to fool the world into believing that it wants peace. It continues stealing land, building settlements and altering realities on the ground.’ I ask Meshaal if it is time to press the restart button on the peace process. ‘Yes, it is. Israel and the PA [Palestinian Authority] have been doing the same thing for 20 years, expecting a different result. That is insanity.’ ‘Negotiations are an extension of the liberation struggle, a tactical tool. Whatever you take away from the negotiating table is a

‘Despite its weaknesses and the political blunders of its leadership, the PLO remains a framework with a history and a role for the Palestinian people,’ says Meshaal. The new charter wants to rebuild the PLO as a national framework for all Palestinians seeking liberation. Policy – as many South African political movements are also now learning – isn’t determined by heavy-handed rhetoric and history but by circumstances on the ground. The new Hamas document is proof of this. ‘This is the document that our grassroots must teach to their children,’ stresses Meshaal.

Towards the future Having served a maximum of two terms as Hamas’s political head, Meshaal now steps down and hands over the reigns to Ismail Haniyeh. I jokingly ask Meshaal if he is ready for retirement. ‘A resistance fighter never retires,’ he quips. Meshaal confirmed that he will continue to serve as a member of Hamas’s Shura council. Suraya Dadoo is a researcher and writer with Media Review Network, a Johannesburg-based advocacy group. Find her on Twitter: @Suraya_Dadoo

Donate your Zakat, Lillah and Sadaqah

EVERY SECOND COUNTS EA ST A FR I CA CRI S I S

DONATE ONLINE www.islamic-relief.org.za


2

Muslim Views

Muslim Views . May 2017


Muslim Views . May 2017

Ramadaan calls for justice

FASTING implies a social responsibility, and Ramadaan this year comes at a time of national crisis following deepening social discontent in our country. Our devotions of sacrifice, self-restraint and compassion for the poor are contextualised by a range of glaring social and political issues. Our spiritual growth, we are constantly reminded by the Quran and the Sunnah, does not occur in isolation of social realities, locally and internationally. The leadership crisis in South Africa, the corrupt global imperial engagements between the USA and Russia, and the sustained impact of the Israeli occupation of Palestine, after almost seventy years, are relevant cases in point. The latter, in particular, is of profound relevance for the fasting Muslim. Our fast must necessarily be introspective but we also cannot fail to confront that which undermines social justice in our midst and further afield in the world. Aspects of the true believer’s inner striving in Ramadaan are mirrored in his or her outer behaviour in the course of a struggle for justice universally. The resistance of Palestinians against Israeli occupation is the iconic struggle of our time, largely because it is a struggle against the last settler colonial state sustained by an imperial power. There is a universality that defines this struggle, even in its transcendence of religious faith.

Colonial occupation has always been a global political phenomenon. Yet, this anti-colonial struggle unites the three revealed, and other, faiths in this world in their universal admonishments to remain committed to justice in the face of any worldly injustice. The capacity and the obligation to resist is the common thread in both the act of religious devotion and a political struggle. This act of fasting, generic to all faiths that recognise God Almighty as Supreme Being, impels the believer to resist the ungodly for the sake of his or her individual spiritual well-being, and for the well-being in the worldly affairs of all people. Ramadaan emerges, year after year, as the burning imperative for Muslims to strive for God-consciousness and spiritual growth in a deeply personal demonstration of faith and devotion in the global community of believers. Yet, it also emerges as the force that impels all believers in their commitment to worldly justice that cannot be dissociated from the struggle within. Both the inner and the outer are absolutely the domains of God hence no true believer can sustain a disconnect between the two. As we commence our fast in Ramadaan, there are more than 400 children in Israeli prisons; and more than a 1 000 Palestinian prisoners in Occupied Palestine are well into the second month of a hunger strike. Their basic demands include more humane regulations for family visits, better prison conditions and medical care, and an end to solitary confinement and detention without charge or trial. It should strike us, and forcefully so, that the suffering of the poor and the oppressed in this world is caused by imperial forces seeking to gain and maintain control of the world’s key sources of wealth. The interests of imperial power are sustained by the enslavement of the other. Fasting produces the appropriate mental, physical and spiritual state not only for the God-conscious individual but for the capacity of the ummah to resist the empire. Fasting is a time for both spiritual growth and social justice. Ramadaan kareem!

Our editorial comment represents the composite viewpoint of the Editorial Team of Muslim Views, and is the institutional voice of the newspaper. Correspondence can be sent to editor@mviews.co.za

Publishers: BRISKTRADE 175 (Pty) Ltd P O Box 442 Athlone 7760 South Africa Tel: 021 696 5404 • Fax Admin: 021 696 9301 Advertising adverts@mviews.co.za Admin info@mviews.co.za Editor Farid Sayed E-mail editor@mviews.co.za Fax Editor 086 516 4772 DISTRIBUTION Your Advertiser 021 638 7491 Views and opinions expressed by contributors and advertisers in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of the editorial team or the publishers.

3

Digital archive of Muslim News and Muslim Views gets underway MAHMOOD SANGLAY

MUSLIM Views and Muslim News have a combined history of almost 57 years. Muslim News was published for 26 years, from December 1960 to August 1986. An estimated 670 fortnightly editions of the newspaper saw the light of day. Muslim Views was launched in September 1986 and has published 368 monthly editions to date for just over 30 years. This record of publishing 1 038 editions of the two titles is unique and remains unparalleled in South African media history. The contents of the collection dating back 57 years is a valuable resource reflecting the social and political history of South Africa, particularly that of Muslims in our country. Muslim News ceased publication in a period of political struggle of resistance against apartheid. Muslim Views was published for eight years under the apartheid regime and for 23 years under a democratic dispensation. This history reflects the narrative, over two generations, of people of vision and courage who sacrificed during an era of political struggle for freedom. An integral part of this history is the legacy of Imam Abdullah Haron who offered the ultimate sacrifice for speaking truth to power. It is in this thirtieth year of publishing Muslim Views that we undertake a major project of digitising the contents of both titles. This process involves collecting every single one of the 1 038 editions in hard copy and sorting them in chronological order. All available editions of Muslim News and Muslim Views have already been sorted in an archive built recently at the Muslim Views office. Each edition published subsequently is added to the growing collection of Muslim Views. The next step is the scanning of every page of the two titles

for storage in a digital archive. All 670 fortnightly editions of Muslim News are designated for scanning. However, only 133 of the 368 monthly editions of Muslim Views need to be scanned because digital archiving on CD and DVD format commenced in November 1997 when Muslim Views was relaunched. Just over 20 000 pages in 803 editions of Muslim News and Muslim Views will be scanned. Muslim Views will outsource the scanning to a suitable service provider. An exciting aspect of the scanning process is that it is enabled for optical character recognition (OCR). This involves the electronic conversion of images of printed text into text that is readable by commercial word-processing software. The process therefore enables word searching as well as copy and paste functions of text from all editions. This is of inestimable value for academic research and for the general public because the entire collection of the editorial text of Muslim News and Muslim Views will eventually be made available online. Farid Sayed, who served on the editorial board of Muslim News and was founding editor of Muslim Views in 1986, says this process is historic for the two titles, for their readers and for the broader community. Sayed says, ‘The 57 years that span the existence of the two newspapers cover an exciting period in our history from the repression of the apartheid era to the dawn of democracy and the challenge of establishing social justice in one of the most unequal societies on earth. ‘The two titles are also unique in that they can claim to have covered for over half a century the challenges and the triumphs of the Muslim community – particularly in Cape Town – for an unbroken period; first on a fortnightly basis and then monthly.’

CALL FOR BACK EDITIONS OF MUSLIM NEWS, MUSLIM VIEWS IN its efforts to digitise the contents of Muslim News and Muslim Views, the publisher has discovered that a number of editions of both titles are missing from its archive. We are therefore calling on members of the public and organisations that have copies of Muslim News, which was published from 1960 till 1986, to please contact the Muslim Views office. Similarly, anyone who has copies of Muslim Views from September 1986 till November 1997 is asked to contact our office. If you have copies of the newspapers, kindly contact our office and advise the year, volume and edition number so that we may check if this is on our list of missing editions. We will then arrange to source these missing editions from you for purposes of adding to our archive and scanning. The support of our readers in this digitisation project is appreciated. Please call our office on 021 696 5404 or e-mail: info@muslimviews.co.za

This newspaper carries Allah’s names, the names of the Prophets and sacred verses of the Holy Qur’an. Please treat it with the respect it deserves. Either keep, circulate or recycle. Please do not discard. Muslim Views


4

Muslim Views . May 2017

Ramadaan: social consciousness and a time of spiritual rejuvenation SHAIKH SA’DULLAH KHAN THE Quran acknowledges that fasting, which is one of the pillars of Islam, has been an integral part of religious traditions through history (Quran 2:183). Ramadaan, the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calendar, is characterised through fasting by the global Muslim community.

Fasting promotes a heightened level of spiritual consciousness, and spirituality has an internal as well as an external dimension. Internally, it refers to the purification of the self from the evils of bad intention,

Far more than hunger and thirst

deceit, hypocrisy, selfishness, cowardice, arrogance and

Fasting in the Islamic tradition requires dawn till dusk abstention from food, drink and intimacy. It is, however, far more than mere abstention from these necessities of daily living. Fasting is considered a mode of enhancing self-discipline. It is an opportunity for regulating one’s attitude and conduct, it serves as a protective shield, and is a means of attaining taqwa/ piety, which the Quran considers as the pinnacle of human development.

prejudice. Outwardly, it is manifested in one’s positive

Private act Though prayer, pilgrimage and charity can be witnessed, fasting is a unique form of worship in that it is not observable. Islam emphasises this special institution of fasting as highly spiritual and moral discipline, both in motive and form. In motive, it requires purity of intention and honesty of purpose,

Muslim Views

attitude, good behaviour and noble character and in form it demands abstention from engaging in any form of unlawful and improper behaviour. This degree of sincerity coupled with self-control is an expression of mastery over one’s carnal self, so necessary in developing a better human being, focusing on the larger purpose of existence.

Balancing the physical and the spiritual From ethical and moral perspectives, we should contemplate the higher purpose and the deeper meaning of our lives, trying to live meaningfully, balancing our physicality with our spirituality.

Fasting promotes a heightened level of spiritual consciousness, and spirituality has an internal as well as an external dimension. Internally, it refers to the purification of the self from the evils of bad intention, deceit, hypocrisy, selfishness, cowardice, arrogance and prejudice. Outwardly, it is manifested in one’s positive attitude, good behaviour and noble character.

As a matter of fact, the feast of Eid-ul-Fitr, marking the end of the fast of Ramadaan, cannot be celebrated unless those affording ones have disbursed the sadaqatul-fitr (natural charity or sincere bounteousness) to the impoverished. This promotes attentiveness to social responsibility, interest in the welfare of society and inspires a continued spirit of generosity.

Societal welfare

Reflection and introspection

While fasting, we are far more aware of the hunger of the poor and the suffering of the oppressed and are therefore instructed to be more generous in this month.

As Ramadaan unfolds, it behoves each fasting person to open a page from the book of muhasabah (critical self-evaluation) and to reflect on what is

being achieved through the month; what benefits are derived, which behaviours are adjusted, what good practices are adopted, which bad habits are being relinquished. How does the prayers and fasting of Ramadaan influence attitudes and perspectives; how is it improving relationships with families, friends and neighbours; how much has it increased consciousness of responsibility towards the destitute; how is it impacting on the body, the heart, the mind and the soul? If there is a genuine effort towards the spiritualisation of one’s being, the moralisation of consciousness, empathy in attitude and goodness in conduct then, perchance, a concerted effort is being made of treading on the pathway towards the objective of fasting – the attainment of taqwa.

Towards fulfilment The Quran refers to the fasting ones as ‘saihun’ or spiritual wayfarers so, the journey of Ramadaan motivates each person to perpetuate the positive spirit being imbibed and to continue on the spiritual journey towards fulfilment and excellence. Ramadaan mubarak – A blessed Ramadaan to all. Shaikh Sa’dullah Khan is the CEO of Islamia College, Cape Town.


Muslim Views . May 2017

5

Muslim Views


6

Muslim Views . May 2017

The legacy of Shamima Shaikh for the Muslims of South Africa VANESSA REVERA DE LA FUENTE

THE ninth of Ramadaan will be 20 years of the death of Shamima Shaikh. She is currently known worldwide for being the most prominent human rights activist and Muslim feminist in South Africa. Twenty years after her death, what is the major lesson that her short but fruitful life left to us Muslims? Allah in the Holy Quran commands every Muslim to embrace an active commitment to what is fair and good, and says in Surah An-Nisa:135: ‘O you who have imaan, stand firm in establishing justice, and be witnesses for Allah, even if it be against yourselves or parents and relatives.’ If Islam is peace then Islam is justice because one can’t exist without the other. It is no coincidence that this mandate appears in the surah of women. Allah speaks there about us and to us. Women, thanks to Quran, are the beneficiaries of justice and equality of the revelation and, at the same time, we are called to be active promoters and builders of social justice. As a Muslim woman and activist for gender justice, in the conviction that Islam contains a message of equality and compassion for all human beings, the most important legacy that Shamima’s life left is the fearless commitment to live for standing up for justice, even if this has negative consequences for us. Shamima Shaikh was a Muslim who firmly stood up for justice, defying the religious status quo of her time. As a believer, she did not hesi-

Twenty years after her death, Shamima Shaikh’s fearless commitment to justice, defying the religious status quo of her time, is Photo SUPPLIED recalled.

tate to make visible the inequality that affects women in our communities, as widely spread and contrary to the divine word of Allah. She said: ‘Despite the overwhelming and strong position of

Muslims that Islam liberated women 1 400 years ago, you still find there’s a problem. ‘Some thought and practice within Muslim society does not reflect this conviction, giving rise to the accusation that Islam

breathe-right

ENT Surgeon | Dr AM Karjieker www.breathe-right.co.za Suite 1601, Christian Barnard Hospital 181 Longmarket Street, Cape Town Also in Rondebosch

all appts: 0800 129 999

hear-right

Audiologist | ANN CARR www.hear-right.co.za Suite 1602, Christian Barnard Hospital Suite 304, Rondebosch Medical Centre

all appts: 0800 124 327

LIVE RIGHT YOUR QUALITY OF LIFE – OUR PASSION

www.live-right.co.za All the medical help you need on one website.

Muslim Views

oppresses women, to which the Muslim community reacts emotionally with denial and animosity, without reflecting inwardly and addressing the existing problems.’ Shamima was a pioneer in the promotion of inclusive mosques, introducing the campaign ‘Women in the Mosque’. She firmly believed that our presence in these spaces was necessary and indispensable, as she stated: ‘It is important for women to be at mosques because they are the most important centres of Islam. Decisions are taken, direction is given. It is where people meet to pray together and it promotes consultation.’ She embodied the commitment for justice that must inspire every Muslim in our daily lives but her own community punished her for this. She was alienated, mistreated and labelled as mad for following the divine guidance revealed by Allah so that humanity could live in justice, ensuring equal dignity for all people. According to the testimony of relatives, an Islamic authority that proudly claimed to be Muslim publicly celebrated that Shamima suffered from cancer, saying that it was a punishment from God for her advocacy for gender justice in the framework of Islam. Shamima’s legacy is much more relevant nowadays, in a time when humans’ lives seem to matter less, making it much more

necessary for men and women of faith to show a real, proactive and unconditional commitment to work for the restoration of the dignity of every human being. How many of us, today, say we are believers in the Quran and are willing to raise our voices to denounce injustice if it involves receiving disapproval? Are we ready to claim back dignity for those in pain when it demands more than the ‘minimum necessary’? Are we standing up for justice beyond pretty statements? Are we ready, as Muslims, to be called crazy, mad or troublemakers for reporting abuse? May her unbreakable faith inspire us to be of those believers that no structure can subject because we are an earthquake; freedom fighters that no fire can burn because we are the fire; Muslims who the oppressor could not silence because we are the thunder; crazy enough, blissfully and proudly crazy to stand up for justice, even against ourselves. This 9th of Ramadaan, Saturday, June 3, at 3:00 p.m. in Women Zone Artscape, we will remember Shamima Shaikh. We will celebrate her life, her legacy and her courage with the respect, love and compassion she deserves. May her name remain in our memory and her life be a light that guides us in establishing the justice and peace of Islam. Vanessa Rivera de la Fuente, a Chilean Muslim, is a social educator and communication specialist, journalist and research consultant. She is also an independent scholar on Women’s Studies, Religion and Politics.


Muslim Views . May 2017

7

Fixed de depo eposit that’t s also lo

Shari’ah Shari’ah comp compliant. liant. It just makes sense. When you’re looking for a Shari’ah compliant way to invest, why not choose the RQHWKDWÎVPRVWVXLWHGWR\RX")1%ÎVÜ[HGGHSRVLWDOORZV\RXWRFKRRVHUHWXUQV that suit you, as well as your own term of investing, from 30 days to 5 years.

So, search ‘FNB Islamic banking’ for investing suited to you, that’s also Shari’ah compliant. Terms and conditions apply. First National Bank – a division of FirstRand Bank Limited. An Authorised Financial Services and Credit Provider (NCRCP20).

Muslim Views


8

Muslim Views . May 2017

property V isit our website to view our full pr Visit operty portfolio www.fpggroup.co.za

W hi Wi Wishing Wis hing al alllll our our Muslim M lim Mu

/6ƀH ,262/#^ .$$%1,-#6

//66ƀ 6ƀH ,22662/ ,2 2//##^

..$ .$$% $%%111,,--##6

Ramadaan Ra Ram R maadaa ma mad madaa addaan an  6 66---,,, ,,,4 4 6-,,4 S H O P P I N G

R E TA I L

C E N T R E

WATERMEYER PARK Pretoria

LIFEST LIFES T YLE PRECINCT PRECIN CT

Rondebosch Rondebosch M Main ain S Shopping h o p pi ng M Mall a ll

& now developing Rondebosch Student Apartments

S T E L M A R K Centre

Sentrum

Chec Checkers kers Centr Centre e Somerset W West est

Muslim Views

Bishop Lavis Plattekloof Pr otea Heights Protea Mandalay Rondebosch Shell Century City TOTAL TOT TA AL ROCKLANDS KFC DRIVE THRU OPENING SOON!

Longbeach

Shell Longbeach


Muslim Views . May 2017

9

Muslim Views


10

Muslim Views . May 2017

The Quran and Ramadaan, a mansion of many spacious rooms SHAFIQ MORTON

RAMADAAN, as we all know, is regarded as the month of the Quran. Historically, the Quran was revealed on the 27th night. Its verses are recited every evening in mosques across the globe, and many try to read it from cover to cover in the 29 or 30 days of Ramadaan. This is a truly astounding phenomenon – one that resounds in the heavenly realms as divine mercy descends to earth on the Night of Power. A Godly gift said to reside in the last ten days of Ramadaan, it offers the immeasurable rewards of one having worshipped for over a thousand months. Ramadaan, resplendent with layered significance, offers grace, mercy and forgiveness in equal measures. It offers exoneration of sin to those who have fasted with a good heart; it gives equal relief to those who have paid their fidya, or expiation, if they cannot fast. As the fast is a secret for each person, something known only to Allah, Ramadaan is a mansion of many spacious rooms. Its outward measures – such as protecting the tongue, the pre-dawn meal, hastening to eat when the sun sets and being generous – are the embellishments of those who submit. But the greatest thing of all is the speech of Allah, the Quran. The Quran – as its descriptive moniker indicates – is a revelation and it talks to each of us with a rare intimacy. Yet, it is not a poem nor a work of prose. As Allah tells us, it is for recitation, and its recitation is highly recommended during Ramadaan.

Each letter, says Qurtubi, has to be given its proper due as it invokes the weight of ten rewards. Or, as the Companion, Amr ibn al-As, commented: ‘Every Quranic verse is a stair of Paradise. Ramadaan, lest we forget, is also a celebratory month. It is not a time for morbidity and moroseness. It is a time of measured action and reflection, of seeking bright blessings. Tarawih – the traditional communal night prayers – is derived from the root word, ‘raha’, which means ‘to rest’. The beautiful incantations recited after the prayer cycles, allows the worshipper to rest. In other words, Ramadaan is not a time for rushing through things. It is a time for savouring the moment, for allowing the Quran’s linguistic mastery, its cadences, its amazing transitions and its subtleties to wash over our senses. It is for this reason that I always struggle to understand why certain mosques – albeit with good intentions – race through the Quran, the youthful reciters going so fast that the words become an unintelligible jumble. Tarawih becomes a sweaty session of going up and down. It begs the question: are we reading the Quran just to finish it? Is our haste not waste? Does a complete reading for its own sake

become the equivalent of a meaningless trophy? Or do we read the Quran because we want to really listen to it, because we really want to swim in its deep pools? Imam Qurtubi, the great 13th century scholar – whose tafsir (exegesis) of the Quran is authoritative – says that the Quran has to be recited without haste. The reader has to clearly pronounce every word. Each letter, says Qurtubi, has to be given its proper due as it invokes the weight of ten rewards. Or, as the Companion, Amr ibn al-As, commented: ‘Every Quranic verse is a stair of Paradise.’ Quite evidently, Imam Qurtubi is being mindful of the Prophet (SAW), as Bukhari and Muslim both report the Prophet (SAW) saying, ‘He is not one of us who does not make his voice melodious while reading Quran.’ In another tradition, via Abu Dawud, the Prophet (SAW) exhorted us to beautify the Quran with our voices. Further traditions say that the Prophet (SAW) used to recite slowly, clearly enunciating each

letter and lengthening the vowel – or madd – sounds in words such as ‘Raheem’. He also used to pause after every verse, until it appeared – said the Companions – to sound longer than it actually was. Imam al-Ghazali, the 12th century colossus, encapsulates exactly how we should approach Quran. He says that we have to taste the Quran in our hearts. We do this by magnifying its speaker, Allah; we do this by paying attention to its letters and words; we do this by pondering over its verses; and finally, we do this by seeking its linguistic, scholarly and contemplative dimensions. For our response to the Quran to be effective, says Imam Ghazali, we have to lift four veils. The first is being concerned merely with outward recitation. The second is bias. Super-imposing our bias over Quranic messages prevents their true nature from being revealed. Thirdly, sin clouds the heart and obscures understanding. And fourthly, tafsir shouldn’t inhibit private reflection (without stepping over the bounds of shariah).

Build Your Future Al Baraka’s Shariah compliant Tax-free Investment Account provides LQYHVWRUV ZLWK WKH RSSRUWXQLW\ RI JDLQLQJ WKH IXOO EHQHÀW RI investment earnings that are free from tax implications.

Think Tomorrow. Think Tax-Free Customer Service Centre : 0860 225 786 www.albaraka.co.za Terms and Conditions apply

Albaraka Bank Limited: Reg No. 1989/003295/06 $OEDUDND%DQN/LPLWHGLVDQDXWKRULVHGÀQDQFLDOVHUYLFHVDQGFUHGLWSURYLGHU $OEDUDND%DQN/LPLWHGLVDQ$XWKRULVHG'HDOHULQIRUHLJQH[FKDQJH FSP No. 4652, NCR No. NCRCP14

Muslim Views

A worshipper, says Imam Ghazali, has to rise in three degrees of recitation, bearing in mind that any act of Quranic recitation already represents a tremendous grade, or state of being. The lowest grade, he wrote, is reading the Quran as if one were standing before Allah, pleading, entreating and supplicating. The middle grade is when we realise that Allah is actually addressing us with His favours, that He is bestowing gifts of meaning, us receiving them with modesty and magnification. This grade leads to feelings of ecstasy, thankfulness and joy. The highest grade is when we behold the Speaker and His attributes, when we see the address of Allah, and only then, realise our recitation. While the comprehension of the Quran is a noble aspiration, Imam al-Ghazali – like all the scholars of repute – says there are equal mercies in reciting the Quran for those who understand it and, significantly, also for those who do not understand it. He relates a story from Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal, who said: I saw Allah, Great and Mighty, in a dream and asked Him: ‘O, Lord, how have those who have drawn near to You achieved this intimacy?’ And Allah, the Almighty, replied: ‘By My speech, O Ahmad.’ Imam Ahmad then asked: ‘Lord, did they do this by understanding the meaning of Your Quran or without it?’ Allah, the Most Merciful, replied, ‘O my dear Ahmad, by understanding it as well as without understanding it.’


Muslim Views . May 2017

11

Muslim Views


12

Muslim Views . May 2017

MSA hosts game night at UWC AMINA WAGGIE

THE Muslim Student Association (MSA) of Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) hosted their second annual game night at University of the Western Cape (UWC) Stadium Hall on Friday, April 28. It was said that this #MSAGameNight would be bigger and better than before, and it definitely was. There were over 100 students at the event. There was a variety of games, which catered for everyone; card games, dominoes, board games, pool, foosball, Xbox as well as a soccer tournament. There was a photo corner where the students could have some silly fun with props and there were also snacks and food on sale. A small entrance fee of R30 went towards funding future MSA events. The MSA hosted the game night with the intention of creating a fun halaal alternative for the students to relax, connect and bond in a healthy and safe environment. The organisers at CPUT hope other MSAs will be inspired to have similar events following the success of the game night. According to Raeeqah Kilshaw, an MSA volunteer, the event was really important for Muslim students because ‘it is extremely tough being in a predominantly non-Muslim classroom at campus. ‘It is also difficult to go out with classmates because they

Muslim Views

A few students playing the board game, 30 Seconds.

won’t necessarily be going to a place that has a halaal environment. Here at the game night, the MSA offers a safe halaal space for the students to entertain themselves in a good atmosphere.’ After Esha Salaah, there was a talk by Muhammed Sheik, chairperson of the MSA Cape. MSA Cape is a regional body that oversees the various MSA chapters based at the major campuses in the Western Cape: University of Cape Town (UCT), UWC and CPUT. Sheik said that the idea behind the #MSAGameNight was that the youth can have fun and at the same time incorporate religion wherever they go. Sheik believes that one of the ways to reach out to the youth is to speak about things that affect them. He spoke about the consistency in acts of worship as well as modest, respectful conduct that one aught to have for fellow Muslims as well as those who are not

Photo EMILY NORRIS

Muslim. Sheik said he wanted to highlight this point because, recently, there have been incidents of religious intolerance in the Western Cape. ‘We as the youth need to adopt a respectful, tolerant approach in our speech, in our conduct with other people such that they can embrace the beauty of Islam and not think that Islam is a very forceful, harsh religion and that it is something that is really adrift in society,’ said Sheik. The objective of the MSA is to organise development programmes so that the youth can grow spiritually and holistically. One way to go about this, Sheik said, was to speak about things that challenge Muslim youth and show how these can be combated in sessions that are concise and interactive. ‘I came to the MSA game night to support my fellow MSAs, as

well as for the entertainment. I think the talk that Muhammad Sheik gave was really good and quite relatable to every student that attended the event,’ said Bilal Matandela, 19, UCT MSA. ‘I came to the MSA game night because I wanted to be involved in more MSA events and also I wanted to meet other Muslims. The turnout was much more people than I expected,’ said Hoosain Wei, 21. The MSA hoped that this event would bring everyone together and out of his or her virtual comfort zones. The game night was well marketed on social media and received many responses via Instagram and Twitter. Many of the youth present were there because of promotions which were done via social media platforms, such as the hashtag #MSAGameNight, which was trending on twitter two weeks prior to the event. ‘I never attended last year’s game night and I had a fear of missing out on this year’s one. I’m having so much fun at this event. I got to meet some twitter people and it’s good to finally put faces to profiles,’ said Husayn Bassier, 22, a well-known tweleb (twitter celebrity). ‘When I heard that Husayn Bassier is attending the game night, I just had to go! I really like being at this event, it’s really awesome,’ said Faseegh Marcus, 20. ‘We hope that this event will help build stronger relations between the MSAs. It is not about how many attendees there were; the most important thing we hoped to obtain were the friend-

ships established between brothers with brothers, and sisters with sisters,’ said Tashreeq Lasker, chairman of CPUT MSA.

Some gems from #MSAGameNight


13

Muslim Views . May 2017

THIS RAMADAN SAY YES TO SAY YES TO SAY YES TO SAY NO TO

PROSPERITY PEACE OF MIND THE ALMIGHTY’S BLESSINGS RIBA

SAY K{ NO } W TO RIBA

CUT OUT THIS 2017 RAMADAN CALENDAR FOR YOUR HOME OR BUSINESS.

R A M A D A N

K A R E E M 1438 | 2017

THIS RAMADAN, YOUR PATH TO PEACE & PROSPERITY IS ONE STEP AWAY

PLEDGE YOUR COMMITMENT TO SAY NO TO RIBA AT

WWW.RIBA.CO.ZA

FIND OUT MORE

IS

SAY K{NO}W TO RIBA

CPT

DBN

THIS RAMADAN

JHB

SUHOOR

IFTAAR

SUHOOR

IFTAAR

SUHOOR

IFTAAR

SAY YES TO

PROSPERITY RAMADAN 01

27 MAY | SAT

06:07

17:50

05:12

17:09

05:19

17:28

RAMADAN 02

28 MAY | SUN

06:07

17:50

05:12

17:08

05:19

17:28

RAMADAN 03

29 MAY | MON

06:08

17:49

05:12

17:08

05:20

17:27

RAMADAN 04

30 MAY | TUE

06:08

17:49

05:13

17:08

05:20

17:27

RAMADAN 05

31 MAY | WED

06:09

17:48

05:13

17:07

05:20

17:27

RAMADAN 06

01 JUN | THUR

06:09

17:48

05:14

17:07

05:21

17:27

RAMADAN 07

02 JUN | FRI

06:10

17:48

05:14

17:07

05:21

17:27

RAMADAN 08

03 JUN | SAT

06:10

17:48

05:15

17:07

05:22

17:27

RAMADAN 09

04 JUN | SUN

06:11

17:47

05:15

17:07

05:22

17:26

RAMADAN 10

05 JUN | MON

06:11

17:47

05:16

17:06

05:22

17:26

RAMADAN 11

06 JUN | TUE

06:11

17:47

05:16

17:06

05:23

17:26

RAMADAN 12

07 JUN | WED

06:12

17:47

05:16

17:06

05:23

17:26

RAMADAN 13

08 JUN | THUR

06:12

17:47

05:17

17:06

05:23

17:26

RAMADAN 14

09 JUN | FRI

06:13

17:47

05:17

17:06

05:24

17:26

RAMADAN 15

10 JUN | SAT

06:13

17:47

05:17

17:06

05:24

17:26

RAMADAN 16

11 JUN | SUN

06:14

17:47

05:18

17:06

05:24

17:26

RAMADAN 17

12 JUN | MON

06:14

17:47

05:18

17:06

05:25

17:26

RAMADAN 18

13 JUN | TUE

06:14

17:47

05:18

17:06

05:25

17:26

RAMADAN 19

14 JUN | WED

06:15

17:47

05:19

17:06

05:25

17:26

RAMADAN 20

15 JUN | THUR

06:15

17:47

05:19

17:06

05:26

17:26

RAMADAN 21

16 JUN | FRI

06:15

17:47

05:19

17:06

05:26

17:27

RAMADAN 22

17 JUN | SAT

06:16

17:47

05:20

17:06

05:26

17:27

RAMADAN 23

18 JUN | SUN

06:16

17:47

05:20

17:07

05:26

17:27

RAMADAN 24

19 JUN | MON

06:16

17:47

05:20

17:07

05:27

17:27

RAMADAN 25

20 JUN | TUE

06:16

17:47

05:20

17:07

05:27

17:27

RAMADAN 26

21 JUN | WED

06:17

17:48

05:21

17:07

05:27

17:27

RAMADAN 27

22 JUN | THUR

06:17

17:48

05:21

17:07

05:27

17:28

RAMADAN 28

23 JUN | FRI

06:17

17:48

05:21

17:08

05:28

17:28

RAMADAN 29

24 JUN | SAT

06:17

17:48

05:21

17:08

05:28

17:28

RAMADAN 30

25 JUN | SUN

06:17

17:49

05:21

17:08

05:28

17:28

SAY YES TO

PEACE OF MIND SAY YES TO

THE ALMIGHTY’S BLESSINGS SAY NO TO

RIBA

IS

YA FOR FASTING NIYYAH I intend to keep the fast for tomorrow, in the month of Ramadan. DUA WHEN BREAKING FAST O Lord! I fasted for You and I believe in You and I break my fast with your sustenance.

THIS RAMADAN, YOUR PATH TO PEACE & PROSPERITY IS ONE STEP AWAY. PLEDGE YOUR COMMITMENT TO SAY NO TO RIBA AT

WWW.RIBA.CO.ZA This calendar has an accuracy of +/- 1 minute. The Suhoor time is 5 minutes before Subh Sadiq and is final. The Maghrib / Iftaar time is 3 minutes after sunset.

Please refer to your local masjid for accurate times. The Lord’s name is not printed on this calendar so it can be disposed after Ramadan.

SAY K{ NO } W TO RIBA A

WWW.RIBA.CO.ZA Muslim Views


14

Muslim Views . May 2017

All hail the best GT-R yet: Nissan’s 2017 gem

Ashref Ismail, who shares monthly motoring news with Muslim Views’ readers. Photo SUPPLIED

ASHREF ISMAIL

THIS here folks is the new Nissan GT-R. It does not look very different to previous models but the new model offers a range of styling, mechanical, luxury and performance upgrades that makes it a more accomplished everyday supercar, with a major improvement in its everyday driveability, and more power on tap at midand high engine speeds. The 2017 GT-R features the most comprehensive styling upgrades to date, with all features offering a performance benefit as well. Viewed from the front, the new GT-R is fitted with a wider, deeper V-motion grille with new matte chrome trim and a redesigned mesh grille pattern. Apart from the more aggressive look, this new design improves airflow to the engine for enhanced cooling.

Styling of the Nissan supercar may be long in the tooth but it can run with the Photo QUICKPIC big boys for a third of the price.

Rounding off the new design is a new rear bumper with functional air vents. This new bumper also aids high-speed airflow for improved drag on the rear wing and greater downforce at high speeds and on the track. The GTR’s drag coefficient remains a low 0,26. The 2017 GT-R features a brand new interior, replete with hand-selected nappa leather and real carbon fibre. The dashboard has been redesigned to be more elegant and simple, with the number of buttons in view of the driver reduced

from 27 to 11. This was made possible by moving many of the control functions to the new, larger 8” capacitive touch screen with Nissan’s proprietary Display Command system. The dashboard itself is upholstered in a large, single piece of hand-selected, soft, nappa leather. The slight increase in weight of this leather cladding is more than offset by a new type of cushioning material, which is lighter than the material previously used. The hand-built VR38DETT V6 engine remains the heart of the 2017 R35 but it has been fur-

ther refined and improved for this model. The engine benefits from greater boost from the turbo chargers, which are similar to those featured in the GT-R GT3 racing car. It also receives individualised timing control on each cylinder for more power and torque and significantly improved engine performance in the midand high-rev ranges. The VR38DETT torque delivery now peaks at 632 Nm (up from 628 Nm) at a wider band from 3 300 rpm to 5 800 rpm. Kilowatt has increased from 397 kW to 408 kW at 6 800 rpm. A key ingredient in the 2017 GT-R’s blistering 0-100 km/h run is its launch control system and an improved gearbox. The six-speed dual clutch automatically actuated gearbox remains fitted above the rear axle and is connected to the engine with a carbon fibre shaft but the shifting has been refined to be smoother and less audible. The GT-R also features a new titanium exhaust system that has been tuned for improved performance and a more appealing mechanical sound. This is enhanced through Nissan’s Active Sound Enhancement system. The GT-R is equipped with new 20” forged alloy wheels that are shod with Dunlop SP Sport 600 DSST ultra-high performance tyres. These tyres were developed in partnership with Nissan for the GT-R and feature RunOnFlat

YOU NO LONGER HAVE TO CHOOSE BETWEEN AN SUV AND A MASERATI LEVANTE. THE MASERATI OF SUVs. STARTING FROM R1 650 000 The practicality and versatility of an SUV, or the power and panache of a Maserati? Now you can enjoy both - Introducing the new Levante. The Powerful V6 Engine, Q4 intelligent all-wheel drive system, 8 speed ZF transmission and sophisticated air suspension confirm that the Levante is every inch a refined SUV. Meanwhile, its exclusive Italian styling, luxurious interior and unique exhaust note affirms its Maserati DNA. So that’s one less difficult decision to make. Discover the new Levante. LEVANTE DIESEL: V6 60 o 2,987CM - MAX POWER: 275 HP AT 4,000 - MAX TORQUE: 600NM AT 2000-2600 RPM - MAX SPEED: 230 KM/H 0-100KM/ ACCELERATION: 6,9 SECS - FUEL CONSUMPTION (COMBINED CYCLE): 7,2 l/100KM - CO 2 EMISSIONS (COMBINED CYCLE): 189 G/KM THE DATA MAY NOT REFER TO THE MODEL REPRESENTED

www.maserati.co.za

MASERATI CAPE TOWN 67 JAN SMUTS STREET, CAPE TOWN, 8001 Phone: 0800 0600 78 | E-mail: info@maseraticpt.co.za Muslim Views

technology. Upgrades to the suspension and a more rigid suspension structure mean that the GT-R now exhibits even better stability and grip through quick lateral transitions, such as on a fast switchback or hairpin on a racetrack. Along with these dynamic improvements, the engineers at Nissan have spent considerable resources and time on making the GT-R an even better performer at everyday speeds. In doing so, they have ensured that the 2017 GT-R exhibits none of the quirks that make other super cars a taxing drive on everyday commutes. ‘The new GT-R delivers a heart-pounding driving experience at all times, on any road, for whoever sits in the driver’s seat. We have continued to push its performance boundaries to the limit – it’s even more potent than before. ‘At the same time, refinement has been added to take the driving experience to an entirely new level. We’re proud to bring you what we feel is the ultimate GT-R that possesses amazing performance, newfound civility and a rich racing history,’ said Hiroshi Tamura, chief product specialist, GT-R, Z and NISMO, Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. The new GT-R is available at Nissan High Performance Centres. The first consignment of vehicles has already been sold but order books are open.


Muslim Views . May 2017

15

Toyota celebrates the spirit of FJ ASHREF ISMAIL

TOYOTA has reincarnated the spirit of its FJ LandCruisers and other iconic adventure vehicles with the world premiere of the FT-4X Concept at the New York auto show. The revolutionary Toyota FT4X – or Future Toyota 4WD Crossover – is a four-wheel-drive toolbox penned by Toyota’s Calty Design Research studio in California. The striking adventurer features compact, sturdy dimensions and ‘rugged charm’ that places emphasis on simplicity, capability and durability while reinforcing the Toyota lineage. Calty president, Kevin Hunter, said the FT-4X demonstrated that designers continually invested deep thought into the emotional connection with their cars. ‘The FT-4X is not simply a concept where style meets function; it is a thoughtful, charming and engaging experience that adds real pleasure and convenience to the journey,’ Hunter said. ‘We focused on how a crossover vehicle can add fun and value to casual adventures, both in and out of the city, thinking about how someone would use it, and what they would love to do with it.’ Based on the Toyota New Global Architecture C-platform, the FT-4X is inspired by a simple,

Bring it on! Toyota shows its funky side with the playful FT-4X concept car. Photo QUICKPIC

sturdy ‘X-theme’. At the sides, a vertical X is shaped to provide the widest point at the door handle, creating a natural protective zone for the occupants. A similar treatment is used for the tailgate. Designers also developed a horizontal X theme that accentuates the rugged 18-inch wheels at each corner of the vehicle. Innovations abound throughout the vehicle. The Multi-Hatch tailgate opens two ways: in urban mode, a horizontal opening splits the hatch in half and makes it easier for kerbside loading of gear. In outdoor mode, the one-piece door opens upwards to create a shelter from the elements. The rotatable tailgate handle is shaped so it can be gripped by a gloved hand.

Twin red hooks in the front and rear bumpers provide secure anchor points for vehicle recovery and for tying down loads. Generous approach and departure angles add to the vehicle’s prowess. Wide black-painted over-fenders lend a tough look to the exterior and engulf the beefy, custom 225/55R18 Goodyear allseason tyres. A vertical picture window set above the driver’s side rear fender can be removed and swapped with multiple opaque colour or tinted glass options, allowing owners to personalise their FT4X. Sculpted rocker panels enhance under-body protection and durability, while a GoPro HERO5 Session camera, built into the driverside rear-view mirror, captures off-road action.

At the centre of the nose is an extra-large embossed Toyota logo that’s flanked by bright LED headlights. The FT-4X interior presents a large accessible space for equipment, with blue colouring for closed storage and orange for open storage. Twin boxes in the cargo area – one warm, the other cold – are designated for functions such as storing snacks, warming gloves or cooling ice packs. A flat cargo floor is fitted with tracks for securing gear and conceals a deep storage compartment, which can be accessed by sliding the floor out. Ahead of the cargo zone is a wet zone for stowing damp clothing or muddy boots while front passengers sit in a clean zone. Rear-door armrests have USB outlets and big, rotatable window switches; front and rear door handles serve as water bottles; removable inside rear lighting doubles as a torch; and the dome light can serve as an exterior locator or beacon. An ultra-compact The North Face® sleeping bag fits neatly between the front seats and functions as an armrest above an extra-large dividing console with more storage space. Its breathable, high-grip,

hybrid mesh surface allows for wet items to dry quickly while its bungee cord lattices keep small items in place. The blue and orange storage themes continue in the dashboard with a larger blue chest that appears to float above a carved orange bin. A removable multimedia system is part boom box and part indash stereo, engineered with an extra-large handle grip. Although there is no traditional navigation screen, designers included a mobile-phone mount directly above the cylindrical digital instrument cluster – a concept that recognises that users are used to relying on their own devices for directions. Although a concept, the FT-4X could potentially employ a punchy, small-displacement fourcylinder engine combined with its mechanical 4WD, selectable low range and front MacPherson strut suspension and rear double wishbones. Calty chief designer, Ian Cartabiano, said the mechanical satisfaction of the concept’s tactile grips, handles and controls are in contrast with today’s digital world. ‘You can tell that we had a blast designing the FT-4X because it looks fun to use and fun to drive,’ Cartabiano said. ‘We want everyone to interact with this car and feel a sense of delight and excitement.’

Muslim Views


16

Muslim Views . May 2017

Two new Mercs prepare for launch ASHREF ISMAIL

THE new S-Class celebrated its world première with extensive innovations at the Auto Shanghai, in April. Among the highlights is an allnew and highly efficient engine range with a series of new technologies for electrification of the power train. Intelligent Drive takes another step towards autonomous driving. And the undisputed leader in the premium segment with regard to comfort and wellness sets new standards in the interior. The market launch of the new S-Class starts in the European markets in July. Several new engines are planned for the new S-Class: inline six cylinders as diesel and petrol engines as well as a new V8 bi-turbo petrol engine. In addition, Mercedes-Benz plans a plug-in hybrid with an electric range of about 50 kilometres. At the same time, groundbreaking technologies such as the 48-volt Integrated Starter Alternator and the electric booster compressor celebrate their world première. The top-of-the-range model of Mercedes-Benz takes another big step towards autonomous driving and elevates Intelligent Drive to the next level. DISTRONIC Active Proximity Control and Active Steer Assist now provide even more comfortable support

The flagship of the Mercedes Benz passenger range, the new S Class, seen here Photo QUICKPIC in pre-production disguise, is due in South Africa soon.

for the driver to keep a safe distance and steer. The speed is now adjusted automatically ahead of curves or junctions. MULTIBEAM LED headlamps and ULTRA RANGE High Beam turn night into day. The flagship from MercedesBenz was the best-selling luxury saloon in the world in 2016. Since 2013, the company has sold well over 300 000 saloons. Today, there are six different S-Class body variants. With the Concept A Sedan at Auto Shanghai, Mercedes-Benz is providing an outlook of the next generation of compact vehicles and a potential, new body type.

The Concept A Sedan show car specifies the evolved MercedesBenz design language. Thanks to its purist, surface-focused design, featuring reduced lines and gaps, the show car is hot and cool at the same time. The ‘Aesthetics A’ sculpture already demonstrated that the upcoming compact class generation marks the dawn of an even more rigorous implementation of the design idiom of ‘sensual purity’. The current compact vehicle generation is crucially contributing to Mercedes-Benz’s most successful and rejuvenated appearance ever, to make 2016 the sixth year of records in succession.

The stunning new CLA prototype clearly shows the new design philosophy at Photo QUICKPIC Mercedes Benz: less creases, more substance.

More than two million compact vehicles have been sold around the globe since 2012. In addition to the contemporary design language, innovative assistance systems, connectivity and driving pleasure, model variety is a crucial factor for success: with the A and B Class, CLA and CLA Shooting Brake, as well as the SUV crossover GLA, five differently positioned variants are available on the market. The Concept A Sedan has been designed with the proportions of a dynamic, coupé-like and simultaneously compact, premium sedan. This aim is emphasised by the traditional three-box design featuring short overhangs, espe-

cially at the rear, as well as the slim greenhouse that has been offset towards the rear. Additional sedan characteristics are the relatively vertical Cpillar, larger side windows and the higher beltline. The striking front expresses self-confidence: this is crucially highlighted by the deep Panamericana grille tilted towards the front, featuring vertical chrome inserts and a star in the centre, as well as the stretched bonnet with Power-domes. The large, lower air inlet featuring a diamond grid structure and a striking trim strip in dark chrome is also amongst the most eye-catching features.

TOYOTA

Muslim Views


Muslim Views . May 2017

17

New Amarok after seven years ASHREF ISMAIL

VOLKSWAGEN Amarok is seven years old and it’s been a long wait for the anticipated new 3.0-litre V6 165 kW TDI engine. Lauded for its car-like driving features and low fuel consumption, the 2.0 litre Amarok did not really set the sales charts alight, with many die-hard bakkie fans apprehensive of a small capacity engine in a big double cab body.

The new 3.0-litre V6 TDI engine is the only six-cylinder diesel engine in the segment. The top-of-the-range engine delivers 165 kW of power that is available at 550 Nm of torque channelled through its standard eight-speed automatic gearbox. The V6 engine pushes the Amarok to a top speed of 193 km/h and sprints from 0 to 100 km/h in 8,0 seconds. From the outside, the new Amarok distin-

guishes itself from the previous model through a redesigned front bumper and radiator grille incorporating front fog lights, new alloy wheels and a third brake light with LED technology. Aligned with the latest Volkswagen DNA seen in the new Caddy, Transporter and forthcoming Crafter, horizontal lines dominate the front of the new model, with much cleaner-looking, angled folds and edges.

Inside the cab, the changes are more prominent with an all-new dashboard design which incorporates Volkswagen’s modular infotainment system with touchscreen radio, App-Connect, Bluetooth and USB interface (iPod/ iPhone compatible). A comprehensive list of safety equipment comes as standard on every new Amarok, including four airbags, Electronic Stabilisation Programme and Volkswa-

gen’s award-winning Automatic Post-Collision Braking System, which can reduce the chance or severity of a secondary accident in the event of a collision. The Trendline equipment trim level has been replaced with the Comfort line equipment trim level, resulting in additional standard features. CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

7 75$160,66,21352'8&76 5$160,66,21352'8&76

 < 1 $  7 $ ( ( 7 %  2 ( 8 4  : 1 ( 7 7 , 5 :

Muslim Views


18

Muslim Views . May 2017

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17

Highline Plus has been added to the model line-up for customers looking for additional top-end convenience and comfort standard features. Extreme replaces Ultimate as the main derivative in the Amarok model line-up. Extreme will be available with an option of 4MOTION automatic 2.0 BiTDI with 132 kW or 3.0 TDI V6 with 165 kW engine. Under the skin, the Amarokâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s running gear has not been fundamentally changed from the previous generation. The base derivative is the 2.0 TDI with 103 kW with 6-speed manual transmission and an option of permanent 4MOTION fourwheel and two-wheel drive systems.

Also carried over from the previous model is the tried and tested 2.0 BiTDi delivering 132 kW. This engine is offered with 6-speed manual and 8-speed automatic transmissions. Customers have an option of the selectable 4MOTION on the derivatives with manual transmission, and permanent 4MOTION four-wheel drive system on derivatives with automatic transmission. The new model retains the previous Amarokâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dimensions: it measures 5,25m long, 2,23m wide and 1,83m high. Its load area continues to measure 2,52m2, meaning it can accommodate a Euro pallet sideways. The new Amarok is expected to appeal to a similar profile of buyers, retaining its position as a technically advanced pick-up

which is as comfortable to drive as it is rugged and capable over rough terrain. With its new engine and even more carlike features and cab, it is also likely to pique the interest of buyers who may previously have shopped in the classic SUV segment. Since its launch in 2010, over 29 000 Amarok units (single and double cabs) have been sold in South Africa. Depending on engine power, there is a choice of a six-speed manual transmission or the eight-speed automatic transmission, both optimised for the Amarokâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high torque values. The large number of gears allows a greater transmission ratio spread to be achieved, compared to a conventional automatic transmission. The Amarokâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cargo bed is 1,55 metres long and 1,62 metres wide, allowing a Euro pallet to be loaded transversely, unique in the Amarok segment.

The cargo box has a loading area of 2,52 square metres and there are four lashing rings for securing the load fitted in each corner. The half-metre platform gate height boosts the good cargo capacity. This is due to the low sill height, an exemplary 0,78 metres. With a maximum gross weight of up to 3 080 kilograms, the Amarok is not only able to transport particularly bulky loads but very heavy loads as well. The maximum payload is 936 kg (Comfortline103kW) and â&#x20AC;&#x201C; depending on the overall configuration â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it can also tow loads of up to 3,3 tonnes. The Amarok model range comes standard with 3 year/ 100 000 km manufacturer warranty, 5 year/ 90 000 km Automotion Service Plan and 6 year anti-corrosion warranty. The service interval is at 15 000 km.

After seven long years, VW offers a V6 to take on the best of the rivals.

A JOURNEY OF PEACE.

Photo QUICKPIC

Sheer Driving Pleasure

BLESSED RAMADAN.

7ROOIUHH ZZZJLIWRIWKHJLYHUVRUJ ZZZJLIWRIWKH JLYHUVRU J7ROOIUHH

May the spirit of Ramadan illuminate your world and bring you peace and happiness. As Auric Autoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BMW Product Genius, if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anything I can do for you during this time, please donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hesitate to contact me on the following details. Reiny Salie Tel. 021 670 1113 E-mail. reinhardt.salie@bmwdealer.co.za Stay well over the fast.

Auric Auto

215 Main Rd, Claremont, Cape Town, 7708 Tel. 021 670 1100 www.bmw-auricauto.co.za

Muslim Views


Muslim Views . May 2017

The Beginning

The Throwback

The sequel

The Evolution

CHUCK TAYLOR ALL STAR

CHUCK TAYLOR ALL STAR II

19

CHUCK TAYLOR ALL STAR LEATHERS

CHUCK TAYLOR ALL STAR II BOOT

Available A vailable at Converse Converse Stores Stores and Selected Retailers.

Muslim Views


20

Muslim Views . May 2017

- ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE -

Ramadaan kareem from Muslim Hands NAZEER VADIA

THE sacred month of Ramadaan is about to dawn upon us, giving the Muslim ummah another opportunity to benefit from its vast blessings and a time to draw closer to Allah SWT. Muslim Hands would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone well over the month of Ramadaan. May the crescent-shaped moon brighten your path toward enlightenment, and may Allah bless you and your family with peace and grace. Let us remember that Ramadaan is not just about fasting. It is also a time for spiritual reflection and devoting ourselves to worship and pray to Allah. Insha Allah, may we all take a page out of the life of our beloved Nabi Muhammad (SAW) who was the personification of goodness and the ideal of humanity. As Muslims, our duty is not just to each other but we have a social responsibility to humanity at large. The Messenger of Allah, peace be upon him, said: ‘Whoever feeds a fasting person will have a reward like that of the fasting person, without any reduction in his reward.’ Muslim Hands would like to make a sincere appeal to our loyal supporters and public to dig deep and donate generously. Let us remember those who are less fortunate. Your sadaqah, fitrah, fidya and zakaah will be appreciated by those in need.

Muslim Views

Some of the children who attended MHSA Orphan Iftaar 2016.

It is reported that the Prophet (SAW) sent a proclaimer through the lanes of Makkah to proclaim, ‘Beware charity of fitr is wajib on every Muslim, male or female, free or slave, young or old…’ Fitrah is the annual compulsory charity that every Muslim pays before the Eid khutbah, to ensure that all Muslims can enjoy the day of Eid. Through individual welfare recipients and a network of grateful organisations that are based in the poorest areas in the Western Cape, Muslim Hands’s annual fitrah distribution benefits close to 1 000 needy recipients each year.

Furthermore, constantly seeking to expand our operation, we will once again join forces with Makro and Voice of The Cape to increase our fitrah campaign. After the success of last year’s joint venture, Makro Ottery has again selected MHSA to partner with, and will collect food items at their till points on our behalf towards our fitrah campaign. Last year, Makro surpassed expectations by further pledging R20 000 of stock towards the fitrah campaign. You can join the campaign by dropping off your fitrah items at their check out points.

Photo ABDURAGHMAAN DAVIDS

Zakaah is one of the five pillars of Islam and is a compulsory act for all Muslims. It is a contribution of two-and-a-half per cent on savings. This giving is to ‘cleanse’ your money and possessions from excessive desire for them or greed. Fidya is payable for a person who has become extremely weak due to an illness or old age and cannot fast. They must feed a deserving person twice a day or give the value of the meals. This Ramadaan, as we sit at the iftaar table eagerly anticipating the meal to come, millions of

people around the world will still be hungry. We know from the generosity of our donors in past years that you share our commitment to feeding the hungry and assisting those in need this Ramadaan. Whether it’s holding a community iftaar for Gazans in Masjidul-Aqsa, supporting Muslim Hands SA orphan iftaar or donating to the students in our School of Excellence in Malawi, your generosity reaches the most disadvantaged people in all corners of the world. O Allah, instil in our hearts conviction, sincerity and determination to improve ourselves as Muslims. Shower us with Your mercy and blessings and allow us to share those blessings with the less fortunate. Muslim Hands and our partners work tirelessly during the month of Ramadaan, ensuring the hungry have iftaar, and all donations, including zakaah, are received by those truly in need. Insha Allah with your help, we will once again make a difference this Ramadaan. We appeal to our loyal donors and supporters to be a part of our efforts this blessed month. Every donation received helps to make a difference in the lives of so many needy people. Call Muslim Hands today on 021 633 6413 to contribute towards this project. You may donate online https://muslimhands.org.za or pay us a visit at our office at 1 Carnie Road, Rylands, Cape Town.


Muslim Views . May 2017

21

makro.c makr o.cco.za BLUE RIBBON Brown n Sliced Brread ead

Baking made fun

700 g

NO VA VAT

ORLEY Whip Imitation Crre eam

9 each

2l

NO V VA AT

250 ml

13

31

1090

SNOWFLAKE Baking Powder

each

39

700 g

90

each

2 kg

BLUE RIBBON White Sliced Brread ead

(All variants)

90

JUNGLE Oats Regular Refill Bag

90

CROWN Cooking Oil

each

each

500 g

25 each

SNOWFLAKE Self Raising Wheat Flour 5 x 1 kg

SELA ATI White Sugar 2.5 kg

35

50

90

each

each

YUM YUM Peanut Butter (All variants) 800 g

CORDON BLEU Margarine Brick

44

9

500 g

each

BOKOMO Weetbix

90

900 g

each

34 each

FRISCO Instant Cofffee fee

JOKO Tagless TTeabags eabags

(All variants)

2 x 200’ 200’s ’ss

750 g

68

each

Enjoy your snacks and beverages

250 g

9

100

each

PACKO Chilli Bite Mix

50

each

FATTI’S & MONIS MO Instant Noodles

((Allll variants) 300 g

20

5 x 78 g

500 g

8

40 each

750 g

(All variants)

IMBO Soup Mix

SAFFARI Roasted Peanuts orr Peanuts and Raisins

MESSARIS Potato Crisps

15

each

BAUMANNS Crream Crackers

each

200 g

990 each

each

ALABAMA Fragrant White Rice

IMBO Split Peas

5 kg

500 g

NO VA VAT

990

89

each

each

CLOVER Krush Fruit Juice (All variants) 1.5 l

TUFFY Light Foil 300 mm x 5 m

18

90

8

each

SP PARLETTTA or TWIST Soft Drinks

HENTIES Juice Lite

2l

3l

(All variants)

10 each

(All variants)

23 each

each

Only available at Montague Gardens 021 550 6300, 3 Topaz Boulevard, Montague Park, Milner ton, Otter y 021 704 7400, Otter er y Rd & Old O Standfontein Roads, Otter y and Cape Gate 021 003 1400, Corner Okavango and Belami Road, Brakenfell, Cape Town. All prices es in i South South h Af African African Rands. Rands Rands. T's & C's available available online. online.

20/2017 Makro HB B RAMADAAN 385 x 265 V Valid alid from: Mo Monday 15 May to Sunday 18 June 2017

Wishing our Muslim u customers and staff staff well over the month of w

Ramadaan

Muslim Views


22

Muslim Views . May 2017

All prices in South Af African Rands. Rand T's & C's available online.

AMADAAN 385 x 265 V Valid 23/2017 Makro CC RAMADAAN alid from: Thursday 25 May to Sunday 25 June 2017

Wishing our Muslim customers and staff u wel over the month of w well

Ramadaan

Preparation essentials Limited to 40 units store per stor e

Brreakfast Pack

Glass Kettle

• Model: SCGK60E • 2200 W • Concealed element • Boil dr y protection • Illumination indicator • 1 year guarantee (336598)

• Model: RHBSS56 • Stainless steel finish • Pack includes: k 1.8 l cordless kettle and 2 slice toaster • 1 year guarantee (260513)

WAS W AS 399

SAVE SA AVE 400

209

Dolce Gusto Mini Me Cofffee fee Machine

• Model: EDG305.WR • 15 bar pressure • 0.8 l water tank • Auto off after 5 minutes • Flow stop function • 2 year guarantee (275708)

SAVE SA AVE 1300

699

999

per pack

each

each

C Cooking g

Daily Collection Hand Mixer • Model: HR1459 • 300 W • 5 speeds • Accessories: beaters and dough hooks • 2 year guarantee (265481)

Airfrryer y Bundle

MAGIC LINE Bag g Sealer

• Model: d l VBS - 540 • Colour: white • 170 W • Used to vacuum seal • Features: • Double sealing function, cord storage • 1 year guarantee (347308)

WAS W AS 429

WAS W AS 399

299

299

SAVE SA AVE V 1000

1999

each

each

• Mod d l HD9220/24+HR1604 del: / • Bundle includes: 0.8 kg manual airfr yer 550 W hand blender • 2 year guarantee (308646)

per bundle

6 l Prressur essurre Cooker Co

• Model: PC600 • 1000 W • Digital LED • 8 cook settings • 9 safety guards • Keep warm function • Stainless steel finish • 1 year guarantee (311278)

Limited to 40 units per stor store e

Deep p Frye yer

1.75 l Glass Jug g Blender

5-in-1 Prospero

WAS W AS 899

SAVE SA AVE 1200

• Model: RHB315 • 1000 W • 5 speed plus pulse function • Dishwasher safe par ts • Stainless steel finish • 1 year guarantee (318066)

599 each

• Model: KM288 • 900 W Variable •V ariable speed • 4.3 l stainless steel bowl • Accessories: whisk, dough hook, k-beater food processor with citrus press • 1.2 l jug blenderr,, fo • 1 year guarantee (135952)

• Model: d l RDF300 00 • 3 l capacity • Digital control •V Variable ariable temperature • Dishwasher safe par ts • Accessories: replaceable filter • Cord storage • 1 year guarantee (248177)

WAS W AS 899

699

2599

each

each

Ser Serve ve in style

2 Pack Chafing g Dish

• 7.5 l • Commerciall stainless l stee steel • Folding frame for easy storage • Stackable for easy transpor tation (272243)

• Consists of 1 l and 1.5 l casseroles with lids, 1.5 l oval and rectangular roaster and pie dish • Dishwasher safe and ovenproof (299812)

7 Piece Ovenwar warre e Set

A Assor

999

WAS W AS 299

FROM

5 kg Chafing Dish Fuel (173153) 119 each

per set

each

per pack

Muslim Views

249

(329307; 319506; 319512; 329306)

39

WAS W AS 1399

999 each


Muslim Views . May 2017

PRESTIGE Bakewarre

21 Piece Stainless Steel Cookware Set

2 Pack Non-Stick Frying Pan and Spatula Spa p Set

(190532; 190616; 190617)

• Includes 16 cm, 20 cm and 24 cm pots, 16 cm saucepan, 24 cm fr ying pan with lids, 20 cm steamerr,, 20 cm bowl with lid, 20 cm grater with ring, steel handle, suction knob, 18 cm fr ying basket with handle and 2 trivets (258880)

23

d 24 cm • 20 cm and (174920)

FROM

WAS W AS 299

69

249

each

per set

SAVE SA AVE 500

999 per set

Ultimate versatility 4 YEAR GUARANTEE

299 l Combi Fridge/Fr g re eezer

• Model: d l H299BME • Metallic finish • “A” energy rating • 230 l nett usable capacity • Removable spill proof glass shelves (300237)

DIMENSIONS

height width 1593 mm 554 mm

depth 566 mm

20 l Manual Microwave Oven

WAS W AS 3899

3299

5 YEAR

each

GUARANTEE

WAS W AS 799

699

• Model: DMO368 • Metallic finish • 6 power levels • Easy turn on operator knobs • 2 year guarantee (292533)

each

2 YEAR GUARANTEE

DIMENSIONS

height 836 mm

width 563 mm

12 Place Dishwasher

depth 526 mm

• Model: SMS40E18ZA • Silver inox finish • “A+” energy rating • 12 place setting • 4 programmes • 52 db noise level • 3 cleaning temperatures • Stainless steel polynox interior (107273)

SAVE SA AVE 1000

3 YEAR GUARANTEE

3499 each

600 mm Oven and Hob Set

• Model: HBN301E2Z+PKE611D1 • Stainless steel finish • Box set includes: • Oven HBN301E2Q/Z • “A” energy rating, 67 l oven capacity • Hob PKE611D17E

130 l Chest Frreezer eez eezer

Available •A vailable at selected stores and online (328950)

• Model: H130CF • 100 l nett ne usable capacity • Low noise design (196116)

SAVE SA AVE 2400

1999

4798 per set

each

Plastic Stool

Plastic Partyy Chair Chair

• Maximum user weight 90 kg • Smoothed edge design • Stackable (315994)

5 for R100

30 each

5 YEAR

h 100 k kg • Maximum user weight • Made from durable plastic • Stackable (310345)

A WARRANTY W ARRANTY

DIMENSIONS

height 710 mm

width depth 1800 mm 770 mm

5 for R200

59 each

Steel Canteen Table Table • 0.7 mm thickness • Steel foldable legs (84265)

WAS W AS 599

499 each

Only available at Montague Gardens 021 550 6300, 3 Topaz Boulevard, Montague Park, Milner ton, Otter y 021 704 7400, Otter y Rd & Old Standfontein Roads, Springfield 031 203 2800, 90 Electr on Road, Springfield, Durban, Cr own Mines 011 309 1000, Corner Main Reef Road & Hanover Street, Cr own Mines Johannesbur g.

Apply A pply online online to receive re eeceive ceive your your own own Makro M Makr akro ro card card d @ www.makro.co.za www ww ww w..makro makro o.co.za .co.za a | call call 0860 0860 300 300 999 999 | sms ms “makro “ma akro kro o card” card d” to 31144 1144 4 To locate To llo ocate o cate t your your nearest neareest Makro, M Ma akro, a krro, see see store sto t re details deta t iills online onlliine or or conveniently convenienttlly shop shop @ www www.makro.co.za ww ww.makro w.makro k o.co.za o Unless we state a specific limitation, Makro will attempt to have sufficient advertised stock available to meet consumers’ anticipated demands. If we still run out of stock, we will attempt to obtain the stock or we will offer you a reasonable alternative. In an attempt to satisfy the demand of the majority of customers, limited quantities per customer might apply. Makro takes utmost care to ensure that all advertisements are correct. If a mistake occurs or incomplete information is printed, we will display a notice in-store with all the correct details. Prices exclude accessories used for display purposes and include 14% VAT. Makro Account Disclaimer *Includes interest @ 21.00% p.a, excludes ser vice fees & compulsor y insurance. ** Includes interest @ 21.00% p.a, ser vice fees & compulsor y insurance. All prices are indicative and actual repayments may var y based on account activity y.. NCRCP 38/FSP 44481.

2 23/2017 Makro CC C RAMADAAN 385 x 265 V Valid alid from: Thursday 25 May to Sunday 25 June 2017

m ro.co.za mak makr o.co.za Muslim Views


24

Muslim Views . May 2017

SHARE YOUR ZAKAH AND LILLAH TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE FOLLOWING PROJECTS: Ě  &DWDUDFWRSHUDWLRQVWRUHYHUVHEOLQGQHVV Ě  'LDO\VLVWRDVVLVWWKHVLFN Ě  &KLOGUHQËšVKRPH Ě  )HHGLQJSURJUDPPHVKDPSHUVDQGPDVVLIWDDUV Ě  0DVMLGDQGPDGUHVVD

NPO 024/017 | PBO 93/0009882

SultanBahuCentre

7R̨QGRXWDERXWRXURWKHUSURMHFWVSOHDVH YLVLWZZZVEFRUJ]DRUFDWFKXVRQITV '679&KDQQHO  :DWFKRXUSOHGJHOLQHRQ,79RQ6DWXUGD\ 0D\DWSPDQGSOHGJH\RXU GRQDWLRQVRQ

ZAKAAT Sarwari Qaderi Silsila (Ref: Your Name+Zakaat)

LILLAH Sarwari Qaderi Silsila (Ref: Your Name+Lillah)

Standard Bank Acc number: 002504111 Branch: Fordsburg (005205)

Standard Bank Acc number: 002504081 Branch: Fordsburg (005205)

SultanBahuSA

SultanBahuSA

CONTACT DETAILS 96 3rd Avenue, Mayfair, Johannesburg, South Africa

SultanBahuCentre

011 839 2025 | 011 837 6067 011 837 0073 hello@sbc.org.za

www.sbc.org.za

PORTLANDS meat hyper an eli

Muslim Views


Muslim Views . May 2017

25

East Africa drought reaches critical levels SHANAAZ EBRAHIM-GIRE

‘THERE is no water and we have lost our dignity.’ These were the words from 56-year-old Halima Ali Nuriye, who lives with her daughter and two nieces in Dadaab – the world’s largest refugee camp – situated 417 kilometres from Kenya’s capital city, Nairobi. Halima was the sole breadwinner in her family but, like thousands of other pastoral families, she lost her livestock in the current drought that has left more than 19 million people across the East African region in urgent need of humanitarian assistance. The number of internally displaced persons currently stands at 3,6 million but humanitarian role-players and governments fear that this figure will rise if the anticipated rains do not come. Internal conflict in south Sudan and Somalia and a cholera outbreak in Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya are adding to an already volatile situation. ‘I used to live in the Fafi subcounty… When the water dried up, I lost 11 cows and 29 shoats. The animals were our only source of food and income for us. I was forced to pack up my family and we walked until we arrived at this Ifo 1 camp in Dadaab, in search of food and water,’ Nuriye said. Life in the refugee camp has not been easy; Halima has to queue for hours to fill a jerry can with water. She explained that the quality of the water is poor and cannot be used for cooking. The water quality has also seen a number of health and social

Thousands of pastoral families have lost their livestock in the current drought that has left more than 19 million people across the East African region in urgent need of humanitarian assistance. Photo ISLAMIC RELIEF

issues amongst the elderly and malnourished children. ‘My daughter and my two nieces do not go to school because the school does not provide any feeding programme for students. The school also does not have any water, making it difficult for good hygiene practice for the young girls.’

Islamic Relief’s response The Nuriye family is just one of thousands which Islamic Relief has been supporting during its emergency response operations in the region. Between January and April 2017, the humanitarian and relief agency has helped more than 273 000 beneficiaries in Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia and

South Sudan. According to Islamic Relief’s East Africa Regional Director, Yusuf Ahmed, the organisation’s emergency efforts focused on distributing food and water in refugee camps in the affected areas. ‘Based on our needs assessments, we found that women,

children and people living with disabilities were the most vulnerable. We rolled out integrated progammes in communities, which included the provision of water, sanitation and hygiene services, feeding programmes and distributed non-food items such as mosquito nets and material for shelter.’ In Somalia, where 6,2 million people are in need of food and water, Islamic Relief scaled up its drought response activities in Puntland, Somaliland and in the southern regions of the country. ‘Since January, we provided food relief to 17 538 people. We provided water to 49 332 households through our water-trucking project and rehabilitated nonfunctioning water facilities in Puntland and Somaliland. During the same period, more than 13 000 people were assisted by our mobile clinic services.’ As the Muslim world prepares to welcome the holy month of Ramadaan, Ahmed appealed to the international community to keep the East Africa region in their prayers, and further appealed for support towards Islamic Relief’s ongoing relief efforts. ‘The drought crisis has reached critical levels, with famine already being declared in some parts of South Sudan. The women and children are particularly at risk. We are responding to the crisis but need your support to save more lives.’ Shanaaz Ebrahim-Gire is the media coordinator for Islamic Relief Worldwide, based at the East Africa regional office in Nairobi, Kenya.

Muslim Views


26

Muslim Views . May 2017

Highlighting Muslim lives in Ramadaan

IS BA BACK! ACK!

Season 2

Join MEHBOOB BAWA, Cape Town’s Love Doc, media personality and actor for another season of the successful and exciting LIVING RAMADAAN TV show.







Taraweegh Immediately afterr the Taraweeg broadcast from Makkah, at 22h30pm with arepeat at09h30am the next day. We also havenon ––muslims muslimsproviding their perspective themonth monthofoffasting fasting while while ourour ‘international’ muslims on the share their ‘Living Ramadaan’ experiences with you.

PRODUCTIONS + 27 84 469 2621 + 27 74 800 6329 Cape Town South Africa

“Living Ramadaan” is a window into the lives of Muslims of all ages and from all walks of life celebrating the month of fasting.

CAPE Town’s Love Doc, media personality and actor, Mehboob Bawa, turns his attention to television, highlighting the lives of Muslim Capetonians and those living abroad during Ramadaan while getting non-Muslims to provide their perspective of the month of fasting in the second season of the TV show, aptly titled ‘Living Ramadaan’. Bawa teams up with his wife, Razia, through their company Razia Bawa Productions, bringing to bear a combined 30 years of experience in the broadcasting industry to produce the show which has a lifestyle magazine approach. Razia explains: ‘Living Ramadaan was broadcast for the first time last year on Deen TV, a channel broadcasting on the Open View HD Channel 152 and StarSat Channel 365 platforms. ‘We had always wanted to produce a show focusing on Ramadaan in a different way and include a programming approach that would set us apart from the regular instudio lectures by clerics and scholars. ‘We take our camera into the lives of Muslims from different walks of life and show them living their Ramadaan. There is a perspective from non-Muslims explaining what Ramadaan means to them as well.’ Mehboob adds: ‘The show offers a unique, in-depth look at the work of organisations and individuals making a difference in the lives of the less fortunate as well as inspirational messages from motivational speakers, and a musical interlude featuring local artistes. ‘The team also asks Muslims, formerly from Cape Town and now living abroad, to send clips of themselves comparing Ramadaan in their new surroundings to that experienced in the Mother City.

The programme commences broadcasting on Deen TV for the last ten days of Ramadaan, with the first episode flighting from the 20th night onwards, immediately after the Taraweeh broadcast from Makkah, at 22h30pm, with a repeat at 09h30am the next day. ‘The show was tremendously successful last year and the content well received locally and internationally, despite production challenges. The Deen TV team has been exceptionally co-operative and it is through their assistance and that of our well-wishers that we have embarked on the production of the second season.’ The programme commences broadcasting on Deen TV for the last ten days of Ramadaan, with the first episode flighting from the 20th night onwards, immediately after the Taraweeh broadcast from Makkah, at 22h30pm, with a repeat at 09h30am the next day. A YouTube link for the previous night’s show is posted on the Living Ramadaan Facebook page daily https://www.facebook.com/livingramadaan/ For further details, contact the producers on 084 469 2621 or 074 800 6329. Issued by Razia Bawa Productions

Give charity without delay, for it stands in the way of calamity. (Prophet Muhammad SAW)

SYRIA 8.4 MILLION

children

are affected BY THE CONFLICT

6 MILLION

children

in need of HUMANITARIAN AID

EVERY YS SECOND D COUNTS GENERAL & LILLAH Standard Relief Standard Bank, Islamic R elief SA Acc. No. No. : 005318459 Fordsburg Branch Branch Code F ordsburg Br anch Br anch C ode : 005205 Ref: SYRIA+Your Contact No.. R ef: S YRIA+Y Your C ontact No

ZAK ZAKAT KAT C CONTRIBUTIONS ONTRIBUTIONS elief SA Acc. No FNB, Islamic R Relief No.. : 62161066933 Street Br anch Br anch Code Code : 221426 Smith Street Branch Branch Ref: Ref: SYRIA+Your SYRIA+Y Your C Contact ontact No No..

DONAATE DONATE ONLINE

0800 1 111 898 11 898 www www.islamic-relief.org.za .islamic-relief.org.za SNAPSCAN

Muslim Views


Muslim Views . May 2017

27

The Management & staff of Oasis wish you and your family

Ramadaan Mubarak

May we gain the true benefits of this Glorious month of Ramadaan through increased Piety, Humility and Understanding. May the Almighty allow us to seek out and find the Blessed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Night of Powerâ&#x20AC;?, Laylatul Qadr, Insha Allah. To those performing Umrah during this auspicious month, may you have a spiritually fulfilling journey and may the Almighty grant you a safe return to your loved ones, Insha Allah. Ramadaan 1438 www.oasiscrescent.com Muslim Views


28

Muslim Views

Muslim Views . May 2017


Muslim Views . May 2017

29

Muslim Views


30

Muslim Views . May 2017

The patient always has rights

As we chatted, it became evident that something was bothering her. All was not well, writes DR SALIM PARKER. MADINAH. The City of Peace, Tranquillity and Light. Hajj was still a few weeks away and most of the pilgrims who had arrived early that year were bathing in the serenity of the Prophet’s City. She was on her first Hajj and was excited about the journey. She was young and accompanied by her husband and, like all normal couples, divided their days between visiting the Prophet’s Mosque for the five daily prayers, acquainting themselves with the history of religion by actually visiting historical sites, and exploring the wonderful eccentricities of the numerous shopping areas. They were childless and she had had a difficult time prior to Hajj. Now, however, she was radiant and content. Their Creator was smiling on them, had blessed them with the gift of the journey of Hajj. When she consulted me in Madinah, she and her husband reiterated their happiness with life. As we chatted, it became evident that something was bothering her. All was not well. Hesitantly she explained that she was pregnant. I smiled and congratulated them. ‘Pregnancy is not a disease, it is part of normal life!’ I said. We discussed travel in pregnancy and I expanded in detail about how, with normal everyday precautions, pregnancy should not be an impediment while on this holy journey. In fact, Islam demands respect for all mothers and mothers to be. She seemed uncertain still and I tried reassuring her about all the efforts the Saudi authorities put in place for pregnant ladies. There are hospitals dedicated to maternity matters staffed by world class specialists. The facilities provided are state of the art. Every year, there is great excitement about the first child born on Mina, on the first Muslim Views

day of Hajj and, especially, for the first child born on Arafah, with newspapers clamouring to publish this news. Boys born on the day of Wuqoof are inevitably named Arafah.

We discussed how Asma bint Umays, the wife of Abu Bakr, gave birth at Dhul-Hulayfah, just outside Madinah, and was instructed to put on her ihraam for Hajj as they were on their way to Makkah. The worried tone persisted in her voice and her demeanour showed that she was definitely not at ease. ‘Is something worrying you?’ I asked directly. She replied with a degree of hesitance, ‘Yes. I am bleeding. There is spotting occurring at the moment and that is worrying me,’ she at last admitted. I took a detailed and in-depth history of her medical issues and advised strict bedrest until we had her seen to by a gynaecologist at the hospital. I explained to her that spotting can occur during pregnancy and that we needed to find out the cause of her bleeding and the course of action to take. She was comfortable seeing a gynaecologist as the Saudi hospitals are staffed by lady gynaecologists. However, when I added that the doctors would, in all likelihood, do an ultrasound scan, she immediately and very firmly said, ‘No, no scan is to be done.’ I was taken aback. I explained to her and her husband that the scan would show us how developed their baby would be, whether there were any abnormal features, and possibly indicate the reason for the bleeding. The doctors would then be in a good position to know what to do. The scans are generally regarded as being harmless to both mother and baby while simultaneously providing a wealth of information. We were not dealing with a case here where the establishment of the baby’s gender was being determined. Nor were we looking for abnormalities in the

Everyday anxieties occur, even in the tranquillity of Madinah.

baby in order to advise medical intervention. Many doctors believe scans should not be done unless the pregnancy is not progressing normally. We often counsel older pregnant ladies who are advised to do tests to exclude Down’s Syndrome, which occurs more frequently in that group. Some would reply that it does not matter whether their baby is going to be normal or not; they would never intervene and would wait to give birth and do not want any tests. Others would say that knowing that the child may be abnormal would prepare them and want to do the tests. Some would want to know if the baby was normal, insist on the tests and act upon abnormal results. ‘No scan,’ she again emphasised. I politely tried to explain its potential benefits but realised that there was no way that she would be persuaded otherwise. Intrigued, I asked her why she was so against a standard medical procedure. ‘My shaikh said I must not have a scan,’ she explained. From what I surmised, her previous problems have been linked to her having had scans. I was in a position that I do not like to be in as the medical profession has the utmost respect for the learned religious scholars. In fact, we often ask for the persuasive knowledgeable assistance of the family shaikh when we deal with difficult cases, and it is very seldom that there is opposing advice given. We were in Madinah, where our beloved Prophet (SAW) advised his companions to consult medically trained compatriots for ailments. We had a South African gynaecologist in our group who was also on her Hajj journey and I

asked her opinion about this situation. This lady doctor was a bit despondent but, like me, would not act against the wishes of the patient. We had no issue with calling the shaikh, who was not in Saudi Arabia, and explaining the need to do the procedures but could not obtain his details. We referred her to hospital to which she willingly went and was attended to by an empathetic, kind and considerate lady. All went well until the issue of the scan was raised. Again, despite the attempts of the specialists, she refused to have it done. The hospital staff complied with her wishes and discharged her with some medication, emphasising that their treatment was in effect a shot in the dark as they could not make a proper diagnosis. I saw her again a few days later. The bleeding had not stopped and it was clear that the medication dispensed to her had not helped. ‘Everything is in the hands of our Creator,’ someone said. Perhaps her problems would stop spontaneously in the next hour, perhaps she would inevitably deteriorate. Western trained, disease treating and result orientated doctors – like me – often feel agitated when our advice falls on deaf ears. Some of us would feel aggrieved that a shaikh could dictate about a procedure that he may have no knowledge about. This was one of the occasions where refuge in the Prophet’s Mosque brought an immense sense of relief. I somehow found a spot in the Rawdatul Jannah and settled down, making duah for her and her unborn child. We are not always right. The patient always has rights.

Photo SALIM PARKER


Muslim Views . May 2017

Connected by Vodacom

31

Ramadan Kareem Well Wishes for 1438 Come in store to get your latest cellular experience

Chatz Connect Ottery Shop 1, Ottery Centre New Ottery Rd, Ottery (021) 703 3128

10% Discount on all accessories in store on presentation of this advert

Muslim Views


32

Muslim Views . May 2017

Mother and son left in desert

Nabi Ibrahim (AS) left Sarah (RA) and Ismail (AS) in a bleak, isolated place, much like this one. Photo HTTPS://7ANANS.FILES.WORDPRESS.COM/2014/08/IMG_6592.JPG

SALIM PARKER

IT is held by some scholars that our forefather, Nabi Adam (AS) laid the foundation of the Kaabah in Makkah. Most indicate that there is no evidence that Nabi Adam actually built the Kaabah. It is evident that Nabi Ibrahim (AS) was instructed by Allah to effect its construction as revealed by the following Quranic verse: ‘And [O Muhammad], when We designated for Ibrahim the site of the House, [saying] “Do not associate anything with Me and purify My House for those who perform tawaaf [circumambulation of the Kaabah] and those who stand [in prayer] and those who bow and prostrate.’ (22:26) Ibn Kathir indicates in his tafsir: ‘There is no authentic report from the infallible [i.e. Prophet Muhammad (SAW)] informing us that the House (the Kaabah) was built before Ibrahim, and whoever states that, relying upon this verse in the Quran (for evidence of that), has no basis for such a claim because what is meant by the verse is that he was simply being informed of where the House was to be built.’ There is a dearth of literature on what happened in Makkah in the time between Nabi Adam and Nabi Ibrahim. Makkah was a barren valley, far removed from the normal trade routes. There were no identified wells, and it is surrounded by mountains, which made it an inhospitable area. Yet we know that the first Muslim Views

mosque was built there. Bukhari reported that Abu Tharr narrated: “I asked the messenger of Allah: ‘O messenger of Allah! Which mosque was the first built on earth?’ Muhammad (SAW) replied: ‘The Sacred Mosque (in Makkah).’ I then asked: ‘Which mosque was built next?’ Muhammad (SAW) said: ‘The Aqsa mosque (in Jerusalem).’ Thereupon, I asked: ‘What was the period between the building of the two mosques?’ The Prophet (SAW) replied that it was forty years.

that over a billion face its direction five times a day, and millions stream to it annually. Nabi Ibrahim was given the title Khalilullah, which means ‘the friend of Allah’. Ibrahim was the forefather of many great prophets and is held in high esteem by all the major revealed religions. He was married to Sarah (RA), lived in Palestine, and years went by without them having any children. He was a prophet of Allah and, having left his native land, he was concerned over who would con-

longed for a descendant and encouraged a union with Haajar. A son was born and he was named Ismail, which means ‘Allah will hear’. Initially, there was great joy amongst all but the situation changed soon thereafter. Ismail (AS) was still an infant when Sarah’s feelings began to change towards Haajar. She asked Nabi Ibrahim to take Haajar and Ismail as far away as possible from her. Allah revealed to His prophet to take them to a place called Bakka, which is now called Makkah.

When Nabi Ibrahim was in Egypt, the pharaoh gave him a slave called Haajar (RA). Sarah was aware that her husband longed for a descendant and encouraged a union with Haajar. A son was born and he was named Ismail, which means ‘Allah will hear’. We know that Allah SWT earmarked Makkah to be the centre of our universe and it took events that touches all aspects of humanity, and the miracles that our Creator wills to effect the habitation of the barren land to the extent

tinue the prophetic office after him and whether he would indeed be a father one day. When Nabi Ibrahim was in Egypt, the pharaoh gave him a slave called Haajar (RA). Sarah was aware that her husband

Bakka was a bleak and isolated place and Haajar was bewildered when Nabi Ibrahim said that he was going to leave her and Ismail there. There was no water or plants around and the only supplies they

had was what they arrived with. No tribes inhabited the area. Nabi Ibrahim took them to a spot under the shade of a tree and left with them a bag of dates and a flask of water. He then set off back to his home. As he was leaving, Haajar called to him, saying: ‘Where are you going? How can you leave us in this deserted valley that has neither humans nor anything else?’ She repeated this a few times but he did not reply and continued walking away from them. Finally, she understood that he was not acting on his own initiative. She realised that Allah had commanded him to do this so she asked: ‘Did Allah command you to do this?’ Nabi Ibrahim replied: ‘Yes.’ Whereupon she said: ‘Then He will never forsake us and will not us be lost.’ Nabi Ibrahim submitted to the command of Allah and with sadness but patience prepared himself for the separation from Haajar and Ismail. He turned towards where they were, close to where the Sacred House would be erected and prayed for them in the following words: ‘O our Lord! I have made some of my offspring to dwell in an uncultivatable valley by Your Sacred House in order, O our Lord, that they may perform assalaah. So fill some hearts among men with love towards them, and (O Allah) provide them with fruits so that they may give thanks.’ (Quran 14:37)


- ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE -

Muslim Views . May 2017

33

Packed calendar of Sanzaf Ramadaan activities SANZAF COMMUNICATIONS

THE South African National Zakah Fund (Sanzaf) has a packed month of events before and during the auspicious month of Ramadaan. Sanzaf will kick off with pre-Ramadaan programmes, which include: Friday, May 5, 2017 and Saturday, May 6, 2017 – Sanzaf International Zakaah Conference. Saturday, May 20, 2017 – iftaar and suhoor parcel packing. Sunday, May 21, 2017 – PreRamadaan Ladies Qira at Masjidul Mubarak, in Belhar. During the month of Ramadaan, Sanzaf will have daily iftaar programmes in partnership with 12 institutions in the Western Cape, from May 27, 2017 to June 25, 2017. On Sunday, May 28, 2017, a student iftaar will take place at University of the Western Cape (UWC) in partnership with MSA. On Friday, June 16, 2017, a Youth Day Programme will be held at Belgravia High School.

Hamper Packing Saturday, May 27, 2017 – iftaar and suhoor parcel packing. Saturday, June 17, 2017 until Tuesday, June 20, 2017 – collection by masajid and institutions. Sunday, June 18, 2017 – ceremonial packing From Wednesday, June 21, 2017, to Saturday, June 24, 2017, there will be home deliveries in the greater Athlone area. An exciting and informative part of Ramadaan at Sanzaf is the

(Above) Operation Fitrah is one of the vital annual relief projects Sanzaf undertakes. Its main objective is to ensure that every Muslim is free from want Photo SANZAF COMMUNICATIONS on the auspicious day of Eid-ul-Fitr.

Zakaah Seminars, will which take place every weekend in Ramadaan. June 4, 2017 – Zakaah Seminar at Al Masjidur Rawbie, Mitchells Plain June 10, 2017 – Zakaah Seminar at Auwal Masjid, Bo-Kaap June 11, 2017 - Zakaah Seminar at Panorama Masjid June 17, 2017 - Zakaah Seminar at Goodwood Mosque June 28, 2017 - Zakaah Seminar at Masjidus Sunni, Rondebosch East Support Sanzaf by donating your zakaah, sadaqah, Lillah and fitrah at the following easy collection points: Kenilworth Centre – Lower Level; Kenilworth Centre – Upper Level; Kenilworth Centre Services; Elite Cash ’n Carry Store; Super Spar, Vangate; Winners Store; Good Hope Meat Hyper; Dr Jakoet (Cape Town CBD); Mrs Galvan

(based in Salt River); Sawants Creation; Pinelands Islamic Society; Masjid ur Raghma, in Athlone; Sanlam Head Office Salaah Room; Bonteheuwel Masjid; Old Mutual; Town Centre Masjid; Pick n Pay, Town Centre; Masjidul Quds; Atlas Trading; Harris Jewellers – Canal Walk Branch; Spar Observatory; Seria’s Chicken; Vodacom; Teddy’s Sweets n Nuts; AK Wholesalers. If you are interested in volunfor Sanzaf, email teering Aneesah.rylands@Sanzaf.org.za For more information on Sanzaf’s projects and programmes feel free to contact us at: 021 638 0965 or email Communications@Sanzaf.org.za Fitrah prices not confirmed.

(Above) Sanzaf scouts and youth engage actively in the preparation of the fitrah hampers that will be distributed to 16 000 families in Western Cape this Ramadaan. Nationally, Sanzaf aims to bring together 23 000 families on the day of Eid as part of Operation Fitrah at the ceremonial packing in Rylands Civic Centre, in Gatesville, on June 18, 2017. If you are interested in volunteering at Sanzaf then visit www.sanzaf.org.za for more.Photo SANZAF COMMUNICATIONS

Ebrahim Jacobs, Sanzaf caseworker, hands a young boy a warm blanket for the harsh impending winter. Photo SANZAF COMMUNICATIONS

Muslim Views


34

Muslim Views

Muslim Views . May 2017


Muslim Views . May 2017

35

The awqaf brand: business with compassion DR HISHAM DAFTERDAR

A BRAND is more than just a name, a trademark, a logo, a symbol or any other visual identity that distinguishes a product or service from others. It is the value the brand stands for, the benefits it offers and the overall impression we gain when dealing with a company or using its products and services. For awqaf organisations, the waqf brand has a broader and more strategic role in expressing the organisation’s vision and mission as well as its core objectives and guiding principles. The awqaf label appears as the epitome of a culture which for more than 1 400 years has established its own brand of moral and ethical constructs. Awqaf values cover a broad range of religious and behavioural practices based on honesty, integrity, fairness, commitment, compassion, trust and responsibility. These values send messages about what awqaf are and what they stand for. They are especially important in projecting the right image of awqaf and in managing external perceptions of the waqf organisation in its strategic communication, fundraising plans and social programmes. Awqaf need a steady flow of funds to enable constant delivery of social work. The most reliable way to ensure this is to have a range of projects in train, creating multiple streams

of income that supplement charitable contributions. While companies are driven by the pursuit of profit and growth, awqaf take a different approach to the process of allocating investment funds. Awqaf investments merge the social mission with the market approach of business. When investing, awqaf apply an ethical rigour built on social and economic factors that connect business to the challenges in peoples’ lives. Awqaf investments cannot be viewed simply as business deals, and some awqaf projects may not be cost effective or financially rewarding. But the exponential impact on society through the creation of jobs, the provision of products and services and making the community more vibrant should not be underesti-

Dr Hisham Dafterdar delivering his presentation ‘Waqf investment models’ at the 4th Waqf Cadre Training Workshop held in December 2016 at the Islamia Auditorium, Lansdowne, Cape Town. Photo NAZMEH SCHROEDER

mated. The brand identity of awqaf is development and compassion. Compassion in awqaf runs wide and deep. Awqaf’s projects are investments that at heart are philanthropic rather than commercial, and clearly define their contribution to society. Before considering a project, we want to know what the needs are and what we can do to help. We also have to sustain profitability and ask questions about present value and return on investment. Awqaf’s vision is not myopic. Our investment choices are focused on adding long-term value and making a lasting difference.

Branding in awqaf is now on the cusp of lift-off. Although many awqaf organisations take a narrow approach to brand management, using the awqaf brand mainly as a fundraising tool, a growing number are developing a broader and more strategic application to create a greater social impact and tighter organisational cohesion. The awqaf brand helps in galvanising support for the waqf organisation, building its operational capacity, maintaining focus on its social mission and, consequently, helping its transition from a cash-strapped organisation to an investment powerhouse.

Brands come and go but when an awqaf brand is damaged, the consequences are dire and more damaging than those faced by private sector enterprises. Commercial entities may always find a way to spin around and do business. But it’s much harder for a waqf organisation to regain lost credibility or to reverse bad publicity and negative sentiments. Awqaf organisations need to be always ethical about how they collect, invest, use and disburse funds. Ethics and compassion have a lot to do with awqaf so let’s protect and promote the awqaf brand with passion and tenacity like we treat our personal identity. Building the awqaf brand could be the best investment awqaf ever makes. If we are efficient, responsible, ethical and compassionate, financial success is a natural outcome. For many awqaf organisations, this will not be easy but it’s worth the effort in the interest of building goodwill and spreading the awqaf culture. At the end of the day, awqaf is our most precious heritage and our most auspicious future. The growth of social enterprise is a reflection of this convergence and helps fill the void between traditional approaches that have focused singularly on creating either social impact or financial returns. Dr Hisham Dafterdar is chairman of Awkaf Australia Ltd.

MY WAQF MY WA WA AQ Q QF F Spreading the culture of Waqf GGiving

Ramadaan R Ram am madaann Kar m Karee Kareem K

SUPPORT OUR PROJECTS MAKE A WAQF / SADAQAH JARIYYAH PLEDGE E Our projects and programmes include: Community Development; Education; ducation; Health, Elders, and d Orphans Care; Youth Leadership Development; Social Cohesion; Water & Sanitation; Masjid/Islamic Centre Renovation and Restoration; Hajj support; Islamic Art, Art Culture and Heritage; Environment; Iftaarr & Qurbani; Waqf Advisory; and Infrastructure

“WAQF IS THE MOST SUSTAINABLE AND ENDURING ISLAMIC CHARITY.”

MAKE A WAQF. LEAVE A LEGACY.

Join the AWQAF SA

Pledgeline

#347 DSTV

3 June 2017

CALL 011 086 7700/1/2/3 SMS/WHATSAPP 084 786 0010

22:30pm - 2:30am

DONATE GENEROUSLY! BANKING DETAILS: Account name: Awqaf SA Nedbank Acc. No: 1469-053934 Code: 198765 Ref: Cell No/ Your Name/MyWaqf

info@awqafsa.org.za EST. 2001 Muslim Views


36

Muslim Views . May 2017

7KH,VODPLF&RRUGLQDWLQJ&RXQFLO ,&& LVDUHJLVWHUHG1RQ3URÃ&#x20AC;W2UJDQLVDWLRQ 132 ZLWK5HIHUHQFH1XPEHU132VHUYLQJWKH                   6RXWKHUQ6XEXUEVFRPPXQLW\RI&DSH7RZQIRURYHU<HDUV           7KHSURMHFWVDQGSURJUDPVWKDWDUHRIIHUHGDUHEDVHGRQWKHIROORZLQJ4XUDQLFYHUVHVWKDWKDVGHSLFWVWKH,&&SKLORVRSK\                                       ´$1'&223(5$7(:,7+21($127+(5,1*22'1(66$1'3,(7<$1''2127&223(5$7(:,7+21($127+(5,16,1$1'(10,7<µ               ´$1'+2/')$67727+(523(2)$//$+$1''2127%(',9,'('$021*67<2856(/9(6µ 

POVERTY ALLEVIATION AND JOB CREATION PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS HOME-BASED CARE COURSE 7KLV FRXUVH ZDV VWDUWHG E\$VPD   6DPRGLHQ DQGSURYLGHGSDUWLFLSDQWVZLWKVRPH        YDOXDEOHVNLOOV7KHFRXUVHUXQVRYHUZHHNV         DQG SDUWLFLSDQWV DWWHQG FODVVHV RQFH D ZHHN      QRUPDOO\RQD7KXUVGD\ IURPWR   

OPERATION FITRA 1438/2017

*UDGXDWHVIURPWKHFRXUVHUHFHLYHDFHUWLÃ&#x20AC;FDWH        WKDWLQGLFDWHVWKHPRGXOHVPDVWHUHGDVZHOODV         D 'LSORPD DIWHU VXFFHVVIXO FRPSOHWLRQ RI WKH FRXUVH

$SSUR[LPDWHO\IRRGDQG)LWUDSDUFHOVZLOOEHSDFNHGDQGGLVWULEXWHGE\WKH,&&WKLV\HDU7KLVLV                   GRQHLQFRQMXQFWLRQZLWK6$1=$)DQGZLWKWKHDVVLVWDQFHRIDOO0DVDMLGVDQG0XVOLPRUJDQL]DWLRQVLQWKH                  6RXWKHUQ6XEXUEV:HHQFRXUDJHWKHFRPPXQLW\WRIRUZDUGWKHQDPHRIDQ\QHHG\SHUVRQWRWKH0DVMLHG                  &RPPLWWHHRU0XVOLP2UJDQL]DWLRQLQWKHDUHDRQO\DVWKHVHDUHDVDUHVWULFWO\GHPDUFDWHG              

$*('352*5$0 

,QDGGLWLRQZHUHTXHVWWKHFRPPXQLW\WREULQJJRRGSUHVHQWDEOHLWHPVRIFORWKLQJIRUUHGLVWULEXWLRQWRWKH                  SRRUDQGQHHG\'XULQJWKHPRQWKRI5DPDGDDQXSWRIDPLOLHVDUHFORWKHG             

$PRQWKO\$JHG'D\SURJUDPLVRUJDQL]HGE\         the ,&& /DGLHV &RXQFLO 7KH GD\ LV VWDUWHG ZKHQDKHDOWK\EUHDNIDVWLVVHUYHGWRWKH$JHG          7KLV LV IROORZHG E\ D OHFWXUH E\ D PHPEHU RI WKH8ODPDDQGDVKRUWWKLHNU/XQFKLVVHUYHG          DIWHU7KXU6DODK7KHDQQXDORXWLQJUHPDLQV        DKLJKOLWH   

('8&$7,21 9DULRXVVFKRROVLQWKHDUHDUHIHUWKHLUOHDUQHUV         to the ,&&WRFRPSOHWH/LIH2ULHQWDWLRQWDVNV     

2XU RIÃ&#x20AC;FHV DUH RSHQ GDLO\ IURP  WR  DQG IURP  5DPDGDDQ RIÃ&#x20AC;FH ZLOO DOVR EH RSHQ HYHU\ HYHQLQJDIWHU7DUDZHHJ6DODDK:HGRFROOHFW)LWUD)LG\DK=DNDDK6DGDND/LHOODDIRUGLVWULEXWLRQ             

A TRIBUTE TO ICC STALWARTS

THE ICC PREMISES

,W LV ZLWK JUHDW VDGQHVV WKDW WKH ,&& LQ WKH ODVW PRQWKEXULHGRQHRILWÒ&#x2039;V)RXQGHUPHPEHUV%URWKHU         $EGXOODK$PLHQSOD\HGDNH\UROHLQWKHIRUPDWLRQ          RIWKH,&&DQGFRQWLQXHGWRSOD\DJXLGLQJUROHLQ            WDNLQJWKHRUJDQL]DWLRQIRUZDUG7KHGHDWKRI        %U6DLW$POD\%U<XVXI%KDURRFKLDQG+DMMD*DGLMD          %URZQLQLVDOVRIUHVKLQRXUPHPRULHV0D\           $OODK$OPLJKW\JUDQWDOOGHFHDVHG-DQQDWXO)LUGRXV        DQGSODFHFRQWHQWPHQWLQWKHKHDUWVRIWKHIDPLOLHV          DQGIULHQGV 

7KH,&&LVVLWXDWHGDWQXPEHUWK$YHQXHLQ           *UDVV\3DUN:HKDYHDKDOOZLWKHQRXJKWDEOHV          DQGFKDLUVWRFRPIRUWDEO\VHDWJXHVWV$ODUJH          NLWFKHQ DQG IRRG SUHSDUDWLRQ DUHD ZLWK HQRXJK WRLOHWVZXGXDQG6DODKIDFLOLWLHVKDVPDGHWKH,&&          DVRUWDIWHUYHQXHLQWKHFRPPXQLW\       

23(5$7,21:,17(5:$507+   7KH,&&LQFRQMXQFWLRQZLWKWKH$IULFD0XVOLP         $JHQF\ VXFFHVVIXOO\ FRQGXFWHG 2SHUDWLRQ :LQWHU :DUPWK  $ ZDUP EODQNHW DQG D IRRGKDPSHUZHUHGHOLYHUHGWRQHHG\IDPLOLHV        LQWKH6RXWKHUQVXEXUEVDUHD     

FOOD PARCEL PACKING EXPERTISE 2XU H[SHUWLVH LQ SDFNLQJ DQG GLVWULEXWLQJ IRRG SDUFHOVLVRIWHQXVHGE\RUJDQLVDWLRQVORFDOO\DQG         QDWLRQDOO\ :H RIWHQ KRVW RWKHU RUJDQL]DWLRQ DQG VKDUHWKH%DUDNDKRIWKLVQREOHWDVN      

6(:,1*&/$66(6  $WOHDVWSHRSOHDWWHQG6HZLQJFODVVHVRQD          7XHVGD\IURPWR    

3$77(51*5$',1*  7KLV FRXUVH LV RIIHUHG RQ D 6DWXUGD\ IURP WR  

62&,$/:(/)$5(2)),&(   7KH6RFLDO:HOIDUHRIÃ&#x20AC;FHRSHUDWHVIURP       0RQGD\WR7KXUVGD\VDQGSURYLGHVVRFLDO       UHOLHIGDZDKDGYLFHDQGJHQHUDOLQIRUPDWLRQ       0DUULDJH&RXQVHOLQJGUXJFRXQVHOLQJGHDO      ZLWKZDWHUDQGUHQWDODUUHDUV    

/21*7,0($662&,$7,21:,7+6$1=$)     7KH,&&UHFHQWO\DFNQRZOHGJHGWKH\HDUVRIVHUYLFHJLYHQWRRXUFRPPXQLW\E\6$1=$)                :HDUHSURXGWRKDYHEHHQDVVRFLDWHGZLWK6$1=$)IRURYHU\HDUV             

DONATIONS :HDUHJUDWHIXOIRUWKHDVVLVWDQFH Ã&#x20AC;QDQFLDODQGRWKHU JLYHQWRWKH,&&E\WKHYDULRXVEXVLQHVVHVLQ                   WKHDUHD:HFROOHFW)LWUD)LG\DK=DNDDK/LHOODDK6DGDTDKIRUUHGLVWULEXWLRQWRWKHSRRUDQGQHHG\                 <RXUGRQDWLRQVFDQEHSDLGLQDWRXURIÃ&#x20AC;FHVIURP          Monday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday between 10-00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 13:00.

285&217$&7'(7$,/6   $UPLHQ6DPRGLHQ             PDVDPRGLHQ#WHONRPVDQHWFR]D =XEDLGD-RKQVRQ      -DLQRGLHQ(PDQGLHQ      ,&&RIÃ&#x20AC;FH     7HOHID[

  

285%$1.,1*'(7$,/6   $FFRXQW1DPH    %DQN    %UDQFK   $FFRXQW1XPEHU    %UDQFKFRGHQXPEHU   

,VODPLF&RRUGLQDWLQJ&RXQFLO    )1%  *UDVV\3DUN       

7KHVXSSRUWRI21(83&DVK &DUU\WKH.KDQMHHIDPLO\DQGIULHQGVIURPXSQRUWK$IULFD0XVOLP$JHQF\6DQ]DI0-&$O,PGDDG)RXQGDWLRQDQGRWKHUV                          DUHDSSUHFLDWHG:HZLVKWRDFNQRZOHGJHWKHFRQWLQXRXVVXSSRUWRIWKHIROORZLQJRUJDQL]DWLRQVEXVLQHVVHV             *RRGKRSH7\UHV%RQD)DVW)RRG%KDURRFKL.H\0RWRUV$$&DWHUHUV-ROO\0HDWV5RRPDQLHV+DUGZDUH5H]ZDDQV)DVW)RRGV%XLOG,W²*UDVV\3DUN                     

THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS OF THE ICC WISH ALL MUSLIMS WELL OVER THE MONTH OF RAMADAAN. Muslim Views


- ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE -

Muslim Views . May 2017

37

Ramadaan: a time for action SHANAAZ EBRAHIM-GIRE

RAMADAAN is a month of fasting, reflection, devotion, generosity and sacrifice observed by Muslims around the world. Each year, Muslims spend the ninth month of the Islamic calendar observing a community-wide fast; a rite considered to be one of the five pillars of Islam. Muslims who are physically able are required to fast each day of the entire month from sunrise to sunset. This period also serves as a reminder to Muslims of the suffering of impoverished and hungry people around the world, and of the importance of charity and the obligation to be charitable throughout the year. Feeding people at the end of the fasting day represents a very rewarding spiritual act according to Islamic tradition and teachings. The Islamic Relief Ramadaan programme offers an opportunity for many needy people around the world, who face food insecurity and hunger, to be provided with a Ramadaan food hamper, which ensures that their burden is eased during the holy month. ‘Alhamdulillah, in Ramadaan 2016, Islamic Relief as a global family managed to distribute 235 043 food packs in 31 countries and areas in Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe, to over 1,25 million people of the poorest of the poor, people who are struggling to get their daily meals to sustain

Beneficiaries from Islamic Relief South Africa’s 2016 Ramadaan programme in Photo ISLAMIC RELIEF Zimbabwe.

their lives and wellbeing,’ Islamic Relief South Africa chief operating officer, Yusuf Mohamed, said. The South African office is responsible for implementing the Ramadaan programme domestically as well as in Lesotho and Zimbabwe. ‘More than 17 000 vulnerable people were reached last year. ‘Beneficiaries included disasterprone communities, female and child-headed households, orphans and vulnerable children, and people living in informal settlements.’ With inequality and poverty reaching critical levels in South Africa, coupled with the East Africa drought and famine crisis and the ongoing Syria conflict, time is running out for thousands of people who are in desperate need of the most basic of food, water and medicines.

Mohamed encouraged the community to sponsor a food hamper for a family in need this Ramadaan. ‘As we feel the thirst and the hunger felt every day by our brothers and sisters around the world, I implore you to make every second… Our hampers consist of groceries and cooking essentials, which will enable beneficiary families to prepare wholesome meals for suhoor and iftaar.’ To sponsor a food hamper in southern Africa (South Africa, Lesotho and Zimbabwe) will cost R500. A food hamper for a family in Syria, Palestine (West Bank and Gaza), Yemen, Iraq, Lebanon and Afghanistan will cost R700. To feed a family in Somalia, South Sudan, Kenya and/or Ethiopia will cost R750. All zakaah contributions can be deposited into: First National

Beneficiaries from Islamic Relief South Africa’s 2016 Ramadaan programme in Photo ISLAMIC RELIEF Ennerdale, Johannesburg.

Bank, Islamic Relief SA, Account Number 62161066933, Smith Street Branch/ Branch Code 221426, Reference: Ramadaan and contact number. For all general donations (Lillah/ sadaqah) use the following banking details: Standard Bank, Islamic Relief SA, Account Number 005318459, Fordsburg Branch, Branch Code 005205,

Reference: Ramadaan and contact number. Online donations are also accepted and can be made on www.islamic-relief.org.za. All proof of payments can be emailed to info@islamicrelief.org.za. For more information, call the Islamic Relief South Africa call centre on 0800 111 898 (toll free).

And spend of that whereof He has made you trustees +RO\4XU·DQ

 

IN EAST AFRICA

363 000 children need urgent nutritional support.

71000 children require

life-saving treatment.

EVERY YS SECOND D COUNTS GENERAL & LILLAH Standard Relief Standard Bank, Islamic R elief SA Acc. No. No. : 005318459 Fordsburg Branch Branch Code Fordsburg Br anch Br anch C ode : 005205 Ref: EAST Contact No.. Ref: EAS T AFRICA+Your AFRICA+Y Your C ontact No

ZAK ZAKAT KAT C CONTRIBUTIONS ONTRIBUTIONS elief SA Acc. No FNB, Islamic R Relief No.. : 62161066933 treet Br anch Br anch C ode : 221426 Smith S Street Branch Branch Code Ref: Ref: EAS EAST T AFRIC AFRICA+Your A+Y Your ou C Contact ontact No No..

DONAATE DONATE ONLINE

0800 1 111 898 11 898 www www.islamic-relief.org.za .islamic-relief.org.za SNAPSCAN

Muslim Views


Focus on Finance

38

Muslim Views . May 2017

Understanding the various types of trusts In the follow-up to last month’s article, HASSEN KAJIE, CA (SA), a director of NEXIA SAB&T, based in the Cape Town office, and AYSHA OSMAN, CA (SA), National Technical Manager for Nexia SAB&T, in the Centurion office, provide readers further understanding about trusts.

THERE are three types of trusts under South African law: l An ‘ownership trust’, under which the founder or settlor transfers ownership of assets or property to a trustee(s) to be held for the benefit of defined or determinable beneficiaries of the trust. l A ‘bewind trust’, under which the founder or settlor transfers ownership of assets or property to beneficiaries of the trust but control over the property is given to the trustee(s). l A ‘curatorship trust’, under which the trustee(s) administer(s) the trust assets for the benefit of a beneficiary who doesn’t have the capacity to do so, for example, a curator placed in charge of a person with a disability.

Trusts can be described in various ways The way in which they are formed: l Inter vivos trust (living trusts) is created during the lifetime of a person. Living trusts are ideal for keeping growth assets out of your estate and are thus a medium to limit estate duty and to protect assets from generation to generation. A living or inter vivos trust comes into being during the lifetime of the

donor or founder with the signing and registration of a trust. l Mortis causa (testamentary) trust is set up in terms of the will of a person and comes into effect after that person’s death. Testamentary trusts are the most common trusts in use. They are especially suited to the protection of the interest of minors and other dependants who are not able to look after their own affairs. These types of trusts come into being only after the death of the testator. The trust is administered by trustees appointed in terms of the will, and is usually ended after a predetermined period or at a determined event, for example, a minor turning 18 or the death of an income beneficiary. The rights they give beneficiaries: l Vesting trust – the income (both of a revenue and capital nature) or assets of the trust are vested in the beneficiaries. The beneficiaries have the vested rights to the income or assets of the trust. The income and capital beneficiaries are already determined and described. The income is taxable in the hands of the income beneficiary, which could also

be the capital beneficiary. The capital beneficiary thus gets immediate property rights, subject to the terms of the will or the trust act. l Discretionary trust – the trustee(s) usually have the discretion whether to and how much of the income, assets or net trust capital of the trust to distribute to the beneficiaries. In these circumstances, the beneficiaries only have contingent rights to the income, assets or net trust capital of the trust. This type of trust may thus be utilised to save on income tax by splitting incomes and having the capital beneficiaries only determined at a later stage. l l l l

Trading trusts Asset-protection trusts Charitable trusts Special trusts For tax purposes the following types of special trusts are recognised: l Special Trust Type A – a trust created solely for the benefit of a person(s) with a ‘disability’, as defined in section 6B(1), where the disability makes it impossible for the person(s) to earn enough money for their care or from managing their

OR ALL YOUR AY US A VISIT FO PAY

MENTS GROCERY REQUIRE LS & DAILLYY ESSENTIA JOIN OUR WHA WHATSAPP ATSAPP TSAPP SPECIALS LIST If you wish to receive our store promotions via WhatsApp, kindly send your name & cell number to 062 840 9367 and we will add you to our growing WhatsApp database.

facebook.com/elitecashcarry facebook. com/elitecashcarry

Cnr. Cnr r. Reen & Carrick Carric Roads, Athlone Industria ࠮࠮Tel: Tel: 021 637 6810

eliteccinfo@gmail.com ࠮࠮Visit Visit our website www www.elitecc.co.za .elitecc.co.za for all our specials

Muslim Views

Their purpose

Hassen Kajie

Aysha Osman

own financial matters. l Special Trust Type B – a trust created solely for the benefit of a person(s) who is/are a relative of the person who died and who is/are alive on the date of death of that deceased person (including those conceived but not yet born), and the youngest of the beneficiaries is younger than 18 years on the last day of the year of assessment. Top tip: The various ways of describing trusts are not mutually exclusive. For example, an Inter vivos trust can be both a Special Trust Type A and a discretionary trust; and a testamentary trust can be both a Special Trust Type B and a discretionary trust.

be taxed in the hands of the: l Donor l Beneficiary or l Trust. Where the trust itself is taxed, it is taxed at a flat rate of 45 per cent. Special trusts are taxed at a sliding scale from 18 per cent to 45 per cent (same as natural persons). If you would like a specific topic featured, kindly send your suggestions to technical@nexiasabt.co.za. This article is intended for information purposes only and should not be considered as a legal document. Please note that while every effort is made to ensure accuracy, Nexia SAB&T does not accept responsibility for any inaccuracies or errors contained herein. If you are in doubt about any information in this article or require any advice on the topical matter, please do not hesitate to contact a Nexia SAB&T office nationally.

How is the income of a trust taxed? All trusts need to register with SARS. Depending on the circumstances, the income of a trust can


Muslim Views . May 2017

39

Muslim Views


40

Muslim Views . May 2017

Health File

Bunions, an abnormality of the foot DR ZIYAAD MAYET

A BUNION is a bump on the inside of the foot at the base of the big toe or, more correctly, at the head of the first metatarsal bone. This is, however, just the visible tip of the proverbial iceberg. The problem lies much deeper than the visible bump. There is an underlying abnormality in the skeleton of the foot, and the way the bones are sitting in relation to each other. This is then complicated by abnormal pull of the tendons attached to the big toe. The proper orthopaedic term for a bunion is ‘hallux valgus deformity’. Usually, the full medical term is seen as doctors trying to be fancy to justify their charges. In this case, however, it is warranted, as there is a much bigger problem than is visible. The anatomy of the foot is made up of 26 bones and 33 joints that work together to allow weight-bearing and movement. Weight is usually loaded through the foot as a tripod structure, with the big toe complex (first metatarsal), little toe complex (fifth metatarsal) and heel bone (calcaneus) taking the weight. Changes in the anatomy causes changes in the way the foot deals with weight-bearing by disturbing this tripod complex. In hallux valgus deformities, this means that the big toe complex is pushed too far out to fully take weight, and this weight is transferred to the second toe complex (metatarsal).

Dr Ziyaad Mayet.

Photo SUPPLIED

The most mentioned causes for bunions are l genetics or a family history of bunions; l tight fitting shoes or shoes with a narrow toe box. The joint surface of the metatarsal head may also be orientated in the direction of the deformity and leads to this. Genetic changes in the bones, including flatfoot, are also mentioned by some authors. Inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and gout are also linked to hallux valgus deformities. Lastly, hallux valgus deformity is more common in women. This is thought to be because women have more lax ligaments compared to men. The most common complaint associated with bunions is pain.

This may be due to the prominent bunion becoming inflamed (red and swollen) or degeneration of the joint. The other complaint is inability to wear shoewear. As mentioned earlier, this could lead to inflammation and pain. Lastly, there may be transferred pain on the second toe and deformity of that toe or pain from nerve compression as the deformity on the smaller toes progress. Cosmesis (the way it looks) is becoming an increasingly more common complaint. Traditionally, we do not operate for this problem, and medical aids do not pay for cosmetic surgery.

Treatment for bunions As with most things in orthopaedics, hallux valgus can be treated non-operatively or operatively. This having been said, management always starts with a good assessment. This will include assessment of the patient as a whole, and assessment of the foot, physically and with an xray. The patients’ problems and expectations, severity of the deformity and condition of the joints are the most important factors that will influence treatment.

Non-operative management This treatment is for patients that should not or cannot have surgery, based on the assessment. The main component is the use of footwear that can accommodate the deformed forefoot. This

Xray showing the bunion and a mild hallux valgus deformity. Photo SUPPLIED

means use of shoes with a wide toebox. Analgesia and padding are added as needed. Nightsplints can be used but they do not correct the deformity and there is very little evidence for their use. I use them only for patients who are on the waiting list for surgery.

Operative management Operative management involves re-alignment of bones mainly through osteotomies (cutting) of the bone and other soft tissue procedures. The exact nature of these will depend on the assessment. Post-operative healing usually takes about three months, of which the first six

Xray after corrective surgery. Photo SUPPLIED

weeks are spent in heel-wedge shoes.

Can bunions be prevented? This is very controversial. However, I do think that good sensible footwear is a good idea. The problem mostly is that this is not usually fashionable. However, as with most things, looking after your feet is always a good idea. Dr Ziyaad Mayet is an orthopaedic surgeon FCOS with fellowships in foot and ankle and limb reconstruction, ABIME qualified. He practises at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, heading the Foot and Ankle and Limb deformity unit.

5

:LVKLQJDOORXU0XVOLP&XVWRPHUV : LVKLQJDOORXU0XVOLP&XVWRPHUV

5 5DDDP P PDDDGGGDDDDDDQQ. . .DDDUUUHHHHHHP P

Muslim Views


Muslim Views . May 2017

41

Depression in the elderly DR USCHENKA PADAYACHEY

Worldwide, it is estimated that 350 million

DEPRESSION in the geriatric community population has been identified as a significant problem in view of the negative outcomes regarding poor functioning, increased perception of poor health and increased utilisation of medical services. Identification and treatment of depression in the elderly is important because of its association with increased morbidity and mortality. It is specifically linked to an increased risk of stroke, heart failure and hip fractures. Depression has been found to be an independent cause of disability as well as contributing to disability from a primary physical illness by exacerbating physical deterioration. Ageing presents with a multitude of organic changes that result in characteristic mood and behavioural patterns, often inadvertently viewed as part of the normal ageing process. Depression encompasses a range of mental issues and associated emotional, cognitive and behavioural symptoms. In addition, late life depression has typically mutable manifestations, often masked by co-morbid medical conditions. Research suggests that older adults are more likely to present with agitation, somatic complaints and hypochondriasis in addition to having no significant association with family history of depression or other mental illness.

individuals suffer from depression. Approximately five million older adults worldwide experience late-onset depression but it still remains under-recognised and inadequately treated Dr Uschenka Padayachey. Photo SUPPLIED

Together, these factors confound the accurate diagnosis and hence treatment of depression in this vulnerable population. Globally, the average life expectancy has increased from 68 years in 1990 to 72 years in 2009, with steadily increasing trends noted in developed countries. Due to this increase and the subsequent escalating burden of chronic diseases, a focus on mental health disorders in older adults is essential due to their impact on morbidity, mortality and quality of life. The Global Burden of Disease Study has predicted that depressive disorders will be a leading cause of disability by 2020 due to their significant impact on functioning and quality of life. Worldwide, it is estimated that 350 million individuals suffer

from depression. Approximately five million older adults worldwide experience late-onset depression but it still remains under-recognised and inadequately treated. Depression is found to persist into older age with the prevalence increasing with age. In South Africa, the prevalence of major depression is reportedly higher in rural settings compared to urban settings. The SASH Study, a nationally representative household survey conducted in South Africa between 2002 and 2004 reported the lifetime prevalence rate of major depression to be 9,7 per cent with a significant association with female gender. The 2008 SAGE study, a national population-based crosssectional study in older South Africans, reported a four per cent, 12-month prevalence of symptom-based depression. Personality attributes; life and

social stressors; single, divorced or widowed status; bereavement; and learned helplessness are thought to be psychosocial risk factors for the development of depression. Loneliness as a natural part of ageing is a direct consequence of loss usually through death or abandonment, and is viewed by the older adult as a precursor to depression as well as a selfimposed withdrawal. Widowhood refers to a longterm state following the experience of death of a significant other, which has social and personal consequences. A recent local study found that participants who were widowed were nearly twice as likely to be classified as depressed as compared with their married counterparts, with widowed females having twice the risk of depression. This could be attributed to the overlap of symptoms of depression and bereavement as well as

the unique stressors of South African women. The widowhood effect, which is the increased likelihood for a recently widowed individual to die, is a direct reflection of the impact of social relations on health. The widowed elderly should therefore be closely supported and monitored for depression to reduce the negative health outcomes associated with depression. Depression in the geriatric population is known to be significantly associated with negative outcomes. Early identification and treatment of depression serves to reduce additional medical costs incurred by depressed individuals, and lessen the significant associated caregiver burden. Dr Uschenka Padayachey [MBBCh, FCPsych(SA), MMedPsych] is a psychiatrist at Melomed Tokai Hospital. Tel: 021 764 7500; Email: drpadayachey@gmail.com

Ramadan Kariem MAY ALLAHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S IMMACULATE GRACE AND EXCEPTIONAL WISDOM CONQUER YOUR LIFE AS YOU CELEBRATE THIS HOLY MONTH OF RAMADAN. HAVE A BLESSED AND PEACEFUL RAMADAN!

Have a blessed and peaceful Ramadan! MELOMED TOKAI

MELOMED GATESVILLE

MELOMED BELLVILLE

MELOMED MITCHELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PLAIN Muslim Views


42

Muslim Views . May 2017

attic rush

Wishes you a blessed Ramadan! is distinctively creamy and delicious with a buttery flavour. Tried and trusted through the centuries. Ideal for baking and cooking your best recipes.

baking

Muslim Views

spreading

The chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice

cooking

sauces

basting


Muslim Views . May 2017

43

Ramadan Kareem Wishing you and your families peace and harmony during the holy month of Ramadan. Zemcor, 124 Capricorn Drive, Capricorn Business Park, Muizenberg, Cape Town, South Africa Tel: + 27 21 709 0541 Fax: +27 21 709 0899 Email: info@zemcor.co.za www.zemcor.co.za

Muslim Views


44

Muslim Views . May 2017

New beauty, fashion and lifestyle feature NEXT month, Muslim Views will launch a beauty, fashion and lifestyle feature showcasing beauty products, fashion and style updates and all you need to know about the latest essential fashion items. And there will be regular give-aways for our readers! The feature will also include a bit of nostalgia, for example, looking back at how modest dressing styles in the Cape have changed over the years as well as signature trends and the most stylish accessories. The beauty, fashion and lifestyle feature will be written by FATIMA RINQUEST. Born and raised in Cape Town, Fatima describes herself as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a modern mother and low-key bloggerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. She has previously worked at leading publishing houses including Fusion Fashion TV magazine, Cosmopolitan and Marie Claire. Fatima says that one canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fail to notice that â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Our teens and young adults are very keen about fashion, and this feature is the place where they will find how they can dress themselves fashionably in a very trendy and Islamically beautiful way.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Look out for our exciting beauty, fashion and lifestyle feature in Muslim Views next month. Fatima Rinquest.

Photo SUPPLIED

Ebrahim Essack

Please contact us for all your Travel needs.

:(35,17

,+/0!./



5 $

Æ&#x201D;



5 $

Æ&#x201D;



5 $

3ULQWHGLQ)XOO&RORXUVLGHGRQJVP:KLWH%RQG $)5((WHPSODWHGHVLJQZKLFKFRQVLVWVRIDOLQHGHVFULSWLRQ OLQHSULFH DJUDSKLFRUSKRWRRIDQLWHPWREHVXSSOLHG ([WUDFRVWDSSO\WR'HHS(GJHSKRWRV3ULFH9$7LQFOXVLYH7 &DSSO\ DLQYHVWPHQWLQ$'9$1&('',*,7$/7(&+12/2*< JLYHV\RX3267(56DW$))25'$%/(35,&(6

#L?;N /;PCHAM Muslim Views


Muslim Views . May 2017

45

Muslim Views


46

DISCUSSIONS WITH DANGOR

Muslim Views . May 2017

Discourses on the state of the nation Some argue that the focus should not be on Jacob Zuma alone but also on all those who are involved in corruption, writes EMERITUS PROFESSOR SULEMAN DANGOR.

CORRUPTION in government, the current spat within the ANC, Gupta influence, foreign interference and sacking of Pravin Gordhan as finance minister are being vigorously debated across the length and breadth of the country. Muslims have also weighed in on the debate. Discussions at social events are dominated by the ‘state of the nation’. In this article, I will attempt to capture some of the deliberations in the social media, specifically on the WhatsApp groups that I am privy to. The vast majority condemns the president primarily for his corruption including, of course, his (perceived) corrupt relationship with the Guptas, accused of state capture. The allegation that the Guptas have attempted to influence the appointment of cabinet ministers is proof that Zuma is no longer in charge of the country.

Muslim Views

Some argue that the focus should not be on Jacob Zuma alone but also on all those who are involved in corruption. They are willing participants in milking the coffers of the state and are equally liable. They will be in the forefront to defend him to the core because they have the most to lose if he were to step down or be recalled. A few defend the president, arguing that the call for Zuma to step down is a foreign plot hatched in London to unseat the ANC. The speculation that the DA is in cahoots with Britain and the European Union to strengthen its planned government takeover after the 2019 or 2024 general elections has their support. Some of the president’s defendants accept the argument that calls for his removal are part of a global conspiracy to destabilise the Brics countries and that ratings agencies are involved because Brics has set up its own development bank and is challenging the global financial hegemony of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. The Guptas, according to some, are all fall guys. The ‘white’ monopoly capitalists, as repre-

sented by the Oppenheimers, Ruperts and Rothschild families are in the background and continue to control the country’s economy and to influence economic policy. South African banks are said to be under their control. Others believe that the Zionists are involved in a regime change plot because the ANC supports the Palestinian cause, is critical of Israel’s actions and supports campaigns against South Africanbased companies operating in occupied territories. Opposition party leaders are viewed with great suspicion because of their recent visit to Israel. My reading is that the majority support Pravin Gordhan has is because of his efficient handling of the Receiver of Revenue department, standing up to the president and the Guptas, and not being tainted by corruption. A minority believes the claim that the Russians were behind his axing because of his refusal to sanction the nuclear deal. The contending view is that Pravin Gordhan is part of the unjust capitalist system and so, in a sense, is supporting the status quo. The need of the hour is radical socio-economic transformation. The president’s statements promoting socio-economic transformation reflect – in their view – his commitment to uplift the downtrodden. Even among those who are highly critical of him, there is a view that they would rather have

Even among those who are highly critical of him, there is a view that they would rather have him than someone who might turn out worse than him – ‘better the devil you know than the one you don’t know’. So they would prefer that he stays on as president until the end of his term of office him than someone who might turn out worse than him – ‘better the devil you know than the one you don’t know’. So they would prefer that he stays on as president until the end of his term of office. The spat within the ANC gives some hope that at last some bigwigs are beginning to realise that Jacob Zuma has become a liability to the party as well as to the country. Even die-hard ANC supporters can no longer defend corruption, nepotism, avarice, inefficiency and intimidation that have become synonymous with the president and his cabal. However, ANC critics are disillusioned with ANC members who are willing to publicly criticise him but defend him when it comes to a no confidence vote in parliament. They are fully aware that if the court does not rule in favour of a secret ballot, the ANC members will be too intimidated to vote against him publicly. Some Muslims who voted for the ANC in past elections no longer support the organisation for some or all of the reasons mentioned above. A number of them have decided to abstain while others have joined opposi-

tion groups, primarily the DA. Those who did so are vilified by ANC supporters as ‘sell outs’. The ANC support for Palestine is brought up repeatedly as an argument in favour of voting for the ANC and not the DA, which is accused of supporting Israel. However, some have pointed out that while the ANC supports the Palestinians, our government continues to maintain strong diplomatic and economic ties with Israel. There is little support for Skosozana Dlamini-Zuma because there seems to be consensus that as the president’s ex-wife she will protect him. Furthermore, she made a right royal mess in Africa as head of the African Union, so much so that many analysts have hailed her departure as a blessing in disguise. As we can see from the above, conspiracy theories abound. However, we can note two distinct positions: the president must go because he is not only corrupt but also not in control of the country. The president must stay because there is a national/ global conspiracy to remove him from office, even if he is not above board.


Muslim Views . May 2017

47

Muslim Views


48

Muslim Views . May 2017

Priced from R1.3 - R5.3 million.

CONSTRUCTION CONS TRUCTION COMMENCE COMMENCED. D.

B

edfordview is considered to be the city’s ‘J ‘Jewel of the east’. It is highly sought-after

for its leafyy surrounds, generous space, and easy access to greater Johannesburg

Modern and slick, Infinité Bedfordview is characterised by light, comfort and Ekurhuleni. M and the muted hues of charcoal, stone, brushed steel, oak and iceberg white. There are quality finishes, including porcelain tiles, and the latest Bosch and Hansgrohe appliances and fittings. Large windows open each living space to expansive surrounding views. MUST W WA ATCH: You uTube video - Search: Infinité Bedfordview (Faatasy Property Developers) ON SHO W: TUESDAY SHOW: TUESDAY - SUNDAY SUNDAY 10am 10a - 5pm. Pointers from Nicol and Bradford Rds. Opposite Eastgate Mall (JHB).

New heights for Bedfordview.

JOHANNESBURG EAST SPECIAL PROJECTS Glen Bester 082 870 4264, Office: 010 595 4300 pamgolding.co.za/infinite Muslim Views


Muslim Views . May 2017

49

Muslim Views


50

Muslim Views

Muslim Views . May 2017


Light from the Qur’an

Muslim Views . May 2017

51

The All-Wise Qur’an: How is it defined? IBRAHIM OKSAS and NAZEEMA AHMED AS the month of Ramadaan is the month of the Quran, let us reflect on what the Quran is and how it is defined. In his Quranic tafsir, Risale-i Nur, Bediuzzaman Said Nursi says that the All-Wise Quran is the criterion which instructs man and the jinn concerning the signs of creation. It regards created beings, each of which is a meaningful letter, as bearing the meaning of another; that is, it looks at beings on account of their Maker. It says, ‘How beautifully they have been made! How exquisitely they point to their Maker’s beauty!’ However, natural philosophy or science that does not take into account the Creator of all beings merely discusses the decorations of the letters of beings. While the letters of the mighty book of the universe (i.e. plants, trees, birds, animals) should be looked at as bearing the meaning of another, that is, on account of Allah, they have not done this; they have looked at beings as only signifying themselves. So, instead of saying, ‘How beautifully they have been made,’ they say ‘How beautiful they are,’ and make them ugly. Bediuzzaman further says that the reason the Quran has been given the highest rank among the infinite words of Allah is the following: the Quran has come from

Sadaqah may be given as learning and knowledge. It may be given as words, as acts or as advice the Greatest Divine Name, and from the greatest level of every Divine Name, (i) it is Allah Almighty’s word in regard to His being Sustainer of All The Worlds; (ii) it is a divine decree through His title of Allah of All Beings; (iii) it is an address in the name of the Creator of the Heavens and the Earth; (iv) it is a conversation in respect of absolute rulership; (v) it is a pre-eternal discourse on account of universal divine sovereignty; (vi) it is a notebook of the favours of the Most Merciful from the point of view of all-embracing, all-encompassing divine rahmah; (vii) it is a collection of communications at the start of which are sometimes ciphers ( e.g. Alif. Lam. Mim; Ha. Mim; Alif. Lam. Ra) in respect of the tremendousness of Divine majesty; and (viii) a wisdom-scattering holy scripture which, descending from the reaches of the Greatest Divine Name, looks to and inspects the all-comprehensive domain of the Arsh-al Atham (Supreme Throne). It is for these reasons that the title of Kalamullah ‘Word of

Allah’ has been given with complete worthiness to the Quran. Furthermore, the Quran has six aspects which are all brilliant and devoid of the darkness of doubts and skepticism; (i) its point of support is certain heavenly revelation; (ii) its aim and goal is self-evidently eternal happiness; (iii) its inner aspect is clearly pure guidance; (iv) its upper aspect is necessarily the lights of imaan; its lower aspect is undeniably evidence and proof; (v) its right aspect is evidently the surrender of the heart and conscience; its left aspect is manifestly the subjugation of the reason and intellect; (vi) its fruit is indisputably the mercy of the Most Merciful and the realm of Paradise; and so its rank and desirability are assuredly accepted by the angels, man and the jinn. Bediuzzaman explains that one of the further distinguishing and defining attributes of the Quran is its eloquence, born of the beauty of its word order, which manifests a purity of style not encountered in other forms of speech. The way the second, minute

and hour hands of a clock each complete the order of the others, that is the way all the ayahs of the All-Wise Quran, and its words, and the order in the relationships between the ayahs and words complete the order of the others. Bediuzzaman then cites the following example from Surah AlBaqara in order to demonstrate the word order in the parts of an ayah: ‘And spend [in Allah’s way] out of what We have bestowed on them as rizq.’ The parts of this ayah point out five of the conditions which make sadaqah (almsgiving) acceptable. First condition: This is to give only so much sadaqah as will not cause the giver to be in need of receiving sadaqah himself. It states this condition through the division or parts signified by ‘out of’ in the words ‘out of what’. Second condition: It is not to take from Ali and give to Wali but to give out of one’s own property. The words ‘We have bestowed on them as rizq’ express this condition. It means: ‘Give out of the rizq that is yours.’

Third condition: This is not to place an obligation on the recipient. The word ‘We’ in ‘We have bestowed on them as rizq’ states this condition. That is to say: ‘I give you the rizq. When you give some of My property to one of My servants, you cannot place them under any obligation.’ Fourth condition: You should give it to a person who will spend it on his livelihood because sadaqah given to those who will squander it idly is not acceptable. The word ‘spend’ points to this condition. Fifth condition: This is to give in Allah’s name. The words ‘We bestow on them as rizq’ state this; that is to say: ‘The property is Mine; you should give it in My name.’ Bediuzzaman contends that these conditions may be extended. That is, to the form sadaqah should take, and with what goods. Sadaqah may be given as learning and knowledge. It may be given as words, as acts or as advice. The word ‘what’ in ‘out of what’ indicates these various sorts through its generality. Thus, with the five conditions in this short ayah describing sadaqah, it opens up a broad field of understanding before the mind and intellect. Insha Allah, during the month of Ramadaan, let us engage in this kind of reflective thought as we seek to understand and act upon the Kalamullah.

Muslim Views


52

Muslim Views . May 2017

From Consciousness to Contentment

In the midst of life, we are in death JASMINE KHAN

I ONCE read that if we focus too much on the fact that we will someday die, we will be afraid to live at all. Needless to say, the above did not come from any Islamic source. Yet, if one observes the behaviour of most people, ourselves included, one could be forgiven for thinking that we live as if there is no end in sight. It seems to be a quirk of human nature. When someone close to you dies, even if that person was terminally ill or involved in a horrific accident, the shock is immense. On an intellectual level, we know that death is not the end; it is just a passing from one domain to another, more permanent one. Still, the finality hits you like a smack in the face. This is when memories hit you; they tumble like a kaleidoscope and, strangely, the memories are only good ones. Even if you had issues with the deceased or were not on very good terms, what we remember are the happy times. Everyone has a positive thing to say about the departed. And this got me pondering. We do actually live our lives as if we will be here forever; we are so engrossed that we very seldom spare a thought about our deaths. Every funeral procession should serve as an eye-opener that very soon it could be our turn. This should motivate us to struc-

Muslim Views

Our Rasul (SAW) was never harsh in his dealings with anyone, not even his enemies, not even those who were guilty of perpetrating the most ignominious atrocities upon his person ture our lives in the obedience of Allah and, in doing so, we should strive to be kind to others. Yet, we still persist in shouting at our children, saying nasty things about others and holding onto grudges as if our very existence depends upon it. The most perplexing thing for me was brought home forcefully very recently when my family suffered a loss. While we say wonderful things about the deceased, we still continue with our usual behaviour towards the living. At the janazah, I was amazed that the very people who were extolling the virtues of the deceased were guilty of unkindness towards the living. One person gave another such a dirty look that I was stunned. I kept staring at this person, desperately hoping that I was imagining it but, no, it was a case of ‘if looks could kill’. Another group was discussing someone not present but the insulting thing being said was shocking. In addition to this, there were the usual ones who persist in treating a janazah as a reunion. What are we to deduce from such behaviour; that the living can be treated badly and that the dead must be respected?

Do we really have to wait for someone to pass on before we acknowledge the person’s good points? Are we not supposed to love one another for the sake of Allah? Allah tells us very clearly in the Holy Quran: ‘The believers are but brothers so make reconciliation between your brothers and fear Allah that you may receive mercy.’ (49:10) Although the word ‘brotherhood’ is used, what is meant is a faith-based community that includes both men and women as brothers and sisters in religion. Brotherhood is a comprehensive concept that is based upon good character, which means emulating our beloved Rasul (SAW) in our treatment of others. Our Rasul (SAW) was never harsh in his dealings with anyone, not even his enemies, not even those who were guilty of perpetrating the most ignominious atrocities upon his person. An-Nu’man ibn Basheer reported that Rasul (SAW) said: ‘The parable of the believers in their affection, mercy and compassion for each other is that of a body. When any limb aches, the whole body reacts with sleeplessness and fever.’ (Bukhari 5665) Further, Allah says: ‘The believing men and believing

women are allies of one another. They enjoin what is right and forbid what is wrong and establish prayer and give charity and obey Allah and His Messenger. Allah will have mercy upon them for Allah is Almighty and Wise.’ (9:71) When we rip someone’s character to shreds in their absence, when we shoot looks filled with malice at another, are we behaving as allies, are we enjoining good and forbidding evil? The strongest level of brotherhood is the sense of community, friendship and common purpose in Islam for the sake of Allah. At this level, the believers work together towards fulfilling the goals of the religion and living out its divine values. Specifically, this level of brotherhood involves purifying the heart of all animosity, hatred and malice for those who have faith. We cannot in all conscience claim to be a community of believers when we harbour grudges and have malice towards our fellow believers. Anas ibn Malik reported that Rasul (SAW) said: ‘Do not hate each other, do not envy each other, do not turn away from each other but rather be servants of Allah as brothers. It is not lawful for a Muslim to boycott his

brother for more than three days.’ (Bukhari 5718) As I write this, we are in the month of Rajab, the month of seeking forgiveness, and as we move towards Ramadaan, let us take cognisance of what our Rasul (SAW) said: ‘Whoever would love to be delivered from the Hellfire and entered into Paradise then let him die with faith in Allah and the Last Day, and let him treat people the way he would love to be treated.’ (Muslim 1844) Let us pray: ‘Our Lord, forgive us and our brothers who preceded us in faith, and put not in our hearts any resentment toward those who have faith. Our Lord, you are kind and merciful.’ (Quran 59:10) Finally, before we say something about a fellow human or harbour bad thoughts about anyone, remember that death awaits us all, and can happen within a blink of an eye, and be prepared. A man asked the Messenger: ‘Who is the wisest of people, O Messenger of Allah?’ He replied: ‘The one who remembers death most often and the one who is well-prepared to meet it; these are the wise, honourable in this life and dignified in the hereafter.’ (Ibn Majah, Tabarani)


Muslim Views . May 2017

53

Around the corner in Timbuktu…

The breakfast spread along with some relevant reading. Photo DILSHAD PARKER

DILSHAD PARKER

AS a young child I remember my folks making reference to going to Timbuktu like it was a mythical place to which you sent naughty children as punishment. The eventual realisation as I grew older that Timbuktu actually existed didn’t diminish its mystery, though. Steeped in legend and folklore, this once wealthy city still remains an enigma. Timbuktu, located in Mali, in Northern Africa, was a world centre of Islamic learning from the 13th to the 17th century, especially under the Mali Empire and Askia Mohammad I’s rule. In its Golden Age, the city’s numerous Islamic scholars and extensive trading network made possible an important book trade. Together with the campuses of the Sankore Madrasah, an Islamic

university, this established Timbuktu as a scholarly centre in Africa. So, it is quite fitting that a bookshop called Timbuktu would be flourishing in the South of Africa, in Cape Town, selling a variety of books and media, from superb translations of classical treasures, such as Al Ghazali, Ibn Rushd and An Nawawi, as well as thought-provoking contemporary writings by a host of international scholars. To add to the attraction, they have installed a contemporary coffee shop within the bookshop. What started out as litle more than a coffee station has fleshed out into a restaurant serving breakfast fare and light meals. I visited Timbuktu for the first time about six weeks ago – a long overdue visit I might add, as they have been open for over a year now.

The chocolate pancake that almost had us needing a nap before we could leave. Photo DILSHAD PARKER

The location of Sybrand Park, being a mostly residential neighbourhood, I found unusual for the nature of the store and even more so for a coffee shop so, with little expectation, I was in no hurry to try it out. To my great chagrine, when I finally did visit, I realised I had been missing out on a true little gem. The shop is bright and airy, split in two, with the bookshop on one side and the coffee shop on the other. The space has the feel of an old home that has been gutted and modernised and yet still retains some of its historic feel. Heavy wooden trestles and benches lend a contemporary and casual feel, and books from the shelves are strategically placed on the tables to whet your appetite. We chatted with Ibtihaaj (don’t you think that’s a beautiful and unusual name?), who runs the

coffee shop, about how they started small and grew the offering into something more substantial. She is passionate about providing a good quality menu that is modern and focuses on good quality and modern fare. I say, bring on the truffle oil… We ordered that Eggs Benedict with Salmon and the Cheese and Mushroom Omelette. Both dishes were substantial and came with dressed rocket on the side and the omelette with a side of toast. The lemon cooler we had to drink was delicious and refreshing, and I can see why it was recommended. They didn’t ask how I wanted my eggs when I placed the order, and I found my eggs were a bit too well done. I would have preferred them a little softer. The meal was otherwise beautifully presented.

Ibtihaaj surprised us with a treat after our breakfast and presented us with the most decadent chocolate pancake for dessert. Dessert after breakfast… why not? The chocolate crepe was perfectly done and filled with creamy, quality chocolate ice cream, drizzled with roasted almonds and a decadent chocolate sauce. I will be returning to have that for breakfast, one day. I have no shame… My only regret is that I didn’t try the coffee. The quality of the coffee is the mark of a good coffee shop after all and the one thing I should have tried was the coffee. The truth is, after that pancake, anything more would have meant me curling up on one of the couches and going to sleep for an hour. Did I mention the comfy couches and armchair? I learned also that they often host stand-up comedy nights. About once a month or so, the likes of Yaseen Barnes or Riaad Moosa, even Loyiso Gola, can be found trying their new material here. So, while the bookshop is focused on Islamic literature, they have put a contemporary spin on the business, which makes it so much more accessible for a younger crowd. Religion, food and comedy – who’d have thought a recipe so quirky would work so well. This review is independent and meals were paid for. Dilshad Parker is owner and author of www.hungryforhalaal.co.za

Muslim Views


54

Muslim Views

Muslim Views . May 2017


FOR ALL Horses: poetry in motion

Muslim Views . May 2017

55

Its story goes back 50 million years, from a multi-toed, dog-sized creature, Eohippus, it slowly evolved into the modern horse, Equus, writes DR M C D’ARCY.

HE loping stride of the giraffe is ballet in slow motion. The blur of the cheetah’s charge is like a hurricane on stimulants. But the stride of the horse is poetry in motion. Human heartstrings have often been strummed by the beauty of its equine line, by the lustre of its shimmering pelt and, most of all, its feisty spirit. Taut muscles and fortitude have been there for man under trying circumstances. The horse’s regal stature has twinkled the eyes of man since the dawn of creation. Unquestionably, the horse is animal art at its pinnacle-best. Opposite the house in Brown Street, District Six, where I was born, lived Tut. He owned a hefty, brown horse and a small cart with iron clad wooden wheels from which he plied through the district selling fruit and vegetables. Now and then, he would lift a youngster up to sit on the back of his horse; that was a special treat. Just imagine being a cowboy for a minute or two! And that’s when I fell in love with horses. The movie cowboy and his horse were sweet Saturday matinee fodder in my youthful days. Roy Rogers, King of the Cowboys, sang as he pranced on the back of Trigger, a great palomino, beautiful as a sculpture from the hands of that great artist, Michael Angelo. Trigger was an equine wonder, swift, intelligent and talented as only the old bioscopes (movie houses) of District Six could enthuse. The acumen of horses should not be underestimated. Trigger could do more than 150 ‘tricks’. He could walk 15 metres on his hind legs. He could sit on a chair, sign his name ‘X’ with a pencil, lie down for a nap and cover himself with a blanket. The sound of applause was his nectar and he would bow on bended knee to appreciative applause. It is said that his great-

T

Guard of honour astride a barb horse at the tomb of King Mohammed V, in Rabat, Morocco. Photo M C D’ARCY

est ‘trick’ was not to have bowel movements when he performed on stage and in public. Which reminds me of an episode on early TV in South Africa when Richard Loring, a well-known singer of mediocre talent, was accompanied by his horse on stage. While belting out a song of lust and love, unbeknown to him, his horse did the unthinkable on stage. The audience cracked up with laughter. Since it wasn’t a particularly funny song, the singer screwed up his face, wondering why. Seventeen thousand years ago, artists drew stunning images of prancing horses cavorting with a menagerie of animals on the walls of the French Lascaux caves. But the horse has a more ancient history than those images. I lapped up its history in Zoology classes. Its story goes back 50 million years, from a multi-toed, dog-sized creature, Eohippus, it slowly evolved into the modern horse, Equus. It was once widespread in the northern hemisphere but inexplicably died out in North America. Contrary to common perception, the indigenous North American ‘Indians’, Mexican Aztecs and Peruvian Incas, did not possess horses. The Spanish conquistadors took horses from Europe into

Mexico and California, Texas and New Mexico, lands that they had usurped from the indigenes, such as the Apache, the Hopi and Sioux tribes. During the wars between the United States and Mexico, many horses were abandoned and had to fend for themselves. They went feral. Herds of horses still roam free across the prairies and badlands of western USA. A similar situation transpired after the First World War, when South Africa defeated the Germans in the then German South West Africa (Namibia). During that war, the Germans slaughtered the Herero population almost into holocaust oblivion. Many horses were let loose on both sides. A few years ago, I was fortunate to see odd bands of skittish wild horses roaming the semidesert areas of Namibia. Many Muslims assume that the expansion of the Muslim Empire took place from the backs of camels but that is not so. Cavalry charges were fought from horseback with lances, swords and scimitars (back-curving swords widening to a tip, used in horseback fighting). Camels were mostly employed for carting baggage and ancillary supplies. Horses were special, and valuable horses sometimes slept in the same tents as their masters.

A black barb at a traditional horse show, in Marrakesh.

Dressage places immaculately coifed horses through stylised routines, each move finely assessed, every step and turn considered for form and execution. This rigid play evaluates horse and rider for perfection. Dressage is essentially bespoke for Western mores. The rough and tumble of the Afghan Bushkazi national sport is not for the fainthearted. It’s a violent ‘take no prisoners’ game in which both horse and rider are whipped into a bone crushing, muscle tearing spectacle. A dead goat is central to a mad melee of sweating, fighting, lashing horsemen hell-bent on delivering the animal carcass to a designated goal post; the very antithesis to the staid Western dressage. Poetry is often velvet prose, sinuous as a meandering river, ethereal as a soft mist on a lake. It is the Arab horse that looms large through the mist of dreams to take its place at the summit of perfection. The legendary Arab horse is

Photo M C D’ARCY

blessed with a delicate head at the end of a curvaceous neck. Its body ripples with firm muscles under a silky pelt. The action of its delicately sculpted legs is not for skirmishes of battle and Bushkazis but for speed, for stamina of steel and its liquid-flowing stride, smooth as shining mercury. And yet, the founding überancestor of the modern thoroughbred, the Bayerley Turk (1678 – 1703) fought in many battles when the Ottoman Turks besieged Vienna. The Arab horse is a supreme speed machine. Its ancestral DNA graces the genes of every thoroughbred racehorse in the world registry. The USA legendary, brilliant red-chestnut coloured horse, Secretariat (Born 1970. Sire: Bold Ruler. Grandsire: Nasrullah) had wonderful legs with three white socks and a stride that was perfection. He was clocked as the fastest racehorse that ever lived. It’s safe to say that Secretariat had heaps of Arab-stallion genes and some to spare. The Moroccan barb (Barbary) horse is not as well defined or as easily recognisable as the classical Arab profile. It is stocky, powerful yet gentle and reliable. Was it named after the indigenous Moroccan Berber tribes? Or was it after the Barbary Coast from which pirates attacked European shipping and also invaded the Southern English coast of Cornwall and captured, girls, women and men for the slave trade. The horse has a close affinity with Islamic history and art. That is evident from its loving depiction in many Iranian, Turkish and Indian miniature art. European artists from the fifteenth century drifted to the Ottoman Empire and added their artistic brushes to the pomp and ceremonies in which horses were sported by caliphs and their cohorts. Even today, the horse has a special place in the hearts Muslims.

Muslim Views


56

Muslim Views . May 2017

A madrasah that leads the way AMINA WAGGIE

Gift Of The Needy assisting one of the many refugee victims of a gas explosion. Photo GIFT OF THE NEEDY

GIFT OF THE NEEDY

ALHAMDULILLAH, we, the fortunate ones, stand on the threshold of another Ramadaan. This most auspicious month brings with it a multitude of blessings and opportunities for us to re-ignite our deen and bring about spiritual renewal not just for ourselves but for our family, community, society and the world. What is desperately needed in this time of socio-political upheaval is for humanity to emerge triumphant. In this time, we must empathise with the plight of all those in distress. This blessed month invites us through observing our fast to experience the pangs of hunger and thirst, which is a way of life for those living in abject poverty. Indeed, Ramadaan calls on every Muslim to identify with the plight of the less fortunate and, in some small measure, reach out to them to bring hope and comfort. The Syrian refugee crisis is a harsh reminder of the unbearable

suffering endured by our Syrian brethren. Left with nothing but the clothes on their backs and hope in their hearts, they depend on acts of humanity to help them pick up the pieces of their shattered lives. Since 2015, Gift of the Needy has been at the forefront of relief efforts. We have worked with humanitarian aid organisations to rescue refugees arriving by boat to the Greek islands of Mytilene. We provided food, water and other essential items to refugees in the refugee camps and in most recent campaigns, we personally assisted Syrian refugees with access to emergency medical care. This included victims of gas explosions. All this was made possible by the generosity of our benefactors who helped us bring hope to those in distress. Insha Allah, after Ramadaan, a team accompanied by two ulama will return there to continue relief efforts as the situation remains dire.

MADRASAH Tul Madina occupies a space in primary Islamic education that makes it stand out among others: it has students from as young as fiveyears-old up to 32-years-old. It is also the madrasah with the highest enrolment in Mitchells Plain. Madrasah Tul Madina is a weekend-only madrasah which operates in Beacon Valley. It has drawn up its own syllabus which has been endorsed by the Muslim Judicial Council (MJC) and International Peace College South Africa (Ipsa). This stamp of approval has seen other madrasahs using its syllabus. While based in Mitchells Plain, the students at Madrasah Tul Madinah come from across the Cape Flats and other parts of the peninsula. Students travel from Bellville, Woodstock, Belhar, Delft and the surrounding areas in Mitchells Plain to attend. Apart from covering Quran recitation and subjects that cover various aspects of Islamic belief and ritual, as well as history, Madrasah Tul Madina also places a heavy focus on leadership training for the youth.

This caters for the large number of high school students who attend. Madrasah Tul Madina hosts various programmes such as youth camps, madrasah quiz competitions, mother-and-daughter workshops, career days and the annual youth Moulood-unNabi, which is the largest Moulood celebration that takes place in Mitchells Plain. The madrasah also invites counsellors with special expertise to address self-esteem issues confronting the youth. ‘The youth that attend the madrasah call it a home away from home,’ said Moulana Abduragmaan May, Principal of Madrasah Tul Madina. Apart from sharing its syllabus with other madrasahs in the Western Cape, Madrasah Tul Madina has embarked on a programme of teacher training for muallims and from various muallimas madrasahs. It held its first teachers’ training workshop on January 7, 2017, followed by another on April 28, 2017. The theme of the workshop was ‘A creative teacher’. The workshop’s main focus was improving teaching methods in the classroom with the intention

of feeding the mind and soul of the learners. Honouring madrasah teachers Madrasah Tul Madina is aware that despite the effort and sacrifices, madrasah teachers do not get the recognition they deserve. To address this, the madrasah will be hosting a Madrasah Teachers’ Awards Evening on Saturday, November 4, 2017. According to Moulana May, ‘We are organising this gala event to appreciate and value the sacrifices that the teachers are making for their students. There will also be a madrasah award to uplift the infrastructure of the different madrasahs.’ Further details of the event will emerge in the coming editions of Muslim Views. For further information, please contact the secretary of Madrasah Tul Madina and the Muslim Youth Forum, Moulana Muhammad Kamalie on 021 376 2827 or 081 803 8538 or email madrasahtulmadina99@gmail.com or muslimyouthforum99@gmail.com The principal of Madrasah Tul Madina, Moulana Abduragmaan May, can be contacted on 083 948 5436.

Sanzaf hosted an International Zakah Conference in Cape Town on May 5 and 6 themed ‘Zakah For Humanitarian Relief’. Distinguished international and local guests presented papers highlighting various aspects of zakaah. Seen here is Fayruz Mohammed, Sanzaf First National Deputy Chairperson, and Professor Osman Khieri, Head of the Advanced Strategic Council for the Global Union of Zakat Rite, in Sudan. His focus area at the conference highlighted ‘Zakah, The Contemporary Challenges and Opportunities of Cyber Globalisation’. Muslim Views will feature the conference in the next edition. Photo SANZAF COMMUNICATIONS

100

100

Your donation will ensure life-saving relief that will reach those in need. 1 Carnie Road, Rylands Estate, 7764, Web: Email: Cape Town, South Africa, Tel: PO Box: 38419, Gatesville 7766 Muslim Views

muslimhands.org.za mail@muslimhands.org.za 021 633 6413

Bank Details: Standard Bank, Parrow Centre Acc: 071621881 Branch Code: 031110

NPO: 005-997 PBO: 930019033

Muslim Views, May 2017  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you