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Burke Prize 2018 The Burke Prize is a new annual award that reinforces the Museum of Arts and Design’s (MAD) commitment to celebrating the next generation of artists working in and advancing the disciplines that shaped the American studio craft movement. Named for Marian and Russell Burke, two passionate collectors of craft and longtime supporters of MAD, the prize is an unrestricted award of $50,000 given to a professional artist age forty-five or under working in glass, fiber, clay, metal, and/or wood. The finalists for the Burke Prize were selected by a jury of professionals in the fields of art, craft, and design based on the artists’ highly accomplished work, strong use of materials, innovative processes, and conceptual rigor and relevance. The prize is accompanied by the exhibition The Burke Prize 2018: The Future of Craft, which features the sixteen finalists. The exhibition is curated by MAD’s Assistant Curator Samantha De Tillio and Assistant Manager of Curatorial Affairs Angelik Vizcarrondo-Laboy with support from Curatorial Assistant Alida Jekabson.

The Winner Cannupa Hanska Luger, Glorieta, NM The Finalists Tanya Aguiñiga, Los Angeles, CA Leonardo Benzant, Richmond Hill, NY Brittany Cox, Seattle, WA Annie Evelyn, Louisville, KY Josh Faught, San Francisco, CA Holland Houdek, Rochester, NY Merritt Johnson, Sitka, AK Heidi Lau, New York, NY Ted Lott, Cooperstown, NY Roberto Lugo, Elkins Park, PA Anna Mlasowsky, Seattle, WA Jordan Nassar, Brooklyn, NY William J. O’Brien, Chicago, IL Ibrahim Said, Greensboro, NC Olivia Valentine, Des Moines, IA The Jury Michael Radyk Director of Education, American Craft Council Editor in Chief, American Craft Inquiry Artist Jenni Sorkin Associate Professor, History of Art and Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara Namita Gupta Wiggers Director, Master of Arts in Critical and Historical Craft Studies, Warren Wilson College Director and Co-Founder, Critical Craft Forum

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Foreword The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) first opened its doors in 1956 as the Museum of Contemporary Crafts, with an original mission of recognizing American artists working in the studio craft disciplines of fiber, clay, wood, glass, and metal. From its earliest years, the Museum has celebrated the changing role of craft in its dual capacity as both noun and verb, providing a platform and support for emerging and established artists who are innovators in the field. Founder Aileen Osborn Webb was a fierce advocate for skilled makers across the United States, and a leader in positioning materials and methodologies defined as “craft” as foundational to those objects and practices described as art or design. In addition to founding the Museum and its collection, Webb supported artists across the country by launching craft institutions like the American Craft Council, the School for American Craftsmen, and the World Crafts Council. Under her leadership, MAD co-organized the landmark 1969 exhibition Objects: USA, which featured over 220 artists working in craft media and traveled to over thirty museums nationally and internationally. MAD continues Webb’s legacy and visionary support for craft with the launch of the Burke Prize, which carries our founding mission into the future. The prize is generously supported by Marian and Russell Burke, avid collectors of contemporary art, craft, decorative art, and design, whose advocacy illuminates the new voices in fiber, clay, wood, glass, and metal that are reshaping perceptions of craft and expanding its audience. For this, the inaugural year of the prize, MAD received five hundred applications from artists approaching craft from a wide range of perspectives. The formal and material innovation, material and technical fluency, and critical and historical lenses evident in these applications were astounding. Craft — however you define it — is thriving, encompassing works that are multivocal, experimental, and canny, as well as exquisite and extraordinary. As an institution we are grateful to be able to provide this support to artists working in craft, and in doing so, to highlight for cultural audiences a segment of the visual arts that has historically been marginalized in favor of other media. We believe that what the Burke Prize, and the associated exhibition of finalists, makes evident is that “craft” — as a specific set of media, an approach to making, or a lens through which to address material culture — is anything but marginal. It is in fact the platform for a decentralized, intersectional conversation, one that embraces a range of identities, histories, and politics as a powerful mode of communication. We thank the Burkes for their support; our jurors, Michael Radyk, Jenni Sorkin, and Namita Gupta Wiggers; Trustee and Chairman Emeritus Jerry Chazen, who set the prize in motion; our Assistant Manager of Curatorial Affairs, Angelik Vizcarrondo-Laboy, who managed the application process; and Angelik and our Assistant Curator Samantha De Tillio, who curated the exhibition of finalists, The Burke Prize 2018: The Future of Craft. And of course, sincere gratitude to all of the artists who applied for consideration —  thank you for sharing your work. ­ Shannon R. Stratton William and Mildred Lasdon Chief Curator

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Curatorial Statement The definition of craft — both as a term and as a field — has been in a constant state of flux throughout history, making it different now than when the Museum of Arts and Design (then the Museum of Contemporary Crafts) was founded in 1956. Yet while craft continues to expand, it remains rooted in its core disciplines — wood, glass, metal, clay, and fiber — and values, such as skilled making, community building, and activism. This dialogue between foundational traditions and evolving practices is evident in The Burke Prize 2018: The Future of Craft, an exhibition of the sixteen inaugural finalists for the Burke Prize, which continues the Museum’s mission of championing artists working in craft media and methodologies while encouraging new definitions and interpretations. The Burke Prize is a thrilling opportunity for the winner. Moreover, it provides an occasion for MAD to shine a spotlight on the breadth and variety of work being made by contemporary craft practitioners across the country. The finalists were selected for their accomplished work, innovative processes, conceptual rigor and relevance, and demonstration of fresh thinking. By bringing them together in one exhibition, the Museum celebrates the burgeoning community of artists working to make the field more inclusive, intersectional, and cross-disciplinary. The prize was awarded not for a specific work, but for overall practice. Consequently, the thirty-five artworks included in the exhibition were chosen to be indicative of their respective artists’ oeuvres and to allow for connections to be drawn between them. These artists represent diverse locations (ten states), ethnicities, races, and genders, as well as the full spectrum of craft materials, techniques, and philosophies, from the virtuosic application of craft skills to the use of new technologies. Importantly, they give insight into the current state of the field and its future: the works on view defy expectations, both technically and visually, encompassing multidisciplinary approaches, social and community projects, interventions with traditional archetypes in their respective mediums, and the incorporation of performance, digital media, and engineering or science components. One important way in which the field is progressing is through its role in today’s political climate, which makes ever clearer craft’s inherent performativity and its power to tell stories, connect deeply with viewers, and provoke dialogues between divergent groups in order to bring communities together. Exemplary of this is our first winner, Cannupa Hanska Luger, who initiated the Mirror Shield Project (2016) in response to the Dakota Access Pipeline protests at the Standing Rock Reservation, as both protest and protection for indigenous community members fighting for environmental justice, access to clean water, and the sovereignty of indigenous nations. He has continued his community-based work with Every One (2018), a beaded curtain that memorializes over four thousand cases of missing and murdered indigenous women, girls, and queer and trans people in Canada.1 In the same vein, as the founder and Director of AMBOS (Art Made Between Opposite Sides), Tanya Aguiñiga uses craft, community projects, and performance to explore binational identity along the US–Mexico border with the aim of uniting diverse communities, especially in adverse political environments. Additionally, through the incorporation of materials that connect to her Mexican home and heritage, Aguiñiga’s object-based works serve to encourage care. Similarly, Jordan Nassar, Ibrahim Said, Leonardo Benzant, and Heidi Lau address identity as it relates to migration and diasporic existence. Nassar uses his Palestinian-

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Curatorial Statement American background as a framework to create embroidery through which to examine the intricacies of cultural heritage, ownership and exchange, and emigrant nostalgia for the “homeland.” Egyptian-born Said’s intricate ceramics take direct influence from the history, forms, and principles of Egyptian pottery and Islamic art, including ideas about ritual and culture; the dominant use of geometric forms, flora, and fauna; and certain glaze chemistries and techniques. Benzant, who considers himself an urban shaman, creates hanging beaded sculptures inspired by Yoruba ceremonies to connect with his ancestors of the African diaspora, uniting more traditional spirituality and culture with a highly urbanized modern experience. Lau explores remembrance, nostalgia, and loss of home through her post-apocalyptic ceramics, inspired by the ruins of Macau, where she grew up under Portuguese colonial and later Chinese rule. She also uses spirituality, in the form of Taoist mythology and folklore, as an avenue to explore her personal heritage. Josh Faught combines textiles and fiber with found cultural objects to create multilayered works that weave together personal and social narratives exploring the history of the queer body, which has long been dismissed as excessively decorated and artificial. His use of materials also references the feminist deployment of traditionally domestic crafts during the 1970s and after. William J. O’Brien focuses on personal histories, including the tension between religion and spirituality and the experience of navigating queerness while growing up Catholic. Using intuitive practices as forms of meditation and emotional release, he creates expressive, colorful ceramics, which he then combines into installations alongside works in felt. Roberto Lugo subverts the traditional archetypes of ceramics to use the medium as a tool of protest, incorporating graffiti and portraits of people of color into conventional pottery forms and ornamentation to bring attention to erased or obscured histories. By choosing to honor and memorialize people outside of the Eurocentric cultural canon, he intervenes in history while simultaneously disrupting the art historical canon. Likewise, Merritt Johnson rewrites indigenous and colonial histories through sculptural baskets that resemble artifacts on view in natural history and ethnographic museums, highlighting the complicated relationship between indigenous craft and its collection and display by art institutions. Not surprisingly, many of the artists in the exhibition create work that interfaces with ideas of craft, skill, and technology, both old and new. Brittany Cox, Olivia Valentine, and Ted Lott all use, reference, or upturn traditional craft techniques. Cox, an antiquarian horologist, has devoted her practice to mastering specialized metalworking and engineering techniques to create mechanized musical objects and automata. Her most recent work is inspired by medieval bestiary and marginalia. Valentine uses the historical medium of lace to produce large-scale, site-specific installations that investigate the threshold between interior and exterior space in relation to architecture and the body. Lott, too, explores the intersection between the body and architecture, personal and public, through his conflation of material culture and architectural models. His work celebrates traditional cabinetry while encouraging viewers to contemplate how the objects around them influence and narrate our personal and collective histories. Holland Houdek and Anna Mlasowsky are turning to science and technology to expand their definitions of craft. Houdek combines traditional metalworking techniques

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Curatorial Statement using the new technology of medical implants, which she receives through partnerships with various medical companies, to create contemporary memento mori that encourage contemplation of the fragility and mortality of the human body. Mlasowsky makes the ephemeral tangible by visually recording the vibrations of singular frequencies in glass plates; she then combines the recordings into a composition that she pairs with the hanging glass pieces to create an immersive installation. Similarly, Annie Evelyn creates unconventionally upholstered seating that draws new relationships between furniture and the body. Altering traditional upholstering techniques, she makes steel, cement, wood, and other hard materials “soft” and flexible, such that the sitter’s body sinks into the surface in the same way traditional upholstery allows. Together, these artists illustrate the diversity of practice contained within the contemporary craft field. While the exhibition is not divided thematically, we hope that the connecting threads, outlined here, will unfold organically as visitors experience the space and the artworks, prompting them to consider what the future of craft means to them now, and its potential in years to come. Samantha De Tillio Assistant Curator

Angelik Vizcarrondo-Laboy Assistant Manager of Curatorial Affairs

1. Patty Hajdu, Canada’s Minister of Status of Women from November 2015 until January 2017, has said that the government does not have an exact count, but pointed to research from the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) that put the number of missing and murdered indigenous women at four thousand as of 2016 (John Paul Tasker, “Confusion Reigns over Number of Missing, Murdered Indigenous Women,” CBC News, February 16, 2016, accessed

August 15, 2018, http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/mmiw-4000hajdu-1.3450237). For the original research, see the NWAC website, https://www.nwac.ca/national-inquiry-mmiwg/understandingmmiwg/. Luger embeds the queer and trans narrative into this project to bring awareness to the lack of data collection for the indigenous LGBTQ+ community, who are impacted at comparably alarming rates.

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2018 Winner


2018 Winner

Cannupa Hanska Luger

United States, born 1979; lives in Glorieta, New Mexico

Cannupa Hanska Luger is a multidisciplinary artist of Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota, Austrian, and Norwegian descent. Through monumental installations that incorporate ceramics, video, sound, fiber, steel, and cut paper, he interweaves performance and political action to communicate stories about twenty-first-century indigeneity. Using social collaboration in response to timely and site-specific issues, Luger produces multipronged projects that often present a call to action, provoking diverse publics to engage with indigenous peoples and values outside the lens of colonial social structuring. He lectures and participates in residencies around the globe, and his work is collected internationally.

Every One, 2018. Over 4,000 clay beads, 192 × 156 × 3 in. (487.7 × 396.2 × 7.6 cm)

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2018 Winner

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2018 Winner

Top: Water Serpent performance in association with the Mirror Shield Project at Oceti Sakowin camp, Standing Rock Reservation, North Dakota, 2016

Bottom: Documentary image of the Mirror Shield Project at Oceti Sakowin camp, Standing Rock Reservation, North Dakota, 2016

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Juror Statement Cannupa Hanska Luger combines social collaboration with craft to profound and enlightening effect. Empowered by the indigenous American experience, his objects, sculptures, actions, and collaborations are provocative and visually impactful. His storytelling and narratives, like his objects, are richly executed and have driven him out of the studio into the world, ready to mobilize, with an urgent sense of purpose. In the 2017 exhibition Neo Native: Toward New Mythologies at the Sam and Alfreda Maloof Foundation for Arts and Crafts, Luger’s work included objects and sculptural installations created by the artist between 2013 and 2017. Beautifully curated by Navajo painter Tony Abeyta, Neo Native brought together eleven artists with indigenous American tribal affiliations, including ceramists, painters, glass artists, printmakers, and sculptors. The exhibition celebrated the visionary work of contemporary artists whose practices are influenced by traditions in tribal and indigenous cultures. Especially satisfying was Abeyta’s selection of works by Luger, which included I Love You to Death (2013), After the Fall (2014), Inside Man (2015), At What Cost: Extraction (2016), and Never Neverland (2017), spotlighting the artist’s interest in cultural mythologies that reflect and illuminate contemporary society. Combining an incredible use of materials — clay, fiber, paper, wood, metal — with skill, craft, humor, intellect, and social commentary, Luger communicates multiple messages and an indigenous agenda. With his recent social engagement projects, Mirror Shield Project (2016) and Every One (2018), he is bringing groups together through a series of calls to action, DIY projects, sculptural installations, and videos. When you view the images with the mirrored shields reflecting, spiraling, moving in the landscape, you are transported to Standing Rock. You sense beauty, humanity, and inclusion. With both of these projects, you are reminded how artists can be the reflective points for change. You are shown how craft can be an avenue for skill sharing and progressive preservation, a lens through which to tell important, intriguing stories about the past, present, and future — a means to focus on transformation. But in the end, it is the artist’s motivation to reclaim and redefine what it means to be an indigenous maker in the twentyfirst century that my brain and heart keep coming back to. Luger writes: I define craft differently than most institutions or craft practitioners. My exposure to the notion of craft is colored by my Indigeneity. The process of surviving in the world as an Indigenous maker is unlike the survival of other craftspeople; the preservation of our people feels urgent and is deeply tied to the survival of our craft traditions. With the Burke Prize and associated exhibition at the Museum of Arts and Design bolstering his passionate devotion to his practice and his enduring belief in art, Cannupa Hanska Luger

will continue to produce installations, objects, and performances that address stereotypes, question capitalism, and inspire social and community engagement. Thank you to the Museum, its board, the curatorial team, and my fellow jurors for their work on the prize. Many thanks to Marian and Russell Burke for their support in the establishment of this prize. Michael Radyk Director of Education, American Craft Council, and Editor in Chief, American Craft Inquiry

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Juror Statement

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the works of Mexican-American artist Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Cannupa Hanska Luger is an artist engaged in craft as a who has also explored the hybridity of past and future, blending community endeavor. He uses materials associated with his indigenous Mandan (and Hidatsa, Arikara, and Lakota) heritage — Mexicanist tropes with techno-futuristic gear as a means of creating a fantastical and ironic warrior who is impervious to beadwork, ceramics, welding, weaving — and enlarges these the pain of exploitation, humiliation, and degradation. labor-intensive, often exquisitely human-scaled practices so that The art world is seeing a strong resurgence of work rooted skill becomes a way to convey a story about the power of resistance. in identity. Formally, I would designate this resurgence as The results are large community-driven events, performances, “second wave” identity politics, distinct from the cultural wars and installations, which often involve people who have banded of the late 1980s and early 1990s. While “first wave” artists together toward a greater cause. His works are socially engaged were invested in institutional recognition and the critique of and politically astute, seeking to heighten awareness and social and political structures, their artistic materials were expose the general public to the perils of industrial extraction largely lens-based: photography, video, performance. Craft was and exploitation of sovereign indigenous lands, wastefulness and overlooked entirely: works imbued with material rigor and pollution, indigenous displacement, and a host of centuries-old skilled making were not considered suitable for institutional issues related to the cultural destruction and colonization of critique. I see the Burke Prize as privileging object-making indigenous nations throughout the United States and Canada. in an era when sculpture, installation, and craft have lost their Craft has historically been modified by “studio” — as in distinctive categorization. Luger’s work troubles the dominant “studio craft” — but these terms, over the last thirty years, have narrative of identity politics by engaging in skill sharing, or become uncoupled. And rightly so. As a postwar history, studio re-skilling, creating hybrid craft forms as a way to ensure the craft has privileged white, middle-class, and largely male artists. survival of indigenous traditions into the future. It has favored certain programs and lineages, and sustained a genealogy of master craftsmen — emphasis on men. American studio craft has a deep and difficult history of cultural appropriaJenni Sorkin tion, sustaining its forms with traditions that are borrowed, Associate Professor, History of Art and Architecture, stolen, and appropriated from the poor, the indigenous, and University of California, Santa Barbara people of color whose own systems of production were destroyed or altered by colonization. Engaged in multimedia craft practices, Luger’s work stands out as a form of pointed opposition, creating a space for the urgency of making indigenous crafts and its future endurance. His best-known work, Mirror Shield Project (2016), served as a communal protest at the Standing Rock Reservation against the Dakota Access Pipeline, then in construction, which now crosses Luger’s home state of North Dakota, the sacred tribal land of the Mandan people. Standing Rock saw months-long protests and encampments by environmentalists in solidarity with the local indigenous population, as there is a very real fear that the region’s water supply and land will become poisoned by the pipeline, with its propensity for spills over such a great distance (the Keystone Pipeline leaked 210,000 gallons of crude oil in South Dakota in 2017). Using Mylar and Masonite, Luger made mirrored shields that functioned simultaneously as quasiriot gear and as a reflective surface, meant to replicate the number of protesters and literally hold a mirror for the world to see the massive outrage and support. Mirror Shield is also a sly reference to Robert Smithson’s Mirror Displacements, appropriating the concept of formal material displacement and reapplying it to the indigenous community living around the site of the pipeline, which has already been subjected to centuries of physical and psychic displacement. Luger’s costume-driven performance The One Who Checks & The One Who Balances (2018–) is a form of speculative Native futurism, in which quasi-indigenous regalia is festooned with cozy afghan squares and riot gear. It strongly reminds me of


Juror Statement Never underestimate the power of an unrestricted award to an artist. The Burke Prize offers exactly that, granting $50,000 to a professional artist age forty-five or under, with no stipulations for how it must be used. This is a gift, both transformational and rare. While there are awards in the United States that offer comparable funding to visual artists, few of these address work created through the use of traditional craft materials — clay, wood, glass, fiber, and metal. The establishment of this prize by the Museum of Arts and Design, the nation’s leading museum dedicated to contemporary craft, attests to the vitality of craft in the twenty-first century. This is an exciting and pivotal moment in the history of the field. The craftscape in the United States is expansive, rich with a multiplicity of materials, processes, concepts, forms, histories, and heritages. The submissions for this inaugural award were strong in terms of breadth and depth, comprising a range of material and physical explorations. Collectively, the work we reviewed conveys myriad connections: between craft and humanity, culture, and social change; between the present and the past; between individuals and our shared and divergent surroundings, the environment, and our personal histories. Overall, the submissions reveal craft’s ongoing capacity to effect change as much as it changes with each generation. Cannupa Hanska Luger’s work exemplifies the complexity of craft today. It calls attention to what is made as much as how and why and by whom. Here, craft remains connected to specific material-driven or object-centric histories while catalyzing critical inquiry into all forms of human production. Luger simultaneously addresses cultural loss and cultural sustenance, memory and interpretation, concrete form and craft as action. In a world wrought with conflict, he illuminates the strength and unity that come through craft’s capacity to engage communities, empower participation, and flourish in contexts within and outside of the museum setting. Jurying awards is an honor and a privilege. Participating on this panel was an especially rewarding experience, well managed by the team at MAD, whose unseen labor moved artists through submissions and a seamless jurying process, into a beautifully curated exhibition and documentation in this publication. The connections established through this process, between the Museum and all the artists who courageously shared their work, will continue to bolster the field. Craft bears a long past, and an exciting, perpetually morphing future; the Burke Prize brings this into view. Namita Gupta Wiggers Director, Master of Arts in Critical and Historical Craft Studies, Warren Wilson College, and Director and Co-Founder, Critical Craft Forum

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Juror Bios Michael Radyk is the Director of Education for the American Craft Council and Editor in Chief of the journal American Craft Inquiry, as well as an artist who has focused his practice on both industrial and hand weaving. Radyk received his MFA from Rhode Island School of Design and developed his interest in education while studying at RISD and Brown University’s Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning. He has spent the last ten years exhibiting his work, producing both handwoven and jacquard textiles and sculptures, and teaching at various institutions. His approach incorporates and reflects multilayered sources of inspiration, meaning, metaphor, and research. Radyk’s work is included in the textile collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art, and he has exhibited throughout the United States and internationally. Upcoming shows include the 2019 invitational biennial exhibition at the International Fiber Art Fair, Seoul Arts Center, South Korea. Jenni Sorkin is an Associate Professor of Contemporary Art History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who writes on the intersection between gender, craft, material culture, and contemporary art. The recipient of a PhD in the History of Art from Yale University, she has been awarded fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Henry Luce Foundation, and the Getty Research Institute. In 2016 she co-curated, with Paul Schimmel, Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016, the inaugural exhibition at Hauser & Wirth in Los Angeles. Sorkin is the author of Live Form: Women, Ceramics, and Community (University of Chicago Press, 2016), which examines American postwar ceramics practices through the lens of gender. She sits on the editorial board of the Journal of Modern Craft, and publishes and lectures widely. Namita Gupta Wiggers is the Director of the newly launched Master of Arts in Critical and Historical Craft Studies at Warren Wilson College, North Carolina, as well as co-founder and Director of the Critical Craft Forum, an online and on‑ site platform for dialogue and exchange. Wiggers has taught courses on contemporary craft and theory, the history of graphic design, curating through craft, and theory of objects. As Curator and Director of the Museum of Contemporary Craft between 2004 and 2014, she curated and organized more than sixty-five exhibitions and hundreds of programs, and commissioned critical writing for online and print projects. Wiggers is a member of the Board of Directors of Haystack Mountain School of Crafts and the Exhibition Reviews Editor for the Journal of Modern Craft, and she serves on the editorial boards of Garland and Norwegian Crafts. She edited A Companion to Contemporary Craft (Wiley-Blackwell, forthcoming) and is collaborating with Benjamin Lignel on a research project on gender and adornment.

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Finalists


Finalist

Tanya Aguiñiga

United States, born 1978; lives in Los Angeles, California

Lanose Hollow, 2017. Self-drying clay and alpaca, 7 ½ × 12 ½ × 14 in. (19.1 × 31.8 × 35.6 cm)

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An artist, designer, and craftsperson raised in Tijuana, Mexico, Tanya Aguiñiga holds an MFA in Furniture Design from Rhode Island School of Design and a BA from San Diego State University. In her formative years she created various collaborative installations with the Border Art Workshop, an artist collective that engages the languages of activism and community-based public art. In her current work, she uses craft as a performative medium to generate dialogues about identity, culture, and gender while creating community. Aguiñiga is the founder and Director of AMBOS (Art Made Between Opposite Sides), an ongoing series of artist interventions and commuter collaborations that address binational transition and identity in the US–Mexico border regions.


Finalist

Leonardo Benzant

United States, born 1972; lives in Richmond Hill, New York

The Chameleon’s Journey: Galveston (with detail), 2017. Textiles, string, monofilament, leather, acrylic, gel medium, glass seed beads, and miscellaneous, 70 × 47 × 12 in. (177.8 × 119.4 × 30.5 cm)

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Born in New York City to Dominican parents, with Haitian heritage on his mother’s side, Leonardo Benzant attended Pratt Institute. His work is included in several important private collections and was recently acquired by the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture, Charlotte, North Carolina. He has exhibited at Aljira: A Center for Contemporary Art, Newark, and the Third Line, Dubai. A recent artist-in-residence at Galveston Artist Residency, Benzant is a 2017 recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant.


Finalist

Brittany Cox

United States, born 1985; lives in Seattle, Washington

Cochlea (Snail), 2018. Brass, steel, sterling silver, cocobolo, and shagreen, snail: 2 ¼ × 4 × 2 ½ in. (5.7 × 10.2 × 6.4 cm), base: 1 ½ × 4 ¾ × 4 ¾ in. (3.8 × 12.1 × 12.1 cm)

Brittany Cox is an antiquarian horologist, guillocheur, ornamental turner, and scholar. The recipient of a Master’s in the Conservation of Clocks and Related Dynamic Objects from West Dean College, she also holds WOSTEP, CW21, and SAWTA watchmaking certifications and two clock-making certifications. In 2015 she opened Memoria Technica, an independent workshop where she teaches, practices guilloche, creates new works, and specializes in the conservation of automata, mechanical magic, mechanical music, and complicated clocks and watches. She is currently at work on a manuscript for Penguin Press.

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Finalist

Annie Evelyn

United States, born 1976; lives in Louisville, Kentucky

Blue Scotty, 2015. Powder-coated aluminum, 19 × 32 × 19 in. (48.3 × 81.3 × 48.3 cm), in collaboration with Scotty Albrecht

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Annie Evelyn received both her BFA and MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. Joy, laughter, and the unexpected are at the heart of her work. Using furniture’s inherent interactive qualities and relationships to the human body, she sets out to invent new and surprising tactile experiences with a wide range of materials, from handmade paper flowers to Swarovski crystals. The 2016 recipient of the John D. Mineck Furniture Fellowship, Evelyn has been a resident artist at the Penland School of Crafts, the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and the Indiana University of Pennsylvania Wood Center.


Finalist

Josh Faught

United States, born 1979; lives in San Francisco, California

Between a Rock and a Hard Place, 2017. Hand-dyed, handwoven hemp, jacquard-woven cotton, and carnival flair on linen, 108 × 70 × 2 in. (274.3 × 177.8 × 5.1 cm)

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Josh Faught’s studio practice has triangulated spaces between personal history, sociopolitical history, and the history of textiles. Faught has had solo exhibitions at venues including the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis; Kendall Koppe, Glasgow; Lisa Cooley, New York; and the Neptune Society Columbarium, San Francisco, where he created a site-specific installation as part of the SFMOMA 2013 SECA Art Award exhibition. His work has appeared in numerous group exhibitions, including at the New Museum, New York; Casas Riegner, Bogotá; Sadie Coles HQ, London; Saatchi Gallery, London; and the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. He is an associate professor and the Chair of Textiles at California College of the Arts in San Francisco and Oakland.


Finalist

Holland Houdek

United States, born 1985; lives in Rochester, New York

Spinal Disc Replacement — Mr. Chalmers, 2013. Copper, nickel plating, and X-ray, 1 × 2 × 2 in. (2.5 × 5.1 × 5.1 cm)

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Holland Houdek holds an MFA from Syracuse University and a BFA from the University of Wisconsin–Stout. Her work focuses on medical implants, the body, and embodied experience. She has exhibited in museums and galleries throughout the world and is widely published. The recipient of numerous awards, Houdek is a former resident of the John Michael Kohler Arts/ Industry program, among others. Working closely with the medical industry through her five “Implants Series,” she has formed partnerships with organizations including the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, MedWish International, and Cleveland Clinic. She is an assistant professor at Nazareth College in Rochester, New York.


Finalist

Merritt Johnson

United States, born 1977; lives in Sitka, Alaska

Door between worlds (Animal), 2018. Handwoven palm fiber, 9 1/2 × 7 1/2 × 6 1/2 in. (24.1 × 19.1 × 16.5 cm)

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Merritt Johnson earned her BFA from Carnegie Mellon University and her MFA from MassArt. Her work navigates spaces between bodies and the body politic, between land and culture rooted in and dependent on Anowarakowa Kawennote (Turtle Island). She has seen and felt the effects of the tongues, knives, and pens that cut apart land, culture, sex, and communities; she responds by creating works that build connection and vision. Her work casts light and shadow on how and who we are, and on how and who we could be.


Finalist

Heidi Lau

United States, born 1987; lives in New York, New York

The Sleepwalker, 2016/18. Ceramic, glaze, and hand-marbled paper, 108 × 70 × 24 in. (274.3 × 177.8 × 61 cm)

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Heidi Lau grew up in Macau, and currently works in Queens. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, in venues including the Macau Museum of Art; AIKE, Shanghai; the Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York; the Museum of Chinese in America, New York; Asya Geisberg Gallery, New York; Geary, New York; and The Hole, New York. Lau’s practice has been supported by numerous residencies and awards, including the Emerging Artist Fellowship at Socrates Sculpture Park, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Emergency Grant, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Process Space, the Martin Wong Foundation Scholarship, and the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant.


Finalist

Ted Lott

United States, born 1979; lives in Cooperstown, New York

A craftsperson, designer, and artist whose work engages the history of wood in material culture and architecture, Ted Lott received his MFA from the University of Wisconsin– Madison. Solo exhibitions include shows at the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Deer Isle, Maine; Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania; and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte College of Arts + Architecture. He has been an artist-in-residence at Anderson Ranch Arts Center, the John Michael Kohler Arts/Industry program, Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, the Center for Turning and Furniture Design, and Vermont Studio Center. Lott has taught at numerous colleges and universities and instructs workshops at craft schools throughout the country.

Carpenter Gothic #2, 2018. Eastern white pine, found objects, and electrical components, 85 × 19 × 21 in. (215.9 × 48.3 × 53.3 cm)

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Finalist

Roberto Lugo

United States, born 1981; lives in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania

Colin and a Queen, 2018. Earthenware and china paint, 11 × 6 1/2 × 17 in. (27.9 × 16.5 × 43.2 cm)

Roberto Lugo is an American artist, ceramist, social activist, spoken-word poet, and educator. He uses porcelain as his medium of choice, illuminating its aristocratic surface with imagery of poverty, inequality, and social and racial injustice. Lugo’s works are multicultural mashups, traditional European and Asian porcelain forms and techniques reimagined with a twenty-first-century street sensibility. His work is in the permanent collections of institutions including the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia; the Columbus Museum of Art, Columbus, Ohio; and the Chipstone Foundation, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In 2018, the Ceramic Arts Network named him Ceramic Artist of the Year.

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Finalist

Anna Mlasowsky

Germany, born 1984; lives in Seattle, Washington

Resonance, 2011–13. Glass, audio, and electronic components, 236 ₁/₅ × 118 ¹1/1₀₀ × 157 ¹²/₂₅ in. (599.9 × 300 × 400 cm). Sound by Edmund Campion, Professor of Music Composition and Director at the Center for New Music and Audio Technologies at the University of California, Berkeley

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Anna Mlasowsky holds a BA in Glass from the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts and an MFA in Sculpture from the University of Washington. In 2017 she received an Artist Trust Fellowship, a Centrum Emerging Artist Residency, and the Irvin Borowsky International Prize in Glass Arts Juror’s Award, and she was a shortlist artist for the American Craft Council’s Emerging Voices Award. Her work is included in the collections of the Corning Museum of Glass (CMoG), the European Museum of Modern Glass, and the Glasmuseum Ebeltoft, Denmark. Mlasowsky recently completed the Specialty Glass Residency at CMoG and a residency at Sculpture Space.


Finalist

Jordan Nassar

United States, born 1985; lives in Brooklyn, New York

Scatter Them In Forest and Meadow, 2018. Hand-embroidered cotton on cotton, 22 × 22 in. (55.9 × 55.9 cm)

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Jordan Nassar’s hand-embroidered textile works address an intersecting field of language, ethnicity, and the embedded notions of heritage and homeland. Treating craft within its capacity as a communicative form, Nassar examines conflicting issues of identity and cultural participation using geometric patterning adapted from Islamic symbols present in traditional Palestinian hand embroidery. He has had solo exhibitions at venues including Frieze New York, with Anat Ebgi; Anat Ebgi, Los Angeles; Artport Tel Aviv; and Evelyn Yard, London. Recent group exhibitions include shows at the Katonah Museum of Art, New York; Abrons Art Center, New York; and Supportico Lopez, Berlin. Upcoming solo exhibitions include shows at the Center for Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv, and The Third Line, Dubai.


Finalist

William J. O’Brien

United States, born 1975; lives in Chicago, Illinois

Untitled, 2015. Ceramic and glaze, 13 × 20 × 13 in. (33 × 50.8 × 33 cm)

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William J. O’Brien’s art is born out of an improvised and intuitive studio practice, rich in material experimentation. Through drawing, painting, sculpture, and ceramics, O’Brien explores the traditional and historical applications of materials, but also employs play to refute such definitive uses. He has exhibited internationally; major exhibitions include shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Louisville; the Renaissance Society, Chicago; and the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Wisconsin. He is an Associate Professor of Ceramics at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.


Finalist

Ibrahim Said

Egypt, born 1976; lives in Greensboro, North Carolina

Devotion, 2018. White earthenware and glaze, 63 × 21 × 26 in. (160 × 53.3 × 66 cm)

Ibrahim Said grew up among the narrow streets, pottery ovens, and noisy workshops of Fustat, an area in Cairo that has etched its name in the history of the pottery industry since the Islamic conquest. His father, a potter, became his first teacher, and the rich cultural heritage of Egypt became his second. Said’s work is included in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Michigan; Bait al-Baranda, Muscat, Oman; the Museum of Modern Egyptian Art, Cairo; and the Kuwait Islamic Arts Center, Kuwait City.

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Finalist

Olivia Valentine

United States, born 1979; lives in Des Moines, Iowa

50mm Lens at 22 ½ feet (State Street, Chicago), 2010/14. String and plexiglass rod, 108 × 270 × 2 in. (274.3 × 685.8 × 5.1 cm)

Olivia Valentine is an interdisciplinary visual artist working primarily in textile construction, creating architecturalscale textile installations and collaborative projects that span a variety of media and disciplines. She received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her BFA from Rhode Island School of Design. The recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship for Installation Art and a Brandford/ Elliott Award for Excellence in Fiber Art, she has exhibited her work internationally. Valentine is an Assistant Professor of Art and Visual Culture at Iowa State University.

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Exhibition Checklist

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Tanya Aguiñiga Agape, 2017 Self-drying clay and alpaca 5 × 8 × 7 in. (12.7 × 20.3 × 17.8 cm) Courtesy the artist and Volume Gallery, Chicago

Josh Faught Between a Rock and a Hard Place, 2017 Hand-dyed, handwoven hemp, jacquard-woven cotton, and carnival flair on linen 108 × 70 × 2 in. (274.3 × 177.8 × 5.1 cm) Courtesy the artist

Tanya Aguiñiga Cleft Lingam, 2017 Self-drying clay and alpaca 14 × 3 1/2 × 3 1/2 in. (35.6 × 8.9 × 8.9 cm) Courtesy the artist and Volume Gallery, Chicago

Holland Houdek Spinal Disc Replacement — Mr. Chalmers, 2013 Copper, nickel plating, and X-ray 1 × 2 × 2 in. (2.5 × 5.1 × 5.1 cm) Courtesy the artist

Tanya Aguiñiga Lanose Hollow, 2017 Self-drying clay and alpaca 7 1/2 × 12 1/2 × 14 in. (19.1 × 31.8 × 35.6 cm) Courtesy the artist and Volume Gallery, Chicago

Holland Houdek Reconstructive Uterine Cavity, 2014 Copper, Swarovski crystals, and patina 7 3/4 × 6 1/4 × 1 1/4 in. (19.7 × 15.9 × 3.2 cm) Courtesy the artist

Leonardo Benzant The Chameleon’s Journey: Galveston, 2017 Textiles, string, monofilament, leather, acrylic, gel medium, glass seed beads, and miscellaneous 70 × 47 × 12 in. (177.8 × 119.4 × 30.5 cm) Courtesy the artist

Merritt Johnson Container (trade object), 2016 Handwoven palm fiber and dentalium shells 6 × 10 × 6 in. (15.2 × 25.4 × 15.2 cm) Courtesy the artist

Brittany Cox Cochlea (Snail), 2018 Brass, steel, sterling silver, cocobolo, and shagreen snail: 2 1/4 × 4 × 2 1/2 in. (5.7 × 10.2 × 6.4 cm) base: 1 1/2 × 4 3/4 × 4 3/4 in. (3.8 × 12.1 × 12.1 cm) Courtesy the artist

Merritt Johnson Door between worlds (Animal), 2018 Handwoven palm fiber 9 1/2 × 7 1/2 × 6 1/2 in. (24.1 × 19.1 × 16.5 cm) Courtesy the artist

Annie Evelyn Nest, 2017 Vintage jewelry findings, leather, and foam 32 × 36 × 36 in. (81.3 × 91.4 × 91.4 cm) Courtesy the artist

Heidi Lau The Gate and its Keeper, 2016/18 Ceramic, glaze, and hand-marbled paper 38 × 50 × 19 in. (96.5 × 127 × 48.3 cm) Courtesy the artist

Annie Evelyn Collaboration with Scotty Albrecht Blue Scotty, 2015 Powder-coated aluminum 19 × 32 × 19 in. (48.3 × 81.3 × 48.3 cm) Courtesy the artist

Heidi Lau The Sleepwalker, 2016/18 Ceramic, glaze, and hand-marbled paper 108 × 70 × 24 in. (274.3 × 177.8 × 61 cm) Courtesy the artist


Exhibition Checklist

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Ted Lott Carpenter Gothic #2, 2018 Eastern white pine, found objects, and electrical components 85 × 19 × 21 in. (215.9 × 48.3 × 53.3 cm) Courtesy the artist

Jordan Nassar Between Sky and Earth, 2018 Hand-embroidered cotton on cotton 34 × 27 in. (86.4 × 68.6 cm) Courtesy the Kamel Lazaar Foundation, Tunisia

Cannupa Hanska Luger Mirror Shield Project: Mirror Shield, 2016 Plywood, Mylar, and rope 48 × 16 × 1/8 in. (121.9 × 40.6 × 0.3 cm) Courtesy the artist

Jordan Nassar The Green Paths Your Alleys, 2018 Hand-embroidered cotton on cotton 20 × 20 in. (50.8 × 50.8 cm) Courtesy the Kamel Lazaar Foundation, Tunisia

Cannupa Hanska Luger Mirror Shield Project: Water Serpent, 2016 Video, TRT 00:03:12 Edited by Sheila Regan Organization support and drone operation by Rory Wakemup Financial support provided by Forecast Public Art Courtesy Sheila Regan

Jordan Nassar Scatter Them In Forest and Meadow, 2018 Hand-embroidered cotton on cotton 22 × 22 in. (55.9 × 55.9 cm) Private collection of Tansa Mermerci Ekşioğlu

Cannupa Hanska Luger Every One, 2018 Over 4,000 clay beads 192 × 156 × 3 in. (487.7 × 396.2 × 7.6 cm) Courtesy the artist

Jordan Nassar Whose Door Is the Morning Mist, 2018 Hand-embroidered cotton on cotton 21 × 21 in. (53.3 × 53.3 cm) Private collection

Roberto Lugo Colin and a Queen, 2018 Earthenware and china paint 11 × 6 1/2 × 17 in. (27.9 × 16.5 × 43.2 cm) Courtesy Wexler Gallery, Philadelphia

William J. O’Brien Untitled, 2014 Felt on felt 71 1/4 × 71 1/2 in. (181 × 181.6 cm) Courtesy the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago

Roberto Lugo Pulitzer: Kendrick and Gwendolyn, 2018 Earthenware and china paint 14 × 14 × 25 in. (35.6 × 35.6 × 63.5 cm) Courtesy Wexler Gallery, Philadelphia

William J. O’Brien Untitled, 2014 Ceramic and glaze 19 × 16 × 16 in. (48.3 × 40.6 × 40.6 cm) Courtesy the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago

Anna Mlasowsky Resonance, 2011–13 Glass, audio, and electronic components 236 1/5 × 118 1/1₀₀ × 157 ¹²/₂₅ in. (599.9 × 300 × 400 cm) Sound by Edmund Campion, Professor of Music Composition and Director at the Center for New Music and Audio Technologies at the University of California, Berkeley Courtesy the artist

William J. O’Brien Untitled, 2015 Ceramic and glaze 13 × 20 × 13 in. (33 × 50.8 × 33 cm) Courtesy the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago


Exhibition Checklist William J. O’Brien Untitled, 2016 Ceramic and glaze 25 × 29 × 11 1/2 in. (63.5 × 73.7 × 29.2 cm) Courtesy the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago

William J. O’Brien Untitled, 2017 Ceramic and glaze 13 × 10 × 10 in. (33 × 25.4 × 25.4 cm) Courtesy the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago

William J. O’Brien Untitled, 2017 Ceramic and glaze 24 × 21 × 16 in. (61 × 53.3 × 40.6 cm) Courtesy the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago

William J. O’Brien Untitled, 2017 Ceramic and glaze 24 × 9 1/2 × 9 1/2 in. (61 × 24.1 × 24.1 cm) Courtesy the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago

Ibrahim Said Devotion, 2018 White earthenware and glaze 63 × 21 × 26 in. (160 × 53.3 × 66 cm) Courtesy the artist

Ibrahim Said Minaret, 2015 Earthenware and glaze 35 1/2 × 7 × 7 in. (90.2 × 17.8 × 17.8 cm) Courtesy the artist

Olivia Valentine 50mm Lens at 22 ½ feet (State Street, Chicago), 2010/14 String and plexiglass rod 108 × 270 × 2 in. (274.3 × 685.8 × 5.1 cm) Courtesy the artist

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Image Credits 8 – 9

Cannupa Hanska Luger Headshot: Photo by Zachary C. Pearson, courtesy the artist. Artwork: Photo courtesy the artist and the University of Colorado, Galleries of Contemporary Art, Colorado Springs

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Artwork (top): Photo by drone operator Rory Wakemup, courtesy the artist. Artwork (bottom): Photo by Rob Wilson Photography, courtesy the artist

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Tanya Aguiñiga Headshot: Photo courtesy the artist. Artwork: Photo courtesy Volume Gallery, Chicago

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Leonardo Benzant Headshot: Photo by Kalalea, courtesy the artist. Artwork: Photo courtesy the artist

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Brittany Cox Headshot and artwork: Photo courtesy the artist

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Annie Evelyn Headshot: Photo courtesy the artist. Artwork: Photo by Mercedes Jelinek, courtesy the artist

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Josh Faught Headshot and artwork: Photo by John Wilson White, courtesy the artist

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Holland Houdek Headshot: Photo courtesy the artist. Artwork: Photo by Tom Burazin, courtesy the artist

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Merritt Johnson Headshot and artwork: Photo courtesy the artist

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Heidi Lau Headshot: Photo by Jeremy Sachs-Michaels, courtesy the artist. Artwork: Photo courtesy the artist and Deli Gallery, New York

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Ted Lott Headshot and artwork: Photo courtesy the artist

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Roberto Lugo Headshot and artwork: Photo by Jewellea Photography, courtesy Wexler Gallery, Philadelphia

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Anna Mlasowsky Headshot and artwork: Photo courtesy the artist

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Jordan Nassar Headshot: Photo courtesy the artist. Artwork: Photo courtesy Anat Ebgi, Los Angeles

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William J. O’Brien Headshot and artwork: Photo courtesy the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, and Shane Campbell Gallery, Chicago

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Ibrahim Said Headshot: Photo courtesy the artist. Artwork: Photo by Daniel Smith, courtesy the artist

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Olivia Valentine Headshot and artwork: Photo courtesy the artist

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Acknowledgments It has been a great joy to curate the inaugural year of the Burke Prize, and to work with so many incredible artists and jurors across the country. We thank them sincerely for their graciousness, enthusiasm, and dedication to our process. We are immensely grateful to Marian and Russell Burke, whose support made this prize possible, further demonstrating their commitment to craft and the Museum of Arts and Design. We thank Trustee and Chairman Emeritus Jerry Chazen for his foresight in establishing the prize, and Shannon R. Stratton, William and Mildred Lasdon Chief Curator, for leading the project with her vision, as well as for her confidence in and support of our curatorial endeavors. We would like to thank Curatorial Assistant Alida Jekabson for her valuable support on this exhibition. Many people at MAD played a crucial role in the realization of the exhibition and catalogue, and we would like to thank them all sincerely here: Chris Scoates, Nanette L. Laitman Director; Elissa Auther, Windgate Research and Collections Curator; Barbara Paris Gifford, Assistant Curator; Ellen Holdorf, Director of Collections Management; Carla Hernandez, Associate Registrar for Exhibitions; Derya Kovey, Associate Registrar for Exhibitions; Andrea Wood, Freelance Registrar; Emily Clayton, Freelance Registrar; Rachel Steinberg, Freelance Registrar; Hendrik Gerrits, Director of Exhibitions; Willow Holdorf, Manager of Exhibitions; Joshua Graver, Lead Designer; Betsy Tsai, Freelance Graphic Designer; Nathan Bennett, Head Preparator; Duncan Cutler, Audiovisual Coordinator; the art handling team: Tisch Abelow, Chris Alzapiedi, Daniel Arthurs, Alex Barry, Alex Branch, Liz Brown, Patrick Cadenhead, Michael Caines, Brian Caverly, Johnny Coast, Rob Deeds, Graham Durward, Jim Ebersole, Nate Gettings, Jim Isherwood, Jun Ishida, Nuno Marques, Josh Nierodzinski, Sasha Nixon, Anna Parisi, David Roesing, Peter Schenck, Christine Wong Yap, and fabricator Wyatt Nash; Claire Laporte, Chief External Affairs Officer; Arzoo Hansen, Communications Manager; Christina Allan, Communications Associate; Cathleen Lewis, Vice President of Education and Programs; Lydia Brawner, Manager of Public Programs; Petra Pankow, Manager of Education Programs; Marissa Passi, Coordinator of Public Programs; Julia Maranto, Coordinator of Youth Programs; Owen Duffy, Development Manager of Exhibitions; Leah Bezbatchenko, Associate Director of Individual Giving; Matthew McEnteggart, Director of Facilities; and Saran Adkinson, Visitor Experience Manager. Additional thanks are extended to the visitor services representatives, facilities associates, and security team, who make all of our exhibitions possible. Samantha De Tillio Assistant Curator

Angelik Vizcarrondo-Laboy Assistant Manager of Curatorial Affairs

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Published in conjunction with the exhibition The Burke Prize 2018: The Future of Craft, organized by the Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY, on view from October 3, 2018, to March 17, 2019. Curated by Samantha De Tillio, Assistant Curator, and Angelik Vizcarrondo-Laboy, Assistant Manager of Curatorial Affairs, with support from Alida Jekabson, Curatorial Assistant. Copyright © 2018 Museum of Arts and Design, New York. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior permission of the publisher. Every attempt has been made to locate the copyright holders of the images reproduced herein. Any omission is unintentional. The Museum of Arts and Design is grateful for the generosity of Marian and Russell Burke for making possible the inaugural 2018 Burke Prize. Designers: Joshua Graver and Betsy Tsai Editor: Kristin Kearns Printer: Sea Group ISBN: 978-1-890385-37-8 All measurements: height × width × depth, unless otherwise noted


Museum of Arts and Design 2 Columbus Circle New York, NY 10019 madmuseum.org

BURKE PRIZE 2018

Profile for Museum of Arts and Design

Burke Prize 2018: The Future of Craft  

The Burke Prize 2018 is an exhibition celebrating the inaugural year of the Burke Prize, an annual award that reinforces the Museum of Arts...

Burke Prize 2018: The Future of Craft  

The Burke Prize 2018 is an exhibition celebrating the inaugural year of the Burke Prize, an annual award that reinforces the Museum of Arts...

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