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a rational approach In both WWI and WWII, many countries strictly rationed foods such as meat, sugar, butter, and canned goods. To supplement their diets, citizens were encouraged to plant so-called “Victory Gardens” and grow their own fresh fruits and vegetables. During WWII, Americans planted 20 million gardens and cultivated nearly half the nation’s vegetables in their backyards.

01. Danish Ration Stamps One sheet contains four stamps for kaffe (coffee) and twenty stamps for 1/2 kg of sukker (sugar). Both of these stamps have a pale pink background with black text. They both have possible expiration dates in 1952. 2000.264.003. Gift of Martin & Johanne Taekker. 02. U.S. War Ration Book belonging to Ebba West Stabell, about 1942. 2012.036.042. Gift of Susan Pallant. 03. OPA Red Point The U.S. Office of Price Administration issued dime-size “red point” celluloid tokens to be given in change for red ration stamps (meats and fats), and “blue point” tokens in change for blue stamps (processed foods). 2004.058.077. Gift of the Estate of Ruth Adeler Lassen Schreiber. 04. Hand Cultivator made by immigrant carpenter Fred Johnsen. 1989.021.014. Gift of Catherine Hyatt. 05. Vegetable Garden Peter Foersom Clement and a dog stand amongst a vegetable garden. 2011.013.566. Gift of Carey Snow.

74 Museum of Danish America

Profile for Museum of Danish America

america letter | SPRING 2018 + 2017 ANNUAL REPORT  

This publication is a benefit of membership in the Museum of Danish America.

america letter | SPRING 2018 + 2017 ANNUAL REPORT  

This publication is a benefit of membership in the Museum of Danish America.

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