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Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Neurosciences

Volume 4 • Issue 3 • September 2011

"Sagittal Skull" For questions or comments contact: Emma C. Vought at vought@musc.edu

www.MUSC.edu/neurosciences


"Sagittal Skull" Cover Illustration by Emma C. Vought

This newsletter was made possible from the generous contributions of faculty and staff in MUSC's Neurosciences Department. The success of this publication is dependant upon this support. Thank you for your interest, time and information. For inquiries, suggestions or submission please contact Emma C. Vought (vought@musc.edu) or Rachel Beard (beardr@musc.edu).

Ta b l e o f Co n t e n t s Chairs' Message ...............................................................

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Clinical Trials ....................................................................... 4 - 7 Grants .................................................................................... 8 - 13 Publications........................................................................... 14-16

Editors:

News ....................... .............................................................. 16-22

Dr. Patel, Dr. Kalivas, Rachel Beard, and Emma C. Vought

Resident News.................................................................... 20 Upcoming Events............................................................... 21-22 Employee Update ............................................................ 23 Contact ................................................................................. 24

Illustrations and Design:

Emma C. Vought Submission Staff:

Rachel Beard and Emma C. Vought


Chairs' Message September, 2011

Welcome back to a new academic year! First, we would like to draw everyone’s attention to two outstanding publications from our departmental faculty since the last letter. Dr. Marc Chimowitz and his stroke team have published a landmark paper in the New England Journal of Medicine that promises to dramatically affect the standard of care in some forms of stroke. Dr. Gary Aston-Jones and his team published a paper in Science demonstrating how the brain links environmental context to important events. Both of these papers are highlighted in this issue.

Chairs' Message

The educational mission of the department comes to the fore this time of year with the arrival of the new medical students, residents and graduate students. Education and mentoring often receives attention only after our clinical and research concerns are met. It is a societal paradox that we choose to excessively promote self-aggrandizing activities. We all know that educating and mentoring the next generation of health care clinicians and scientists is our most sacred mission since without sincere sacrifice for the next generation, all of our personal career efforts will fade into history. Indeed, the quiet efforts on behalf of others create an institutions or societies greatest legacy; a next generation that is better than itself. We have a number of new initiatives in mentoring and teaching medical students and residents. The first year medical student curriculum, where we present basic principles of neurosciences, will continue to be directed by Dr. Henry Martin. However, let me welcome our new faculty member, Dr. Heather Boger, who will co-direct with Henry this year and take over in the 2013 academic year. Henry is a brilliant educator, and will continue to provide lectures, but the neuroscience core of lectures will be managed by Heather beginning FY2013. There are to be many new faces providing lectures in the 1st year curriculum in order to provide full exposure for our students to the breadth of the anatomical and mechanistic underpinnings for neuroscience in medicine. An exciting new development in our medical education program is that the Dean’s office is considering forming a ‘Teaching Academy’. This will be a body of highly experienced lecturers who can mentor new faculty towards teaching excellence. This project is spear-headed by Drs. Deborah Deas and Debra Hazen-Martin in the deans office. At present the first two years of lecture to medical students are provided by excellent teachers that are largely on the backside of their careers, and there is a great need to train the next generation of teachers. Our department of Neurosciences has its own initiative in this regard, as indicated by our recruitment of Dr. Heather Boger, and we hope that the new initiative by the dean’s office will augment our own efforts to mentor young education faculty in neurosciences. The residency program has a new curriculum. This was conceived and initially executed by Drs. Jonathan Edwards and Leo Bonhila. However, the nuts and bolts and daily shepherding have been conducted by Drs. Angela Hays and Rup Sainju. I have worked closely with Angela and Rup to provide the basic science faculty who can best cover the various topics of this 18-month curriculum. Like all new projects, we will need to hear from everyone, faculty and residents, on how it plays out and where we can make improvements. As our Neurology and Neurosurgery residency programs evolve, an increasing research orientation in this curriculum will provide a strong primer, as well as exposure to the researcher faculty (not to mention helping the residents pass their boards).

Dr. Peter Kalivas Co-Chair Neurosciences

Our graduate program remains at the top of the College of Graduate Studies in most parameters. We have the largest recruitment of the Ph.D. programs, 5 of the 8 individual NIH predoctoral salary awards (predoctoral NRSA) at MUSC belong to Neuroscience predoctoral students and Drs. Jakie McGinty and John Woodward each direct two of the NIH Institutional training grants on campus. These achievements, as well as the overall prestige of the Neurosciences Track should help convince the College of Graduate Studies to stop penalizing our students who at present receive 4 months of stipend from the college while all other Ph.D. students receive 13 months. We hope to resolve this continuing injustice this month. Last but not least, we have a new mentoring plan that was just approved by the deans office. This is the culmination of an effort spearheaded through the dean’s office by our own Dr. Marc Chimowitz in his role as Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs. The plan will be posted on our website shortly and is designed to be a one-stop site for the faculty regarding mentoring and promotion/tenure policies. Our two departmental mentoring champions are Drs. Marc Chimowitz and Dr. Jakie McGinty. All incoming faculty will be assigned mentoring teams by our champions, and for existing faculty, please contact these individuals to set up mentoring teams as needed.

Dr. Sunil Patel Co-Chair Neurosciences

“You make a living with what you get, but you make a life with what you give” – ancient Greek proverb Welcome back everyone, thanks for all of your continuing efforts, and keep it real out there! Peter and Sunil

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To s e e a f ul l list ing of c linic al t rials at MU SC vi si t: h t tp:// w w w.m usc heal t h.c om /c l inic alt rial s/

Clinical Trials

Clinical Trials T h e Fo l l o w i ng St udies are Ac t ivel y Enrol l ing Subjects Alzheimer's Study

Title

Sponsor

Principal Investigator

Study Coordinator

Contact Phone/Email

ADNI-2

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2

National Institute on Aging

Jacobo Mintzer M.D., Arthur Williams M.B.A. and David Bachman M.D.

843-740-1592 masoncr@musc.edu

CEREGENE

A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled (Sham Surgery), Randomized, Multicenter Study Evaluating CERE110 Gene Delivery in Subjects with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

National Institute on Aging and Ceregene, Inc.

Jacobo Mintzer M.D., Beth Safrit, NP M.B.A. and David Bachman M.D.

843-740-1592 masoncr@musc.edu

BAPI

A Phase 3, Multi-Center, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel Group Efficacy and Safety Trial of Bapineuzumab in Subjects with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

Pfizer Pharmaceuticals

Jacobo Mintzer M.D., Jan Watts, RN M.B.A. and David Bachman M.D.

843-740-1592 masoncr@musc.edu

CITAD

National A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial Study Institute of Health of Citalopram for the treatment of Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease

Jacobo Mintzer M.D., Amanda Watts M.B.A. and David Bachman M.D.

843-740-1592 masoncr@musc.edu

Study

Title

Principal Investigator

Study Coordinator

Contact Phone/Email

FACT

Fusion Assessment Clinical Trial Flexuspine, Inc. (FACT), Rev. G, Protocol # 01000-T02

Bruce Frankel, M.D.

Michele DeCandio, RN

843-792-9016 decandio@musc.edu

KAST

The KIVA™ System as a Vertebral augmentation Treatment- A Safety & Effectiveness Trial

Benvenue Medical

Bruce Frankel, M.D.

Michele DeCandio, RN

843-792-9016 decandio@musc.edu

NanOSS

A Prospective, Multi-Center, Nonrandomized study to assess Lumbar Fusion Usin.g Interbody Cages with Autograft in Conjunction with Instrumented Posterolateral Gutter Fusions Using NANOSS BA™

Pioneer Surgical Technology

Abhay Varma, M.D.

Michele DeCandio, RN

843-792-9016 decandio@musc.edu

Spine Trials

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Sponsor

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Epilepsy Trials Study

Title

Sponsor

Principal Investigator

Study Coordinator

Contact Phone/Email

PARTIAL ONSET SEIZURES HR 20585

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo- UCB, Inc. Controlled, Multicenter, Parallel-Group Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Brivaracetam in Subjects (≥16 to 80 Years Old) with Partial Onset Seizures

Jonathan Halford, M.D.

Ashley Gantt

843-792-7118 gantt@musc.edu

EPILEPSY HR 20691

Open-Label Study to Assess the Safety and Tolerability of Intravenous Carbamazepine as Short-Term Replacement of Oral Carbamazepine in Adult Patients with Epilepsy

Lundbeck, Inc.

Jonathan Halford, M.D.

Ashley Gantt

843-792-7118 gantt@musc.edu

ACUTE REPETITIVE SEIZURES HR 18083

A Phase 3, Randomized, DoubleBlind, Parallel, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Study, with Optional Open-Label Continuation, of the Efficacy and Safety of Vanquix™ AutoInjector (Diazepam Injection) for the Management of Selected, Refractory, Patients with Epilepsy who Require Intermittent Medical Intervention to Control Episodes of Acute Repetitive Seizures

King Pharmaceuticals

Jonathan Halford, M.D.

Ashley Gantt

843-792-7118 gantt@musc.edu

REFRACTORY COMPLEX PARTIAL SEIZURES Pro00010630

A prospective, open-label study of the structure and function of the retina in adult patients with refractory complex partial seizures treated with vigabatrin (Sabril®)

Lundbeck, Inc.

Ekrem Kutluay, M.D.

Ashley Gantt

843-792-7118 gantt@musc.edu

Movement Disorders Study

Title

Sponsor

Principal Investigator

Study Coordinator

Contact Phone/Email

CD-PROBE

CD PROBE - Cervical Dystonia Patient Registry for Observation of Botox® Efficacy

Allergan Sales, LLC

Vanessa Hinson, M.D., Ph.D.

Jennifer Zimmerman, RN

843-792-9115 zimmerj@musc.edu

FS Zone

Parkinson’s Disease Neuroprotection Clinical Trial Center - FS Zone Supplemental Study

NIH/NINDS

Vanessa Hinson, M.D,. Ph.D.

Jennifer Zimmerman, RN

843-792-9115 zimmerj@musc.edu

Phytopharm

A Phase II, multi-centre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study to investigate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of Cogane™ (PYM50028), a novel, orally active neurotrophic factor inducer, in male and female subjects with early-stage Parkinson’s disease when administered once daily for 28 weeks.

Phytopharm Plc (ICON Clinical Resarch)

Gonzalo Revuelta, M.D.

Jennifer Zimmerman, RN

843-792-9115 zimmerj@musc.edu

Synosia

A double-blind, randomized, placebocontrolled study of the safety and efficacy of SYN115 as adjunctive therapy in levodopa-treated Parkinson’s subjects with end of dose wearing off

Synosia Therapeutics, Inc.

Gonzalo Revuelta, M.D.

Jennifer Zimmerman, RN

843-792-9115 zimmerj@musc.edu

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Clinical Trials continued...

ALS Studies Study

Title

Sponsor

Principal Investigator

Study Coordinator

Contact Phone/Email

CEF-ALS-2006

Clinical Trial of Ceftriaxone in Subjects with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (CEF-ALS-2006)

National Institutes of Health/National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

David Stickler, M.D.

Michele DeCandio, RN

843-792-9016 decandio@musc.edu

Brain & Spine Tumor Program Clinical Trials Study

CTO #

Title

Coordination Site

Trial Source

Glioblastoma, Adjuvant

101481

Pierre Giglio, MD RTOG 0837: Radnomized, Phase II, DoubleBlind, Placebo-Controlled trial of conventional Tel: 843-792-6592 giglio@musc.edu chemoradiation and adjuvant temozolomide plus cediranib versus conventional chemoradiation and adjuvant temozolomide plus placebo in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

John Keller Tel: 843-792-1286 kellej@musc.edu

Clinical Trials Office (Hollings Cancer Center)

RTOG 0837

Glioblastoma, Recurrent

101254

Bruce Frankel, MD A Phase I/II Study of Intraventricular Depocyt (Orphan Drug Designation 06-2348) in Patients Tel: 843-792-2423 frankel@musc.edu with Recurrent Glioblastoma.

Michele DeCandio, RN Tel: 843-792-9016 decandio@musc.edu

Translational Research Unit (Neurosciences)

NIH Funding

The Effect of Garlic Compounds on Fresh Human Glioma Biopsies

101378

The Effect of Garlic Compounds on Fresh Human Glioma Biopsies

Michele DeCandio, RN Tel: 843-792-9016 decandio@musc.edu

Translational Research Unit (Neurosciences)

Anaplastic Glioma, Adjuvant (1)

101450

Pierre Giglio, MD RTOG EORTC 0834/26053 22054, “Phase III Trial on concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide Tel: 843-792-6592 chemotherapy in Non-1p/19q deleted anaplastic giglio@musc.edu glioma.”

John Keller Tel: 843-792-1286 kellej@musc.edu

Clinical Trials Office (Hollings Cancer Center)

The CATNON Intergroup Trial (RTOG 834)

Anaplastic Glioma, Adjuvant (2)

101449

Phase III Intergroup Study of Radiotherapy ver- Pierre Giglio, MD Tel: 843-792-6592 sus Temozolomide Alone versus Radiotherapy with Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide giglio@musc.edu for Patients with Ip/ 19q Codeleted Anaplastic Glioma.

John Keller Tel: 843-792-1286 kellej@musc.edu

Clinical Trials Office (Hollings Cancer Center)

NCCTG

Low Grade Glioma, Progressive

101399

ECOG E3F05, “Phase III Study of Radiation Therapy With or Without Temozolomide for Symptomatic or Progressive Low-Grade Gliomas.”

Pierre Giglio, MD Tel: 843-792-6592 giglio@musc.edu

John Keller Tel: 843-792-1286 kellej@musc.edu

Clinical Trials Office (Hollings Cancer Center)

ECOG (Study E3F05); RTOG Endorsed

6

Principal Investigator Study Coordinator

Arabinda Das, PhD dasa@musc.edu

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An interpretation of the formation of an Amyloid plaque. Amyloid precursor protein is snipped by Gamma-secretase and Beta-secretase resleasing Beta-amyloid. Segments of Beta-amyloid float outside the cell combining to form Amyloid plaques.

Amyloid plaque

Beta-amyloid

Amyloid precurser protein

Beta-secretase

Gamma-secretase

Our Ne uro -O nc o lo g y S e r vi c e Pro m i s e : Pati e n ts c an b e s e e n wi t hi n 3 busi ne ss da ys. To re c e i ve a c o p y o f Ne u ro - O n c o l o g y c l i n i c al tr i al s li s t or t o se a rc h M U SC f o r m o re C l i n i c al Tr i al s vi s i t: ht t p: //ac ade micde partme nts.musc .e du/ tru/studi e s


Grants

Neurosciences: Fiscal Year 2011 3rd Quarter Grants

Principal Investigator

8

Agency 1

Agency 2

Adams, Robert J.

SC Research Centers of Economic Excellence

CoEE for St

Aston-Jones, Gary

NIH/NIDA

Role of Exte

Banik, Naren L.

NIH/NINDS

Role of Prote

Buhusi, Catalin V.

NIH/NIMH

Attentional P

Chimowitz, Marc

MUSC Fdn.

Chandler, L. Judson

NIH/NIAAA

Actin-Dynam

Chimowitz, Marc

NIH/NINDS

SAMMPRIS Stroke in Intr

Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

NIH/NIA

Dual-Hit Hy

Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.

NIH/NIGMS

Norepinephr

Joseph, Jane E.

NIH/NIDA

Exploring th

Joseph, Jane E.

NIH/NIMH

A Comparat

Joseph, Jane E.

NIH/NICHD

Functional N

Kalivas, Peter

NIH/NIDA

Glutamate a

Kalivas, Peter

NIH/NIDA

Glutamate a

Kalivas, Peter

NIH/NIDA

Neurobiolog

Kalivas, Peter

NIH/NIDA

Cocaine, Op

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SC Research Centers of Economic Excellence

Countess-Pa


Main Title

Total Direct

Total Indirect

Total

troke Research State Match Endowment Draw

$2,576,626

$-

$2,576,626

ended Amygdala in Opiate and Cocaine Abuse

$288,090

$136,843

$424,933

einase in Spinal Cord Injury

$214,375

$98,613

$312,988

Processing of Temporal Information

$198,000

$94,050

$292,050

aolozzi Endowed Chair in Translational Neurology for the Stroke CoEE

$7,300

$-

$7,300

mics and Spine Remodeling in Ethanol-Induced Plasticity

$226,002

$107,351

$333,353

S - Stenting vs Agressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent racranial Stenosis

$3,650,101

$449,899

$4,100,000

ypothesis of Aging Related DA Dysfunction

$37,663

$17,890

$55,553

$13,453

$6,189

$19,642

$100,328

$47,656

$147,984

tive Developmental Connectivity Study of Face Processing

$199,638

$42,610

$242,248

Neuroanatomy of Developmental Changes in Face Processing

$197,921

$94,012

$291,933

and Craving for Cocaine

$191,250

$90,844

$282,094

and Craving for Cocaine

$14,875

$7,065

$21,940

gy of Addiction Research Center

$698,939

$320,544

$1,019,483

poids, and Drug Abuse

$241,719

$114,817

$356,536

rine Transport Regulaltion by Phosphorylation

he Neurobiological Response to Anti-Drug Media Messages with fMRI

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Kara, Prakash

NIH/NEI

Development and Plasticity of Functional Micro-Organizatio

Kindy, Mark S.

VAMC

Complement and Traumatic Brain Injury

Kindy, Mark S.

Coll. of Charleston

NSF

Lowcountry Partnership for Biomedical Innovation

Kutluay, Ekrem

MUSC OIP

Pfizer, Inc.

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-G Trial of Pregabalin Controlled Release Formulation as Adjunc with Partial Onset Seizures

Kutluay, Ekrem

Covance, Inc.

Lundbeck, Inc.

A Prospective, Open-Label Study of the Structure and Funct Adult Patients with Refractory Complex Partial Seizures Treat (Sabril)

Lackland, Daniel T.

Sanofi-Aventis US, Inc.

South Carolina Diabetes Care Program

Mahler, Stephen V.

NIH/NIDA

VTA Glutamate and Orexin Involvement in Cue Reinstateme

McGinty, Jacqueline F.

NIH/NIDA

Psychostimulant Effects on Striatal Signaling

McGinty, Jacqueline F.

NIH/NIDA

Psychostimulant Effects on Striatal Signaling

Mintzer, Jacobo

Quintiles Pacific, Inc.

Parsegian, Aram

NIH/NIDA

Impact of Meth Self-Administration on Glutamate and Dopa cumbens Pathway

Ramamoorthy, Sammanda

NIH/NIMH

Serotonin Transporter Phosphorylation

Ramamoorthy, Sammanda

NIH/NIMH

Serotonin Transporter Phosphorylation

Ramamoorthy, Sammanda

NIH/NIMH

Kappa-Opoid Receptor Mediated Regulation of Dopamine T

Reichel, Carmela

NIH/NIDA

Reversal of Methamphetamine Induced Cognitive Deficits an

Reichel, Carmela

NIH/NIDA

Reversal of Methamphetamine Induced Cognitive Deficits an

Reissner, Kathryn J.

NIH/NIDA

Cytoskeletal Mechanisms of Cocaine-Induced Neuroplasticit

Revuelta, Gonzalo J.

Pharmaceutical Research Associates

10

Eli Lilly

Biotie Therapeutics, Inc.

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Continued Efficacy and Safety Monitoring of Solanezumab, a Antibody in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study of t of SYN115 as Adjunctive Therapy in Levodopa-Treated Parkin of Dose Wearing Off


Grants Continued...

on of the Visual Cortex

$237,600

$109,296

$346,896

$230,200

$-

$230,200

$27,200

$12,920

$40,120

Group, Multi-Center ctive Therapy in Adults

$143,610

$33,049

$176,659

tion of the Retina in ted with Vegabtrin

$94,226

$22,806

$117,032

$50,000

$-

$50,000

$792

$-

$792

$174,636

$80,333

$254,969

$13,583

$6,248

$19,831

an Anti-Amyloid Beta

$335,737

$83,059

$418,796

amine in the Corticoac-

$420

$-

$420

$191,250

$87,975

$279,225

$19,125

$8,798

$27,923

Transport

$229,834

$98,888

$328,722

nd mGlu Receptors

$50,474

$-

$50,474

nd mGlu Receptors

$852

$-

$852

ty

$924

$-

$924

the Safety and Efficacy nson's Patients with End

$97,808

$23,702

$121,510

ent of Drug Seeking

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Revuelta, Gonzalo J.

Icon Clinical Research, Inc.

Schwendt, Marek

NIH/NIDA

Striatal RGS4 Interacts with mGluR5 Signaling in Relap

See, Ronald E.

NIH/NIDA

Striatal Mechanisms of Relapse to Cocaine Seeking

Shapshak, Angela H.

Johns Hopkins Univ.

Smith, Rachel J.

NIH/NIDA

Molecular Mechanisms of Cocaine-Induced Alteration Receptors

Smith, Amena Weston

NIH/NEI

Role of Calpain in the Pathogenesis of Experimental O

Smith, Rachel J.

NIH/NIDA

Molecular Mechanisms of Cocaine-Induced Alteration Receptors

Turan, Tanya N.

NIH/NINDS

Characterization of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Stenos

Turner, Raymond

Univ. of Florida

Turner, Raymond

Codman and Shurtleff, Inc.

Codman Training Grant - Work Order #1

Turner, Raymond

MindFrame, Inc.

MindFrame Training Event (07/11) - Stress Test Evalua the MindFrame System with Multiple Device Use in N Competetive Device Control

Turner, Robert P.

MIND Institute

Prevention of Photoparoxysmal EEG Abnormalities th Stimulation

Woodward, John J.

NIH/NIAAA

Training in Alcohol Research

Woodward, John J.

NIH/NIDA

Neural Actions of Toluene

Youssef, Michael

Amer. Brain Tumor Assoc

ABTA 2011 Medical Student Summer Fellowship

12

Phytopharm Plc

NIH/NINDS

ev3 Neurovascular

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Investigation of Cogane (PYM50028) in Early-stage P

ICH Removal: Minimally Invasive Surgery + rt-PA

AMERICA: AxiumTM MicroFX for Endovascular Rep A Multi-Center, Prospective Observational Registry


Parkinson's Disease

$73,462

$17,615

$91,077

pse to Cocaine-Seeking

$8,750

$4,156

$12,906

$14,000

$6,440

$20,440

$55,821

$11,155

$66,976

ns in Accumbens AMPA

$852

$-

$852

Optic Neuritis

$420

$-

$420

ns in Accumbens AMPA

$50,474

$-

$50,474

sis Using HR MRI

$160,814

$11,108

$171,922

pair of IntraCranial Aneurysm -

$15,000

$3,000

$18,000

$12,186

$5,788

$17,974

ation for Vessel Tolerance of Native Swine Arteries Versus

$16,512

$7,843

$24,355

hrough Patterened Auditory

$30,000

$-

$30,000

$321,549

$23,343

$344,892

$15,350

$7,291

$22,641

$3,000

$-

$3,000

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Publicat ion s Re c e n t Pu b l i cat ions

Publications

* Alice H. Luo, Pouya Tahsili-Fahadan, Roy A. Wise, Carl R. Lupica, and Gary Aston-Jones (2011) Linking Context with Reward: A Functional Circuit from Hippocampal CA3 to Ventral Tegmental Area. Science 15 July 2011: 353-357. Reichel CM, Moussawi K, Do P, Kalivas PW, See RE (2011) Chronic N-acetylcysteine during abstinence or extinction following cocaine self-administration produces enduring reductions in drug-seeking. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics; 337(2):487-493. Zhou L, Sun WL, See RE (2011) Orexin receptor targets for anti-relapse medication development. Pharmaceuticals 4:804-821. Feltenstein MW, Henderson AR, See RE (2011) Enhancement of cue reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in rats by yohimbine: sex differences and the role of the estrous cycle. Psychopharmacology; 216(1):53-62. Waters RP, See RE (2011) Chronic cocaine selfadministration attenuates the stress inducing effects of the benzodiazepine inverse agonist, FG 7142. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior; 99:408413.

Galuska CM, Banna KM, Willse LV, Yahyavi-FirouzAbadi N, See RE (2011) A comparison of economic demand and conditioned-cued reinstatement of methamphetamine- or food-seeking in rats. Behavioural Pharmacology; 22(4):312-323. * Stenting versus Aggressive Medical Therapy for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis Marc I. Chimowitz, M.B., Ch.B., Michael J. Lynn, M.S., Colin P. Derdeyn, M.D., Tanya N. Turan, M.D., David Fiorella, M.D., Ph.D., Bethany F. Lane, R.N., L. Scott Janis, Ph.D., Helmi L. Lutsep, M.D., Stanley L. Barnwell, M.D., Ph.D., Michael F. Waters, M.D., Ph.D., Brian L. Hoh, M.D., J. Maurice Hourihane, M.D., Elad I. Levy, M.D., Andrei V. Alexandrov, M.D., Mark R. Harrigan, M.D., David Chiu, M.D., Richard P. Klucznik, M.D., Joni M. Clark, M.D., Cameron G. McDougall, M.D., Mark D. Johnson, M.D., G. Lee Pride, Jr., M.D., Michel T. Torbey, M.D., M.P.H., Osama O. Zaidat, M.D., Zoran Rumboldt, M.D., and Harry J. Cloft, M.D., Ph.D. for the SAMMPRIS Trial Investigators N Engl J Med 2011; 365:993-1003 September 15, 2011

Aquilla Turk1, Jordan Asher Magarik2, Imran Chaudry1, Raymond D Turner3, Joyce Nicholas3, Christine A Holmstedt3, Julio Chalela3, Angela Hays3, Christos Lazaridis3, Edward Jauch3, Marc Chimowitz3, Tanya Turan3, Robert Adams3. CT perfusion-guided patient selection for endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke is safe and effective. J NeuroIntervent Surg doi:10.1136/neurintsurg-2011-010067

T h e Cat al yst- July 2 2 , 2 0 1 1 *Fe atu red Pu bl ic a t i o n ( Linking Context with Reward: A Functional Circuit from Hippocampal CA3 to Ventral Tegmental Area.) Researchers discover brain circuit vital in addiction- Spotlight in the Lab Imagine if actor Charlie Sheen were able to break the link his brain makes every time he sees triggers in his environment that induce a substance abuse relapse. He might still have his hit show and his wife. In an article published in the July 15 edition of Science, MUSC and National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers report the discovery of a new brain circuit that is responsible for connecting contextual, or environmental, cues and stimuli with the perceived reward for responding to those cues. This discovery is important for developing new therapies to treat recovering drug addicts, people suffering from certain mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, or people who live with learning disorders. It also sheds light on the brain system responsible for allowing people to adapt to changes in their environments over time... To read the rest of this Catalyst article visit:

http://www.musc.edu/catalyst/archive/2011/co7-22researchers.html

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Publ ic a tio n in T h e Ne w s

* Fe a tu re d Pu b l i c a t ion ( Stenting versus Aggressive Medical Therapy for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis.) Marc Chimowitz, M.D. co-authored the article "Stenting versus Aggressive Medical Therapy for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis", which was recently published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine. This article subsequently lead to an article in the Washington Post. To read the Washington Post article please visit the link below: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/ brain-stents-for-stroke-patients-do-more-harm-thangood-study-shows/2011/09/02/gIQAtRWS9J_print.html

MUSC has sent out a press release (see below) regarding Dr. Marc Chimowitz's SAMMPRIS clinical trial and its findings (approved by NEJM and NIH). Dr. Chimowitz's has also done several interviews about his findings including the following: New York Times Washington Post Wall Street Journal LA Times WebMD Bloomberg News Science News Cardiovascular Business HealthDay Congratulations to Dr. Chimowitz on a fantastic publishing accomplishment and the great media attention it is sure to receive across the nation.

MUSC Press Release Contact: Heather Woolwine 843.792.7669 woolwinh@musc.edu Sept. 7, 2011 Medical treatment better than stenting for high-risk stroke patients MUSC-led trial findings published in NEJM CHARLESTON -- Physicians now have evidence that aggressive medical therapy is safer and more effective than placing a stent in the brain to ward off a second stroke in high-risk patients with a narrowed brain artery. Results from a 50-center nationwide clinical trial

spearheaded by lead investigator Marc Chimowitz, MBChB, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Neurosciences professor and SmartState endowed chair, have shown that aggressive medical management alone is superior to aggressive medical management combined with a specific type of brain stent for patients at high risk for stroke. Investigators published the results from the Stenting vs. Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial in this week’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. “There were two surprising findings in this study,” Chimowitz said. “First, stents did not perform as well as we had anticipated which has important implications for clinical practice because stenting is increasingly being used to treat these patients worldwide. The second surprising finding was the large gains demonstrated through the use of aggressive medical therapy on its own. This is the first stroke-related trial to include lifestyle change therapy and protocol-driven management of multiple risk factors such as high blood pressure and raised cholesterol,” he said. “Based on the results of this study, stroke patients with recent symptoms and intracranial arterial blockage of 70 percent or greater should be treated with aggressive medical therapy alone that follows the regimen used in this trial as closely as possible.” The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the NIH (National Institutes of Health) and which funded the trial, halted new enrollment in the study in April because early data showed significantly more strokes and death among stented patients at the 30day mark when compared to the group who received aggressive medical management alone. “This study provides an answer to a longstanding question by physicians, what to do to prevent a devastating second stroke in a high risk population. Although technological advances have brought intracranial stenting into widespread practice, we have now learned that this particular device does not lead to a better health outcome,” said Walter Koroshetz, M.D., NINDS deputy director. Study details Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the US. Stenosis, a blockage or narrowing of a brain artery caused by the build up of plaque, accounts for more than 50,000 of the 795,000 strokes that occur annually nationwide. Stenosis is particularly common in African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, and people with diabetes. The SAMMPRIS study enrolled 451 patients at 50 sites across the US. The investigators looked at whether patients had a second stroke or died within 30 days of enrollment, or had a stroke in the same area of the brain from 30 days to the end of follow-up.

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They had hypothesized that compared to aggressive medical therapy alone, the addition of intracranial stenting system would decrease the risk of stroke or death by 35 percent over two years. Instead they found that 14.7 percent of patients (33) in the stenting group experienced a stroke or died within the first 30 days after enrollment, compared with 5.8 percent (13) of patients treated with medical therapy alone. There were five stroke-related deaths within 30 days, all in the stenting group, and one non-stroke related death in the medical management group. Over a mean follow-up of 11.9 months, 20.5 percent of patients in the stenting group and 11.5 percent of patients in the medical group had a study primary endpoint (stroke or death within 30 days or stroke in the same area of brain beyond 30 days), which demonstrates a highly significant difference in favor of the aggressive medical management on its own. Based on these data, the Data and Safety Monitoring Board recommended the NINDS stop new enrollment, and the institute issued a clinical alert. All patients will continue to be followed for two years to determine the long-term effects of both interventions. Aggressive medical management is defined as: • a daily dosage of 325 milligrams of aspirin; • 75 milligrams a day of clopidogrel, a medication used to prevent blood clots, for 90 days after enrollment; and

Carol Krolicki in front of her award winning poster at the Diabetes Symposium.

• intensive management of key stroke risk factorshigh blood pressure and high levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL), the unhealthy form of cholesterol. All patients also participated in a lifestyle modification program which focused on quitting smoking, increasing exercise, weight loss in overweight patients, healthy diet, and controlling risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol. With aggressive medical management, the medical group in this trial had a 30-day rate of stroke and death of 5.8 percent and a one year primary endpoint rate of 12.2 percent. In comparison, patients in a previous NIH trial with similar entrance criteria to SAMMPRIS who were treated with less intensive medical management had a 30-day rate of stroke and death of 10.7 percent and a one year rate of primary endpoint of 25 percent, suggesting that the aggressive medical management in this trial was effective in lowering the risk of stroke.

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For more data and study details, visit the New England Journal of Medicine’s website: http://www.nejm.org/ doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1105335

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Ne w s Neurosc ienc e Ser vice Line Leader Em ploye e Rec ognit ion Program Congratulations to Leah Ramos for receiving the Leader Employee Recognition Award for the Neuroscience Service Line. This award is presented 2 times a year. Leah received her award at the NSL Managers Meeting on July 8, 2011. Comments from her peers include: I'd like to nominate Leah for the NSL Leader Employee Recognition. She is always upbeat, positive and "get's the job done". I've enjoyed working with Leah since she was an Educator back in NSICU. She's grown into quite the manager in a short period of time and seems to be respected by her peers and coworkers. She also received the MUHA Nurse Manager of the Year Award. I've never had to track Leah down for anything - she's quick at responding to all emails, phone calls and work related requests. Leah is someone I know I can go to with any questions and trust that her answers are knowledgeable and correct. She's very appreciative of any help I give - not only does she verbalize this on a regular basis, she also sends thank you notes to my house quite often. Leah is an asset to the NSL and should be recognized for all she does. Leah sets a great example and mentors staff. She is an expert in neuro nursing.

Heart Walk Fundraise r Brain Teasers (the Department of Neurosciences Heart Walk Team) has raised over $1,900 for the American Heart Association. We want to thank everyone that participated in our fundraiser and helped us to exceed our goal.

Diabet es Sym posium Poste r Awards Carol Krolicki R.N III and Beth Griffin's MHP-PA-C poster "Diabetes and Vascular Disease, Making the Connection, Reducing the Risk" won third place at the scientific presenters poster competition during the recent Diabetes Symposium.


Con gra tu l a tio n s Dr. Carmela Reichel in Dr. See’s laboratory has been awarded a K12 Career development in the BIRCWH (Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health) program.

July 8, 2011 Congratulations to medical student Jordan Magarik, recipient of the 2011 AHA/ASA Student Scholarship in Cerebrovascular Disease & Stroke.

June 8, 2011 Dr. Robert J. Adams has been selected as Best Doctors in America 2011-2012.

July 19, 2011 SC AHEC Series of presentations on Stroke and Hypertension for healthcare professionals across South Carolina – The MUSC Stroke Team of Dr. Robert J. Adams, Dr. Edward C. Jauch and Dr. Daniel T. Lackland have been recognized and thanked for helping make the recent statewide telehealth educational programs offered through the South Carolina AHEC's system a success. These presentations as enduring materials are available on line for CME/CU credits. A calendar of upcoming educational events, as well as the library of online training programs may be accessed at http://scahec.

net/schools/library.html.

and the hospital to improve patient care and she is a member of the NSL Operations Committee. As the In-patient PA/NP Clinical Lead, Beth will lead and coordinate the daily activities of the Staff Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners to promote the NSL and help to guide its strategic direction in concert with the Director of Neuro-critical Care, Director of the Primary Stroke Center, Department Chair and Division Chief and Administrative Leadership of the Service Line and Department. Beth will take on a leadership role in the implementation of the vision and pillar goals of the Medical University of South Carolina, as well as the Neuroscience Service Line.

News

Please welcome Beth to her new role and give her your support as we work to improve care that we give to our patients. Thank you. June Darby, Administrator Neuroscience Service Line Steven Glazier, MD, Medical Director Neuroscience Service Line Sunil Patel, MD, Chairman Neuroscience Department Jonathan Edwards, MD, Interim Division Chief Neurology Division

August 9, 2011 Dr. Chalela surprised Emma Vought and Melissa Hill (and Grace Laird Johnston that was not in attendance) with Certificates of Excellence at the the Neuroscience Service Line August Meeting for all of their hard work on the new NSICU Patient/Family Brochure. The educational brochure will be given to each patient and family. This resource was made to help patients and their families understand more about their condition, treatment, or procedure. Their dedication to patient care and hard work is greatly appreciated.

New C l in ic a l Le ad

R E ACH: MUSC Telestroke Program Newsletter: The first REACH MUSC Telestroke Program Newsletter is scheduled for publication in September and will be distributed to partner sites and practitioners throughout the state. This inaugural issue will celebrate the network’s many accomplishments over its first three years with program updates, stroke-related articles, a community corner and several CME/CEU opportunities. For more information or to join the mailing list, please contact:

September 13, 2011 We are pleased to announce that Beth Griffin, MHP, PA-C will assume the duties of Clinical Lead for the In-patient Neuroscience PA’s and NP’s. Beth has 18 years experience as a PA and has been at MUSC for 2 years in her role as a Neurosurgery PA-C. She is very active working on current projects for the service line

the MUSC Stroke Center at 803-792-3020 or email Lynn Brown at broly@musc.edu.

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M U SC S t ro ke Cent er May 20 1 1 – Ju l y 20 1 1 Updat es Statewide Effort: June 29, 2011 - Stroke System of Care Act becomes a law; The Stroke Systems of Care Study Committee included Dr. Robert J. Adams, Chair and Dr. Edward C. Jauch, Vice-Chair. The Stroke System of Care is an effective system to support optimal stroke care needed in South Carolina in order to treat stroke patients in a timely manner and to improve the overall treatment of stroke patients to increase survival and decrease the disabilities associated with stroke.

L aw t o b e n e f it st roke pat i e n t s

Network aims to offer best care to save lives By Renee Dudley, rdudley@postandcourier.com Thursday, June 23, 2011 A soon-to-be state law will change how stroke patients are treated, sending them to the hospital that is best-equipped to handle their care instead of just the nearest medical facility. The Legislature overturned the governor's veto to pass the Stroke Prevention Act of 2011, which will establish a network of hospitals for stroke patients similar to the network that now exists for trauma patients. Like the trauma system, all hospitals will be rated based on their capabilities... to read the rest of this article please visit:

http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2011/ jun/23/law-to-benefit-stroke-patients/

A l z h e i m e r 's Researc h & C l i n i c al Program s (A RCP) Summer Newsletter is available online. Visit:

http://academicdepartments.musc. edu/arcp

St rike Out St roke July 25, 2011 This summer, the Medical University of South Carolina’s MUSC Stroke Center partnered with the Charleston Riverdogs Minor League Baseball Team to “Strike Out Stroke.” Strike Out Stroke is a grassroots program which brings health care folks and students to local sports events to educate fans about stroke and stroke prevention, as well as to provide blood-pressure checks. Strike Out Stroke began over 10 years MUSC Stroke Center Team "Strike Out Stroke" at the Charleston Riverdogs ago with a Baseball Game (July 25, 2011) consultation to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in partnership with the Baltimore Orioles Major League Baseball Team and was focused on blood pressure control. The current program in Charleston revolves around local athletic events such as baseball, high school football, car races and tennis. According to MUSC faculty organizer Professor Daniel Lackland, DrPH, a large percentage of the fans participating in Strike Out Stroke have high blood pressure and know it (30-40%). Yet many have lost touch with their health care provider and are not being treated regularly. Data has shown that approximately 10% of Strike Out Stroke participants will see a primary care provider within one month of taking part in the program. Thus this innovative outreach and awareness program is empowering patients to take control of their health while reconnecting them with their local health care provider. In the process, students receive training as they educate fans on the connection between high blood pressure and stroke and how we can all make a difference to “Strike Out Stroke” in our communities. For more information on this Strike Out Stroke and how to setup a similar program in your community, please contact:

the MUSC Stroke Center at 843-792-3020.

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Treatm en t o f Wo o t e n 's s t ro ke a n exa m pl e f or s t at e, n at i o n The Hampton County Guardian By Michael M. DeWitt, Jr. Published on Thursday, July 28, 2011 - 9:09am

James "Jimmie" Wooten is a lucky man. And he knows it. It all happened quickly, around 9 a.m. July 19. A bailiff at the Hampton County Courthouse, 73-yearold Wooten was in a restroom stall near the family courtroom when suddenly he lost consciousness and fell. He was unable to move the left side of his body, or see the left side of the world. He was inside the locked stall, helpless, afraid. A public defender, Steve Bennett, happened to see his foot sticking out from the stall and called 911 before crawling under the door to help... to read the rest of this article please visit:

http://www.hamptoncountyguardian.com/ news/treatment-wooten’s-stroke-examplestate-nation#comment-2737

Dr. Fra n ke l Fe at u re d Dr. Bruce Frankel was featured in TK system innovations magazine issue 1- 2011. This article consisted of a physican profile of Dr. Frankel (see below). The column, Portrait, features Bruce Frankel, Professor of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology in the Department of Neurosciences at the Medical University of South Carolina. His special interests include his R01 funded translational tumor research and leading the AO Nursing CE Spine Bioskills Workshop. ---beginning of article--Portrait: Bruce Frankel by Robert McGuire

Bruce Frankel is Professor of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology in the Department of Neurosciences at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, USA. Originally from New York, Bruce attended the State University of New York Upstate Medical University for medical school. After five years in practice at the University of Memphis, he chose MUSC because the

institution offered a unique arrangement where the Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Neurosciences departments were combined into one large department. The intent was to facilitate the development of novel translational research programs driven by teams of researchers composed of physicians and basic scientists. Bruce thought this would be a valuable environment in which to continue his research into tumors of the central nervous system.

News

The MUSC has grown from a small, private medical school in 1824 into one of the nation’s top academic health science centers, with a 700-bed medical center (MUSC Health) and six colleges that train approximately 2,600 healthcare professionals per year. In 2009, US News & World Report named MUSC Health “One of America’s best hospitals” in seven specialty areas, with nearly 300 MUSC Health physicians making the prestigious “Best Doctors in America” list. An active member in AANS and CNS, Bruce became engaged in the AO Foundation in 2010 after learning about the comprehensive programs offered. After several years of research in certain aspects of vertebral augmentation and product development, he was recognized for his work by the AO Foundation and invited to join the Fracture & Tumor Expert Group. He is particularly proud of his leading role in the AO Nursing CE Spine Bioskills Workshop held at MUSC on March 12, 2011. Over 30 nurses attended and several MUSC spine surgeons gave lectures. Special and current interests in spinal surgery for Bruce include less invasive approaches for the treatment of spinal fractures. This encompasses pathological conditions resulting from metastatic epidural spinal cord compressions, vertebral augmentation procedures, and novel device development. When asked about the many honors and rewards he has received, Bruce referred to his membership in the AOTK Fracture and Tumor Expert Group as “an honor to join an internationally recognized team of outstanding individuals”. He indicates that his most meaningful achievement was obtaining federal R01 funding to support his translational tumor research. Bruce says that he, his wonderful wife, and three children are fortunate to live in beautiful Charleston, South Carolina. When he is not driving from one school sporting event to another, he enjoys boating, fishing, and photography. ---end of article---

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Resident News Resident News

Me e t Ou r New Resident s Neurosurgery

Ron Ron Cheng, M.D.

Avery Buchholz, M.D.

Jan Vargas Machaj, M.D.

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Karen Maria Sequeira, M.D.

Amandeep Kalra, M.D.

Dong In Sinn, M.D.

Julia Rothlisberger, D.O.

Mac Wilson Abernathy, M.D.

Bryan West, M.D.

Jessica Hannah, M.D.

Steve Reeves, M.D.

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Up comin g Eve nt s Hockey Hero e s fo r Ep i l e p s y November 19th, 2011

Charleston Coliseum On November 19, 2011, a group of volunteers are organizing the 2nd annual event entitled, “Hockey Heroes for Epilepsy” to raise awareness and support for epilepsy research. The evening at the North Charleston Coliseum will focus on raising awareness of this devastating disease and highlight the facts and faces of those who are affected. Sponsor and vendor tables and a silent auction will accompany the awareness event. Proceeds from ticket sales, sponsors, and the silent auction will be donated to the REEF (Research and Education in Epilepsy Fund) account at the MUSC Foundation. Karen St. Marie, a parent of one of MUSC’s epilepsy patients, is leading the initiative once again this year and hopes to surpass the great success the event had in 2010. Karen leads this initiative because “there is a tremendous need for epilepsy advocacy and awareness in our state.” Karen is leading the event as the new Executive Director of the South Carolina Advocates for Epilepsy (SAFE) organization. When Karen was asked what inspired her to form SAFE, she responded,” “Experiencing these very real issues first hand, I knew there were other families in South Carolina that desperately needed help and support. My son became my inspiration to do just that, and South Carolina Advocates For Epilepsy was founded. Our goal is to help epilepsy patients and their families through advocacy, education and inspiration. We hope to make a difference for everyone that deals with epilepsy on a daily basis.” Please join us as the South Carolina Stingrays battle it out on the ice with the Gwinnett Gladiators, for a fun and unique way to support MUSC’s epilepsy program. According to the Epilepsy Foundation, epilepsy and seizures affect 3 million Americans at all ages, and 200,000 more cases are diagnosed each year. In South Carolina, approximately 90,000 people carry an epilepsy diagnosis, with 44,000 currently receiving treatment. In addition, 2,100 new cases of epilepsy are diagnosed in South Carolina each year.

Epilepsy facebook page. An additional Hockey Heroes Event (II) will be held on November 10, 2011, at the Bi-Lo Center in Greenville, SC. For additional ways to support the epilepsy program at MUSC, or questions about the event, please do not hesitate to contact:

Events

Debbie Bordeau, our Director of Development, at 843.792.4342 or bordeau@musc.edu.

Wal k t o End A lz heim er's October 22nd, 2011 10am at Patriots Point

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. Join the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’sTM and unite in a movement to reclaim the future for millions. With more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s , and nearly 11 million more serving as caregivers, the time to act is now! For more information visit:

www.musc.edu/arcp

P ink Heal s Tour

September 27th MUSC Horseshoe 12- 2pm A new event is coming up called the “Pink Heals Tour,”. It includes a fleet of pink fire trucks that tour the country to promote awareness for all women with cancers. Female cancer survivors are invited to sign the trucks. To learn more about this group visit:

http://pinkfiretrucks.org/ The tour is coming to Charleston on September 27th and their one and only stop will be at MUSC. The trucks will be parked on the horseshoe from 12:002:00. In honor of this event MUSC will also be hosting a cancer awareness fair. To learn more please contact. Heidi Stroup at stroup@musc.edu

Additional details on the event can be found at stingrayshockey.com or by visiting the Hockey Heroes for

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Trau m at i c B rain Injur y Symposium

Events

Saturday, November 19, 2011 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Storm Eye Institute, 8th Floor A symposium on Traumatic Brain Injury will take place at MUSC on Saturday, November 19th in the Storm Eye Institute auditorium. Sponsored in part by the Department of Neuroscience, AHEC, Rosen, Rosen & Hagood LLC and the Steinberg Law Firm, this day long symposium will feature Dr. Nancey Tsai, Dr. Jonathan Edwards, Dr. L. Randolph Waid, Joyce Davis and Richard Rosen, Esq. Topics covered will range from overview and diagnosis of TBI, occupational and speech therapy, neuropsychiatry and detection, patient resources and legal issues. AHEC credits are available. For more information please contact Caroline Diez, diezc@musc.edu 792-9554 and look for updates on the MUSC Neuroscience website.

20 1 1 S t ro ke Awareness He al t h Fai r October 27th from 10am – 2pm MUSC Horseshoe/Portico

MUSC Stroke Program will hold a Stroke Awareness Health Fair open to the public to celebrate stroke awareness. Health care providers will offer consultations, blood pressures, cholesterol and blood sugar screenings (no food 3 hours prior to cholesterol screening if possible), nutrition information, weight management, speech therapy, occupational and physical therapies, diabetic education, stress management, smoking cessation, and REACH/ telemedicine information. Stroke health educational material will also be provided by the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

To f in d o u t mo re ab o u t Ho c key Heroes f or Epilepsy visit : http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hockey-Heroes-for-Epilepsy/136647539700477

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Employee Update

G oodbye and Good Luc k

Welc o m e New Emp l o ye e s

Name Dilan Ellegala Sarah Valesco Ashley King Vicky Salak Balasubrama Annanalai Rebecca Fallon Rebecca Madell Deborah Mitchell Chelsie Benca Amy Parker Melza Van Roijen Jiulong (Justin) Yang Jessica Kandl Sarah M. Barry Lori Roten Rebecca Ellison Becca Ready Meghan Steiner Greg Sartor Shanon Smith Tadanobu Utsuki Pengfei Li Tamela Kyryliuk Allison Markowitz Moroni Kenneth Hoshino Kaylin Currie Heather Collins

Name Carrie Smith Sarah Alota Amy DeLambo Wayne Feng Britt Hinkson Pratik Chhatbar Suzanne Pach Audrey Padula Faraday Davies Ashley Gantt Caitlin Evins Matthew Newsome Elliott Mappus Catherine Haar Martijn Huits Andrea Bari Michelle Caskey Kimberly Fender Jonathan Dilgen, Alex Matthews Maggie Crosby Colleen Hanlon Rebecca Wilson Viran Jay Ranasinghe Sarah M. Barry Chris Etheredge Christina Crossley Hleb Fedarovich Stephanie Johnson Samantha Minkin Aly Bourreza Ethan Brewer Joshua Smith Adrien Schramm Carmela Reichel Grace Baik Andrew Stubenrauch Peter Bailey Hao He Lidia Yamada Pratik Chhatbar Cody Weidenthaler Catherine Danner DeAnna Adkins Terence Muir Travis Nesland Sarah Valesco

Position PA Admin Specialist Neurology NP for Neurology Stroke Program Physician PA/Clinical Instructor Postdoc APRN/Clinical Instructor RS I RS I RS II Student Volunteer Student / Other Student / Summer Volunteer Post Doc Prog. Asst. RS I Post Doc GA Student/MUSC Faculty / Dual RS I Volunteer Student/MUSC RS I Volunteer Student Volunteer Prog. Asst Student Student/Other GA - Student Post Doc Res Asst Prof RS I TEMP RS I Student/MUSC RSI Visiting Scholar Post Doc RS I Admin Asst Asst Prof TEMP RS I Info Res Coord

Position Neurosurgeon Admin Asst RSI Instructor Staff Sci. I RS I Student Admin Asst RSII RNI TEMP - RS I RS I Prog. Asst Student/MUSC Admin Spec. II Volunteer Student Prog. Asst (PT) GA Student Staff Sci. I Exchange Student RS II Prog. Asst RS I Student/Other Post Doc

Employee Updates

Thanks and Congrat ul at ions John and I, as well as our children Troy Peter, Dane Ryan and Jake Liam, are proud to announce the arrival of Zack Ethan. He arrived 3 weeks early on 8/24 at 7 pounds, 20 1/2 inches. We are so excited to have him and grateful for his health and safe arrival. We would like to thank the department for the generous and delicious gift. It was a wonderful surprise and could not have come at a better time. We are so appreciative and grateful for everyone's kind thoughts and gifts. Christine Holmstedt, DO

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Thank you for your contributions. For questions, comments or to make a submission please contact: Emma C. Vought at vought@musc.edu or Rachel Beard at beardr@musc.edu

www.MUSC.edu/neurosciences

MUSC NeuroNews September 2011  

The departmental newsletter for MUSC's department of Neurosciences.

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