Page 1

Starting Out In Music Electronic Resources Accompanying Teacher’s Manual


What is Music? •What is music?

•What makes music sound musical?

•Why do we have music?

1.1


Lesson 1

Transparency 1.2

Element Element

Meaning

Beat

a steady pulse; a unit of measure

Rhythm

the duration of the notes and rests used

Pitch

whether the notes sound high, medium or low

Expression/dynamics

whether the volume of the music sounds loud, medium or soft

Phrasing

musical punctuation (where to take a breath when singing or playing an instrument)

Articulation

whether the music has a broken (staccato) and/or smooth (legato) sound

1.2


The Importance of Beat

1 centimetre = 1 unit of measure

0

1x

2x

3x

4x

2 cm are EXACTLY 2 x 1 cm. 4 cm are EXACTLY 4 x 1 cm.

2.1


Practising Beat with Counting Clap four one beat notes. Count these beats while clapping.

Now clap four times one-beat sounds and one-beat silences.

Then clap two beat sounds and silences.

Then three beat sounds and silences.

Finally clap four beat sounds and silences.

2.2


Introduction to Reading Rhythm RHYTHM Rhythm is how much time the SOUNDS and SILENCES take. We have to know how to READ and WRITE rhythm.

2.3 (1/2)


Introduction to Reading Rhythm This rhythmic tree shows how the note values relate to each other:

2.3 (2/2)


Writing Rhythm HOW TO DRAW UP THE RHYTHMIC FRAME.

1. A horizontal line is needed. 2. This line has to be divided into bars, also known as measures by adding vertical lines at equal distances.

3. A time signature is added. This tells what and how to count. It has two numbers. X

the top number tells how many beats to count in each bar.

Y

the bottom number tells us what note value is to be counted.

3.1 (1/3)


Writing Rhythm At this stage we use the following time signatures: 2 4

=

Two quarter/crotchet beats to be counted in each bar.

3 4

=

Three quarter/crotchet beats to be counted in each bar.

4 4

=

Four quarter/crotchet beats to be counted in each bar.

3.1 (2/3)


Writing Rhythm 4. Notes and rests (i.e. sounds and silences) are added to complete the rhythmic frame. The values in each measure must equal the time signature. Here is an example of a four bar rhythm completed.

3.1 (3/3)


Practising Rhythm

3.2


Practising Rhythm

4.1


Creating a Piece of Music A Simple Song Twinkle Twinkle Little Star Twinkle Twinkle Little Star How I wonder what you are Up above the world so high Like a diamond in the sky Twinkle Twinkle little star How I wonder what you are.

5.1


Writing Music Notation We will now build the Grand Frame.

How to number the spaces and lines of the staves:

5.1?


Writing Music Notation

5.2(2/2)


Reading and Writing Pitch

6.1


Naming Pitch

Note names:

E

C

F

C

F

A

D

6.2

B

C

E

A

F

B

D

G


Practising Pitch Option 1. Naming pitch

Option 2. Writing pitch

7.1


Mastering Pitch Option 1. Naming Pitch.

8.1 (1/3)


Mastering Pitch Option 2. Writing Pitch. 1. Musical words Here are some examples of musical words you can create.

8.1 (2/3)


Mastering Pitch Option 2. Writing Pitch (cont). 2. Simple harmony

8.1 (3/3)


Combining Rhythm and Pitch PITCH + RHYTHM = MUSICAL NOTATION

RHYTHM + PITCH = MUSICAL NOTATION

9.1 (1/2)


Combining Rhythm and Pitch A. Name these notes.

B. Clap/tap the rhythm below.

C. When rhythm and pitch are combined, they create music! Listen and read!

9.1 (2/2)

Music Magic - Starting out in Music, Teacher’s electronic resources  

Electronic presentation material to accompany the Muscepts Teachers Manual. This is in Adobe PDF format, while the original is supplied in M...

Music Magic - Starting out in Music, Teacher’s electronic resources  

Electronic presentation material to accompany the Muscepts Teachers Manual. This is in Adobe PDF format, while the original is supplied in M...

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