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Weathering, Erosion, and Deposition QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.

Jared Rhinehart Ms . Pilcher 6A


Process of Weathering One earth process that breaks down rocks into smaller pieces is called weathering. Over time, rocks crack, crumble, and are broken apart by water and wind. Drops of water on a rock may repeatedly freeze and melt, causing the rock to crack. Water may react with some of the chemicals in a rock and cause part of the rock to break down. Rocks sometimes fall from higher places, breaking as they fall. Small animals and the roots of plants also contribute to the weathering of rock when they burrow into the ground. Weathering forms sediments that can be moved by wind and water.


Process of Erosion The movement of sediments from one place to another by water, wind, or ice is called erosion. When water erodes the earth’s surface, it cuts into the ground, forming surface channels. These channels can range from tiny depressions in the earth to huge canyons, such as the Grand Canyon. Slow and steady water erosion over long periods of time has created valuable features of the earth’s landscape such as lakes, rivers, hills, canyons, and fertile plains.


Process of Deposition When erosion carries sediments from one place to another, the sediments are left, or deposited somewhere else. This earth process is called deposition.It occurs when pieces of rock or soil settle out of flowing water or wind as they slow down. The processes of erosion and deposition are closely related because erosion moves the sediments that are eventually deposited. A delta at the mouth of a river is an example of a landform formed by deposition.


Different Types Of Erosion

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Water Erosion Water erosion starts from the chemicals in the water, and the force of the flow in the river. There are many chemicals in a river, and those chemicals can break down certain rocks, such as limestone or chalk. This eroded rock is carried through the river. Sometimes, a crack develops in the rock. When the flowing river forces against the crack, the rock can break, and be carried down the river again.

QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.

QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.


Wind Erosion Wind erosion may be small where you live, but can take quite a charge on areas of the world covered in desert. Wind erosion is when light objects such as rocks and pebbles are carried by the wind and can hit landforms, eroding materials off them, that are carried off in the wind.

QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.

QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.


Glacier Erosion Ice erosion, comes mostly in the form of glacier erosion. Glaciers are giant bodies of ice that can pick up huge pieces of rocks, some even as big as houses. A combination of the water, ice, and picked up sediment, create a powerful eroding charge.

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Different Types Of Weathering

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Mechanical Weathering Mechanical weathering takes place when rocks are broken down without any change in the chemical nature of the rocks. The rocks are torn apart by physical force, rather than chemical breakdown. The forces that break rocks down can be a large amount , and including such things as pent up energy . When great amounts of pressure build up , the results can be Mechanical Weathering .


Chemical Weathering Chemical weathering takes place in almost all types of rocks . Smaller rocks are more susceptible however , because they have a greater amount of surface area . Chemical reactions break down the bonds holding the rocks together , causing them to fall apart , forming smaller and smaller pieces . Chemical weathering is much more common in locations where there is a lot of water . This is because water is important to many of the chemical reactions that can take place . Warmer temperatures are also more friendly to chemical weathering . The most common types of chemical weathering are oxidation , hydrolysis and carbonation .


Biological Weathering Biological weathering would include the effect of animals and plants on the landscape. This is more than roots digging in and wedging rocks. Biological weathering is the actual molecular breakdown of minerals. There are things called lichens (combinations of fungi and algae) which live on rocks. Lichens slowly eat away at the surface of rocks. The amount of biological activity that breaks down minerals depends on how much life is in that area. You might find more activities like lichens near oceans where the air is humid and cooler.


Linking Sites

http :// www . geography 4 kids . com / files / l  http :// www . kidsgeo . com / geology - for - ki  http://teacher.scholastic.com/dirt/erosion/whater 


Ersosion and Deposition