Page 1

Insight

Getting it Done

Snapshots of Success Vol. I, Issue 9: May 9, 2018

The MUSD Superintendent and Board of Trustees share a photo with Classified Employees and Educators of the Year, Directors of Human Resources, CSEA and MEA Union Presidents, and a few supporters at the District Celebration.

As we count down the days until summer, our minds reflect on all that we have achieved throughout the year. Students remember friends and teachers who have shared a wealth of knowledge and experience with them. Teachers remember students who have touched their hearts. Administrators continue to analyze department programs to continue our best practices and identify areas in need of additional support. However, before we all enjoy a well-deserved summer break, there is still plenty of work to ensure the year is properly closed out and prepped for a smooth opening of the 2018/19 school year. Just like our students who have their best success with a seamless summer enrichment plan, MUSD staff must do the same. Here are just some of our year end close out tasks and summer supports to make the 2018/19 school year a complete success:

The MUSD Information Technology department collects, inventories, repairs, and upgrades over 35,000 individual devices. They test and reinforce the digital infrastructure. Improvements are made to various databases from which we all work. They are always happy to support your district technology needs. http://www.mantecausd.net/departments/informationtechnology Our financial offices tirelessly work to close out the 2017/18 books, analyze current fiscal allocations and expenditures in order to prepare balanced budgets for 2018/19. All Purchase Orders are closed out and forecasted for appropriate renewal. Please remember that close-out is a challenging process that requires commitment and an all-around team effort. Need assistance from business services during this process? http://www.mantecausd.net/departments/businessservices See Getting it Done on page 3

The Mark Publication Dates

May 30 The Mark: Graduation / Promotion Edition

Insight Publication Dates (Titles Subject to Change) June 13

Summary Report

Vol. I, Issue 9 - Page 1


Contents

MUSD School Board President Stephen J. Schluer, Area 6

Getting it Done

1

Regional Site Visits 2017-2018

2

Getting it Done

3

iResults Staffing Snapshot

4

Michael Seelye, Area 3

iResults Student Achievement Snapshot

5

Nancy Teicheira, Area 4

A Closer Look at College Readiness

8

Monthly Budget Report

9

Vice President Bob Wallace, Area 7 Board Clerk Evelyn Moore, Area 5 Eric Duncan, Area 1 Kathy Howe, Area 2

MUSD Superintendents Superintendent Jason Messer

How Will LCFF 2.0 Be Funded?

10

Field Summary Reports

11

Dr. Clark Burke

Lathrop Elementary Opens their STEAM Lab

12

Roger Goatcher

Deputy Superintendents

Regional Site Visits 2017-2018

Superintendent’s Office:

Community Outreach Manteca Unified School District

Vision Statement:

Region

Lead

August 30, 2017

Region 3

Steve Anderson

September 19, 2017

Region 2

Susan Sanders

October 17, 2017

Region 6

David O’Leary

October 24, 2017

Region 5

Francine Baird

November 29, 2017

Region 4

Debbie Ruger

December 6, 2017

Region 1

Dale Borgeson

January 10, 2018

Region 1

Dale Borgeson

February 7, 2018

Region 4

Debbie Ruger

February 21, 2018

Region 5

Francine Baird

April 11, 2018

Region 2

Susan Sanders

April 20, 2018

Region 3

Steve Anderson

May 2, 2018

Region 6

David O’Leary

May 16, 2018

Region 4

Debbie Ruger

May 18, 2018

Optional

Making a positive difference to each and every student daily. Mission Statement:

Manteca Unified School District will ensure every school day is relevant, rigorous, and leads students to become productive and engaged members of a global society while residing in the central valley.

Page 2 - MUSD Insight: Snapshots of Success

Visit Date

Manteca Unified School District is committed to providing a safe environment where all students will thrive with the tools, resources and support needed to achieve their academic and personal potentials.

2


Getting it Done

The MUSD Student Board Members and Community Outreach Interns at the District Celebration.

Continued from page 1 The Human Resources department ensures the right people are in the right place at the right time to support our students. Scheduled recruitment events, employee in-processing, and professional training are essential to our District’s mission. Please check out their web pages for more information. http://www.mantecausd.net/ departments/human-resources Manteca Unified’s Community Outreach department is working year round to get our message out and receive community input. As it takes a village to raise every child, we appreciate every opportunity to communicate. http://www.mantecausd.net/departments/communityoutreach It is an exciting time in the Facilities department. After completing five Measure G modernization projects, we are kicking off the next series of school site improvements. Thank you to everyone who supports our local schools in this effort to build quality schools for our students.. To see some of our past projects and to learn about what is being planned, visit: http://www. mantecausd.net/departments/facilities-planning Summer is the time for maintenance! The Operations department is about to kick into high speed. There are over 1300 classrooms and over 650 acres of grounds that need deep cleaning and maintenance. Safe and clean learning environments is one of the core foundations for a quality education. http://www.mantecausd.net/ departments/facilities-and-operations

Always serving the fundamental needs of our students, the Nutrition Education department never stops provide healthy meals year round. Manteca Unified takes pride in developing menus and preparing meals that are the building blocks of life. Please see all they have to offer at http://musdnutrition.net/ If your student is in need of Transportation services, our busses will be serviced, cleaned and ready to safely transport your student to and from school. http://www. mantecausd.net/departments/transportation Health Services is dedicated to the philosophy that promoting health year round in children enhances their ability to learn. http://www.mantecausd.net/ departments/health-services And even though summer is coming, our Educational Services departments are here to support education throughout their tenure in our district. How can we support you? http://www.mantecausd.net/departments/ education We are proud to be MUSD!

Dr. Clark Burke Deputy Superintendent Vol. I, Issue 9 - Page 3


Personnel Action Snapshot

Manteca Unified School District

iResults Staffing Snapshot CERTIFICATED STAFFING UPDATE 2

211

Total Number of Positions

Elementary Secondary

2017-2018

SpecEd

682

1,285

Vacancies

390

Total Positions

3

Temporary Teacher

Employment Actions March 23 - May 25, 2018

Temporary Administrator

2

17

Employment

1

11

Secondary/acorn coaching/extrapay assignments for spring sports

Actions

Substitute Teachers & Resignations

7

May 25 - December 18, 2018

Resignations

21

Substitute Teachers Manteca Unified 14 School District

Personnel Action Snapshot

Actions

1

CLASSIFIED STAFFING UPDATE 111

Total Number of Positions

Staffed Positions

2017 - 2018

Vacancies

1,411

1,300

Positions

Employment Actions

5 1

16

SSA - Employment

4

SSA - Reassignment SSA - Resignation SSA - Substitutes

11

63

14

Actions

Positions Posted Applications Received & Screened Interview Sessions Held Page 4 - MUSD Insight: Snapshots of Success

Classified - Reassignment Classified - Termination

1

Continuous Hiring Process

Classified - Employment

6

5

Classified - Resignation Classified - Substitutes

Hiring Update March 31 - April 26, 2018

30 559 18

4

2


STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT SNAPSHOT

Manteca Unified

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School District

Local Indicators Based on LCFF State Priorities

iResults Student Achievement Snapshot GRADUATION 100% 80%

SCHOOL CLIMATE

Graduation Rate

60% 40% 20% 0

92%

93%

92%

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Year-over-year comparison

95.8%

93% 2015/16

(2016/17 CA Dashboard = 96%)

1

SCHOOL CLIMATE

Students with expulsions

1,644 students

Year-over-year comparison

1,408 Students

6%

Year -to-date

31 Students

Students with expulsions

<1%

<1%

(LCFF Snapshot = 0.17%

96%

(LCFF Snapshot = 93%)

Year -to-date

2016-2017

(2016/17 CA Dashboard = 6%)

Suspended last school year

Graduation Rate

Manteca Unified School District

Students with suspensions

(2016/17 Dataquest = 0.1%)

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT SNAPSHOT

Powered by

Local Indicators Based on LCFF State Priorities

Manteca Unified School District

20 10 0

80%

82%

84%

86%

1st Grade

88%

90%

92%

94%

58%

35%

(2016/17 CA Dashboard = 76% K-12)

2nd Grade

40%

46 students

30

52%

2016-2017

92%

2012/13

40

SCHOOL CLIMATE

50

Students with suspensions

2014/15 2013/14

92% 93%

60

50% 30% 20% 10% 0

Expelled last school year

(LCFF Snapshot = 10%)

7%

2015/16

93%

60%

% of 4-8th grade EL students making progress towards English proficiency Using SRI Assessments with specific cut-off points per grade

GRADUATION

Local Indicators Based on LCFF State Priorities

Student Achievement Snapshot

ENGLISH LEARNER ACHIEVEMENT

% of 9-12th grade EL students making progress towards English proficiency EL students with B- or higher in English courses

48%

56%

54%

58%

5th Grade

6th Grade

7th Grade

8th Grade

% of 1-3rd grade EL students making progress towards English proficiency

25% 3rd Grade

44% 4th Grade

Using District Benchmark Assessments

40%

(Note: Kindergarten results not available at this time.)

(2016/17 CA Dashboard = 76% K-12)

50% 40% 30% 20%

48%

(2016/17 CA Dashboard = 76% K-12)

10% 0

43%

52%

48%

50%

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

Vol. I, Issue 9 - Page 5


STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT SNAPSHOT

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Manteca Unified School District

Local Indicators Based on LCFF State Priorities

Reclassified 296

# of EL students reclassified As of last quarter

296

Total # of EL Students 5093

(2016/17 Dataquest = 11%)

ENROLLMENT African-American 8%

White 20%

Enrollment by race / ethnicity

Asian 15% Other 2%

Latino/Hispanic 56%

60%

Enrollment by program eligibility

40% 20%

B

1% DR

RB SA

s es el om

3%

H

rY ou

th Fo s

te

tY ou

ED

ra n ig M

3%

1% th

1%

13% SP

D

D SE

22% EL

64%

0

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT SNAPSHOT

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Manteca Unified School District

Local Indicators Based on LCFF State Priorities

Enrollment by School

Lathrop High School 1252 Lathrop Elementary 874 Joshua Cowell Elementary 579 Joseph Widmer Elementary 852 Great Valley Elementary 1118 Golden West Elementary 518 George McParland Elementary 1102 George Komure Elementary 958 French Camp Elementary 612 East Union High School 1586

23,395

Calla High School 154 Brock Elliott Elementary 867

#

be.tech 124 August Knodt Elementary 819

Lincoln Elementary 610 Manteca Community Day (7-12) 42 Manteca Community Day (K-6) 10 Manteca High School 1506 Mossdale Elementary 1060 Neil Hafley Elementary 765 New Haven Elementary 542 New Vision Educational Center 92 Nile Garden Elementary 565 Sequoia Elementary 796 Shasta Elementary 794 Sierra High School 1374 Stella Brockman Elementary 872 Veritas Elementary 973 Walter Woodward Elementary 820 Weston Ranch High School 1159

(Total Enrollment)

COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS 400

# of students on-track to complete A-G requirements

300

Students with C- or higher in A-G courses

200

688

100 0

448

240

11th Grade

12th Grade

(2016/17 Dataquest = 499)

50%

% of students on-track to complete at least 1 CTE Path

40%

Students with C- or higher in CTE courses in one pathway

30%

(Total Enrollment)

20%

35%

10% 0

(2016/17 Dataquest = 35%)

Page 6 - MUSD Insight: Snapshots of Success

6

38%

24%

36%

46%

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade


STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT SNAPSHOT

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Manteca Unified School District

Local Indicators Based on LCFF State Priorities

50%

% of students likely to pass 2 or more AP exams with a 3 or higher

40% 30%

Students getting at least a A- in an AP course

20% 10% 38%

32%

50%

47%

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

0

45%

(2016/17 CA Dashboard = 39%)

28% 24%

Measuring college readiness in ELA

20%

Students with an A- or better in A-G English courses

16% 12% 8%

25%

4% 26%

23%

25%

27%

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

0

(2016/2017 11th grade SBAC Level 4 = 17%)

40%

Measuring college readiness in math

30%

Students with an A- or better in A-G Math courses

20% 10% 22%

22%

20%

37%

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

0

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT SNAPSHOT

23%

(2016/17 11th grade SBAC Level 4 = 7%)

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Manteca Unified School District

Local Indicators Based on LCFF State Priorities

See â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Closer Lookâ&#x20AC;? on page 8 % Approaching Prepared 42%

College Readiness

% Prepared 39%

% of students who are college ready per the State of California new definition

39%

% Not Prepared 20%

(2016/17 CA Dashboard Indicator)

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT 80

1-8 ELA Formative Assessments

60

Students meeting or exceeding standards in District Benchmark Assessments

40 20 0

71%

54%

38%

33%

35%

30%

35%

38%

1st Grade

2nd Grade

3rd Grade

4th Grade

5th Grade

6th Grade

7th Grade

8th Grade

42%

(Note: Kindergarten results not available at this time.)

(40% in 3rd - 8th Grade SBAC)

60%

Measuring ELA academic achievement for 9-12th grade students

50%

Students with an B- or better in A-G English courses

30%

55%

(51% in the 11th Grade SBAC Levels 3 and 4)

40% 20% 10% 0

54%

53%

54%

60%

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

Vol. I, Issue 9 - Page 7


STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT SNAPSHOT

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Manteca Unified School District

Local Indicators Based on LCFF State Priorities

100% 80%

K-8 Math Formative Assessments

60%

Students meeting or exceeding standards in District Benchmark Assessments

40% 20%

61%

8t h

Gr ad e

60%

Gr ad e

39%

7t h

Gr ad e

60%

6t h

5t h

Gr ad e

57%

Gr ad e

50%

4t h

Gr ad e

45%

3r d

2n d

Gr ad e

en

1s t

73%

(26% in 3rd - 8th Grade SBAC)

Ki

nd er ga rt

83%

Gr ad e

92%

0

40%

Measuring math academic achievement for 9-12th grade students

30% 20%

Students with an A- or better in A-G Math courses

10%

23%

0

(19% in the 11th Grade SBAC Levels 3 and 4)

22% 9th Grade Powered by

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT SNAPSHOT

22%

20%

37%

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade

Manteca Unified School District

Local Indicators Based on LCFF State Priorities

A Closer Look at College Readiness

% Approaching Prepared 42%

College Readiness

% Prepared 39%

% of students who are college ready per the State of California new definition

39%

See the Matching Data Below! % Not Prepared 20%

(2016/17 CA Dashboard Indicator)

The College/Career Indicator (CCI) is based on the four-year ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT graduation cohort and uses both college and career measures to 80 evaluate how well districts and schools are preparing students for 60 success after high school.

measures in the CCI Prepared and Approaching Prepared Levels. Students can meet more than one measure in each CCI level. As a result, the tables contain duplicative counts. 1-8 ELA Formative Assessments Students meeting or exceeding standards in District

More information on the CCI measures is provided in Benchmark Assessments the Dashboard Technical Guide located on the California Accountability Model & School Dashboard page.at this time.) (Note: Kindergarten results Web not available

40

The Status and Change report on the Fall 2017 Dashboard displays 20 Status Only for the graduating class of 2016. This report the displays the number and 71% 54% 38%percent 33%of students 35% that 30%met each 35% of the 38% 0 1st Grade

2nd Grade

3rd Grade

4th Grade

5th Grade

6th Grade

7th Grade

42%

8th Grade

(40% in 3rd - 8th Grade SBAC)

60%

Measuring ELA academic achievement for 9-12th grade students

50%

Students with an B- or better in A-G English courses

30%

40% 20%

55%

10% 0

(51% in the 11th Grade SBAC Levels 3 and 4)

Page 8 - MUSD Insight: Snapshots of Success

8

54%

53%

54%

60%

9th Grade

10th Grade

11th Grade

12th Grade


Monthly Budget Report

$36 Million

to On-Going Contributions

to Under Funded Programs

2017-18

$5.6 M

illion

on

Milli 2 3 $ RS

E

Transp

ortati

on

$7.9 Million Routine Restricted Maintenance (3%) rred e f e D 000 , 0 4 nce 6 a $ n e t n Mai

LCFF Base Dollars

Minimum Wage Increase

The impact of pension cost increases on California’s schools The grim effects

of rising costs on California’s schools In 2017, CSBA convened a meeting of governing board members from school

P STRS /

Special Education $26.9 Million Other Ed Progra ucational ms $1 .9 Mill ion

Cuts are happening now, and it’s only going to get worse While many school districts and county offices have been able to avoid program cuts in the current year, most if not all recognize that cuts are coming. Many vital programs are being forced to operate with less, or will be cut altogether.

Increased Pension Costs for Schools Question: districts and county offices of education throughout California to examine the effects of rising employer contributions to CalPERS and CalSTRS on their schools, and discuss how these cost pressures are affecting their ability to provide their students witha quality education. takeaways California alreadySeveral ranks important 45th nationally in from their findings are reflected in this report. per-pupil funding, $3,462 per student below

the national average.

With pension contributions set to nearly triple by 2024… $12,156 National Average 43%

$8,694 California

rank

45t said they have already cut programs that are h Source: Ed Week 2013-14 through 2014-15

included in their Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP).

68% of those who have not yet cut programs anticipate making cuts Staff areinfirst to go. and/or engaging in deficitspending the next 2 to 3 years. Due to rising pension contributions, school districts and county offices of education with vacant certificated and classified positions are leaving many of those positions unfilled, and temporary staff are not being brought school districts and back. Pay increases for existing staff are being reduced or county offices ofiteducation that reported eliminated, making harder to recruit and retain quality teachers andbudget staff. certification for 2016-17 a positive

1 out of 4

Is your school district or county See the full CSBA story here. Pensions outpacing COLA office having to use reserves to cover increasing pension costs? Weighted average of pension cost increases in 2017-18 said

 52%

YES

Cost-of-living adjustment for K-12 education in 2017-18 budget

1.87%

58% of those who said

1.56%

NO indicate that cuts have Weighed average of Projected cost-of-living already been made projected pension cost to avoid adjustment for K-12 usingincreases reserves, or that their reserve in 2018-19 education in 2018-19* level is already down to the 2.23% 2.15% state-required minimum.

*Source: School Services of CA Financial Projection Dartboard

Vol. I, Issue 9 - Page 9

On the chopping block


How Will LCFF 2.0 Be Funded?

Fact Sheet AB 2808 (Muratsuchi) -- How Will LCFF 2.0 be Funded? We have fielded questions from legislators, media, and staff regarding the proposed Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) revisions contained in AB 2808. The following talking points explain how future annual increases in the Proposition 98 guarantee will provide gap funding each year to reach the new LCFF funding targets proposed by the bill. ü Following full LCFF funding implementation proposed by Governor Brown in his 2018-19 state budget, AB 2808 would establish new, higher funding targets, effective 2019-20. ü The future Governor and Legislature will maintain discretion over the amount of funding apportioned annually for the new LCFF targets established by the bill. ü Funding for the new LCFF targets are allocated through the annual state budget process and intended to be phased in overtime, as determined by the Governor and Legislature, and consistent with the growth in available Proposition 98 funding in excess of the statutory cost-ofliving-adjustment (COLA). ü AB 2808 does NOT change the Proposition 98 minimum guarantee, and there is no cost to the state’s General Fund. ü Because Proposition 98 funding is required to be spent on K-14 education, AB 2808 will help preserve LCFF’s principle of local control and provide increased unrestricted funding to meet local education agency increasing base costs; as well as increased supplemental and concentration funding for English language learners and economically disadvantaged students.

For more information contact the California School Funding Coalition (SFC): Nancy LaCasse (NancyL@sscal.com) at (916)446-7517 or Steve Ward (SteveWard@clovisusd.k12.ca.us) at (559)327-9118 Page 10 - MUSD Insight: Snapshots of Success

10


Using the track and field at Sierra High School, members of all five schools take part in the 2nd Annual All-Star Olympics.

Field Summary Reports May Report – The following is a summary of the comprehensive high school stadium fields. We are pleased to report that all stadiums are open and in acceptable conditions. The full individual evaluation reports are on file at the Superintendent’s office. East Union Stadium & Practice Fields = Good/Open Acceptable Conditions Overall: Acceptable; Turf: Acceptable; Pests: Acceptable; Irrigation: Acceptable; Hazards: Acceptable Lathrop High Stadium & Practice Fields = Good/Open Acceptable Conditions Overall: Acceptable; Turf: Acceptable; Pests: Acceptable; Irrigation: Acceptable; Hazards: Acceptable Manteca High Stadium & Practice Fields = Good/Open Acceptable Conditions Overall: Acceptable; Turf: Acceptable; Pests: Acceptable; Irrigation: Acceptable; Hazards: Acceptable Sierra High Stadium & Practice Fields = Good/Open Acceptable Conditions Overall: Acceptable; Turf: Acceptable; Pests: Acceptable; Irrigation: Acceptable; Hazards: Acceptable Weston Ranch Stadium & Practice Fields = Good – Open Acceptable Conditions Overall: Acceptable; Turf: Acceptable; Pests: Acceptable; Irrigation: Acceptable; Hazards: Acceptable

Please note closure information requires confirmation: For all five comprehensive high schools, the next scheduled closure for field rest for Stadium Track and Practice Fields is scheduled for the summer. All others are scheduled for the fall. At the SHS All-Star Olympics, one of the field events was a modified discus throw. Vol. I, Issue 9 - Page 11


Lathrop Elementary Opens their STEAM Lab

Page 12 - MUSD Insight: Snapshots of Success

12

Musd Insight 2018, Vol 1 Issue 8  

In this issue Dr. Clark Burke discusses the many ways that departments at the District Office work hard to get the job done.

Musd Insight 2018, Vol 1 Issue 8  

In this issue Dr. Clark Burke discusses the many ways that departments at the District Office work hard to get the job done.

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