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COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS Medical University of South Carolina

Leading the Way 2012 annual report

151-A Rutledge Avenue, MSC 960, Charleston, South Carolina, 29425 | www.musc.edu/chp


MISSION As a College dedicated to educating a diverse range of health professionals, we benefit our students, the University, and community through our synergistic approach to creating new knowledge and expertise. Through interprofessional collaboration and innovation, we enrich the learning environment, increase our capacity to conduct research, and augment our ability to provide service. We are a dynamic and responsive College that generates solutions and contributes to the overall health and well-being of the citizens of our state and beyond.

VISION The College of Health Professions seeks to achieve national distinction in health professions’ education, research and service.


2 ‘1 TABLE OF CONTENTS 2012 Annual Report

4 Executive Summary 12 College Organizational Chart 14 Educational Highlights 18 Research and Scholarship Highlights 22 Service Highlights 25 Awards and Promotions 32 Department of Health Professions 38 Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management 41 Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions 46 Department of Health Sciences and Research 49 Development and Alumni Relations 54 Tribute to Dr. Benjamin F. Lawson 55 Human Resources 57 Financial Highlights 60 Student Achievement Highlights 68 Appendix 68 Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report 86 Appendix B: Grants 90 Appendix C: Student Productivity Report 96 Acknowledgements


Executive Summary This 2011-2012 annual report provides an overview of accomplishments across all areas of our mission and highlights the significant achievements of our faculty, staff and students. The executive summary will first identify substantial changes within the College over the last year and then present key indicators that characterize our advancement over the past year.


Executive Summary 5

Significant Changes: Leadership and Administrative Appointments Lisa K. Saladin, PT, PhD Dean Effective October 1, 2011, Dr. Lisa K. Saladin was appointed Dean of the College of Health Professions. Dr. Lisa Saladin, previously Executive Associate Dean of the College and Chair of the Department of Health Professions, served as Interim Dean for the College of Health Professions (CHP) from July 2010 to October 2011. Subsequent to a national search, she was offered and accepted the position of Dean for the College. With her national reputation in her academic discipline, her exemplary performance during her tenure as CHP Executive Associate Dean and then as Interim Dean of the College of Health Professions, a strong consensus developed amongst search committee members to recommend offering the permanent position to Dr. Saladin. Among many desirable leadership qualities cited by the search committee, her collaborative approach to decision-making was highlighted as having a direct and immediate impact on CHP. “Dr. Saladin is also accorded extraordinary respect for her accomplishments as a faculty member, as evidenced by her numerous honors for her teaching at MUSC and beyond, and her national reputation in her academic discipline of physical therapy,” said Dr. Mark Sothmann, MUSC Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Provost. “Her expertise is further evidenced in her scholarship, and through her insightful service to the College, MUSC, and on the national level. I am confident she has the skills, the demeanor, and the talent to enhance the prominence the College already enjoys. I believe it is a tribute to the College of Health Professions faculty that a rigorous national search to find the best candidate identified one of their own.” At MUSC, Dr. Saladin has served as Director of the Physical Therapy Education Program, Chairwoman of the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Chairwoman of the Department of Health Professions. She also led the design and implementation of a distance degree program for physical therapy in Greenville, SC. Dr. Saladin has received three University Teaching Excellence Awards, has been designated a Master Teacher by the MUSC Board of Trustees and received a national award for Teaching Excellence from the American Physical Therapy Association. Dr. Saladin earned her bachelor’s degree in Medical Rehabilitation Physical Therapy and a master’s degree in Anatomy from the University of Manitoba. She received her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Nova Southeastern University in Florida.

College of Health Professions MUSC


6 Executive Summary

Maralynne Mitcham, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Assistant Dean Dr. Maralynne Mitcham served as Chair of the Department of Health Professions in 2011. Since 2012, she was offered and accepted a new role as Assistant Dean in the College of Health Professions. Her portfolio will include serving as the primary mentor champion in the College with oversight and accountability for the College mentorship plan as well as service as an individual mentor for College faculty interesting in developing career plans/goals and writing papers for scholarship. She will also serve as a mentor for division directors and for those interested in writing training grants. Dr. Mitcham is nationally and internationally known for her mentorship skills with academic faculty and this skill set is an excellent match for the College. She will continue to provide vital leadership for the interprofessional component of the College strategic plan, the University Creative Collaborative Care (C3) initiative, and she will continue her important contributions to the occupational therapy curriculum.

Becki Trickey, BS, MHA, PhD Interim Chair, Department of Health Professions Dr. Becki Trickey, Professor Emerita, graciously agreed to return from retirement to serve as Interim Chair of the Department of Health Professions while the College launches and completes a national search for a new chair. Dr. Trickey retired from the Medical University of South Carolina in June 2011 after serving with distinction since 1972. She held an active faculty appointment in the College of Health Professions for thirty-two years serving as an educator, scholar, administrator and mentor. She has provided leadership with distinction in the College and her temporary return has been greatly appreciated.

James S. Zoller, PhD Chair, Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management Dr. James Zoller was appointed 2012 Annual Report

Department Chair of the new Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management. Dr. Zoller has extensive experience in hospital administration and as an academic educator, scholar and administrator that will be a valuable asset in this new role. Dr. Zoller received his doctorate in Biometry & Epidemiology from the Medical University of South Carolina and a Master of Health Administration degree from Virginia Commonwealth University. Prior to joining the Department of Health Administration & Policy in the College of Health Professions in 2003, he was a Research Associate in the MUSC Center for Healthcare Research. Dr. Zoller has more than 15 years of experience as a hospital administrator in South Carolina with prior clinical experience as a Respiratory Therapist. He has more than 10 years of experience as an academic administrator with roles to include Director of the Survey Research Unit, Director of the Doctoral of Health Administration program, Interim Chair of the Department of Health Administration and Policy, and most recently as the Director of the Division of Healthcare Leadership. Dr. Zoller currently teaches courses in statistics, epidemiology and research methods in health administration programs at the doctorate and master’s degree levels in the College and he has a sustained record of active engagement in survey research. The creation of this new Department provides an opportunity to advance the already outstanding reputation the College has developed in the areas of healthcare leadership and management and Dr. Zoller is the perfect person to lead this new initiative.

Gilbert Boissonneault, PhD Chair, Division of Physician Assistant Studies After an extensive national search, Dr. Gilbert Boissonneault was selected from a well-qualified pool of candidates to serve as Director of the Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Health Professions, at the rank of professor with tenure effective January 2012. Dr. Boissonneault received a doctorate in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Illinois; a master in Library and Information Sciences, and a bachelor in Physician Assistant studies from the University of Kentucky. Dr. Boissonneault has over 25 years in higher edu-


Executive Summary 7

cation with experience as an educator, a scholar and an academic leader. He held the rank of professor with tenure at the University of Kentucky since 1995 where he had academic leadership roles that included Department Chair for Clinical Services and Interim Director of the Physician Assistant program. As an educator, Dr. Boissonneault has received two awards for teaching excellence in the classroom and has been described as patient, extremely knowledgeable, organized and always current. He has mentored and served as a committee member for more than 100 master and doctoral students throughout his career. In the area of scholarship, Dr. Boissonneault has more than 70 publications in peer-reviewed journals and 10 published book chapters demonstrating a sustained record of productivity in the area of nutrition sciences and areas pertinent to his role as physician assistant. Dr. Boissonneault is a role model for faculty. He is poised to exert substantial leadership to direct the future of the Division of Physician Assistant Studies.

Nancy Carson, PhD Interim Director, Division of Occupational Therapy Dr. Nancy Carson was appointed Interim Director for the Division of Occupational Therapy in October 2011. She has a bachelor’s degree in Occupational Therapy, a master’s degree in Health Science, and PhD in Public Health from the University of South Carolina. Dr. Carson is a specialist in the psycho-social aspects of occupational therapy, one of the very few in South Carolina, and makes a significant contribution to our curriculum in this area. She has been a full and part-time faculty member in the College since 1990 and has served in a variety of roles including curriculum coordinator and student advising coordinator. Dr. Carson is well-prepared to fill this leadership role as the College launches a national search for a permanent director.

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Leslie Brady, MSW Director of Development Ms. Leslie Brady joined the College of Health Professions as Director of Development. In her new position, she will be responsible for working with alumni, corporations and other supporters to raise private funds for the benefit of the College. Ms. Brady earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Social Work at Winthrop University and the University of South Carolina, respectively, and worked in social work for 10 years before transitioning to healthcare communications in 1996. She later became involved in professional fund development at Inova health System Foundation in Fairfax Virginia, earned her Certificate of Fundraising Management from The Center on Philanthropy’s Fundraising School at Indiana University at Purdue. In 2007, she returned to South Carolina to serve as Executive Director of the Charleston Horticultural Society, a post she held until joining the College. Ms. Brady brings the experience and the drive needed to substantially improve our outcomes in fundraising. She has an infectiously positive attitude, and a warm and engaging personality as well as the requisite skills for the job. She is well respected in the development community and we are proud to have recruited her to our team.

Julie Parrish, MBA Executive Director of Finance and Administration Ms. Julie Parrish was promoted to the Executive Director of Finance & Administration for the College of Health Professions upon the retirement of the Assistant Dean for Finance and Administration. She provides leadership to the Shared Services Team Leaders, assumes responsibilities for leadership of the research and finance teams, serves on the College Leadership Council, manages financial and human resources activities in the College and interfaces with finance and administration at the University-level. Ms. Parrish graduated from the College of Charleston and obtained her MBA from the Citadel while working in her first position in audit with Hagemeyer (formerly College of Health Professions MUSC


collaboration

Cameron & Barkley Company). She obtained 10 years of internal audit and management experience before transitioning to their manufacturing facility outside of Raleigh, NC as the Finance Manager. After 13 years with Hagemeyer, Ms. Parrish welcomed the opportunity to transition back home to Charleston where she served as plant controller for Saint-Gobain until joining the College. In August 2009, Ms. Parrish joined the College as the Director of Finance.

Significant Changes: Organizational New Academic Department Effective August 12, 2011, the MUSC Board of Trustees unanimously approved the establishment of a new Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management in the College of Health Professions. This new Department merged three different academic degree programs in health administration that were housed in two separate Departments into a single unit to enhance efficiencies and to emphasize the importance of healthcare administration and leadership. As health care reform evolves, the Department is positioned to educate and develop strong leaders with knowledge of health policy, health delivery systems, quality improvement, and resource management.

Summary of Significant Accomplishments Education • Admissions applications for FY 2011-2012 reached a new record high with 1,787 submissions, a 15% increase from the previous year. Contributing to these numbers, the College hosted over 650 prospective students who participated in information sessions, private tours and/or group visits on campus. • The College of Health Professions continues to serve the largest number of students among the six colleges at the Medical University of South Carolina, with 723 enrolled students.

• 96.4% of graduating students believe they made the right choice in selecting the MUSC College of Health Professions. • Students graduating from programs that take national board examinations performed exceptionally well again this year with four of our academic programs achieving 100% pass rate, with an overall pass rate of 98.5%. • The U.S. News and World Report ranked the Division of Occupational Therapy at 21 out of 151 programs this year; an increase from the 2010 ranking of 24th place. • The U.S. News and World Report ranked the Division of Physician Assistant Studies (PAS) in the top 25 of all masters-level PAS programs nationally. • The Division of Physical Therapy was ranked 51st out of 211 accredited programs in the 2012 U.S. News and World Report rankings of physical therapy programs. • The College of Health Professions continues to take a significant leadership role in interprofessional (IP) education and collaborative practice on the MUSC campus. o In the past year, 12 graduates from the College completed the MUSC Interprofessional Education Fellowship. o An interprofessional team from the College was selected as one of the four university-wide recipients of the inaugural 2011-2013 Interprofessional grant funding cycle: Drs. Wanda Gonsalves, Patty Coker-Bolt, Kit Simpson, Sara Kraft, and Gretchen Seif wrote a winning proposal entitled “IPE at MUSC: Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support (CARES) Clinic.” o Faculty, staff and students from all colleges at MUSC were represented at the Collaborating Across Borders III conference focusing on an exploration of common issues around interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP).


Executive Summary 9

o College of Health Professions faculty received two awards for best posters at the national Collaborating Across Borders III conference in Arizona focusing on an exploration of common issues around interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP). Drs. Sara Kraft, Holy Wise, Paul Jacques, Mr. Jerry Burik, Drs. Barbara Edlund (College of Nursing), Maralynne Mitcham, and David Graber were awarded best poster (development theme), “Discharge planning case study: An interprofessional learning activity to enhance caring/compassion in health professions students.” Medical student E. Thomas Lewis, pharmacy student Caroline Griggs, Mr. David Howell and Dr. Maralynne Mitcham were awarded best poster (infrastructure theme) for “Assessing the effectiveness of a student interprofessional society in promoting collaboration between future health care practitioners.” • Dr. K. Jackson Thomas, Professor in the Division of Physical Therapy, received the 2011 College of Health Professions Teacher of the Year, an award he also received in 2001. • Dr. Gretchen Seif, Assistant Professor in the Division of Physical Therapy, was awarded the 2012 MUSC Health Sciences Foundation Teaching Excellence Developing Teacher Award. • Dr. Patricia Coker-Bolt, Assistant Professor in the Division of Occupational Therapy, received the 2012 Health Sciences Foundation Teaching Excellence Educator-Mentor Award.

• Dr. James Krause, Director of the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions, received the 2011 National Courage Award. This award is presented annually by the Courage Center and the Medtronic Foundation to recognize an individual’s outstanding contributions to the health, welfare and rehabilitation of people with disabilities. Previous recipients of the award include, but are not limited to, former Senator and Presidential candidate Bob Dole, former US Attorney General Janet Reno, physics pioneer Stephen Hawking, and research advocate and former actor Christopher Reeve. Dr. Krause, a leading national expert in health and longevity following a spinal cord injury, was recognized for his contributions as a researcher and scholar. • Dr. Heather Bonilha, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Research, received the 2011 College of Health Professions Developing Scholar of the Year Award. • A funding highlight for the year was the award of an American Heart Association (AHA) Innovative Research Grant to Drs. Steven Kautz (PI) and Bowden, both in the Department of Health Sciences and Research. This prestigious award is a relatively new funding mechanism estab-

Students graduating from programs that take national board examinations performed exceptionally well again this year with four of our academic programs achieving 100% pass rate, with an overall pass rate of 98.5%.

Research and Scholarship • Grant submissions averaged 28.5 million dollars over the last three years. • Of our 28 federal applications this past year, 11 (39%) were for requests greater than $1 million. • Noteworthy in our grant submissions for 2012 were 28 federal proposals totaling $25.4 million and of these, 10 were Veteran’s Administration applications for more than $10 million, 3 were National Institute of Health proposals for $3.9 million, and 3 were applications to the Department of Education for $1.2 million.

Mrs. Deepthi Meruva, 2012 MHA Graduate, with husband College of Health Professions MUSC


10 Executive Summary

lished “to support highly innovative, high-risk, high-reward research that could ultimately lead to critical discoveries or major advancements that will accelerate the field of cardiovascular and stroke research.” The award is extremely competitive in that only one in rehabilitation was awarded from a competitive pool of nearly 350 applications.

innovation

• Dr. Michelle Woodbury, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Research, and collaborators from a computer science research team at the Clemson University School of Computing have designed an award winning, innovative, upper extremity stroke rehabilitation virtual reality game. The group was one of only three teams to qualify in the national competition. Their game placed 2nd at the International Microsoft Imagine Cup Kinect Fun Labs Challenge 2012 Competition, which was held in Australia in June, 2012. • Dr. Matthew Malcolm joined the Department of Health Sciences and Research faculty, with a secondary appointment in the Division of Occupational Therapy. Dr. Malcolm has specific expertise in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), motor control, and intensive rehabilitation paradigms. His research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), American Heart Association (AHA), the VA, and industry.

2012 Annual Report

• The College is establishing a state-of-the-art neurostimulation research laboratory. This lab will offer capabilities to study brain function and activity, and to develop, test, and apply neuro-rehabilitative applications of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). • The PhD students have been engaged in self-initiated, mentored research and have several other achievements that demonstrate the high caliber of their science and scholarship including: 23 peer-reviewed manuscripts accepted for publication, 40 research presentations, 13 awards and 6 grants.

Service • Dr. Becki A. Trickey, Professor Emerita, received the 2011 Medical University of South Carolina Distinguished Faculty Service Award. • The College of Health Professions students have donated over 4,500 hours of community service within the last year. • Dr. James Krause, Professor and Associate Dean for Research, was awarded The NARRTC Distinguished Service Award on April 26, 2012, which is the highest recognition conferred by NARRTC. This award is given to individuals with sustained contributions or an accumulation of life-time achievements to the field of disability through research, teaching, service, knowledge translation, or advocacy. Second year Occupational Therapy student, Carson Michalski greeting a patient in line amongst hundreds at a clinic in Uganda.


Executive Summary 11

• Dr. Charles Ellis, Associate Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Research, was awarded the 2011 Certificate of Recognition for Special Contribution in Multicultural Affairs of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). He was recognized for his achievements and contributions in the area of multicultural professional education, research and clinical service. • Dr. Patty Coker-Bolt, Assistant Professor in the Division of Occupational Therapy, was selected as the 2011 Volunteer of the Year Award as part of Charleston Magazine’s Giving Back Awards. The Giving Back Awards are granted annually by Charleston Magazine to support, promote, and recognize nonprofit organizations throughout the Lowcountry. • Ms. Naomi Sampson, Instructor and Director of Executive Operations and Project Management, received the MUSC Excellence in Leadership Award. Ms. Sampson was recognized for fully embracing MUSC Excellence and serving as a role model to others.

Strategic Plan

The College has implemented its five year strategic plan. Strategic leaders have been identified to facilitate the yearly initiatives within the plan. There are seven overarching goals that map to the University’s strategic plan. 1

Enhance national and international distinction in neuro-rehabilitation research.

2

Attain national and international recognition for innovative, entrepreneurial activities in health professions research, education, and service.

3

Be recognized by stakeholders as having faculty and staff who are motivated, consumer oriented, talented and professionally prepared.

4

Lead South Carolina and the nation in translating research into the classroom and clinic of our respective professions.

5

Achieve national and international distinction as leaders in interprofessional education and practice.

6

Demonstrate the value and maximize the ability of all health professions represented in the College to participate in new models of health care delivery emerging from health care reform.

7

Educate and graduate students who reflect and are culturally sensitive to the communities in which we serve.

recognition

• Ms. Ashley Hodge, Assistant Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Perfusion, was awarded the College of Health Professions Excellence in Service and Clinical Service Award. This award is presented to faculty members who, during a substantial portion of their careers, have provided exceptional and sustained service and contributions in teaching, research, health care, public service and/ or clinical service to the College, University and the citizens of South Carolina and the nation. • Ms. Marisah H. Daniels, Business Administrator, Health Sciences and Research, received the 2011 4th Quarterly Champion Award and Staff Annual Legend Award for her dedication and commitment to excellence in the Department of Health Sciences & Research. • The CHP Research Administration team received the 2011 Staff Team of the Year award for their excellence in the management of the many grant proposals, award and ongoing research projects in the College of Health Professions. • The College of Health Professions Staff Congress sponsored two community service activities. The first was a food drive to benefit Tricounty Family Ministries, a local food bank, located in North Charleston, SC. The second service activity was a back pack drive for students at J. K. Gourdin Elementary School in St. Stephens, S.C. n

College of Health Professions MUSC


organizational chart

12 Organizational Chart

Dean Lisa K. Saladin, PT, PhD

Interim Chair for Department of Health Professions Becki Trickey, PhD

Chair for Department of Health Sciences & Research; Co-Director of Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions

Chair for Department of Healthcare Leadership & Management James Zoller, PhD

Steven Kautz, PhD

Director of Physical Therapy Division David Morrisette, PhD

Director of Physician Assistant Studies Division Gilbert Boissonneault, PhD Clinical Education Manager Chad Higgins, BA

Director of Cardiovascular Perfusion Joseph Sistino, PhD

Director of Doctor of Health & Rehabilitation Science Division Bonnie MartinHarris, PhD

Director of Anesthesia for Nurses Division Anthony Chipas, PhD

Interim Director of Occupational Therapy Division Nancy Carson, PhD

2012 Annual Report

Associate Dean for Research; Director of Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions James Krause, PhD

Director of Doctor of Health Administration Division James Zoller, PhD

Director of Master in Health Administration Division Andrea White, PhD

Assistant Dean Maralynne Mitcham, PhD


Organizational Chart 13

Executive Assistant to the Dean Becky Hamrick, BS

Associate Dean for Academic & Faculty Affairs

Associate Dean for Student Affairs

Emily Moore, EdD

Karen Wager, DBA

Director of Education & Information Technology

Director of Student Services

Director of Research & Adminstration

Melissa Freeland, MSM

Debra Siler, MS

Director of Student Life & Recruitment

Business Manager for Dept. of Health Sciences & Research; Dept. of Healthcare Leadership & Management

Dusti AnnanCoultas, EdD

Cami Meyer, MEd

Director of Development Leslie Brady, MSW

Marisah Daniels, MHA

Executive Director of Finance & Administration Julie Parrish, MBA

Director of Executive Operations & Project Management Naomi Sampson, MHA

College Finance Manager Paula Butler

Business Manager for Dept. of Health Professions Chris Miller, BA

Business Manager/Fiscal Analyst for Dean’s Office; Dept. of Health Studies Ashley Martindale, BS

College of Health Professions MUSC


Education Highlights Academic Degree Programs Bachelor of Science in Cardiovascular Perfusion Master in Health Administration Master in Nurse Anesthesia Master of Science in Occupational Therapy Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies Doctor of Philosopy in Health and Rehabilitation Science Doctor of Health Administration Doctor of Physical Therapy


1

% 5

Education Highlights 15

INCREASE IN NUMBER OF STUDENT APPLICATIONS.

Record-Breaking Applications

Although the College anticipated the number of student applications had reached a plateau, applications for FY 2011-2012 reached a record high with 1,787 submissions, a 15% increase from the previous year. Contributing to these numbers, the College hosted over 650 prospective students on campus who participated in information sessions, private tours and/or group visits. The College also sponsored an inaugural Pre-Health Advisors Day on Friday, April 13, 2012. Faculty advisors representing 17 schools from three states—South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia—participated in the day’s events. Participants learned the latest in program news from our division directors, faculty, staff and students, and saw firsthand exciting research being conducted in our Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions.

Entering Class The College admitted an extraordinary group of 297 new students into our various academic programs, for an overall acceptance rate of 16.6%. The entering grade point average was 3.42, with an average score of 1697 on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Twenty-eight percent (28%) of our entering students are men, and nearly 10% of new students are underrepresented minorities. The average age of our incoming residential student is 28 years, and the average age of our executive student is 39 years. The College of Health Professions continues to serve the largest number of students among the six colleges at the Medical University of South Carolina, with 723 enrolled students. Many of our students are recognized nationally, state-wide, and within the University for their outstanding academic and professional achievements. Highlights of their accomplishments this year may be found in the Student Achievement Highlights section of this report.

demographics of 2011-2012 incoming class

3 .4

1697

32

Average

Average

Average

GPA

GRE

Age

10 % Minority

30 % Male

College of Health Professions MUSC


16 Education Highlights

Graduating Students Our College enjoyed another successful graduation this year with 276 students earning their degrees. The job prospects for our graduates remain high, with many students securing positions prior to graduation. Results from exit interviews also remain very strong with 96.4% percent of graduating students indicating that they made the right choice in selecting the MUSC College of Health Professions.

Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice The College of Health Professions continues to take a significant leadership role in interprofessional (IP) education and collaborative practice on the MUSC campus as it builds its way to national distinction. Innovation prevails and key accomplishments include continued dissemination of scholarly work at professional, interprofessional, national and international conferences, and through journal publication, which is critical to demonstrating distinction as leaders in the field. Through this work, faculty and students have been recipients of training opportunities, research awards, and national best posters awards.

96.4% of graduating students believe they made the right choice in selecting the MUSC College of Health Professions 2012 Annual Report

Faculty Growth and Leadership Several mechanisms prepare faculty members for interprofessional work with students. Within the past four years, almost 25% of the College’s regular faculty have completed the IP Faculty/Staff Development Institute, and this past year almost 35% of College faculty members and PhD students served as small groups facilitators for the University required course, IP 710 Transforming Health Care for the Future. Almost 30% served as facilitators during the annual MUSC Interprofessional Day. Two faculty members in the College, Dr. Holly Wise and Mr. David Howell, made significant contributions by serving as mentors for the student teams in the annual interprofessional Clinician Administrator Relationship Improvement Organization (CLARION) competition and Dr. Holly Wise’s team placed first in the local MUSC competition and went on to compete nationally; Dr. Jim Zoller served as a judge for the competition. Another example of interprofessional leadership is Dr. Hazel Breland serving as the College’s faculty advisor to the MUSC Presidential Scholars Program.

Student Participation In the past year, 12 graduates from the College completed the MUSC Interprofessional Education Fellowship: four from Occupational Therapy, three from Physician Assistant Studies, and five from Physical Therapy. The fellowship includes opportunities for students to engage in interprofessional learning opportunities beyond those developed within their academic programs and includes additional didactic and practicum experiences. College of Health Professions students won 1st and 2nd place interprofessional awards at the Perry Halushka MUSC

Dr. Mitcham proposed the concept of the Fellowship and was a key person involved in its design and implementation. Naming the fellowship in her honor recognizes her significant contributions to learning, scholarship and leadership in interprofessional education and faculty mentoring at MUSC”. Dr. Amy Blue, Professor and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Student Research Day showcasing the importance they attach to collaboration. See the Student Achievement Highlights section for details.

Maralynne D. Mitcham Interprofessional Fellowship The new MUSC Interprofessional Fellowship has been named in honor of Dr. Maralynne D. Mitcham, Professor and Assistant Dean in the College of Health Professions. Dr. Mitcham has been a leader in the interprofessional education movement since its inception on campus and has led many key initiatives at the curricular level. The purpose of this Interprofessional Fellowship is to prepare university faculty and staff to successfully assume new roles in


Education Highlights 17 interprofessional education, research, practice, and/or administration. The program seeks to foster a new generation of people who demonstrate interprofessional competencies that span multiple disciplines and contexts. Further, the fellowship strives to enrich collaborative learning experiences and scholarship, thereby supporting a deeper level of interprofessional engagement and integration.

Interprofessional Awards Grant Winners An interprofessional team from the College was selected as one of the four university-wide recipients of the inaugural 2011-2013 IP/ID grant funding cycle: Drs. Wanda Gonsalves, Patty Coker-Bolt, Kit Simpson, Sara Kraft, and Gretchen Seif wrote a winning proposal entitled “IPE at MUSC: Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support (CARES) Clinic.” The Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic (CARES) clinic is an example of an existing MUSC interprofessional learning experience where students from multiple professions work together to learn from each other while serving the community. Since 2005, this service learning experience has enhanced the preclinical experience of medical, occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), pharmacy, and physician assistant (PA) students while providing much needed health care to the uninsured population in the Tricounty (Berkley, Charleston, Dorchester) areas and beyond. The newly funded project will examine the learning outcomes of OT, PT, PA, medicine, and pharmacy students that participate in the CARES clinic program via survey assessment.

Additionally, the project examines the economic impact of an interprofessional student run free medical clinic for unfunded patients. Results will be used to assess the impact of the CARES program on the Charleston community and to grow and expand this program.

National Awards for Poster Presentations Faculty, staff and students from all colleges at MUSC were represented at the Collaborating Across Borders III conference focusing on an exploration of common issues around interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP). Held in Tucson, AZ, November 2011, the conference theme, “Interprofessional Collaboration: From Concept to Preparation to Practice,” reflected the importance of further conceptual development occurring simultaneously with efforts to prepare current and future practitioners for evolving demands in interprofessional collaborative practice. The College of Health Professions received two awards for best posters: Drs. Sara Kraft, Holly Wise, Paul Jacques, Mr. Jerry Burik, Drs. Barbara Edlund (College of Nursing), Maralynne Mitcham, and David Graber were awarded best poster (development theme), “Discharge planning case study: An interprofessional learning activity to enhance caring/compassion in health professions students.” Medical student E. Thomas Lewis, pharmacy student Caroline Griggs, Mr. David Howell and Dr. Maralynne Mitcham were awarded best poster (infrastructure theme) for “Assessing the effectiveness of a student interprofessional society in promoting collaboration between future health care practitioners.” n

Student assists a patient in the CARES clinic.

Incoming students enjoy lunch together at CHP New Student Orientation, May 2012

College of Health Professions MUSC


RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP HIGHLIGHTS


4243+ 4124+ 42+3839+ Research and Scholarship Highlights 19

Grants Submitted In review of the grant applications submitted by College of Health Professions (CHP) faculty since 2005, the number has remained consistent, with the exception of a significant decrease in FY 2008 when the College underwent considerable restructuring. The range in the number of submissions over the 8 years was 24-42 with an average of 39 per year. The dollar value of those applications submitted between 2005 and 2009 was relatively steady with values ranging from $12-$18 million. The lowest value in FY 2008 correlates with the significant drop in the number of submissions during the time the College was being restructured. The dollar value of grant applications has, on average, steadily increased over time since 2009. Beginning in FY 2010, the dollar value of the applications increased significantly indicating an increased focus on securing higher dollar grant awards that support research over longer periods of time. The average over the last three years was $28.5 million. Of our 28 federal applications this past year, 11 (39%) were for requests of greater than $1 million. This clearly demonstrates that CHP faculty continue to aggressively pursue major grant opportunities to support new and ongoing lines of research. Positive growth is clearly illustrated in the graph showing the trendline of the dollar value of our grant applications since FY 2005. Noteworthy in our submissions for 2012 were 28 Federal proposals totaling $25.4 million and of these, 10 applications went to the Veteran’s Administration for more than $10 million, 3 proposals were sent to the National Institutes of Health for $3.9 million, 3 applications went to the Department of Education for $1.2 million, and a subproposal for $2.3 million in Federal flow-down that was part of a University of Delaware Center Grant application.

Applications # Grant Submitted 42 43 41

42 42

38 39

1716+ 1812+ 1535+ 2328+ 24

FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12

Value of Grant Applications $ Submitted 35

17

16

18

12

23

28

15

FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 (millions)

FY2012 Grant Submissions by Source

72+5+320 21%

3% 5%

72%

Federal Corporate State Foundation Other


20 Research and Scholarship Highlights

Grants Awarded Looking back at grant awards to CHP principal investigators since 2005, the number has remained steadily greater than 20 awards (range 21-31; average 27). Given the increasingly competitive and subjective environment of external funding, particularly from federal funding sources, this is a strong indicator of the quality of our researchers and the strength of our research programs. The trend for the dollar value of those awards indicates a steadfast funding stream of greater than $2.3 million annually, with an average annual total of $3.3 million. The significant jump in the value of the awards for FY 2011 was due, in large part, to a single 5-year $1.6 million Health Resources and Services (HRSA) award that had all five years of funding awarded in the first year. Also contributing were four federal awards of nearly $400K each and one of nearly $800K. With the substantial number and value of submissions for FY 2012, we anticipate a noteworthy increase in funding for FY 2013. If the anomaly of the 5-year HRSA grant that was awarded in its entirety in FY 2011 is adjusted to the annual amount for each year, which is how the award is managed, the award amount for FY 2011 is reduced, but the awards for FY 2012 (and through FY 2015) will be increased by the amount of that year’s funding. The adjusted trendline that more clearly illustrates the progression is shown in the graph.

Listing of Grants Awarded See charts in Appendix B

Sponsors of New Awards Federal Sponsors • United States Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration • United States Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center • United States Department of Education • National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development • National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research Institute 2012 Annual Report

30+2127+ 22+ 2831+

# Grants Awarded 30 30

21

27

27 22 28 31

2732+ 2329+ 2637+ 5635+ 2733+ 2329+ 2637+ 4338+ FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12

Value of Grants $ Awarded 2.6

2.9

3.3

2.3

5.6

3.7

2.6

3.5

FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 (millions)

$

2.7

Value of Grants Awarded Adjusted 2.9

3.3

2.3

3.8 3.7 4.2

2.6

FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 (millions)


Foundation Sponsors • Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina • American Heart Association Corporate Sponsors • Abbott Laboratories • Aretech, LLC • Innovative Neurotronics State Sponsors • South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund

Summary of College Scholarship In addition to scholarship of research, faculty and students continue to be productive in the scholarship of education and service. Faculty scholarly activities involve originality, creativity, collaboration, and effective communication of contributions through teaching, practice, presentations, and publications. A snapshot of the faculty accomplishments is reflected by the numbers. See Appendix A for detailed information. n

FY2012 Awards by Funding Source

55+13+16106 6%

10%

55%

16%

13%

Federal Corporate State Foundation Other

By the Numbers

18

36

Student publications with faculty involvement

Student presentations with faculty involvement

7 Faculty as a grant reviewer

19 Professional organizations with faculty as officer or board member

10

24

Faculty as Editorin-Chief, Associate Editor or Editorial Board Member

Faculty as editorial reviewers

62

115

Faculty Publications

Faculty Presentations

College of Health Professions MUSC


Service Highlights


Service Highlights 23

Community Service Activities Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Summer Careers Academy Prepares Future Health Care Professionals The College of Health Professions (CHP) participated in the AHEC Summer Careers Academy that took place June, 2012. The majority of students who participated were entering freshmen undergraduates chosen by CHP faculty. This weeklong session emphasized preparation for programs of study in which they had interest. The skills centered on interviewing techniques, how to prepare for applying into the program, and professionalism skills. Six students participated in the CHP programs this year. Immediately following the Summer Career Academy, the South Carolina AHEC held the Health Careers Program (HCP). The program works to increase the number of students entering the health professions pipeline in South Carolina. Emphasis is placed on underrepresented minority and disadvantaged students in order to address disparities in the health professions workforce. The HCP is designed to develop academically proficient and self-confident future health care professionals. Ninety-three students from across the state participated in the 2012 event which was held on the campus of South Carolina State University. The agenda included activities and interactive sessions which emphasized health career exploration, academic and career planning, resource development, health disparity topics, basic health skills training, and a service learning component. Ms. Angela Hampton, PA-C, a graduate of the MUSC Physician Assistant Studies program, was among the health care practitioners and educators who participated as session facilitators. Ms. Hampton’s sessions engaged 34 students in learning more about the field of physician assisting.

clinic. One specific client that the physical therapy and occupational therapy students, and faculty in the clinic have helped is 17 year-old Mr. Khasim Burton. Mr. Burton came to CARES as a young man with paralysis due to transverse myelitis. He was walking with the assistance of a walker and also using an old, heavy wheelchair. While Mr. Burton previously enjoyed many sports such as surfing, water skiing, basketball, and soccer prior to his disease, he had not become involved in any recreational activities since his diagnosis. In the clinic, the students, with the guidance of Drs. Kraft and Seif, were able to get an ultralightweight manual wheelchair donated to Mr. Burton as well as teach him to walk on loftstrand crutches. Outside the clinic, the students were able to engage Mr. Burton in a variety of adapted wheelchair sports including water skiing, kayaking, jet skiing, and basketball. Coming to the CARES Clinic changed this young man’s life and opened his eyes to all the possibilities available to him, regardless of his physical abilities.

Staff Congress Sponsors Community Service Activities The College of Health Professions Staff Congress sponsored two community service activities. The first was a food drive to benefit Tricounty Family Ministries, a local food bank, located in North Charleston, SC. The second service activity was a back pack drive for students at J. K. Gourdin Elementary School in St. Stephens, S.C.

CARES Clinic helps 17 year-old Resume Recreational Activities There have been over 470 visits of underinsured and uninsured people in the tri-county area to the Community Aid, Relief, Education, and Support (CARES)

Students guide Mr. Burton into the water. College of Health Professions MUSC


24 Service Highlights

Hope

A Glimmer of in a World of Need Tricounty Family Ministries Tricounty Family Ministries (TFM) is a faith-based not-for-profit, ecumenical ministry providing food, clothing, medical care, counseling, transportation, shelter, financial assistance and other vital services to the less fortunate in the Tricounty area. The College of Health Professions’ faculty, staff, and students, were generous in their giving and provided over four car loads of canned goods around the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. In addition, there were 12 Staff Congress members who donated their time to the annual TFM Christmas luncheon and helped serve food, assisted families with young children, and handed out toys and clothing. The families enjoyed the day and the volunteers experienced the rewards of serving others. J.K. Gourdin Elementary is a Title I Community School with 95% of the students from a low income family. The students are given some school supplies through funding provided to Title I schools, but backpacks, essential for each student, are not allowed to be purchased with these funds. Seeking to fill that need, the CHP staff sponsored a drive to raise funds to purchase a backpack for each of the nearly 200 students at the school. The drive was successful and a total of 200 back packs were donated. The College of Health Professions’ Occupational Therapy Division provided information inside the backpacks that explained how to “Pack it Light, and Wear it Right” to promote safety. Members of Staff Congress were delighted to meet the need and bring smiles to the children’s faces. n Front Row: J.K. Gourdin Elementary Students; Back Row: (L-R) Ms. Lorene Bradley (J.K. Gourdin Principal), CHP Staff Ms. Julie Parrish, Ms. Melissa Serrano, Ms. Ashley Martindale and Ms. Marisah Daniels.

2012 Annual Report


Awards & Promotions


26 Awards & Promotions

Faculty Awards Education Awards 2012 MUSC Health Sciences Foundation Educator-Mentor Award Patricia Coker-Bolt, PhD Dr. Patricia Coker-Bolt, Assistant Professor in the Division of Occupational Therapy, has been praised by her colleagues and students for her work both in and out the classroom. Inside the classroom, she lectures and teaches students about infant motor skills, muscle development and pediatric occupational therapy. Outside the classroom, Dr. Coker-Bolt can be found working with the Charleston Miracle League, serving as a camp counselor with Camp Hand to Hands, and mentoring students on a medical mission trip. One of her favorite quotes about teaching is a Chinese proverb: “Tell me and I’ll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I’ll understand.” 2012 MUSC Health Sciences Foundations Teaching Excellence: Developing Teacher Award Gretchen Seif, DPT Dr. Gretchen Seif, Assistant Professor in the Division of Physical Therapy, was awarded the Health Sciences Foundation Developing Teacher Award. Students praise Dr. Seif for her innovative teaching skills, her vast knowledge of the subject and her rapport with them. She will gladly spend extra time outside the classroom to ensure that her students understand the clinical concepts involved. As time-consuming as this can be, Dr. Seif remains actively engaged in her profession, currently serving as president-elect for the state chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association. 2011 College of Health Professions Teacher of the Year K. Jackson Thomas, EdD Dr. K. Jackson Thomas, Professor in the Division of Physical Therapy, received the 2011 MUSC College of Health Professions Teacher of the Year, an award 2012 Annual Report

L-R: Dr. Lisa Saladin (Dean) presents award to Dr. K. Jackson Thomas

Dr. James Krause displays the 2011 National Courage Award

he also received in 2001. This award is presented to a faculty member who demonstrates distinction in four areas of teaching: knowledge of the subject, effective teaching skills, rapport with students and modeling of professionalism. This year’s recipient exemplifies distinction in all these areas. Ms. Samantha Kubinski, physical therapy student said, “Dr. Thomas is a one-of-a-kind professor who is easily approachable. His passion for teaching is conveyed in every lecture. His desire to see his students succeed is reflected in every conversation I've had with him."

Research and Scholarship Awards 2011 National Courage Award James Krause, PhD Dr. James Krause, Professor in the Center for Rehabilitation and Neurological Conditions, received the 2011 National Courage Award. This award is presented annually by the Courage Center and the Medtronic Foundation to recognize an individual's outstanding contributions to the health, welfare and


Awards & Promotions 27

People often focus on recovery and place their hope for a good life on the extent of their physical recovery. I want people to know that, under any circumstance, disability or otherwise, there is HOPE. It’s important to develop goals and live with whatever circumstance you have. Focus on the things that are within your control. Be concerned about the present and the future, not about the past or lost opportunities. I truly believe that when one door closes, another opens. You have to look for, and sometimes make, those opportunities.” Dr. James Krause, Associate Dean for Research; Director of Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions.

rehabilitation of people with disabilities. Some previous recipients of the award include former Senator and Presidential candidate Bob Dole, former US Attorney General Janet Reno, physics pioneer Stephen Hawking, and research advocate and former actor Christopher Reeve. Dr. Krause, who suffered a paralyzing spinal cord injury while diving when he was 16, is now a leading national expert and researcher who specializes in health and longevity following a spinal cord injury. He said the award has increased his resolve to continue efforts in those areas. The award is especially meaningful as Dr. Krause was a patient at Minneapolis Courage Center's Transitional Rehabilitation Program from 1976-79, known then as the Courage Residence. "I am honored beyond anything that can easily be put into words,"

said Krause of his award. "I was a Courage Center inpatient for more than three years and certainly would not have been able to accomplish nearly as much as I have without the benefit of the services I received there. It gave me a foundation from which to build. The friendships I developed there have lasted. Receiving this award will help me continue my work and to positively impact the lives of people with disabilities." 2011 College of Health Professions Developing Scholar Award Heather Bonilha, PhD Dr. Heather Bonilha, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Research, received the 2011 College of Health Professions Developing Scholar of the Year. This award is presented to junior members of the MUSC CHP faculty who are promising research scholars as demonstrated by their research contributions. Dr. Bonilha has had a very productive scholarly career as evidenced by 12 publications in peer-reviewed journals and more than 20 manuscripts currently either in press or under review. Her exemplary accomplishments during her first two years uniquely position her for continued success. She is also continuing her work on a NIH-funded Small Grant Program (R03) and two internally-funded SCTR Pilot Projects. Dr. Bonilha consistently shows enthusiasm for teaching, learning, service and scholarship and serves as a great inspiration in all areas of her work.

Service Awards National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers (NARRTC) Distinguished Service Award James Krause, PhD Dr. James Krause was awarded The NARRTC Distinguished Service Award on April 26, 2012, which is the highest recognition conferred by NARRTC. This award is given to individuals with sustained contributions or an accumulation of life-time achievements to the field of disability through research, teaching, service, knowledge translation, or advocacy. Dr. Krause is honored among previous recipients that include: Senators Thomas Harkin and Robert S. Dole. College of Health Professions MUSC


28 Awards & Promotions

2011 Certificate of Recognition for Special Contribution in Multicultural Affairs of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Charles Ellis, PhD Dr. Charles Ellis, Associate Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Research, was awarded the 2011 Certificate of Recognition for Special Contribution in Multicultural Affairs of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). He was recognized for his achievements and contributions in the area of multicultural professional education, research and clinical service. Dr. Ellis has a research emphasis on neurologically based disorders of communication, health disparities, and minority health issues.

honors the University can bestow on faculty. This annual award was enacted by the University Board of Trustees to recognize and honor faculty members who, over a substantial portion of their careers, have provided exceptional and sustained service and contributions in teaching, research, health care and/ or public service to the University and the citizens of South Carolina. Dr. Trickey has had a long and distinguished career at the Medical University of South Carolina as an educator, scholar, administrator and mentor and she is truly worthy of this recognition. She has made substantial and significant contributions to the College of Health Professions, to the University, and to

2011 Charleston Magazine Volunteer of the Year Patty Coker-Bolt, PhD Dr. Patty Coker-Bolt, Assistant Professor in the Division of Occupational Therapy, was selected as the 2011 Volunteer of the Year Award as part of Charleston Magazine’s Giving Back Awards. The Giving Back Awards are granted annually by Charleston Magazine to support, promote, and recognize nonprofit organizations throughout the Lowcountry. The finalists and winners are voted on by Charleston, SC residents. Dr. Coker-Bolt was recognized for her work with the Charleston Miracle League, a community supported baseball league for adults and children with mental and physical challenges. Dr. Coker-Bolt has also served as president of Pattison’s Academy and on the Board of Directors of Play Today Foundation, helps run Camp Hand to Hands for kids with hemiplegic cerebral palsy, organizes the free weekly MUSC CARES Clinic, and travels on mission trips to Uganda with Palmetto Medical Initiative. 2011 Medical University of South Carolina Distinguished Faculty Service Award Becki A. Trickey, PhD Dr. Becki A. Trickey received the 2011 Medical University of South Carolina Distinguished Faculty Service Award; one of the highest 2012 Annual Report

L-R: Dr. Jean Nappi (College of Pharmacy), Dr. Becki Trickey, and Dr. Mark Sothmann (Provost) the profession of occupational therapy during her 32 years of service. 2012 MUSC Excellence in Leadership Award Naomi Sampson, MHA

Ms. Naomi Sampson, Instructor and Director of Executive Operations and Project Management, received the MUSC Excellence in Leadership Award at the MUSC Leadership Development Institute (LDI) held April 2012. Ms. Sampson was recognized for fully embracing MUSC Excellence and serving as a role model to others. She has an unwavering positive attitude and she exemplifies the concept of service. Ms. Sampson has contributed to the attainment of multiple pillar goals, including: improving faculty and staff satisfaction, faculty and staff valuing diversity, and designing baseL-R: Ms. Naomi Sampson and line goals for service improvement. Dr. Mark Sothmann (Provost)


Awards & Promotions 29

2011 College of Health Professions Excellence in Service and Clinical Service Award Ashley B. Hodge, MBA, CCP

Debora D. Brown, PT, DPT, Department of Health Professions, Division of Physical Therapy (below right)

Ms. Ashley Hodge, Assistant Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Perfusion, was awarded the College of Health Professions Excellence in Service and Clinical Service Award. This award is presented to faculty members who, during a substantial portion of their careers, have provided exceptional and sustained service and contributions in teaching, research, health care, public service and/or clinical service to the College, University and the citizens of South Carolina and the nation. Ms. Hodge passionately devotes her talents and time to work on a national level. She serves as Chair of the American Society for Extracorporeal Technologists Membership Committee in addition to being an active member of other professional committees. She still has time to volunteer and make a difference in her community.

From Instructor to Assistant Professor

Faculty Promotions From Associate Professor to Professor

Ashley B. Hodge, MBA, Department of Health Professions, Division of Cardiovascular Perfusion (not pictured)

College of Health Professions Staff Awards 2011 Staff Annual Legend Award Marisah Daniels, MHA Ms. Marisah H. Daniels (Business Administrator, Health Sciences and Research) received the 2011 4th Quarterly Champion Award and Annual Legend Award for her dedication and oversight of the Department of Health Sciences & Research and the Grand Opening event for the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions. Ms. Daniels was praised for her attention to detail, outstanding support, and for consistently exceeding expectations.

Francis Wickham Lee, DBA, Department of Health Studies (pictured left) Sandra S. Brotherton, PT, PhD, Department of Health Professions, Division of Physical Therapy (above middle) Holly H. Wise, PT, PhD, Department of Health Professions, Division of Physical Therapy (right) From Assistant Professor to Associate Professor David O. Sword, PT, DPT, Department of Health Professions, Division of Physical Therapy (left)

L-R: Dr. Saladin (Dean), Ms. Daniels, Ms. Parrish (Executive Director of Finance and Administration)

2011-2012 Staff Quarterly Champions Awards Ms. Susan Johnson (Student Services, 4th Qtr 2011) was recognized for her reliability, efficiency, and flexibility. In addition to those characteristics, she is a consummate team player and is always willing to go above and beyond expectations of both faculty and staff. Ms. Renee Hutson (Research Administration, 1st Qtr 2012) was recognized for her ability to quickly step in and manage several grants for the College after the sudden departure of one team members in Research College of Health Professions MUSC


Administration. Ms. Hutson provides high quality service to the faculty and staff she interacts with on a daily basis and works well with everyone on the team. Ms. Julie Parrish (Finance & Administration, 1st Qtr 2012) seamlessly stepped in to cover the duties of a vacant finance position in addition to her regular responsibilities. Ms. Parrish’s attention to details of the University Funds Flow Model resulted in revenue recovery for the College. In addition, Ms. Parrish has re-energized the staff team leaders through improved communication and regular meetings. Ms. Lauren Stitely (Development, 2nd Qtr 2012) was recognized for her outstanding job on the layout and design of the 2011 College Annual Report. Ms. Stitely produced this excellent report while in the midst of a major website redesign project. She is acknowledged for how she managed both projects with a great attitude and a smile on her face. Ms. Melissa Serrano (Clinical Education, 2nd Qtr 2012) was recognized for her commitment to the Clinical Education team during a time when the team was short-staffed. Ms. Serrano emerged as a leader and ensured other team members had everything they needed to do their jobs. In addition, she served as a liaison for the team during the design of a new data tracking system. Ms. LaQuett White (Clinical Education, 3rd Qtr 2012) was recognized for her dedication and hard work in the compliance area of Clinical

L-R: Ms. Melissa Serano, Ms. Marisah Daniels, Ms. Heather Knight, Ms. Julie Parrish, Ms. Susan Johnson, and Ms. Lauren Stitely

Education. Ms. White, known as the “guru” of compliance, interacts with all of the various programs within the College, which requires speed, efficiency, and a positive attitude. She has been consistently noted by staff, students and faculty for her can-do attitude and attention to details. Ms. Heather Knight (Health Sciences & Research, 3rd Qtr 2012) was recognized for taking on additional responsibilities with the resignation of a research team member. In order to keep engineering support activities running smoothly in the laboratories of the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions, Ms. Knight spent many hours in the lab. 2011 Team of the Year Award Research Administration Team The CHP Research Administration team received the 2011 Team of the Year award for their excellence in the management of the many grant proposals, award and ongoing research projects in the College of Health Professions. As part of the College’s strategic plan, one of the major initiatives is to increase grant funding for the College. The Research Administration Team has successfully assisted the investigators in achieving this initiative.

L-R: Dr. Saladin, Ms. Debra Battjes Siler, Ms. Renee Hutson, Ms. Mary Steffens, Ms. JoAnn King, and Ms. Julie Parrish. Not pictured are Mr. Wally Pregnall and Ms. Karen Richardson


Awards & Promotions 31

2011-2012 Staff of the Month Awards Month

Recipient

Team

July 2011

Ms. Sherri Scott

Student Services and Student Life

August 2011

Ms. Shenikqua Simmons

Administrative Support

September 2011

Ms. Pam Shoaf

Executive Administrative Support

October 2011

Ms. Cami Meyer

Student Services and Student Life

November 2011

Mr. Will McCormack

Physician Assistant Studies

December 2011

Ms. Amy Grainger

Executive Administrative Support

January 2012

Mr. Jim Moore

Education and Information Technology

February 2012

Mr. Gary Melancon

Education and Information Technology

March 2012

Ms. Terri Bozzelli

Administrative Support

April 2012

Ms. Leslie Brady

Development

May 2012

Ms. Katie Weas

Finance and Administration

Staff Promotions Ms. Paula Butler College Finance Manager Ms. Paula Butler, who previously served as the Dean’s Office Business Administrator, transitioned to a new role as the College Finance Manager. She provides direct supervision to the department business managers and manages many of the College-wide financial initiatives. Ms. Butler began with the University in 1980 and held several administrative and accounting positions over the course of eleven years. In 1991, she began her career with CHP in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences. She also held positions in the former Department of Rehabilitation Sciences before moving to the Office of the Dean in 2003. In October 2011, Ms. Butler celebrated being with the University for thirty-one years and she has been a part of College for over twenty years. Ms. Ashley Martindale Dean’s Office Business Administrator Ms. Ashley Martindale, who previously served as our fiscal analyst/forecaster, transitioned to the role of Dean’s Office Business Administrator. Ms. Martindale continues to play an important role in fiscal forecasting for the College and, in addition, she serves as the primary business person in charge of the Dean’s Office budget and finances. While Ms. Martindale had only been with the College since March 2011, she has demonstrated that she is a quick learner and she has been an engaged and active participant on the finance team since her arrival. Ms. Martindale graduated from College of Charleston and began her career as an auditor for the federal government for two years. She then transitioned to the SC Department of Revenue as a field auditor for four years prior to joining the College in 2011 as a Fiscal Analyst. n College of Health Professions MUSC


Department of Health Professions


Department of Health Professions 33

Department Overview The Department of Health Professions is home to five academic divisions – Anesthesia for Nurses, Cardiovascular Perfusion, Occupational Therapy, Physician Assistant Studies and Physical Therapy – each of which prepares graduates to work in a profession that contributes to the provision of quality care in the healthcare delivery system. Each of the divisions is recognized nationally for excellence in educational innovation. Interprofessional education is a key component of each division with many opportunities for students and faculty to practice interprofessional collaboraDr. Becki Trickey, tion within the divisions, College, University and community. Each division has inteInterim Department grated evidence-based practice content into its curriculum so that each contributes Chair to the strategic goals for the College. Faculty and students have multiple opportunities to utilize evidence-based practice knowledge and skills. The graduates of the five divisions do exceptionally well on national board and certification exams.

Division of Anesthesia for Nurses The Anesthesia for Nurses (AFN) program is accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA) until 2019. The AFN program received 120 applications, of which 27 matriculated into the program. The mean grade point average (GPA) is 3.46 and the mean Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score is 1085. The current pass rate for National Board for Certification and Recertification of Nurse Anesthetists is 96% for first-time test takers. A Nurse Anesthesia Traineeship Grant of $27,000 was awarded to the AFN Division to support students in the program.

Continuing Education The AFN Division recently acquired a Simman® patient simulator for the anesthesia lab. This simulator will allow students to perform and interpret complex cases without putting patients at risk. In addition, the lab simulation capabilities were increased with the addition of a C-MAC video laryngoscope and a camera for use with the fiberoptic bronchoscope. The 25th Charleston Anesthesia Conference was held at the Double Tree Hotel in May 2012. In attendance were 260 nurse anesthetists from across the United States who received 20 hours of continuing education credit. This was the largest attendance in conference history. Topics included pain management, difficult airway, management of the pediatric patient, and a variety of Dr. Anthony Chipas other health topics.

Research

provides instruction to students in the anesthesia lab

Dr. Anthony Chipas continues to study the effects of stress on practitioner and student wellness. The direct effect of this research has been the adoption of a new standard by the Council on Accreditation (COA), the accrediting body for nurse anesthesia schools, requiring that all nurse anesthesia programs College of Health Professions MUSC


6 #2 34 Department of Health Professions

Simulation Lab

The simulation lab was updated this year with new video monitoring equipment and software for student evaluation that is now incorporated into the new perfusion simulation course. The pharmacology course was reorganized and is now led by two perfusion faculty. A simulation course was added to the curriculum in the summer ANESTHESIA FOR NURSES session so that students absorb a comprehensive experience in the perfusion program out of 110 nationwide simulator before going out on clinical rotations. All new equipment was purchased teach wellness in its curriculum. This line of reas part of the Thoracic Surgery grant awarded last search has also led to the establishment an American year and will be utilized in the simulator course. Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) Taskforce to develop the curriculum and teaching materials on wellness that will be used by all nurse anesthesia programs.

Faculty Accomplishment Dr. Chipas spoke at several continuing education conferences this year and served as a visiting professor for the Barry University Nurse Anesthesia Program. Dr. Angela Mund served as the President-Elect of the South Carolina Association of Nurse Anesthetists. On the national level, Dr. Mund serves as the Executive Director of the Association of Veteran’s Affairs Nurse Anesthetists and was elected by her peers to serve as the Faculty Representative to the AANA Education Committee.

Division of Cardiovascular Perfusion The Cardiovascular Perfusion Division, accredited through 2019, submitted its annual accreditation report to the Accreditation Commission for Perfusion Education. The division had 12 students to graduate in May 2012. In 2011, the graduating class achieved a 100% pass rate on the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion professional exam. There has been a 25% increase in student applicants. Based on this data and the availability of a simulation lab, the Division will increase its class size from 14 to 15 for the 2013 academic year. 2012 Annual Report

Continuing Education The Update on Perfusion Devices Conference continues to be a success for the division and attracts alumni from all over the country. Through the success of this national conference, there are resources to implement new initiatives in clinical practice to address new surgical and interventional procedures.

Faculty Accomplishments The Cardiovascular Perfusion faculty completed 12 presentations and 3 publications this year. Faculty continue to pursue professional development. Ms. Ashley Hodge received the 2011 College of Health Professions Excellence in Service award and is featured in the Awards and Promotions section of this report.

Faculty member from our Cardiovascular Perfusion program demonstrates the “heart pump” in the simulation operating room to a small group of visiting health advisors.


1 #2

Department of Health Professions 35

Division of Occupational Therapy

Dr. Nancy Carson was appointed Interim Director for the Division of Occupational Therapy in October of 2011 as Dr. Maralynne Mitcham now serves as Assistant Dean in the College of Health Professions. A search committee has been appointed and applications are currently being accepted for this position. A national search will be conducted and a permanent division director will be selected in the upcoming year.

Student Accomplishments

Applications are continuing to increase for the program with a record number of 311 applications received this past year. Forty-six students were accepted into the program for 2012. Graduates have a 95% pass rate (first-time takers) on the national certification exam.

Swinging in the Camden Scott Meyer Pediatric Lab during Camp Hand to Hands is a form of constraint-induced movement therapy...just don’t tell the children.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY program out of 151 nationwide

Community-based activities continue to be a strong component for experiential learning, and students participate in a variety of learning activities with diverse populations throughout the community. Students participate in programs such as summer camps for youth with disabilities, a hippotherapy program, a work activity center for adults with developmental disabilities, a mental health program for adults with severe mental illness, a community re-entry program for individuals with traumatic brain injury, and programs at assisted living and memory care centers and at a school for children with multiple disabilities.

Faculty Accomplishments Faculty members continue to engage in research in a variety of areas including ergonomics, chronic rheumatic conditions, health disparities, pediatric constraint-induced movement therapy, sensory modulation, and interprofessional education. Two faculty members are currently working on occupational therapy text books and the faculty continues to publish in peer-reviewed journals and present at national conferences. Faculty members maintain engagement in services activities throughout the local and global community. Several faculty mentor students and provide therapy services at the CARES clinic located at MUSC.

College of Health Professions MUSC


5 2

36 Department of Health Professions

Division of Physician Assistant Studies

top

Dr. Wanda Gonsalves stepped down from her position of Physician Assistant Studies (PAS) Medical Director to devote more time to her role as College of Medicine Associate Dean for Resident Inclusion and Diversity Education. Dr. Christine Otruba, Assistant Professor, will assume the role of program Medical Director. Two individuals joined the faculty in January 2011: Gilbert Boissonneault, PhD, PA-C as Program Director, and Clint Blankenship, PharmD, PA-C as Academic Coordinator. The school year ended with the retirement of one of the program’s most recognized and loved of its faculty, Mr. Arnold Metz, MA, PA-C. Mr. Metz joined the MUSC PAS faculty in 1996 and over the years has served in the capacity of Program Director and most recently as Director of Admissions, in which capacity he provided thoughtful guidance to thousands of interested students. He taught in many courses but is probably best remembered as expert instructor for Physical Diagnosis and Clinical Applications, a course series that teaches PAS students many of the basic skills for hands-on patient evaluation and treatment. His calm and wise counsel as well as his friendliness to all will be missed.

Student Accomplishments

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDIES program out of 128 nationwide

A survey of previous classes demonstrated that 50% of our PAS graduates are working in primary care, thus they are well positioned to help address the evolving health care needs of South Carolina and the nation. In spring of 2012, Forbes Magazine ranked the physician assistant profession first in the United States based on midcareer salary and a projected 30% increase in need for the profession through 2020 based on Bureau of Labor Statistics’ employment projection data. PAS graduates continue to excel in multiple measures. In 2011, the US News and World report ranked the MUSC PAS program among the top 25 of all masters level physician assistant programs nationally. We received a record number of applications (752) this past year – an indication of the growing interest in the PA profession, and in the MUSC program in particular. As a group, 93% of the class of 2011 passed the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants Exam on the first attempt, compared to a 91% pass rate nationally. Eleven of 67 students, 16% of the class, earned the highest possible score on this highly competitive certification examination.

Faculty Accomplishments

Mr. Arnie Metz and PAS class of 2013 at the PAS White Coat Ceremony (July 20, 2012) 2012 Annual Report

Faculty continues to be engaged in scholarly activities. For this year, faculty made nine presentations through the country and published eight manuscripts in refereed journal. David Howell is recognized in the Education Highlights section of this report for best poster at the Interprofessional Education Conference in Tucson, Arizona.


1 5 #

PHYSICAL THERAPY

program out of 211 nationwide

Division of Physical Therapy

The Physical Therapy Program was fully re-accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapist Education until 2020. The Division of Physical Therapy received 382 applicants and 64 students matriculated into the program in May 2012. The average GPA for students entering the program is 3.7 on a 4.0 scale. Among the 2012 graduating class, five were Interprofessional Fellows and four were Presidential Scholars. The current pass-rate on the National Physical Therapist Examination is 98%. The Division had five students presenting at national conferences and three students publishing original research through three articles in peer-reviewed journals. Students provided over 2,000 volunteer hours for individuals with multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, post-polio, and adult developmental disabilities.

Continuing Education The Division of Physical Therapy offers an annual course series in orthopaedic manual physical therapy, through which licensed physical therapists must complete the course sequence and assignments, and pass written and practical examinations for certification in manual orthopedic physical therapy. This program has drawn participants from five states, and as far away as from Ohio.

Department of Health Professions 37

Research In the area of research, Dr. Jesse Dean was awarded a second year for an NIH grant involving the use of an exoskeleton to facilitate gait in neurologically impaired individuals. Dr. David Morrisette’s study on the effect of different types of back supports for the management of lower back pain was presented at the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Faculty of the division published 16 research manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals and had 18 peer-reviewed presentations.

Faculty Accomplishments Dr. Gretchen Seif, PT was elected the President of the South Carolina Chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association (SCAPTA) and assumed office in April, 2012. Dr. Debora Brown, PT continues to serve on the Nominating Committee of SCAPTA and Dr. Holly Wise, PT is the Chair of this committee. Dr. David Morrisette was elected as the Representative at Large for the Education Section of the APTA, and serves on the practice affairs committee for the Orthopaedic Section of the APTA. Drs. Kraft and Seif initiated the relocation of the MUSC CARES Physical Therapy clinic from the East Cooper location to the MUSC campus. The CARES clinic now offers Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy interprofessional rehabilitation services to underfunded or unfunded patients. n

PT student working with a volunteer at a Polio Clinic

The Division offered a 2-day course on musculoskeletal examination and management for the shoulder and knee, instructed by Dr. Terry Malone, PT, that was offered at a reduced cost for the clinical instructors for the program. Over 50 clinical instructors participated traveling from as far away as Texas and Virginia to attend. College of Health Professions MUSC


DEPARTMENT OF HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP AND MANGEMENT


Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management 39

Department Overview

Dr. James Zoller Department Chair

The new Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management was created in July 2011 to provide a broader approach to education at an executive level and to prepare healthcare leaders for the future. The structure of the new department will improve efficiency in the administration of the College’s health administration and leadership academic programs and position the faculty to play a role in assisting institutions to adapt to changes in the healthcare delivery environment. The Department is home to two academic divisions – Master in Health Administration (MHA), and Doctor of Health Administration (DHA).

Division of Master in Health Administration Professor and Director for the Master in Health Administration (MHA) division, Dr. Andrea White announced, after 25 years of service, her retirement effective August 2012. Dr. White joined the College of Health Professions in 1987 as an Instructor in the Health Information Administration Educational Program. She progressed over the years both academically and administratively to the position of Professor and Director of the MHA Division. Dr. White has always displayed an infectious enthusiasm for her work and tirelessly supported the students. During Dr. White’s leadership, the MHA program has steadily grown in both number of students and reputation; this year was no exception. The program accepted its largest MHA class in the 2012 academic year to include 37 Residential students and 33 Executive students. There were 53 graduates of the program in May 2012. Many graduates have obtained excellent positions in a variety of healthcare venues around the country, and 17 of them are in an administrative fellowship or development program within a large healthcare system. Several executive MHA graduates who are already employed in healthcare revealed that they have been offered promotions and/or new positions as a result of their education. In November 2011, the MHA program was notified by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME) of its reaccreditation for the maximum allowable time, six years.

Dr. Andrea White

Division of Doctor of Health Administration and Leadership The Doctor of Health Administration (DHA) executive program was the first of its kind in the country when it was implemented at MUSC in the 1990s. The Doctor of Health Administration (DHA) Program continues to thrive and it is now offered in three diverse tracks. Each track is designed to allow ambitious healthcare professionals to turn their clinical or administrative experiences into opportunities to teach, shape public policy and/or lead complex organizations.

College of Health Professions MUSC


40 Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management

Doctor of Health Administration – Executive Candidates in the DHA-Executive program have achieved senior-level administrative positions, and now seek the next level of education. Our graduates generally use their doctoral degrees to pursue faculty positions in higher education, leadership roles in healthcare advocacy, or top administrative roles in healthcare. The program accepted 10 new students for 2011 Fall semester. The program had 10 graduates in May of 2012, which is the largest number of graduates in recent years.

Doctor of Health Administration Interprofessional Studies This program features evidence-based practice with an emphasis on collaboration and enhanced leadership skills in an interprofessional environment. The goal is to improve patient quality of care and safety in the healthcare delivery system. The program continues to grow in its second year with nine students accepted for 2011 Fall semester.

Health care delivery is evolving at a rapid rate with the adoption of health care reform. There is a great need for competent administrators and leaders throughout the healthcare industry. Our vision is to prepare these leaders for the future.” Dr. Zoller, Department Chair, Department of Healthcare Leadership & Management

Doctor of Health Administration Information Systems This new program delivers cutting-edge, doctoral level, training on-line so students may work while enrolled. Professionals will apply their experience in healthcare technology to this degree and build on the domains of change, leadership, and health informatics. The program admitted its inaugural class for the 2011 Fall semester. n

MHA students attend an Aramark Manager Grand Rounds via videoconference to learn about fellowship opportunities.

2012 Annual Report


CENTER FOR REHABILITATION RESEARCH IN NEUROLOGICAL CONDITIONS


42 Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions

Center Overview

Dr. James Krause, Center Director

The Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions (CRRNC) is comprised of investigators from the Longevity after Injury Project led by Dr. James Krause (Director of the CRRNC), investigators from the Department of Health Sciences and Research led Dr. Steven Kautz (Co-Director of the CRRNC), and other investigators in the College of Health Professions with an interest in research related to neurological conditions. The CRRNC has witnessed outstanding accomplishments within the past year including an increase in grant support, the addition of key personnel, new infrastructure, significant awards, training of students, outstanding data collection, and a strong pattern of scholarship that includes national and international presentations and publications.

Grants & Collaborative Relationships The CRRNC continues to have substantial funding from federal, state, and private foundations, including continued work in two federally funded center grants: a Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) focused on the prevention of secondary conditions after spinal cord injury (SCI), and a Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP) on capacity building for underserved populations with both SCI and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The RRTC and DRRP have Dr. Krause as principal investigator. A funding highlight for the year for the CRRNC was the awarding of an American Heart Association (AHA) Innovative Research Grant to Drs. Steven Kautz (PI) and Mark Bowden (Co-investigator). According to AHA, this prestigious award is a relatively new funding mechanism established “to support highly innovative, high-risk, high-reward research that could ultimately lead to critical discoveries or major advancements that will accelerate the field of cardiovascular and stroke research.� The award is extremely competitive in that only 16 (and just one in rehabilitation) were awarded out of nearly 350 applications. Drs. Kautz and Bowden will study the application of transcutaneous direct current stimulation to the brain and spinal cord to augment locomotor rehabilitation after stroke. This work is being performed in collaboration with Dr. Mark George of PsychiaDr. Jesse Dean, Assistant Professor, demonstrates the exoskeleton device used to facilitate gait to try and Behavioral Scivisiting students ences in the College of Medicine who leads the Brain Stimulation Laboratory and group. Over the past year, two primary mechanisms have emerged to grow collaborative relationships between the researchers within the CRRNC who focus on Evaluation and Treatment (led by Dr. 2012 Annual Report


Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions 43

Kautz), and those who focus on Outcomes and Prevention (led by Dr. Krause). • First, researchers in the Locomotor Rehabilitation Laboratory (LRL) have partnered with Dr. Krause and his research team to help identify individuals within the state of South Carolina for participation in studies examining the biomechanics of walking following SCI. These studies are designed to collect pilot data to support future collaborative grant proposals for labs in the CRRNC and MUSC Center for Advanced Imaging Research (CAIR). • Second, locomotor rehabilitation researchers and Dr. Krause recently developed and submitted a grant proposal to the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service of the Veterans Health Administration. This application was in response to a specific request for applications to study the effects of activity-based interventions on functional behavior in persons with chronic SCI, with special emphasis placed on whether co-morbid psychological conditions impact recovery of function. With Dr. Gregory as principal investigator, the combined expertise of the two groups uniquely positioned the CRRNC to respond to this funding opportunity. The specific goals of the proposal are to determine the relationship between the presence of various secondary health conditions (e.g. depression, fatigue and pain) and walking function in persons with chronic incomplete SCI, as well as the impact of rehabilitation training to improve walking on health, depression and quality of life.

New Faculty Two new faculty members with research interests aligned with the Center were added during the past year. In addition to Dr. Matthew Malcolm (see Department of Health Sciences and Research section), Dr.

Drs. Kautz and Bowden received the prestigious rehabilitation grant awarded by the American Heart Association Innovative Research.

Yue Cao was appointed research associate to work with the assessment and prevention team (Longevity after Injury Project). His outstanding credentials include a PhD in Medical Sociology and an MPH in Epidemiology. He joined the team after completing his training at the University of Alabama Birmingham, having worked for the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center. He is currently funded by a recruitment and seed grant from the South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund.

New Infrastructure Following the recruitment of Dr. Malcolm, the CRRNC is establishing a state-of-the-art neurostimulation research laboratory. This lab will house the Magstim line of transcranial magnetic stimulators and will support the study of brain function and activity, as well as the ability to develop, test, and apply neuro-rehabilitative applications of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Importantly, the neurostimulation research lab is located in close proximity to the department’s rehabilitation and assessment labs, offering greater ease for collaborative human performance, rehabilitation, and neurostimulation studies. This laboratory is of great strategic value for building our university-wide collaborations as it will strengthen the emerging alliance with the Brain Stimulation Laboratory and group led by Dr. George.

Students As a critical component of its mission, the CRRNC continues to train students through a number of mechanisms. This training provides a key connection between the academic and research programs and provides education that would not be possible without having an established center for research. The students include: • One graduate assistant currently enrolled within the College’s PhD program • Several summer interns supported through the aforementioned RRTC and DRRP grant projects • Two MUSC medical students • Two graduate students from South Carolina State University • Four undergraduate students, with two from Spelman College in Atlanta, GA College of Health Professions MUSC


Research Participants One of the key elements to the success of any research endeavor is the ability to identify and enroll research participants who fit the needs of the various studies. Because the two arms of the CRRNC conduct dramatically different types of research, with one arm focusing on epidemiologic studies and the other focusing on evaluation and treatment, the number of enrollees differs dramatically. Enrollment by the assessment and prevention team involves two special populations (SCI, TBI). Over 1400 participants completed extensive self-report measures that allow us to identify risk factors for secondary health conditions.

Trans-continental Research Participant In February 2012, the CRRNC evaluated its first trans-continental research participant. The participant traveled from Valdez, Alaska based on the recommendation from a therapist she was seeing in Seattle, Washington. Her therapist had seen a recent cover story on the laboratories of the CRRNC in the professional magazine “Advance for Rehabilitation and Physical Therapy.� The participant travelled almost 4000 miles to be evaluated at MUSC, primarily because of the stateof-the art capabilities of the research labs, including an instrumented split-belt treadmill that can measure 3-D ground reaction forces, a motion-capture system that allows movement data to be collected, a perturbation system for investigating balance during walking, and a $150,000, Zero G computer-controlled, bodyweight support system that assists someone walking on a treadmill or on the ground. She underwent five days of evaluations in the Locomotor Energetics and Assessment Laboratory and the Locomotor Rehabilitation Laboratory as a participant in studies conducted by Drs. Chris Gregory and Mark Bowden. These studies are part of an ongoing effort in the College to develop a locomotor rehabilitation program specific to spinal cord injury, in addition to current ongoing research with stroke patients. Both Drs. Gregory and Bowden are funded by start-up grants from the South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund.

The evaluations assessed the participant’s immediate responses to a variety of theory-based interventions. At the end of the week, the research team discussed the results with her and synthesized those findings into a description of her underlying deficits and her responses to various theoretical interventions. While Drs. Gregory and Bowden will use this information to inform the most promising experimental interventions, the participant will share the research findings with her clinical team in Alaska with the goal of developing a therapy program that she could independently follow at home. She hopes to return for two weeks in fall of 2012 to enroll in an intensive mobility training program.

Scholarship and Research Scholarly activities have been at the heart of the activity of the CRRNC. The number of presentations of Center faculty and associated personnel over the past year was 52. More importantly, 29 manuscripts were published in refereed journals. Several of the scholarly activities resulted in important new findings for the field. Highlighted are a few of the more major findings and their implications for policy and practice. Predictors of mortality were evaluated in a study using data collected by the assessment and prevention team on a cohort of 1,386 participants with SCI and the analysis was structured to be consistent with that utilized in the general population. The findings with SCI were very similar to that observed within the general population indicating similar types of risk factors. However, SCI appeared to result in a heightened importance of socioeconomic status, as those in the lowest economic strata were at substantially greater risk of mortality than that indicated within the general population. Of great practical importance, cigarette smoking had an even stronger relationship with mortality than has been observed in the general population, suggesting the need for intervention strategies. The second study focused on socioeconomic predictors of mortality after SCI and found that employment was a critical factor to preventing mortality, with the effects above and beyond those related to two other socioeconomic indicators, education


Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions 45

and income. These findings held even after accounting for differences in age, biographic characteristics, and injury severity. The key policy implication was that well-known medical and financial disincentives to employment not only serve to create an impoverished group of people with severe disability, but they also may result in diminished longevity. Policies governing return to work frequently provide incentives for working a limited number of hours and with limited income. The key and perhaps surprising result of the study was that there were dramatic differences in risk of mortality and life expectancy between those who were full-time and those who work only part-time. Those at the unfavorable spectrum of the population who are relatively uneducated, unemployed, and who live in poverty have less than half the life expectancy of those under the favorable end of the spectrum. These findings mandate change. In a third study focused on health care access after SCI, researchers assessed the relationship of socioeconomic status and health care access with pressure ulcer outcomes after SCI. It was found that health care access factors (including health insurance) were not consistently related to pressure ulcer outcomes. However, income level was consistently associated with these outcomes, where persons in the lowest income level had increased risk of pressure ulcer outcomes than persons in the highest level. Healthcare providers should be aware of the increased risk of pressure ulcers among persons with SCI who are in lower socioeconomic groups.

Innovative Research “Duck-Duck-Punch” Dr. Michelle Woodbury, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Research, and collaborators from a computer science research team at the Clemson University School of Computing, have designed an award winning, innovative, upper extremity stroke rehabilitation virtual reality game. The group

The upper extremity stroke rehabilitation virtual reality game, Duck-Duck-Punch placed 2nd at the International Microsoft Imagine Cup Kinect Fun Labs Challenge, Sydney, Australia.

was one of only three teams to qualify in the national competition. Their game placed 2nd at the International Microsoft Published Imagine Cup Kinect Fun manuscripts Labs Challenge 2012 Competition, which was held in Australia in # miles research June, 2012. participant travelled to The game, be a part of a study called in the Locomotor “DuckRehabilitation Lab DuckPunch,” has an old-time Faculty carnival feel but inpresentations corporates modern innovative

29

4,000

52

movement-scaling technology that enables a person who has very little movement in the “real world” to have near normal movement in the virtual world. A therapist tailors the movement-scale to match a client’s unique ability level; therefore even patients with limited movement can successfully use their arm to play the game. The team hopes that one day this system will be a low-cost, user-friendly way for a therapist to provide “off hours” and at home opportunities for a person with stroke to practice arm movements. Dr. Woodbury has submitted a grant proposal to the American Heart Association to seek support for further development and testing of the game. n

Dr. Michelle Woodbury College of Health Professions MUSC


DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SCIENCES AND RESEARCH


Department of Health Sciences and Research 47

Department Overview The Department of Health Sciences and Research had an excellent year. Department faculty were very productive in scholarship and external funding. Faculty published 15 articles in professional journals. Over the course of the Dr. Steven Kautz, academic year the total research Department Chair expenditures on grants with faculty as principal investigator were $1.27 million. The number of research support staff (i.e., coordinators, research associates, therapists and engineers), who are predominantly grant funded, has grown from 7 to 12. Since many of our faculty perform their research at the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions (CRRNC), several of the research highlights of department faculty have been presented in the CCRNC section. These accomplishments were made possible by the research infrastructure developed in the CRRNC and are a testament to progress made toward the College’s strategic goal of achieving national prominence in neurorehabilitation research. We are very proud of the department’s contributions to achieving this goal. One of the leading indicators of research productivity is the number of research subjects participating in studies, and we expect great things for the 2013 academic year given the growth in participant visits from 63 in 2010 to 359 in 2011.

Research and Expansion Another significant accomplishment this year was the successful recruitment of a new faculty member, Dr. Matt Malcolm. Dr. Malcolm joined the Department of Health Sciences and Research, with a secondary appointment in the Division of Occupational Therapy, after serving nine years on faculty at Colorado State University in the Departments of Occupational Therapy and Health and Exercise Science. The broad aims of his research are to 1) develop the most effective interventions for individuals experiencing neurologically-related deficits; and 2), to identify mechanisms that underlie recovery of the nervous system and the individual. Dr. Malcolm has specific expertise in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), motor

control, and intensive rehabilitation paradigms. His research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, the VA, and industry. Dr. Malcolm has also previously taught courses in the areas of adult neurology, biomechanics, research, and theory. Dr. Malcolm will continue and expand his line of research to use neurostimulation as an assessment and treatment tool. To date, his work has helped to establish the reliability of TMS for assessing motor nervous system activation and function, as well as to develop novel intervention approaches using repetitive TMS in combination with movement-based rehabilitation. Dr. Malcolm will be collaborating with researchers investigating upper and lower limb control and function, perceptual function, and other related brain functions. Ultimately, he hopes to work with others to develop a better understanding of brain plasticity and function, and how these relate to recovery following a neurological injury.

359

Research participant visits in 2011. A dramatic increase from only 63 visits in 2010.

Neurorehabilitation Clinical Integration Group Another significant highlight of the year was the inaugural meeting of the Neurorehabilitation Clinical Integration Group (NCIG), the first formal gathering to facilitate a dialogue between stroke rehabilitation researchers, therapists, and educators. The meeting was attended by approximately 30 people who represented a continuum of healthcare settings in which individuals with stroke receive treatment. Group members include occupational, physical, recreation, and speech therapists from all stroke care/rehabilitation centers in Charleston (MUSC, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital, Trident, and Roper Rehabilitation); directors from all stroke support groups in the tri-state area; stroke rehabilitation researchers; and representatives from the MUSC Occupational and Physical Therapy academic College of Health Professions MUSC


48 Department of Health Sciences and Research

programs. Most importantly, individuals who had experienced a stroke, and their caregivers, attended and provided essential input into the formation of the NCIG and will continue to help chart its future direction. The NCIG group was united in the belief that there is a critical need to improve dialogue between the laboratory, clinic and classroom and have this dialogue informed by people with stroke and their caregivers. We were able to identify several barriers limiting translation of knowledge to/from these settings that will be addressed.

PhD candidate, Ms. Nicole Dipiro (standing) working in the ZeroG lab.

Division of Health and Rehabilitation Science The PhD program in Health and Rehabilitation Science, which is housed within the department, is an integral part of the research plan. The program has been incredibly successful for only being in its third year. The program received 11 applications and 5 students matriculated into the program. While the first graduation will not be held until next year, the students are clearly showing strengths in skills that will make them successful future scientists and faculty members through didactics, presentations, articles, grants and awards.

Student Progress through the Doctoral Program A PhD program has three key hurdles that are worthy of celebration when students’ progress through them: 1) finish coursework and pass the Qualifying Examination, 2) successfully defend a Dissertation Prospectus, and 3) successfully defend a completed Dissertation.

The Qualifying Examination is an intensive and comprehensive, three-day written examination followed by an oral examination to ensure that a student has gained sufficient knowledge in their concentrated area of science through coursework and laboratory experiences in and is prepared to begin work on their dissertation research. Nine students have successfully passed their Qualifying Examinations and have progressed to working on their dissertation. Four students have progressed to the next level of academic and scientific rigor, and have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus.

Doctoral Student Scholarship

The doctoral students have been engaged in self-initiated, mentored research and have several other achievements that demonstrate the high calMs. Kendrea iber of their science and scholarship, includFocht, doctoral ing: 23 peer-reviewed manuscripts accepted student, for publication, 40 research presentations, 13 showcases her awards and 6 Postdoctoral/ Fellow Plenary grants. n Poster Award

2012 Annual Report

See Student Achievement Highlights section in Appendix C for listing of students’ scholarly activities.


DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI RELATIONS


50 Development and Alumni Relations

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” Winston Churchill Philanthropy is critical to the future success of the College of Health Professions and to the many academic and community programs that serve our students. Ultimately, this in turn builds enhanced health programs and quality outcomes for our communities. Although the Medical University is a state-assisted institution, the College of Health Professions currently receives only 11% of its annual operating budget from the state of South Carolina. Private support helps us overcome that shortfall, providing us with the resources needed to build a truly exceptional environment for learning, discovery and patient care. Each gift, regardless of size, helps to further our vision which seeks to achieve national distinction in health professions’ education, research and service. To learn more about how you can make a difference in the lives of others, please visit www.musc.edu/ CHP and click the online giving button, or contact Leslie Brady, Director of Development at 843-7928547 or bradyl@musc.edu.

especially research. He restructured the College to create a Department of Health Sciences and Research, successfully recruited a chair with national recognition and new research faculty, created the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions, and launched the initiation of the PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences.

The College of Health Professions is extremely grateful for Dr. Sothmann’s outstanding contributions as a visionary administrative leader, a researcher, an exemplary financial manager, a mentor and a strong advocate within the Medical University and the nation as a whole. On January 21, 2012, his colleagues in the College of Health Professions established the Dr. Mark Sothmann Scholarship Fund for the Advancement of Science in Health Professions to support doctoral students as they pursue a career in health professions research.

Small Steps, do indeed, Lead to Big Things The College of Health Professions is pleased to announce the establishment of The Camden Scott Meyer Pediatric Fund in support of The Camden Scott Meyer Pediatric Lab and Camp Hand to Hands. A dedication ceremony and unveiling of a plaque bearing Camden’s name was held Friday, July 6,

College Honors Former Dean through Scholarship Fund Before becoming Provost of the Medical University, Dr. Mark Sothmann served as Dean of the College of Health Professions. During his time as Dean, he collaboratively developed a new vision for the College and took bold steps that placed it in a strong position to achieve national distinction in health professions education, service and 2012 Annual Report

Cami and Dennis Meyer with their son Jackson


Development and Alumni Relations 51

Our dream has come true!

2012. This tribute lab honors the memory of Camden Scott Meyer while supporting the Physical and Occupational therapy divisions, its student and the camp, an annual, week-long camp for young children with hemiplegia.

After the tragic death of our first born son in 2002, we started this fund with a vision of making a difference at MUSC

The College acknowledges the Meyer family for their incredible strength and courage. Their commitment through philanthropy to young pediatric patients and their families is extraordinary and transformational. The future for our students and the young lives of our patients and their families will be impacted for years and years to come.

and honoring Camden’s memory. The reality of having a pediatric lab named after Camden is above and beyond our expectations…this fund will help provide much needed equipment for both the pediatric labs and the

Home Again, Home Again

Camp, support faculty research in constraint movement therapy, and

The MUSC College of Health Professions in conjunction with the MUSC Alumni Affairs Office hosted an exceptionally successful alumni homecoming in Charleston on February 3 and 4, 2012. The weekend kicked off with a Student-Alumni Happy Hour held in the College’s atrium that attracted over 200 attendees that included alumni, faculty, staff, students, and family. On Saturday evening the crowd moved to the Charleston Visitors Center for an oyster roast complete with a bluegrass band, photo booth and children’s games. Indeed, the weekend was deemed a success and the College looks forward to building on the event in 2013. n

bring an abundance of smiles and laughter to children being impacted by our rehabilitation professionals and outstanding students.” Cami and Dennis Meyer

1

3

2

1. Ms. Elizabeth Braisbane and Ms. Angel Simmons (Bachelor of Health Science ’07) 2. Ms. Sheryl and Mr. Jim Cheek (Master in Health Administration ’10), Ms. Jennie Grooms (MUSC Alumni Affairs Office), Ms. Toni and Dr. Brian Polin (Doctor of Health Administration, ’10) 3. Students and alumni with Dr. Gretchen Seif (2nd from left)

College of Health Professions MUSC


honor roll of donors

52 Development and Alumni Relations

It is our great pleasure to honor our generous individual donors, corporate partners, and foundation partners from July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012. Thank you again for your extraordinary support!

$100,000+ American Heart Association

Dr. and Mrs. Anthony G. Shackelford Drs. Sabra C. Slaughter and Shannon E. Richards-Slaughter Mr. Richard Staab Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Steinberg Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Thomas Mr. N. Walker Wells

$100-499

2011 Occupational Therapy Class Ms. Latecia M. Abraham $50,000 - $99,000 Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey R. Acsell Dr. Sarah D. Adams Wells Fargo Ms. Vanessa L. Aklin $10,000 - $24,999 ARAMARK Healthcare Technologies Dr. and Mrs. Brian R. Poplin $500-$999 Ms. Judy Askins $5,000 - $9,999 Mr. and Mrs. Derrick Hamlin Dr. and Mrs. Frank M. Armocida Mr. and Mrs. J. Kevin Beeks Dr. and Mrs. Vincent T. Peng Mr. John F. Bistrick, Jr. Dr. Deirdre A. Bell South Carolina Association of Ms. Katherine C. Caggiano Mr. Gregson A. Bellamy Nurse Anesthetists Ms. Josephine Traina of Ms. Sandra L. Bellamy Mr. Douglas S. Trickey and Dr. Carolina One Dr. Vinamra Bhasin Becki A. Trickey Dodds & Hennessy, LLP Ms. Kristen M. Bieri Mr. and Mrs. Marshall C. $2,500 - $4,999 Mrs. Carla Bistrick Edwards Mr. Troy H. Blanks Mr. Santhosh Rao ExxonMobil Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert A. Drs. Michael E. Saladin and Mr. and Mrs. Darryl B. Gardner Lisa K. Saladin Mr. and Mrs. William M. Hagood, III Boissonneault Drs. Leaonardo Bonilha and Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. $1,000-$2,499 Heather Bonilha Hancock, Jr. Ms. Nykeba S. Braddy Mr. and Mrs. David L. Brady Dr. and Mrs. Steven A. Kautz Mr. and Mrs. Patrick E. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Butler Dr. Anne O. Kilpatrick Browning, Sr. Dr. Anthony J. Chipas Knauer-Sudkamp LTD Mr. and Mrs. Gregory F. Buck Mr. and Mrs. Boyd W. Gainey, Jr. Partnership Mr. Brian J. Burgess Mr. and Mrs. Casey T. Liddy Google Gift Matching Program Mr.* and Mrs. Keith W. Cady Dr. Walter E. Limehouse, Jr. Dr. Leslie W. Howard, Jr. Ms. Nell H. W. Caldwell MD Publishing, Inc. Dr. Bonnie H. Howell Dr. Yue Cao Dr. George Mikitarian, Jr. Dr. Paul F. Jacques Dr. Peter S. Carnohan Dr. Maralynne D. Mitcham Ms. Leigh W. Manzi Dr. and Mrs. Peter S. Carnohan MUSC Physicians Dr. Bonnie B. Martin-Harris Mr. and Mrs. James D. Cheek Mr. and Mrs. Dennis J. McKenna Drs. Mark Sothmann and Mr. Robert V. Chisholm, III Dr. and Mrs. David C. Morrisette Kathleen Lally CHP Research Administration Team South Carolina Academy of MUSC Physician Assistant Mr. Cermette J. Clardy, Jr. Physician Assistants Studies Alumni Chapter Dr. Christopher J. Cobb and Dr. Mr. and Mrs. Capers H. Poulnot Mr. John C. Sudkamp Lindsay B. Cobb Mr. Donald W. Tennant Mr. and Mrs. Ganga Rao Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. University of St. Augustine Mr. Matthew Seif and Coleman Dr. Gretchen Seif

2012 Annual Report


Development and Alumni Relations 53

Mr. and Mrs. Gary N. Combs Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Cooper, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Justin L. Crockett Ms. Brittany L. Crosby Ms. Maycie A. Cruz Mr. Stephen D. Davis Dr. Jesse Dean Dr. and Mrs. Charles W. Derrick, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Dickerson Ms. Seantell N. Dorsey Mr. Michael L. Dosher Mr. and Mrs. Bruce DuRant Mr. and Mrs. E. Dargan Ervin, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Ferguson Mr. Brian D. Forbus Ms. Andrea C. Frasier Dr. Louise M. Freeman Mr. and Mrs. Jason G. George Mr. and Mrs. Allan Glover Mr. and Mrs. Joshua S. Goldstein Dr. Philip L. Gregory Mr. Jeffrey L. Gresh Ms. Susan D. Groome Mr. and Mrs. George C. Hagood, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Hanna Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Harbert Mr. Kenneth W. Hightower Dr. Diane G. Hillman Mr. and Mrs. Larry L. Hilton Mrs. Heather L. Hipp Ms. Elizabeth L. Holden Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Hydrick, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Anton C. Johnson Dr. and Mrs. Donald R. Johnson, II Mr. and Mrs. Scott Kent Dr. Ronald J. Kintz Mr. and Mrs. Lester J. Kitten Ms. Megan S. Klein Major Mattese M. Lecque Ms. Stacey M. Lee Dr. Abby M. Leisge Ms. Mary Eileen Leonard Mr. and Mrs. Jacques G. Leonardi LMH Therapy

Dr. and Mrs. Lee R. Mandel Mr. and Mrs. Christopher W. Martin Mrs. Diane K. Mathews Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. McCall Mr. and Mrs. Clay McCullough Mr. Donald E. McCurry, II Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey H. McEntire Ms. Billie J. Mckenzie Mrs. Martha B. McKinney Mr. Joseph C. McTavish Mrs. Marvesh M. Mendhi Mr. and Mrs. Arnold E. Metz, Jr. Mrs. Chris Miller Mrs. Vivian H. Mitchell Dr. Benjamin R. Moore Mr. and Mrs. R. Henry Moore Drs. Herman Blake and Emily L. Moore Dr. Sara I. Moore MUSC Division of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics MUSC Physician Assistant Studies Program Mr. and Mrs. Timothy H. Nicholl Mr. and Mrs. John C. Nielsen Mr. Harvey C. Nix, III Mr. and Mrs. Jerome H. Nymberg Dr. Jennifer M. Ortiz Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Overcash Mr. Robert J. Pare Dr. Ruth M. Patterson Mr. Lewis G. Porter, IV Ms. Marion S. Pressley Ms. Wilma Rabon Ms. Ann-Marie Rader Mr. Bruce A. Reeves Mr. and Mrs. Timothy W. Rickborn Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Riegle Ms. Brantley B. Robbie Rocket Science Consulting, Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Brian E. Rodgers Mr. Sean E. Rubendall

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony A. Sampson Mr. James J. Saunders and Dr. Ninfa M. Saunders Mr. and Mrs. Timothy B. Sease Ms. Debra Battjes Siler Ms. Teresa D. Snelgrove Mr. and Mrs. Lee F. Snidersich Mr. and Mrs. Anthony C. Stanowski Mr. and Mrs. David P. Steffens Ms. Lauren M. Stitely Dr. John M. Sundermann Mrs. Nancy S. Tabor The Pines Foundation, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Kirk D. Thomas Mr. Bruce M. Wager and Dr. Karen Ann J. Wager Mrs. Rosetta S. Washington Mrs. Katie M. Weas Wells Fargo Foundation Educational Matching Gift Program Mr. and Mrs. Jason W. Whaley Dr. Pamela A. Whitmire Dr. Gary K. Wilde Ms. Jennifer L. Willett Mr. Sean M. Wittorf Mrs. Veronica F. Wolfswinkel Dr. M. E. Woodard Mr. and Mrs. William D. Workman, IV Mr. and Mrs. Robert Zinko

*Deceased

If you prefer to have your name listed differently, please contact Leslie Brady at bradyl@musc.edu or (843) 792-9134.

College of Health Professions MUSC


54 Tribute to Benjamin F. Lawson, DDS

TRIBUTE TO BENJAMIN F. LAWSON, DDS Benjamin F. Lawson, DDS, professor emeritus of oral and maxillofacial surgery and former Dean of the College of Health Professions (CHP), passed away Feb. 15, 2012. Before coming to MUSC, Lawson served on the faculty at Emory University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He joined the faculty at MUSC July 1, 1968 as an associate professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery, where he organized the Department of Oral Medicine. In 1970, Lawson was promoted to full professor of oral and maxillofacial surgery, a position and rank he held until his retirement in 1990. In 1972, however, he was given the opportunity to become the Dean of the newly created College of Allied Health Sciences (presently the College of Health Professions). He relished the prospects of having a chance to build an educational body from the ground up and led the College in developing a diverse number of health professions programs.

“

His vision and leadership guided the growth and development of the College of Health Professions, laying the groundwork for the success it now enjoys. He gave me my first leadership opportunity at MUSC and guided my early career with wisdom, high expectations, and a warm heart. He was larger than life in many ways and made an enormous contribution to MUSC.� Valerie T. West, EdD MUSC Professor Emerita 2012 Annual Report

By the time Lawson retired, he had helped the College of Health Professions achieve the distinction of having the highest student enrollment of any of the colleges at MUSC, and programs such as Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy were being noticed and recognized by national publications. The deans who came after him have capitalized on the base that he built, encouraging growth of the various clinical and healthcare programs, along with the completion of the CHP complex on Rutledge Avenue in 2005, and the addition of the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions at the original CHP building at the corner of President and Bee streets. Dr. Lawson will be missed by all who knew him and the College will always be grateful for the foundation he laid for our growth and success. n


Human Resources


56 Human Resources

Staff Hires Ms. Michelle D. Priester, Administrative Assistant Office of the Dean

Staff Demographics

Ms. Lilia Correa, Administrative Coordinator Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management

Staff Number Permanent 38 Temporary 12 Total 50

Ms. Meghan Hann, Student Services Coordinator Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management Mr. Chad Higgins, Clinical Education Manager Department of Health Professions Ms. Christine Miller, Business Administrator Department of Health Professions Mr. Stan Smith, Grant Administrator Research Administration Ms. Rebecca Truesdell, Fiscal Technician Research Administration

Faculty Hires

31+12+4557

Regular Faculty by Rank

7%

5%

31%

Clint Blankenship, PharmD, Assistant Professor Department of Health Professions Division of Physician Assistant Studies

Professor Associate Professor

Lindsay Perry, DPT, Research Associate Department of Health Sciences and Research

Assistant Professor Instructor Research Associate

Yue Cao, PhD, Research Associate Department of Health Sciences and Research

12%

45%

Matthew Malcolm, PhD, Associate Professor Department of Health Sciences and Research n

Regular Faculty

Faculty Demographics Faculty Status Regular Faculty Adjunct Faculty Total Faculty

2012 Annual Report

Number 58 150 208

48%

male

52%

female

16%

tenured


Financial Highlights


58 Financial Highlights

Financial Highlights Fiscal year 2012 marks the final year under our current financial system at the University. Beginning in FY 2013, the transition to Responsibility Centered Managed (RCM) will be implemented. This new model will move decision-making and resulting revenues and expenses from University administration to the colleges in order to create transparency in the budgeting process. RCM is intended to create incentives for entrepreneurial outcomes at the unit level. Much of FY 2012 centered on educating and creating the infrastructure needed to implement this system of funds and expense allocation to the units within our College. The entire College leadership team worked together to make joint decisions regarding the distribution of funding and budgeting under this new model. The primary goal of RCM is to provide our leaders with increased transparency into our finances to aid in setting the College’s priorities now and into the future. Having the transparency that RCM offers will allow the College leadership to project future trends and enable us to explore the viability of new ventures and entrepreneurial opportunities.

Despite continued reductions in state funding and the challenge of the current economic environment, the College ended this fiscal year with a positive operating margin of just over $1M. State appropriations for the College have declined over 25% in the last three years from $2.55M in FY 2010 to $1.91M in FY 2012. State funding now represents only 11% of total College annual revenue. Our ability to offset this reduction and to grow revenue was a direct result of three primary factors. First, there was increased revenue from tuition & fees (3% over FY 2011) due to increased class sizes across the College and a modest increase in tuition. Second, the commitment to invest strategically in the area of research resulted in a growth in grant revenue of 3% in FY 2012 compared to FY 2011. Finally, expenses were significantly reduced due to unfilled faculty and staff vacancies. As we seek to create an environment of fiscal stability, the College has developed proposals for new educational programs that have the potential to not only meet the needs of the citizens of South Carolina but to add revenue streams for the College. More specific details about these proposals will be provided as they are approved and formalized. n

Statement of Personnel & Operations YTD as of June 30, 2012 Combined MUSC & UMA FY 2012 Budget

Original

Actual June YTD

$ 15,967,490

$ 17,369,694

Total Personnel

$ 11,710,579

$ 11,630,760

Total Operating

$ 3,820,701

$ 4,378,547

$ 15,531,280

$ 16,009,307

$ (5,184)

$ (298,625)

$ 431,026

$ 1,032,990

Revenue:

Total Revenue Expenditures:

Total Expenditures Total Other Additions (Deductions) Revenue Over/(Under) Expenditures

2012 Annual Report


Financial Highlights 59

FY 2011 Revenue Sources State Appropriations

200= $ 1,999,388 12%

Faculty Practice

151= $ 1,506,695 11%

Grants

256= $ 2,564,907 16%

Continuing Education 24= $ 242,273 2% Student Tuition and Fees 892= $ 8,920,940 54% All Other Revenue

104= $1,040,905 5%

FY 2012 Revenue Sources State Appropriations

191= $ 1,905,734 11%

Faculty Practice

92= $ 921,979 5%

Grants

321= $ 3,213,298 19%

Continuing Education 24= $ 240,751 1% Student Tuition and Fees 993= $ 9,925,484 57% All Other Revenue

116= $1,162,448 7%

College of Health Professions MUSC


Student Achievement Highlights


Student Achievement Highlights 61

Service

Global Outreach

Community Service

Student Serves On Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Mission Trip

The College of Health Professions (CHP) students continue to strive to make a significant contribution to the local community through various fundraisers and volunteer activities within the surrounding community. Over 20 community agencies have benefited from the CHP students volunteer and/or fundraising events: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Adopt a Highway Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Society Achieving Wheelchair Equity Burke High School Mentoring Camp Happy Days CARES Clinic Charleston Miracle League Crisis Ministries Cystic Fibrosis Dorchester Mental Health Center Down Syndrome Association March for Babies MUSC Children’s Hospital Palmetto Medical Initiative Pattison’s Academy Relay for Life Ronald McDonald House Special Olympics Number of St. John’s High School hours CHP Student students have Leadership Society donated to Susan G. Komen for the community Cure

4,500

service

In October 2011, Mr. Ronnie Smith, a Cardiovascular Perfusion student in the CHP, was selected to go on a pediatric cardiac mission trip to the Dominican Republic with International Children’s Heart Foundation (ICHF) Santiago. Ronnie was part of a team of 12, led by Dr. Juan Ramirez. During their mission, they completed a total of 16 surgeries in 10 days. Mr. Smith shared the following about his experience: “The experience that I gained while attending a cardiac mission trip is priceless to me. I would not trade those two weeks for anything. I learned so much. Not only information pertaining to cardiac surgery, but so much about people and culture. There are so many things here in America that we take for granted and do not think twice about. I admit that I was definitely one of those people, but after seeing things in a different country I realize how fortunate every one of us are in America. I try to think about some of the things that can stress me out sometimes and compare it to things in the Dominican Republic. It was extraordinary to see people from all over the world come together, put trust in each other, and work towards a common goal. There were so many positive things that I took away from this trip as a student. I learned to fight obstacles such as having limited equipment by using creativity and imagination. We did not have all the extraordinary technology that is available here in America, but we always were able to make things work. The experience was very humbling and although it was only two weeks, I will never forget my time spent there. I plan to continue working with ICHF and participate in the trips throughout my career in perfusion.”

The Student Health Professionals United in Recognizing Diversity (SHPURD) President, Ms. Brittany Bennett (Master in Health Administration Program), presents a $1,000 check to Camp Happy Days.

Mr. Ronnie Smith

College of Health Professions MUSC


62 Student Achievement Highlights

Uganda Field Notes

National and International Honors

Sixteen occupational therapy students chose to spend their spring break working in Uganda as volunteers for a trip organized through the Palmetto Medical Initiative. Dr. Patty Coker-Bolt, Occupational Therapy faculty, played a vital role in the recruitment for this organization. The students traveled 7,400 miles to Masindi, Uganda from May 4-14, 2012.

National Alpha Eta Honors Society

Excerpt from the Catalyst

“You would go to clinic with your shoes and a hat and you would leave without them,” she said. “Going on this trip was the best decision I have ever made. Learning both life and career lessons while helping people who genuinely need it? Sign me up.” - Ms. Emily Caveny “As I sit both mentally and physically exhausted on a two-hour van ride back from clinic, I am trying to wrap my mind around everything I experienced today. I met a man whose amazing smile and overwhelming gratefulness will forever be engrained in my mind. He had a severe case of polio, something that is rarely seen in the States anymore, and as a result had the most debilitating case of scoliosis I may ever see. He came to us in a wheelchair made of a hard plastic lawn chair and bike tires hoping for a cure, or at the very least, relief from the pain. We luckily had some foam material that we were able to modify and attach to his chair to provide him better posture, and most importantly, comfort. As he sat back on a soft surface for maybe the first time in his life his huge smile and laughter said it all. Something as simple as making a chair that he uses everyday more comfortable may have changed his quality of life forever, and at the end of the day, it doesn’t matter if you are in America or Uganda. That is what I came to OT school for. That is what occupational therapy is all about.” – Ms. Lauren Wengerd

Among the graduating classes of 2011-2012, 46 students were inducted into the National Alpha Eta Honor Society for their academic achievements. Alpha Eta is a prestigious national scholastic honor society that is exclusively devoted to the allied health professions. Recipients of this honor are individuals who are devoted to the promotion and recognition of scholarship, leadership and health services.

Awards for Oral and Poster Presentations Ph.D. in Health and Rehabilitation Science Ms. Kathleen Cartmell American Association of Cancer Institutes’ Clinical Research Initiative Meeting 2nd Place Abstract Award: Poster Presentation. Navigate: Navigation to increase guidance and awareness of trials for thoracic and esophageal cancers. Ms. Kendrea Focht Postdoctoral/Fellow Plenary Poster Award Annual Meeting of the Dysphagia Research Society Oral presentation: Markov modeling to evaluate pre-treatment swallowing exercises in head and neck cancer. Ms. Brittany Smalls 2012 Academy Health/Aetna Foundation Minority Scholars Program. Health Disparities Research.

Sixteen of MUSC’s Occupational Therapy students volunteered to work on a medical trip to Masindi, Uganda on their spring break, May 4-14.

Ms. Emily Caveny, Occupational Therapy student, enjoys a moment with an Ugandan boy as he awaits a check-up at the local clinic in Masindi, Uganda. 2012 Annual Report


Student Achievement Highlights 63

Cardiovascular Perfusion

Interprofessional Education Fellowship

Ms. Jennifer Hutchinson, Ms. Margaret Relle, Mr. Adam Mattison American Society of Extracorporeal Technology 50th International Conference, Orlando, FL

The purpose of the MUSC Interprofessional Education (IPE) Fellowship is to encourage interprofessional engagement among students and faculty. The program seeks to foster a new generation of graduates who are capable of demonstrating interprofessional competencies that go beyond those developed within the individual academic programs. The following students are 2011 graduates from the IPE Fellowship:

Best Scientific Presentation. Using Binomial Proportions and a Linear Regression to Predict Adoption of Perfusion Techniques and Technologies. Mr. Trevelyn Rowell, Mr. Yancey Mooney American Society of Extracorporeal Technology 50th International Conference, Orlando, FL. Best poster. Separation of Biocompatible Cardiopulmonary Bypass Tubing Connections.

Occupational Therapy Program

Ms. Melissa Turpin Ms. Beth Bower Physician Assistant Studies Program

State Honors

Ms. Lindsey Marie Perrone

South Carolina Association of Nurse Anesthetists (SCANA)

Physical Therapy Program

Mr. Benjamin “Eddie” Thomas, RN, SRNA, Anesthesia for Nurses Program, SC Student Representative American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Political Action Committee (CRNA-PAC) Ms. Grace Laird Johnston, RN, SRNA, Anesthesia for Nurses Program, Student Representative

University Honors

Ms. Casey Rae Amato Ms. Carrie Blakeney Latham Ms. Alyson Rathge Ms. Emily May Tennant Ms. Christine Sanders Walker MUSC Student Leadership Society The MUSC Student Leadership Society was established in 2008 to recognize students who have made notable contributions to the University through their character, service and commitment to enhancing the University environment.

Presidential Scholars 2011-2012

Ms. Janna Cone, Master in Health Administration

The MUSC Presidential Scholars Program is a premiere interprofessional program for students. It was originated by Dr. Raymond Greenberg as a mechanism to enrich the academic culture of the University and promote greater interprofessional understanding among health professional students.

Provost Award

Ms. Rachel Binder, Physical Therapy Ms. Bethany Clark, Physical Therapy Ms. Laura Fitzgerald, Physical Therapy Ms. Elizabeth Douglas, Physician Assistant Studies Ms. Hailey James, Master in Health Administration Ms. Deepthi Meruva, Master in Health Administration Ms. Kathryn Roberts, Master in Health Administration Mr. Erik Sederstrom, Master in Health Administration

The MUSC administration established the Provost’s Scholarship Awards to recognize two students from each college for their excellence in academic achievement, leadership skills, and dedication to community service. Ms. Hailey James, Master in Health Administration Mr. Jayson Zeigler, Occupational Therapy

College of Health Professions MUSC


64 Student Achievement Highlights

Earl B. Higgins Achievement in Diversity Award Established to honor a former director of minority affairs, the award acknowledges persistence and dedication to positive contributions to diversity enhancement within the Medical University of South Carolina. Mr. Kristopher Andrews, Physician Assistant Studies Exchange Club of Charleston The Exchange Club awards scholarships to local MUSC students based on academics, financial need and community service. Students must be from the tri-county area to be eligible. Leadership and community service are important criteria. Ms. Annie Tsui, Master in Health Administration Ms. Meredith Smith, Occupational Therapy MUSC Women’s Club Scholarship for 2011 The Medical University Women’s Club invites students in all six colleges who have financial needs to apply for its annual scholarships. Awards are generated through the proceeds of the Club’s various fundraisers. Ms. Sarah Boyd, Master in Health Administration Ms. Julia Cartmell, PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Science Ms. Claire Marsh, Occupational Therapy Ms. Shijuana Scotland, Anesthesia for Nurses 2011 MUSC Perry V. Halushka Student Research Day Health Disparities

Ms. Kathleen Cartmell, PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Science 1st Place: Navigate: Navigation to Increase Guidance and Awareness of Trials for Thoracic and Esophageal Cancers Clinical Professional-Masters I Social/Behavioral Sciences

L-R:  Ms. Diane Okpala (SC College of Pharmacy); Mr. Kristopher Andrews (College of Health Professions); Ms. Aminah Fraser-Khan (College of Nursing).

Ms. Lisa Johnson and Ms. Abbie Martin, Occupational Therapy Program 1st Place: An Exploration of Early Motor Delays and Early Intervention for an Extremely Premature Infant Ms. Stacy McGinnis and Ms. Rebecca Wiesner, Occupational Therapy Program 2nd Place: Early Motor Skill Differences in Low and High Risk Infants 2012 Annual Report

L-R: Mr. Ryan Rhome (Medicine), Mr. Oday Alsarraf (Graduate Studies), Ms. Meg Croom (Pharmacy), Ms. Janna Cone (Health Professions), Mr. Brandon Hagan (Dental Medicine), Mr. Daniel West (Dental Medicine), Ms. Ashleigh McCall (Nursing), and Ms. Mia Taylor (Medicine)


Student Achievement Highlights 65 Clinical Professional-Masters III Basic/Clinical Sciences

Ms. Christa Barrett, Ms. Katie Kirstein, and Ms. Tania McElveen, Occupational Therapy Program 1st Place: Four Kinematic Variables to Measure Quality of a Reaching Movement in Stroke Rehabilitation Interprofessional Award

Ms. Kathleen Cartmell, PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Science 1st Place: Navigate: Navigation to Increase Guidance and Awareness of Trials for Thoracic and Esophageal Cancers Ms. Caroline Tuttle and Mr. Casey Hudson, Occupational Therapy Program 2nd Place: Infant Head Movements: Intrarater and Interrater Reliability Using Dartfish 2D Motion Kinematics MUSC Gives Back Most Outstanding Volunteer Ms. Samantha Kubinski, Physical Therapy student, was recognized for exceeding her fellow students with over 75 hours of volunteer service. She shared her time with nonprofit organizations such as the MUSC CARES Clinic, Adopt a Highway, SC Special Olympics, Louie’s Kids, and Hospice of Charleston. MUSC Gives Back Most Outstanding Volunteer Student Group Occupational Therapy Class of 2012 is the recipient of this award for their significant role in the success of the Down Syndrome Association Buddy Walk held October 2011. The students’ involvement included activities such as the following: served as a buddy during the walk, organized games, performed face painting, and offered dance lessons.

College of Health Professions Honors Diversity Essay Contest

L-R: Ms. Lauren Wengerd, Dr. Saladin (Dean), Dr. Sothmann (Provost), and Ms. Virginia Reagan

There were two students who won the Essay Writing Contest on the importance of diversity in the healthcare workplace. Ms. Virginia Regan from the Physician Assistant Studies Program won first place for her creative and thought-provoking essay entitled Crayola Colors: Diversity as Art in Healthcare. Second place went to Ms. Lauren Wengerd, a student from the Occupational Therapy Program, who wrote about the importance of cultural competency and the insights she gained from observing an OT in her small hometown.

Showcasing Success-Student Scholarships The College of Health Professions held its 3rd annual awards ceremony, Showcasing Success, on Friday, November 18, 2012 at St. Luke’s Chapel in Charleston, SC. Students were recognized for their extraordinary accomplishment. The scholarships awarded are made possible through the invaluable support of our alumni and friends.

College of Health Professions MUSC


CARES Clinic volunteers for the 2012 school year

College of Health Professions-- Student Scholarships Recipients Student

Program

Name of Scholarship

Mr. David Guthrie

Anesthesia for Nurses

Mary Ann Cone Scholarship

Ms. Jordan Hill Physician Assistant Studies

CHP Student Government Association Scholarship Will Hagood Scholarship

Ms. Alexandra Snyder Cardiovascular Perfusion

Anne Pappas Scholarship James Palmer Dearing Memorial Scholarship

Ms. Hailey James Master in Health Administration CHP Alumni Association Scholarship Melvin “Bubba” Nickles Scholarship Ms. Annie Tsui

Master in Health Administration HCA/DeMarco Endowed Scholarship

Ms. Rebecca Loftis Occupational Therapy

Rowley Award for Education in Rehabilitation Sciences

Ms. Denae Buzzell Physical Therapy

Rowley Award for Education in Rehabilitation Sciences

Ms. Katherine Steifle

Catherine Michele Poulnot Scholarship

Physical Therapy

Ms. Kathleen Scheele Physical Therapy

Catherine Michele Poulnot Scholarship CHP Public Advisory Board Scholarship

Ms. Sara Jerdemy

Physician Assistant Studies

Reamer Lorenzo Cockfield Scholarship

Mr. Mark Noble

Physical Therapy

Relax the Back/Lowery Family Scholarship

Ms. Claire Marsh

Occupational Therapy

Kenneth and Cozie Thomas Memorial Scholarship

Ms. Kathryn Blair

Physician Assistant Studies

Elizabeth Gouge Scholarship

Ms. Karen Karpick Physician Assistant Studies

Sushma Rao Scholarship CHP Alumni Association Scholarship


Student Achievement Highlights 67

Doctor of Health Administration Candidates Dissertation Defense The College of Health Professions congratulates 10 doctoral candidates who have successfully completed their doctoral defense. These are trained leaders who are prepared for the roles they will assume as the era of healthcare reform evolves. Candidates’ names and dissertation titles are listed below. Dr. Bill Anderson - A Study of the Relationship Between the Employees’ Perception of the Effectiveness of Managers and Employee Satisfaction in a Community Hospital Dr. Kinneil Coltman - The Impact of Minority and Women Leaders on Health Care Employee Satisfaction Dr. Brenita Crawford - Effective Governance in Safety Net Hospitals– CEO Views Dr. Latonya Dunlow - A Retrospective Analysis of Sustainability: CHCS That Were Part of a Consortia When Federal Funding Ended Dr. Danielle Dyer - Does Patient Awareness of Physician Financial Conflicts of Interest Impact Patient Healthcare Decision-Making Dr. Taher Giaedi - Using Structural Equation Model to Study the Impact of Organizational Culture and Nursing Work Environment in Nursing and Patient Satisfaction Dr. Donna Gares - The Relationship of Acute Inpatient Hospital Length of Stay and Patient Satisfaction Dr. Victoria Harkins - Factors That Influence Nurse Satisfaction and Retention: Using the Satisfaction in Nursing Scale to Compare Responses By Age Group and By First-Career and Non-First Career Nurses Dr. Melissa Henshaw - Cardiovascular Risk Profile of Pediatric Obesity Patients Dr. Randy Kearns - What is the Capacity of Burn Centers within the American Burn Association Southern Region to Absorb Significant Numbers of Burn Injured Patients during a Medical Disaster n

L-R: Drs. James Zoller and Lisa Saladin receive a college gift from Doctor of Health Administration Cohort 11.

College of Health Professions MUSC


APPENDIX A: FACULTY PRODUCTIVITY REPORT


Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report 69

Editor and Editorial Boards Chipas, A. CRNA Today, Editor-in-Chief Graber, D. Journal of Health and Human Service Administration, Editorial Board Member Kautz, S. A. Journal of Applied Biomechanics, Editorial Board member; Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, Editorial Board Member Krause, J. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, Editor-in-Chief; Rehabilitation Psychology, Editorial Board Member Martin-Harris, B. Dysphagia Journal, Associate Editor & Editorial Board Member; Bulgarian Journal of Communication Disorders, Editorial Consultant; Journal of Applied Physiology, Editorial Consultant; American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Editorial Consultant; Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Editorial Consultant; Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Editorial Consultant; Laryngoscope, Editorial Consultant; Archives of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Editorial Consultant; Journal of Speech-Language-Hearing Research, Editorial Consultant; Neurogastroenterology and Motility (NMO), Editorial Consultant; Diseases of the Esophagus, Editorial Consultant Saunders, L.L. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, Associate Editor Sistino, J. Journal of ExtraCorporeal Circulation, Associate Editor White, A. American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE)/Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) Health Administration Press, Chair of Editorial Board Woodbury, M.L. Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, Editorial Board Member

Editorial Reviewers Breland, H. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Reviewer Bonilha, H. Dysphagia, Reviewer; Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, Reviewer; Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research, Reviewer; Journal of Voice, Reviewer Bowden, M. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Experimental Brain Research, Reviewer; Gait and Posture, Reviewer; Journal of Biomechanics, Reviewer; Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, Reviewer; Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Reviewer; Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Reviewer; Medical Engineering and Physics, Reviewer; Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Reviewer; Physical Therapy Journal, Reviewer; Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, Reviewer; Spinal Cord, Reviewer; Stroke, Reviewer; Topics in Spinal Cord Rehabilitation, Reviewer Breland, H. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Journal of Aging and Health, Reviewer; Military Medicine, Reviewer; Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer Brotherton, S. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Spinal Cord, Reviewer; Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation; Reviewer Chipas, A. American Journal of Psychiatry, Reviewer Coker-Bolt, P. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Clinical Rehabilitation Disability College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX A

Breland, H. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Editorial Board Member


70 Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report

and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Reviewer

APPENDIX A

Dean, J.C. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Biological Cybernetics, Reviewer; Journal of Applied Biomechanics, Reviewer; Journal of Biomechanics, Reviewer; Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation Research, Reviewer; Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Reviewer; Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Reviewer Ellis, C. Stroke, Reviewer; Journal of Allied Health, Reviewer; Ethnicity and Disease, Reviewer; Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Reviewer; Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Reviewer; Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice, Reviewer Graber, D. The Gerontologist, Reviewer Gregory, C. Journal of Athletic Training, Reviewer; Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Clinical Biomechanics, Reviewer; Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, Reviewer; Gait & Posture, Reviewer; Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, Reviewer; Aging Science, Reviewer; Experimental Gerontology, Reviewer; Physical Therapy, Reviewer; Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Reviewer Hewett, M. Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, Reviewer Jacques, P. Journal of Physician Assistant Education, Reviewer Jones, W. Journal of Health Administration Education, Reviewer; Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Reviewer Kautz, S.A. Journal of Neurophysiology, Reviewer; Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Reviewer; Journal of Neuroscience, Reviewer; Brain Stimulation, Reviewer; Gait & Posture, Reviewer; Journal of Biomechanics, Reviewer; Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Reviewer; Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Reviewer; International Journal of Stroke, Reviewer; Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer Kazley, A. BMC Health Services Research, Reviewer; Journal of Medical Systems, Reviewer; Journal of Health Care Engineering, Reviewer; Journal of Healthcare Management, Reviewer; Pediatrics, Reviewer; Recent Patents on Biomedical Engineering, Reviewer Moore, E.L. Journal of Health Administration Education, Reviewer Moreau, N. Journal of Novel Physiotherapies, Reviewer Morrisette, D. Spine Journal, Reviewer; Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Ergonomics, Reviewer Saladin, M. Psychopharmacology, Reviewer; Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Reviewer; Journal of Anxiety Disorders, Reviewer Saunders, L.L. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Disability and Health, Reviewer, Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Reviewer Seif, G. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, Reviewer Wager, K.A. Journal of Health Administration Education, Reviewer White, A. Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA), Journal of Health Administration Education, Reviewer 2012 Annual Report


Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report 71

Wise, H. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, Reviewer; Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, Reviewer

Bickel, C.S., Gregory, C.M., Dean, J.C. (2011). Motor unit recruitment during neuromuscular electrical stimulation: A critical appraisal. European Journal of Applied Physiology. 111(10), 2399-407. Bickel, C.S., Lein, D., & Gregory, C.M. (2011).Impact of electrical stimulation parameters on muscle torque and fatigue in people with SCI. Archives of Physical Medicine Rehabilitation, 92(10), 1708-2011. Bowden, M.G., Behrman, A.L., Woodbury, M., Gregory, C.M., Velozo, C.A. & Kautz, S.A. (2012). Advancing measurement of locomotor rehabilitation outcomes to optimize interventions and differentiate between recovery versus compensation. Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy; 36(1), 38-44. Bowden, M.G., Embry, A.E.,& Gregory, C.M. (2011). Physical therapy adjuvants to promote optimization of walking recovery post stroke. Stroke Research and Treatment. E-published, doi:10.4061/2011/601416. Breland, H.L. & Ellis, C. (2012). Is reporting race and ethnicity essential to occupational therapy evidence? American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 66 (1), 115-119. Brotherton, S.S., Saunders, L.L., Krause, J.S., & Morrisette, D.C. (2012). Association between reliance on devices and people for walking and ability to walk community distances among persons with spinal cord injury. The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, 35(3), 156-161. Bui, J., Hodge, A., Shackelford, A., & Acsell, J. (2011). Factors contributing to burnout among perfusionists in the United States. Perfusion, 26(3):1-6. Bushardt, R., Booze, L., Hewett, M., Hildebrandt, C., & Thomas, S. (2012). Physician assistant program characteristics and faculty credentials on physician assistant national certifying exam pass rates. Journal of Physician Assistant Education, (23)1, 19-23. Coker-Bolt, P., Jarrard, C., Woodard-Kline, F., & Merrill, P. (2012). The effects of oral motor stimulation on feeding behaviors of infants born with single ventricle anatomy. Journal of Pediatric Nursing. E-published, doi:10.1016/j.pedn.2012.03.024. Day, K.V., Kautz, S.A., Wu, S.S., Suter, S.P. & Behrman, A.L. (2012). Foot placement variability as a walking balance mechanism post-spinal cord injury. Clinical Biomechanics, 27,145-50. Esparza, S. J., Zoller, J.S., White, A.W., & Highfield, M. E. (2012). Nurse staffing and skill mix patterns: Are there differences in outcomes? Journal of Healthcare Risk Management, 31(3), 14-23. Frueh, B.C., Grubaugh, A.L., Lo Sasso, A., Jones, W.J., Oldham, J.M., & Lindrooth, R.C. (2012). Key stakeholders perception regarding acute care psychiatry in distressed publicly funded mental health care markets. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic 76, 1-20. Gebregziabher, M., Miller, P., Psenka, T., Rehman,S., Zoller, J.S., & Blue A.V. (2011). Interprofessional team practices, attitudes, and educational experiences of medical faculty. Journal of the South Carolina Medical Association, 107 (Supplement I), 11-16. Graber, D., Mitcham, M., Coker-Bolt, P., Wise, H., Jacques, P., Edlund, B., & Annan-Coultas, D. (2012). The caring professionals program: Educational approaches that integrate caring attitudes and empathic behaviors into health professions education. Journal of Allied Health, 41(2), 90-96. Groah, S.L., Charlifue, S., Tate, D., Jensen, M.P., Molton, I.R., Forchheimer, M., Krause, J.S., Lammertse, College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX A

Journal Publications


72 Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report

D.P., & Campbell, M. (2012). Spinal cord injury and aging: Challenges and recommendations for future research. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 91(1), 80-93.

APPENDIX A

Hall,P.D., Zoller, J.S., West, V.T., Lancaster, C, J.,& Blue, A.V. (2011). A novel approach to interprofessional education: Interprofessional Day, the four-year experience at the Medical University of South Carolina. Journal of Research in Interprofessional Practice and Education, 2(1), 1-14. Hormes, J. M., Coffey, S. F, Drobes, D. J., & Saladin, M.E. (2012). The Obsessive Compulsive Cocaine Use Scale: Development and initial validation of a self-rated instrument for the quantification of thoughts about cocaine use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 120, 250-254. Jensen, M.P., Molton, I.R.,Groah, S.L., Campbell, M., Charlifue, S., Chiodo, A., Forchheimer, M., Krause, J.S., & Tate, D. (2011). Secondary health conditions in individuals aging with SCI: Terminology, concepts and analytic approaches. Spinal Cord. E-published ahead of print, doi: 10.1038/sc.2011.150. Kautz, S.A., Bowden, M.G., Clark, D.J. & Neptune, R.R. (2011). Comparison of motor control deficits during treadmill and overground walking post-stroke. Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair, 25, 756-765. Kazley, A.S., Diana, M.D., & Menachemi, N. (2011). The agreement and internal consistency of national hospital EMR measures. Health Care Management Science, 14(4), 307-313. Kazley, A.S., Diana, M.D., Ford, E., & Menachemi, N. (2011). Is EHR use associated with patient satisfaction in hospitals? Health Care Management Review, 37(1). Kazley, A.S., Wilkerson, R., Jauch, E., & Adams, R.J. (2012). Access to expert stroke care with telemedicine: REACH-MUSC. Frontiers of Teleneurology, 3(44), 1-6. Kirby, K. C., Carpenedo, C. M., Stitzer, M. L., Dugosh, K. L., Petry, N. M., Roll, J. M., Saladin, M.E., Cohen, A. J., Hamilton, J., Reese, K., Sillo, G. R., Stabile, P. Q., Sterling, R. C. (2012). Is exposure to an effective contingency management intervention associated with more positive provider beliefs? Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 42, 356-365. Kohout, R., Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2011). The relationship between prescription medication use and ability to ambulate distances after spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92(8), 1246-1249. Krause, J.S., & Bozard, J.L. (2012). Natural course of life changes after spinal cord injury: A 35-year longitudinal study. Spinal Cord, 50, 227-231. Krause, J.S., & Ricks, J.M. (2012). Stability of vocational interests after recent spinal cord injury: Comparisons related to gender and race. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 93(4), 588-596. Krause, J.S., & Saunders, L.L. (2011). Health, secondary conditions, and life expectancy after spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92(11), 1770-1775. Krause, J.S., & Saunders, L.L. (2012). Socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors for mortality: Do risk factors observed after spinal cord injury parallel those from the general USA population? Spinal Cord. E-published ahead of print, doi: 10.1038/sc.2012.24. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., & Acuna, J. (2012). Gainful employment and risk of mortality after spinal cord injury: Effects beyond that of demographic, injury, and socioeconomic factors. Spinal Cord, E-published ahead of print, doi: 10.1038/sc.2012.49. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., & Zhai, Y. (2012). Stability of predictors of mortality after spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 50(4):281-284. 2012 Annual Report


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Krause, J.S., Terza, J.V., Erten, M., Focht, K.L., & Dismuke, C.E. (2012). Prediction of post-injury employment and percentage of time worked after spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 93(2), 373-375. Ling, C., Kelechi, T. J., Mueller, M., Brotherton, S.S., & Smith, S. (2012). Gait and function in class III obesity. Journal of Obesity. E-published, doi:10.1155/2012/257468. McRae-Clark, A. L., Carter, R. E., Price, K. L., Baker, N. L., Thomas, S., Saladin, M.E., Giarla, K., Nicholas, K., & Brady, K. T. (2011). Stress- and cue-elicited craving and reactivity in marijuana-dependent individuals. Psychopharmacology. 218(1), 49-58. Menachemi, N., Mazurenko, O., Kazley, A.S., Diana, M.L., & Ford, E.W. (2012). Market factors and electronic medical record adoption in medical practices. Health Care Manage Review, 37(1):14-22. Merritt, K.J., Raburn, C.E., & Dean, J.C. (2012). Adaptation of the preferred human bouncing pattern toward the metabolically optimal frequency. Journal of Neurophysiology, 107, 2244-2249. Michaud, E., Jacques, P.F., Gianola, F.J., & Harbert, K. (2012). Assessment of admissions policies for veteran corpsmen and medics applying to physician assistant educational programs. Journal of Physician Assistant Education, 23(1):4-12. Moreau, N.G., Falvo, M. J., & Damiano, D. L. (2012). Rapid force generation is impaired in cerebral palsy and is related to decreased muscle size and functional mobility. Gait Posture, 35, 154-158. Paul L.A., Grubaugh A.L., Frueh B.C., Ellis C., & Egede L.E. (2011). Associations between binge and heavy drinking and health behaviors in a nationally representative sample. Addictive Behaviors, 36(12):1240-5. Plowman, E., Hentz, B., & Ellis, C. (2012). Post-stroke aphasia prognosis: A review of patient-related and stroke-related factors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 18, 689-694. Price, K. L., Baker, N. L., McRae-Clark, A. L., Saladin, M.E., DeSantis, S. M., Santa Ana, E. J. & Brady, K.T. (2012). A randomized, placebo-controlled laboratory study of the effects of d-cycloserine on craving in cocaine-dependent individuals. Psychopharmacology. E-published ahead of print, PMID:22234379. Raburn, C.E., Merritt, K.J., & Dean, J.C. (2011). Preferred movement patterns during a simple bouncing task. Journal of Experimental Biology, 214, 3768-3774. Saladin, M.E., Gray, K.M., Carpenter, M.J., LaRowe, S.D., DeSantis, S.M., & Upadhyaya, H.P. (2012). Gender differences in reactivity to smoking and negative affect/stress cues. American Journal on Addictions. 21(3), 210-220. Saladin, M.E., Santa Ana, E. J., LaRowe, S. D., Simpson, A. N., Tolliver, B. K., Price, K. L., McRae, A. L., & Brady, K. T. (2012). Does alexithymia explain variation in cue-elicited craving reported by methamphetaminedependent individuals? American Journal on Addictions. 21, 130-135. Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2012). Behavioral factors related to fatigue among persons with spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 93(2), 313-318. Saunders, L.L., Krause, J.S., & Acuna, J. (2012). Association of race, socioeconomic status, and health care access with pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. E-published ahead of print, doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2012.02.004. College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX A

Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., Bombardier, C., & Kalpakjian, C.Z. (2011). Confirmatory factor analysis of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9: A study of participants from the SCI Model Systems. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 3(6), 530-540.


74 Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report

Saunders, L.L., Krause, J.S., & Focht, K.L. (2012). A longitudinal study of depression after spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 50(1), 72-77.

APPENDIX A

Seif, G.A. & Elliott, J.M. (2011). Ankylosing spondylitis in a patient referred to physical therapy with low back pain. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 28(1), 63–70. Selassie, A.W., Varma, A., Saunders, L.L. (2011). Current trends in venous thromboembolism among persons hospitalized with acute traumatic spinal cord injury: Does early access to rehabilitation matter? Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92(10), 1534-1541. Shackelford, A., & Hodge, A. (2011). A technique for autologous priming of the veno-venous bypass circuit during liver transplantation. Journal of ExtraCorporeal Technology, 43, 89-92. Sharma, N., Gregory, C.M., & Dixon W.E. (2011). Predictor-based compensation for electromechanical delay during neuromuscular electrical stimulation. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 19(6), 601-11. Sharma, N., Gregory, C.M., Johnson, M., & Dixon W.E. (2012). Closed-loop neural network-based nmes control for human limb tracking. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Transactions on Control Systems Technology, 20(3), 712-725. Sievert, A.N., & Sistino, J.J. (2012). A meta-analysis of the renal benefits to pulsatile perfusion in cardiac surgery. The Journal of Extra-corporeal Technology, 44(1), 10-14. Sistino, J.J., & Ellis, C. (2011). Effects of health disparities on survival after neonatal heart surgery: Why should racial, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic status be included in the risk analysis? The Journal of Extracorporeal Technology, 43(4), 232-235. Sistino, J.J., Michaud, N.M., Sievert, A.N., & Shackelford, A.G. (2011). Incorporating high fidelity simulation into perfusion education. Perfusion, 26(5), 390-394. Teufel, R., Kazley, A.S., & Basco, W.  (2011). Is computerized physician order entry use associated with a decrease on hospital resource utilization in hospitals that care for children?  Journal of Medical Systems, 36(4), 2411-2420. Thomas, K.J., Wise, H.H., Nietert, P.J., Brown, D.D., Sword, D.O., & Diehl, N.S. (2011) Interaction with a health care professional influences changes in physical activity behaviors among individuals with a spinal cord injury. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, 17(1):94- 106. Tolliver, B. K., Price, K. L., Baker, N. L., LaRowe, S. D., Simpson, A. N., McRae-Clark, A. L., Saladin, M.E., DeSantis, S. M., Chapman, E., Garrett, M., & Brady, K. T. (2012). Impaired cognitive performance in subjects with methamphetamine dependence during exposure to neutral versus methamphetamine-related cues. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 38(3), 251-259. Velozo, C.A., & Woodbury M.L. (2011). Translating measurement findings into rehabilitation practice: An example using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the Upper Extremity with clients following stroke. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 48(10): 1211-1222. Westerkam, D., Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2011). Association of spasticity and life satisfaction after spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 49(9), 990-994. Yuen, H. K., Halthaus, K., Kamen, D. L., Sword, D., & Breland, H.L. (2011). Using Wii Fit to reduce fatigue among African American women with systemic lupus erythematosus: A pilot study. Lupus, 20 (12), 12931299. 2012 Annual Report


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Yuen, H., Brooks, J., Azuero, A., & Burik, J. (2012). Brief report: Certified driver rehabilitation specialists’ preferred situations for driver simulator scenarios. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 66, 110-114.

Martin-Harris, B., Blair, J., & Focht, K.L. (2011). Meeting the challenges of communication and swallowing disorders after treatment for head and neck cancer. In N.E. Leupold & J.S. Sciubba (Eds.), Meeting the challenges of oral and head and neck cancer: a survivor’s guide (2nd ed.). San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing, Inc.

Presentations Allen, J.L., Kautz, S.A., & Neptune, R.R. (2011). Modular control of walking: A 3D simulation study. American Society of Biomechanics Annual Meeting. Long Beach, CA. Backus, D., Pike, E., Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2012, April). Insights gained from assessment of research bias and reported utilization of evidence after a specialized training program. National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Annual Conference. Alexandria, VA. Bickel, C.S., Lein, D., & Gregory, C.M. (2011, October). Impact of electrical stimulation parameters on muscle torque and fatigue in people with SCI. American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine Annual Conference. Atlanta, GA. Blue, A., Ragucci, K., Bistrick, C., Brown, D., Burik, J., Hollerbach, A., Leaphart, A., Norcross, D., & Thomas, K. (2011, November). An interprofessional case conference for students at the Medical University of South Carolina: A description and evaluation. Poster. Collaborating Across Borders III Conference. Tucson, AZ. Bonilha, H.S. (2011, September). Creating a mastery experience during the voice evaluation. 9th Pan European Voice Conference. Marseille, FR. Bonilha, H.S., & Halstead, L. (2011, September). Efficacy of tremor reduction techniques. 9th Pan European Voice Conference. Marseille, FR. Bonilha, H.S., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, August). Perception of 5 vocal fold vibratory features with notoriously poor reliability. Medical Image Perception Society XIV Conference. Dublin, IE. Bonilha, H.S., Blair, J., Carnes, B., & Martin-Harris, B. (2012, April). Clinical implications of pulse rate on perception of swallowing components from the MBSIMP. Association for Clinical Research Training Translational Science Meeting. Washington, D.C. Bonilha, H.S., Blair, J., Carnes, B., Michel, Y., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, August). Clinical implications of frame rate on perception of swallowing components from the MBSIMP. Medical Image Perception Society XIV Conference. Dublin, IE. Bonilha, H.S., Blair, J., Carnes, B., Michel, Y., & Martin-Harris, B. (2012, March). Clinical implications of pulse rate on perception of swallowing components from the MBSIMP (Award of Achievement. 2nd Place Scientific Abstract Poster). 20th Annual Dysphagia Research Society Meeting. Toronto, Ontario, CA. Bonilha, H.S., Dawson, A.E., & McGrattan, K.E. (2012, February). Are improved rater reliability results associated with faster reaction times after rater training for judgments of laryngeal mucus? SPIE Medical Imaging. San Diego, CA. Bonilha, H.S., Gerlach, T.T., & Sutton, L.E. (2011, September). Impact of systemic hydration on laryngeal College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX A

Book Chapter


76 Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report

sensation, coughing, and throat clearing. 9th Pan European Voice Conference. Marseille, FR. Bonilha, H.S., Gerlach, T.T., Sutton, L.E., & McGrattan, K.E. (2011, September). Relationship between the presence of and perception of laryngeal mucus. 9th Pan European Voice Conference. Marseille, FR. APPENDIX A

Bonilha, H.S., Gerlach, T.T., Sutton, L.E., & McGrattan, K.E. (2011, November). Are patient reports of laryngeal mucus accurate? American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention. San Diego, CA. Bonilha, H.S., McGrattan, K.E., Gerlach, T.T., Sutton, L.E., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, August). Perception of laryngeal mucus: Rater reliability. Medical Image Perception Society XIV Conference. Dublin, IE. Bonilha, H.S., Simpson, A.N., Ellis, C., Mauldin, P.D., Martin-Harris, B. & Simpson, K.N. (2011, November). 1-year cost of dysphagia post-ischemic stroke. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention. San Diego, CA. Bonilha, H.S., Simpson, A.N., Ellis, C., Mauldin, P.D., Martin-Harris, B. & Simpson, K.N. (2012, March). 1-year cost of dysphagia post-ischemic stroke. Dysphagia Research Society. Toronto, CA. Breland, H.L. (2012, March). Environmental determinants of autoimmunity: Lessons from the sea island Gullah community. 2nd Annual Research to Action Grantee Meeting, National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Partnerships for Environmental Public Health (PEPH). Bethesda, MD. Burik, J. & Mitcham, M. (2012, April). If one is good, two or more are better: A synopsis of interprofessional education at the Medical University of South Carolina. The Academic Fieldwork Coordinators’ Forum, American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference and Exposition. Indianapolis, IN. Carnes, B., Bonilha, H., Blair, J., Humphries, K., McGrattan, K., Michels, Y.,& Martin-Harris, B. (2011, November). Effect of frame rate on swallowing function judgments via MBSImP. American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention. San Diego, CA. Carpenter, M., Saladin, M.E., & Gray, K. M., (2012, March). Adolescent occasional vs. daily smokers: Evidence for greater cue reactivity? Poster. 18th annual meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Research. Houston, TX. Carson, N., Coker-Bolt, P., Harvison, N., Herge, E., Hissong, A., Kern, S. & Mitcham, M. (2012, April). Exploring opportunities to integrate interprofessional education/practice (IPEP) in occupational therapy curriculum. Oral Presentation. American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Meeting. Indianapolis, IN. Charalambous, C.C., & Dean, J.C. (2012, February). Does a passive exoskeleton with two degrees of freedom at the hip make walking easier? Human Movement Science Research Symposium. Chapel Hill, NC. Chipas, A. (2011, October). Anesthesia for the difficult airway with hands-on workshop. Barry University. Tampa, FL. Chipas, A. (2011, October). Anesthesia for the difficult airway with hands-on workshop. Barry University. Orlando, FL. Chipas, A. (2011, October). Anesthesia for the difficult airway with hands-on workshop. Barry University. Miami, FL. Chipas, A. (2011, October). Anesthesia for the difficult airway. Barry University. Miami, FL. Chipas, A. (2011, September). Anesthesia for the difficult airway: Hand-on workshop. Florida Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Orlando, FL. 2012 Annual Report


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Chipas, A. (2011, September). Assessment of the airway. Kansas Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Wichita, KS. Chipas, A. (2011, September). CRNAs role in preventing surgical site infections. Georgia Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Atlanta, GA. Chipas, A. (2011, September). CRNAs role in preventing surgical site infections. Kansas Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Wichita, KS. Chipas, A. (2011, September). Health policy and anesthesia practice. Kansas Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Wichita, KS. Chipas, A. (2011, September). Pain management: A review. Georgia Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Atlanta, GA. Chipas, A. (2011, September). Pain management: A review. Kansas Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Wichita, KS. Chipas, A. (2012, January). Health policy and anesthesia practice. Mississippi Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Jackson, MS. Chipas, A. (2012, January). Herbal medication and anesthesia. Mississippi Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Jackson, MS. Chipas, A. (2012, January). Pain management: A review. Mississippi Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Jackson, MS. Chipas, A. (2012, March). Anesthesia for the difficult airway with hands-on workshop. Indiana Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Indianapolis, IN. Clark, D.J., Behrman, A.L. & Kautz, S.A. (2011, November). Does foot placement accuracy during walking reveal the integrity of supraspinal locomotor control following stroke? Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. Washington, DC. Clark, D.J., Kautz, S.A., Bauer, A., Chen, Y.T., & Christou, E.A. (2012, April).Task-specific differences in the cortical contribution to walking are revealed by 30-60Hz oscillatory EMG activity. Pepper Older American Independence Centers Annual Meeting. Bethesda, MD. Coker-Bolt, P. & O’Brien, J. (2012, April). How important is the restraint? Applying theories of motor control and motor learning to pediatric CIMT. American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference and Exposition. Indianapolis, IN. Coker-Bolt, P., Jarrard, C., Woodard, F., & Merrill, P. (2012, April). The effects of oral motor stimulation on infants born with congenital heart defects. American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference and Exposition. Indianapolis, IN. Coker-Bolt, P., Woodbury, M., Moreau, N., Perkel, J., & Jenkins, D. (2012, April). Early motor differences in high and low risk premature infants. American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference and Exposition. Indianapolis, IN. Dean, J.C. (2011, August). Effects of a passive elastic exoskeleton during walking. 35th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Biomechanics. Long Beach, CA. College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX A

Chipas, A. (2011, September). Assessment of the airway. Georgia Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Atlanta, GA.


78 Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report

Dean, J.C. (2012, April). Intensive mobility training and functional assessment post-stroke: biomechanics of walking. South Carolina American Physical Therapy Association Annual Conference. Greenville, SC.

APPENDIX A

Dean, J.C. (2012, May). A foot placement strategy for the active control of gait stability. Dynamic Walking Conference. Pensacola, FL. Ellis, C., & Bonilha, H.S. (2011, November). A meta-analysis of aphasia-naming studies using activation likelihood estimation. American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention. San Diego, CA. Ellis, C., Simpson, A.N., Bonilha, H.S., Mauldin, P.D.,& Simpson, K.N. (2011, November). The attributable cost of aphasia. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention. San Diego, CA. Embry, A.E., Bowden, M.G., Gregory, C.M., Behrman, A.L., Neptune, R.R., & Kautz, S.A (2012, February). Relationship between personal factors and behavioral outcomes after locomotor rehabilitation intervention post-stroke. American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting. Chicago, IL. Floyd, L.M., Holmes, T.C., & Dean, J.C. (2011, August). Contributors to ankle proprioception for static and dynamic tasks. 35th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Biomechanics. Long Beach, CA. Fox, E.J., Kautz, S.A., Day, K.V., Suter, S.P., Clark, D.J., Howland, D.R. & Behrman, A.L. (2012, February). Mechanisms of walking recovery in adults with incomplete spinal cord injury. American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting. Chicago, IL. Fox, E.J., Kautz, S.A., Day, K.V., Suter, S.P., Clark, D.J.,Howland, D.R. & Behrman, A.L. (2011, November). Mechanisms of walking recovery following locomotor training in adults with incomplete spinal cord injury. Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting. Washington, DC. Franz, C.O., Monsch, E.D., & Dean, J.C. (2011, August). Effects of varying gait strategy on metabolic cost and stability. 35th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Biomechanics. Long Beach, CA. Graber, D., Mitcham, M., Coker-Bolt, P., Wise, H., Jacques, P., Edlund, B., & Annan-Coultas, D., (2012, May). Developing caring professionals: Infusing compassion and humanism in health professions education. Creating and Sustaining Caring in Health Care – Arthur Vining Davis Foundations Conference. Jacksonville, FL. Gray, K.M., Saladin, M.E., Schiller, C.E., Carpenter, M.J. & Hartwell, K.J. (2011, September). From cycles and phases to levels and ratios: Refining methods to investigate ovarian hormone effects on smoking behaviors in women. Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Europe Annual Meeting. Antalya, TR. Green, R.W., Brandt, H., & Jones, W.J.(2011, November). CPRIT funding: Behind the score. 2nd Annual Innovations in Cancer Prevention and Research Conference. Austin, TX. Gregory, C.M. (2011, October). Muscle power and locomotor function after stroke: The chicken or the egg phenomenon. American Heart Association Research Forum. Hilton Head, SC. Hodge, A. (2011, November). Are you smarter than a perfusion student? American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Pediatric Meeting. Philadelphia, PA. Hodge, A., Fernandez, A., Snyder, A., & Sistino, J. (2011, November). The effect of sleep loss and fatigue on cardiovascular perfusion students: Preliminary results. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Pediatric Meeting. Philadelphia, PA. Hodge, A., Snyder, A., Fernandez, A., Boan, A., Malek, A., & Sistino, J. (2012, March). The effect of sleep loss and fatigue on cardiovascular perfusion students: A mixed method study. 50th International Conference of the American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Orlando, FL. 2012 Annual Report


Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report 79

Howell, D., (2012). Preparing physician assistants for IP collaborative practice through a transformative learning approach. Fourth annual West Michigan Interprofessional Initiative Conference. Grand Rapids, MI. Humphries, K., Blair, J., Bonilha, H., Carnes, B., McGrattan, K., Hill, E., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, November). Radiation exposure time during VFSS: An analysis of influencing factors. American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention. San Diego, CA. Jacques, P.F., & Cousineau, L. (2011, October). Evidence based medicine in clinical practice. South Carolina Academy of Physician Assistants Conference. Isle of Palms, SC. Jacques, P.F., Mitcham, M., & Wise, H., (2011, November). Embedding interprofessional learning experiences (IPE) into the first semester of a graduate PA program. Physician Assistant Education Association Annual Forum. New Orleans, LA. Jefferson, M.S., Rouvalis, E., Sword, D.O., & Ford, M.E. (2011, November). Life after lung cancer resection: Exploring rehabilitative options to improve quality of life. Poster. American Institute for Cancer Research Conference. Washington, DC. Kautz, S.A. (2011, November). Optimizing patients outcomes – What does movement analysis reveal about how locomotor rehabilitation works? Optimizing the Management of Spastic Patients. Nice, FR. Kazley, A.S., Simpson, K.N., Simpson, A., Jauch, E., & Adams, R.J. (2012, February). Increased rt-PA utilization will decrease healthcare costs in South Carolina. International Stroke Conference. New Orleans, LA.   Kazley, A.S., Wilkerson, R., Heidari, K., Jauch, E., & Adams, R.J. (2011, September). REACH-MUSC: Use of telemedicine to address disparities in stroke care. Diabetes Fall Symposium for Primary Care Providers. Charleston, SC. Kraft, S., Wise, H., Jacques, P., Burik, J., Edlund, B., Mitcham, M. Graber, D., Coker-Bolt, P., AnnanCoultas, D., & Green, M. (2011, November). Discharge planning case study: An interprofessional learning activity to enhance caring/compassion in health professions students. Poster. Collaborating Across Borders III Conference. Tucson, AZ. Krause, J.S & Acuna, J. (2012, March). Vocational outcomes among underserved populations with SCI: a systematic program of research. Race, Ethnicities, and Disabilities: State of the Science Conference. Arlington, VA. Krause, J.S & Saunders, L.L. (2012, March). Developing a fundable program of research focused on underserved populations. Race, Ethnicities, and Disabilities: State of the Science Conference. Arlington, VA. Krause, J.S. (2011, September). Considerations in applying for NIDRR grants. South Carolina State University Research Forum. Orangeburg, SC. Krause, J.S., & Saunders, L.L. (2012, April). Socioeconomic factors and mortality after spinal cord injury. American Spinal Injury Association Annual Conference. Denver, CO. Krause, J.S., Bozard, J.L., & Reed, K.S. (2011, October). Natural course of life changes after spinal cord injury: A 35-year longitudinal study. American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine Annual Conference. Atlanta, GA. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L., DeVivo, M., Staten, D., Cao, Y., & Reed, K.S. (2011, October). Disparities in health outcomes after TBI and SCI. American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine Annual Conference. College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX A

Howell, D., & Aston, S. (2011). Why IPE? Creating Collaborative Care (C3): Interprofessional education at Medical University of South Carolina. Des Moines University. Des Moines, IA.


80 Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report

Atlanta, GA. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., & Sligh Conway, C. (2011, September). Race-ethnicity, health behaviors, and secondary conditions in SCI. Paralyzed Veterans of America Conference. Orlando, FL. APPENDIX A

Martin-Harris, B., Focht, K.L., McGrattan, K., & Sandidge, J. (2011, November). Mapping dysphagia phenotypes using standardized measures of swallowing impairment. American Speech Language Hearing Association. San Diego, CA. Martin-Harris, B., Hill, E., Bonilha, H., & McGrattan, K. (2011, November). Effects of bolus variables on physiologic components of swallowing impairment. American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention. San Diego, CA. Meacham, M., & Moore, E.L. (2012, May). Going international. Association of University Programs in Health Administration. Minneapolis, MN. Michaud, N., Sistino, J.J., Ikonomidis, J., & Fernandez, A. (2012, January). Team training for adverse situations utilizing simulation. 12th Annual International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare. San Diego, CA. Michaud, N., Sistino, J.J., McCall, M., & Bistrick, C. (2012, January). Can a simulation in a perfusion curriculum improve a student’s clinical readiness? 12th Annual International Meeting on Simulation in Healthcare. San Diego, CA. Mitcham, M., Graber, D., Coker-Bolt, P., Jacques, P., Wise, H., Edlund, B., & Annan-Coultas, D. (2011, November). Adding caring and compassion to interprofessional education: Strategies for enriching and redesigning courses in the health professions. Collaborating Across Borders Conference. Tucson, AZ. Moreau, N.G., Holthaus, K., & Marlow, N.M. (2011, October). Differential adaptations of muscle architecture in response to high velocity versus traditional strength training in cerebral palsy. American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, Las Vegas, NV. Moreau, N.G., Holthaus, K., & Marlow, N.M. (2012, February). Muscle architectural plasticity of the quadriceps in response to high velocity vs. traditional strength training in cerebral palsy: A randomized clinical trial. American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting. Chicago, IL. Moreau, N.G., Holthaus, K., & Marlow, N.M. (2012, February). Muscle architectural plasticity of the quadriceps in response to high velocity vs. traditional strength training in cerebral palsy: Effects on function, self-concept, activity and participation. American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting. Chicago, IL. Morrisette, D.C., Cholewicki, J., McGowan, S. & Seif, G.A., (2012, May). Comparison of 2 designs of lumbosacral supports for the management of lower back pain. The First Spine Conference. Kiawah Island, SC. Morrisette, D.C., Cholewicki, J., Seif, G.A., & McGowan, S. (2012, May). Efficacy of extensible and inextensible lumbosacral orthoses in the management of low back pain. International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine. Amsterdam, NL. Mund, A. (2012, March). Fluid responsiveness: Cultivate your curves. Wisconsin Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Wisconsin Dells, WI. Mund, A. (2012, March). Perioperative management of heart failure. Wisconsin Association of Nurse Anesthetists. Wisconsin Dells, WI. Mund, A. (2012, May). Perioperative management of heart failure. MUSC Charleston Anesthesia Conference. 2012 Annual Report


Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report 81

Charleston, SC.

Peterson, C.L., Kautz, S.A. & Neptune, R.R. (2011, August). Paretic muscle work is increased in pre-swing during hemiparetic walking. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Biomechanics. Long Beach, CA. Romano, F., Duin, D., Gropack, S.J., Morrisette, D., & Simpson, D.S. (2011, November). Self-perceived attitudes about professional behavior among allied health students. Association of Schools of Allied Health Annual Conference. Phoenix AZ. Rowell, T., Mooney, Y., Shackelford, A.G., Michaud, N.M., & Sievert, A.N. (April, 2012). Separation of biocompatible cardiopulmonary bypass tubing connections. Presented at the American Society of Extracorporeal Technology 50th International Conference. Orlando, FL. Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2012, April). Behavioral factors related to fatigue among persons with spinal cord injury. American Spinal Injury Association Annual Conference. Denver, CO. Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2012, February). Health outcomes research and capacity building for underserved populations with spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury. Invited presentation at Spelman College, Atlanta, GA. Saunders, L.L., Krause, J.S., & Acuna, J. (2012, April). The association of race, socioeconomic status, and health care access with pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury. American Spinal Injury Association Annual Conference. Denver, CO. Saunders, L.L., Krause, J.S., & Selassie, A. (2012, April). Health behaviors among blacks with spinal cord injury: A comparison with the general population. Poster. American Spinal Injury Association. Denver, CO. Saunders, L.L., Krause, J.S., Selassie, A., & Cao, Y. (2012, April). Healthcare access after SCI and TBI: A comparison with the general population. National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Annual Conference. Alexandria, VA. Saunders, L.L.,Krause, J.S., Acuna, J., & Cao, Y. (2012, April). Association of race, socioeconomic status, and health care access with pressure ulcers after SCI. National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers Annual Conference. Alexandria, VA. Seif, G., Brown, D., & Annan-Coultas, D. (2012, June). Development in clinical reasoning skills of physical therapy students through the use of educational technology. Poster. Physical Therapy 2012: Annual Conference and Exposition of the American Physical Therapy Association. Tampa, FL. Seif, G., Brown, D., & Annan-Coultas, D. (2012, June). The use of educational technology, self and peer assessment on student perception of preparation for clinical practicums. Poster. Physical Therapy 2012: Annual Conference and Exposition of the American Physical Therapy Association. Tampa, FL. Shackelford, A.G. (2011, November). An introduction to racial disparities in the treatment of cardiovascular disease: Polishing our lens of research and care. North Carolina State Perfusion Society Annual Education Seminar. Charlotte, NC. Shackelford, A.G. (2011, November). Evolution of an adult ECMO program: How technology drove redesign. North Carolina State Perfusion Society Annual Education Seminar. Charlotte, NC. Shackelford, A.G. (2011, September). The Use of a Modernized Extracorporeal Life Support System: A Case Series. Florida Perfusion Society’s Case Reports in the Sun VII. Tampa, FL. College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX A

Perkel, J., Coker-Bolt, P., Moreau, N., Mulvihill, D., Woodbury, M., & Jenkins, D., (2012, April). Very early quantifiable motor skills in preterm infants. Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting. Boston, MA.


82 Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report

APPENDIX A

Shackelford, A.G., Relle, M., Hutchinson, J., Mattison, A., & Sievert, A.N. (2012, March). Report on trends in adult perfusion practice in the United States: Results from 2006 and 2011 surveys. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology 50th International Conference. Orlando, FL. Sievert, A. (2011, November). Factor VII usage in pediatric cardiac surgery. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Pediatric Perfusion Conference. Philadelphia, PA. Sievert, A. & Sistino, J.J. (2012, February). Part 2: Sitting in the hot seat -perfusion safety training using simulation. Cardiothoracic Research and Education Foundation. San Diego, CA. Sievert, A. (2012, March). Factor VII in cardiac surgery: Do the benefits outweigh the risks? 32nd Annual Cardiothoracic Research and Education Foundation Perfusion Conference. San Diego, CA. Sistino, J.J. & Sievert, A. (2012, February). Part 1: Sitting in the hot seat -perfusion safety training using simulation. Cardiothoracic Research and Education Foundation. San Diego, CA. Sistino, J.J. (2012, February). Long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in neonatal heart surgery patientsImplications for adults. Cardiothoracic Research and Education Foundation. San Diego, CA. Sistino, J.J. (2012, January). Development of an air embolism video for perfusion safety training, American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion. New Orleans, LA. Vargus, A., Jacques, P.F., Shrader, S., & Kern, D., (2011, November). Enhancing physician assistant education through simulated interprofessional rounding experiences. Poster. Physician Assistant Education Association Annual Forum. New Orleans, LA.

Professional Service Activities Acsell, J. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Internet Committee, Member Annan-Coultas, D. EDUCAUSE National Conference Teaching and Learning Track, Libraries, E-Research, and Digital Content Track, Reviewer; Teaching Learning and Technology Professional Association, Member Bonilha, H. South Carolina Speech Language Hearing Research Committee, President; The Voice Foundation: Care of the Professional Voice Symposium, Poster Judge; ASHA Convention 2012 Voice, Resonance and Alaryngeal Speech Program Committee, Member Bowman, P. National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Clinical Simulation Question Writing Committee, Member; American Occupational Therapy Association, Member; South Carolina Occupational Therapy Association, Member Breland, H. Association of Rheumatology Health Professions (ARHP) Annual Meeting Rehabilitation Science Category Abstract Review, Chair; ARHP Annual Scientific Meeting Program Subcommittee, Member Brotherton, S. South Carolina Chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association, Vice President Brown, D. South Carolina Chapter, American Physical Therapy Association National House of Delegates, Delegate; South Carolina Chapter, American Physical Therapy Association, Member Burik, J. American Occupational Therapy Association, Member Chipas, A. South Carolina Association of Nurse Anesthetists, President; American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Wellness (AANA) Curriculum Taskforce, Member; AANA Wellness Committee, Member 2012 Annual Report


Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report 83

Ellis, C. American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention Program Planning Committee, Member Embry, A. South Carolina American Physical Therapy Association Board of Directors, Conference Committee, Federal Affairs Liaison, and Strategic Planning Task, Member Graber, D. American Public Health Association, Member; Metanexus Institute, Member Hodge, A. Pediatric American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Meeting , Moderator Jacques, P.F., Physician Assistant Education Association, Helping Veterans Become PAs, Bridge Program Subcommittee, Co-chair; American Academy of Physician Assistants, House of Delegates, S.C. Delegate; South Carolina Academy of Physician Assistants, Immediate Past President; South Carolina Academy of Physician Assistants, Legislative Committee, Chair; South Carolina Academy of Physician Assistants, Awards Committee, Chair Jones, W. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Reviewer; Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT), Scientific Research and Prevention Programs Committee, Scientific Reviewer; Pennsylvania Department of Health / Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Performance Reviewer Kautz, S.A. American Heart Association Mid-Atlantic Affiliate Board of Directors, Member Kazley, A. Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) Upsilon Phi Delta Honor Committee and Annual Planning Committee, Member Martin-Harris, B. OESO, World Organization for Specialized Study on Diseases of the Esophagus, Permanent Scientific Committee, Member; OESO, World Organization for Specialized Study on Diseases of the Esophagus Deglutology Section, Chair; Board of Councilors for the International Society for Maxillofacial Rehabilitation (ISMR), Member; Medical Advisory Board, Support for People with Oral Head and Neck Cancer, Member; International Dysphagia Research Society, Program Planning Committee, Member; American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA) Special Interest Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders, Voice and Voice Disorders, Member; ASHA Special Interest Research Committee, Chair; ASHA Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders Board, Recognized Specialist; American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Member; South Carolina Speech and Hearing Association, Member, South Carolina Cancer Alliance, Member McCall, M. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology, Member; American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion, Associate Member Michaud, N. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology, Member; American Association of Blood Banks, Member; American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion, Member Moreau, N. American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Section on Pediatrics Awards Committee, Chair; APTA Research Committee, Member; American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Awards Committee, Member Morrisette, D. American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) 2012 Education Section, Delegate at Large; APTA , Orthopaedic Section Practice Affairs Committee, Member; APTA Combined Sections Meeting Poster Presentation, Reviewer Mund, A. Association of Veteran’s Affairs Nurse Anesthetists, Executive Director; South Carolina Association College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX A

Coker-Bolt, P. American Occupational Therapy Association, Member; South Carolina Occupational Therapy Association, Member


84 Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report

of Nurse Anesthetists, President-Elect; American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Education Committee, Member; South Carolina Future of Nursing Taskforce, Member Sampson, N. Project Management Institute, Member; American College of Healthcare Executives, Member APPENDIX A

Seif, G. South Carolina American Physical Therapy Association (SCAPTA) 2012, President and Delegate; SCAPTA 2011, President- elect; SCAPTA Programs Committee, Chair Shackelford, A. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Membership Committee, Member Sievert, A. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Ethics Committee, Chair; American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Nominating Committee, Member Sistino, J. Perfusion Program Directors Council Board, Member Sword, D. American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Certified Specialist Exam, Item Writer Wager, K. Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education Accreditation Site Visitor, Fellow; Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) Information Management Special Interest Group, Member; AUPHA-HIMSS-CAHME Task Group, Health Information Technology Curriculum Development Project, Panel Reviewer; American Medical Informatics Association, Member; Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, Senior Member White, A. Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME) Council of Accreditation Site Visitor, Chair; CAHME Candidacy Committee, Chair; South Carolina Chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives Board of Directors, Member Wise, H. South Carolina Chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association (SCAPTA) Nominating Committee, Chair; SCAPTA Strategic Planning Committee, Member Woodbury, M. American Congress of Rehabilitation Measurement, Post-Stroke Upper Extremity Task Force, Member; NeuroRecovery Network, Upper Extremity Measurement Tool Development Task Force, Member; American Occupational Therapy Association, Member; American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine, Member; American Society for Neurorehabilitation, Member Zoller, J. Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) Information Management 2011 Annual Conference Planning Committee, Development Committee, Member; AUPHA- 2011 Annual Conference Session, Facilitator

Community Service Activities Bowman, P. MUSC Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic, Supervisor Breland, H. Lowcountry AHEC Coalition for Health Careers, Member; Howard University Occupational Therapy Alumni & Friends Advisory Board, Member Brotherton, S. USA Swimming Stroke and Turn Swimming, Official; South Carolina High School League Swimming Stroke and Turn Swimming, Official Burik, J. MUSC Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic, Mentor Chipas, A. South Carolina Aquarium, Volunteer Educator Coker-Bolt, P. Charleston Miracle League Executive Board, Member; Pattison’s Academy Finance Committee 2012 Annual Report


Appendix A: Faculty Productivity Report 85

and Executive Board, Member; Play Today Foundation, Member Embry, A. Charleston Miracle League, Coach and Board of Directors; Human Rights Committee, Chairman

Kazley, A. MUSC Children’s Hospital, Volunteer Martin-Harris, B. Medical Advisory Board, Member; Head and Neck Cancer Alliance, Member McCall, M. Charleston Exchange Club Auxiliary, Member Moore, E.L. Respite Care Charleston Board of Directors, Member Morrisette, D. MUSC Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic, Volunteer; Low Country Splash and Cooper River Bridge Swim, Volunteer Sampson, N. Trident United Way Day of Caring, Project Coordinator Sievert, A. Junior League of Charleston, Member Sword, D. American Heart Association Lowcountry Heart Walk, Fundraiser Wise, H. Center for Post-Polio Rehabilitation Board, Member Woodbury, M.L. Ashley Hall High School, Mentor Zoller, J. SC Office for Healthcare Workforce Analysis and Planning Board, Member; SC State Health Planning n

College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX A

Howell, D. We Are Family Board of Directors, Member


APPENDIX B: GRANTS


Appendix B: Grants 87

Grant Reviewers Bonilha, H. America Speech and Hearing Language Foundation Support Program for Advancing Research and Collaboration Grant Award, Reviewer Bowden, M. South Carolina Clinical & Translational Institute, South Carolina SCI Research Fund, Reviewer Dean, J. National Science Foundation Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences, Ad hoc Reviewer; US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Ad hoc Reviewer Gregory, C. South Carolina Clinical & Translational Institute, South Carolina SCI Research Fund, Reviewer

Kautz, S. American Heart Association Bioengineering and Biotechnology study section, Ad hoc Reviewer; Research Foundation Flanders, Belgium, Ad hoc Reviewer Saladin, M. South Carolina Clinical & Translational Institute KL2 Award Program, Reviewer; National Institute of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Ad hoc Reviewer n

College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX B

Jones, W. Cancer Research and Prevention Institute of Texas (CPRIT), Panel Reviewer; Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Ad hoc Reviewer


PI

Type

Current Year Indirect Costs

Current Year Total

$28,417

$0

$28,417

$61,846

$0

$61,846

$41,625

$0

$41,625

$5,385

$0

$5,385

$8,033

$0

$8,033

$15,000

$0

$15,000

$2,500

$0

$2,500

$125,000

$48,363

$173,363

08/01/2011 07/31/2012 12/01/2011 11/30/2012

$62,983

$0

$62,983

$32,269

$0

$32,269

07/01/2011 06/30/2012 08/01/2011 07/31/2012 11/01/2011 10/31/2012 07/01/2011 06/30/2012 07/01/2011 03/31/2012 08/17/2011 12/31/2012

$69,977

$6,998

$76,975

$126,081

$0

$126,081

$50,000

$0

$50,000

$94,888

$0

$94,888

$19,476

$9,251

$28,727

$119,256

$29,064

$148,320

01/01/2012 12/31/2013

$68,182

$6,818

$75,000

04/01/2012 02/28/2013 07/01/2011 06/30/2012 10/01/2011 09/30/2012

$20,060

$9,528

$29,588

$68,903

$0

$68,903

$714,461

$76,576

$791,037

10/01/2011 09/30/2012 Center for Health Outcomes Research and Capacity Building for Underserved Populations SCI & 10/01/2011 09/30/2012 TBI

$135,575

$64,397

$199,972

$264,203

$88,931

$353,134

Participation, Subjective Well-being, Health, and Spinal Cord Injury: A 40-Year Longitudinal Study

10/01/2011 09/30/2012

$135,592

$64,406

$199,998

10/01/2011 09/30/2012

$21,376

$10,154

$31,530

10/01/2011 09/30/2012 12/01/2011 11/30/2012

$25,320

$12,027

$37,347

$195,000

$0

$195,000

10/15/2011 $40,000 06/30/2012 03/18/2009 $145,600 12/31/2012 05/26/2010 $129,600 12/31/2012 08/03/2011 $2,500 06/30/2012 07/01/2011 $120,316 06/30/2012 Total $2,949,424

$10,000

$50,000

$36,400

$182,000

$32,400

$162,000

$0

$2,500

$0

$120,316

Bowden, M.

Sponsor South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund

State

Title Propulsion Training in Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury (Year 2)

Bowden, M.

Veterans Administration

Federal

Evaluation of Walking Specific Motor Learning in Chronic Stroke (Year 2)

Cao, Y.

South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund

State

The Application of Medical Sociology to the Study of Health and Mortality after Spinal Cord Injury

Chipas, T.

Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Federal Services Administration Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Federal Services Administration MUSC Interprofessional Interdisciplinary - Provost Office Internal

Chipas, T. Coker-Bolt, P.

Appendex B: Grants 88

Nurse Anesthetist Traineeship Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship

Coker-Bolt, P. Coastal Community Foundation of SC

Foundation

Interprofessional Education at the MUSC: Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support (CARES) Clinic Camp Hand to Hands

Dean, J.

National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Federal

Development of a Passive Elastic Exoskeleton for Gait Rehabilitation (Year 2)

Ellis, C.

Veterans Administration

Federal

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Post-Stroke Outcomes (Year 3)

Gregory, C.

South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund

State

Development of a Rehabilitation Research Program to Study the Biomedics of Walking following Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury (Year 2)

Gregory, C.

American Heart Association

Foundation

Lower Extremity Power and Locomotor Function after Stroke

Gregory, C.

Veterans Administration

Federal

Skeletal Muscle Properties and the Metabolic Cost of Walking Post-Stroke (Year 4)

Kautz, S.

Federal flowdown

tDCS for Walking Recovery After Stroke: Comparison of Cortical and Spinal Stimulation

Kautz, S.

South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute/NIH/NCRR Veterans Administration

Federal

Research Career Scientist Award (Year 4)

Kautz, S.

Aretech, LLC/NIH/NICHD

Federal flowdown

ZeroG: Dynamic Over Ground Body Weight Support System (Subaward Year 1)

Kautz, S.

Innovative Neurotronics, Inc.

Corporate

Kautz, S.

American Heart Association

Foundation

Kautz, S.

Aretech, LLC/NIH/NICHD

Federalflowdown

Randomized Trial of the Innovative Neurotronics WalkAide Compared to Conventional Ankle Foot Orthosis in Stroke Patients Do Spinal & Cortical tDCS Suggest Distinct & Synergistic Neuromechanical Mechanisms for Post-stroke Walking Recovery? ZeroG: Dynamic Over Ground Body Weight Support System (Subaward Year 2)

Krause, J.

South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund

State

Research Development Core (FY2011-2012)

Krause, J.

U. S. Department of Education

Federal

Krause, J.

U.S. Department of Education

Federal

Rehabilitation and Research Training Center for Secondary Conditions in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury Ambulatiion and Secondary Complications: Participants with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

Krause, J.

U.S. Department of Education

Federal

Krause, J.

U.S. Department of Education

Federal

Krause, J.

U.S. Department of Education

Federal

Krause, J.

U.S. Department of Education/Sherpherd Center

Federal flowdown

Saunders, L.

South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund

State

Simpson, K.

Abbott Laboratories

Corporate

Center on Health Outcomes Research and Capacity Building for Underserved Popoulations with Spinal Cord Injury and Traumatic Brain Injury (Supplement) A Longitudinal Study of Gainful Employment 10 Years after Spinal Cord Injury Onset: Comparisons of those Who do not Return to the Pre-onjury Employer (Subaward) Measuring Outcomes after Spinal Cord Injury Throughout South Carolina: A System of Tracking, Research and Referral A Study of Antiretroviral Drugs in Pregnant Women in the U.S.

Simpson, K.

Abbott Laboratories

Corporate

Economic Models of Kaletra for Europe (Amended Award)

Simpson, K.

Abbott Laboratories

Corporate

JIA Economic Model (Amended Award)

Woodbury, M. MUSC Yes Campaign

Internal

Neurorehabilitation Research Clinical Integration Group (MUSC Office of Development)

Woodbury, M. Veterans Administration

Federal

A Toolbox for Measuring Post-Stroke Upper Extremity Motor Ability (Year 4)

Project Dates

12/01/2011 11/30/2012 07/01/2011 01/31/2012 11/01/2011 10/31/2012 07/01/2011 06/30/2012 07/01/2011 06/30/2012 12/01/2011 09/30/2012 07/01/2011 06/30/2012 04/01/2012 03/31/2013

Current Year Direct Costs

$505,313 $3,454,737

APPENDIX B

CHP Faculty Principal Investigators Grant Awards


Appendex B: Grants 89

CHP Investigators Participating in External Grant Awards College/Department/PI

Sponsor

Type

Title

Dates of Participation

CHP Investigator(s)/ Effort

APPENDIX B

College of Medicine, Rheumatology & Immunology (Kamen, PI)

National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Federal

Environmental Determinants of Autoimmunity among African Americans in Coastal SC - Diversty Supplement

07/01/2011 03/31/2012

Breland, H. 75%

College of Medicine, Rheumatology & Immunology (Kamen, PI)

National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Federal

Environmental Determinants of Autoimmunity among African Americans in Coastal SC - Parent Grant

04/01/2012 12/31/2012

Breland, H., 60%

College of Medicine, Psychiatry (Brady, PI)

South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute/NIH/NCRR CTSA Federal

South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research Institute (SCTR): KL2

04/01/2012 03/31/2013

Bonilha, H., 75%

College of Medicine, Pediatrics (Macias, PI)

Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration

Federal

LEND: Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities

10/01/2011 06/30/2012

Coker-Bolt, P. 10%

College of Medicine, Neurology ( Hinson, PI)

Barmore Foundation

Foundation

Forced Exercise in Post-Deep Brain Stimulation Parkinson’s Disease Patient’s for Freezing Gait

11/14/2011 06/30/2012

Embry, A., 11%

College of Medicine, Psychiatry (Brady, PI)

South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute/NIH/NCRR CTSA Federal

South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research Institute (SCTR)

04/01/2012 03/31/2013

Kautz, S., 29%

College of Medicine, Neuroscience ( Adams, PI)

National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Federal

Prevention of Stroke after STOP (Year 3)

07/01/2011 04/22/2012

Kazley, A., 10%

College of Medicine, Neurology (Slaughter, PI)

Department of Defense/U.S. Army/U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity

Federal

Southeastern Virtual Institute of Equity & Wellness (SE View; Project 9)

07/01/2011 04/22/2012

Kazley, A., 30%

College of Medicine, Surgery/Transplant (Baliga, PI)

National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease

Federal

A Program to Increase Living Donations in African Americans (Year 5)

7/1/2011 04/22/2012

Kazley, A. 15% Simpson, K. 2.5%

College of Medicine, Cardiac Surgery (Ikonomidis, PI)

Thoracic Surgery Foundation

Foundation

Multi-Disciplinary Simulation and Training in Cardiac Surgical Crisis Management

07/01/2011 04/30/2012

Michaud, N. 4% Fernandez, A. 1%

College of Medicine, Psychiatry (Brady, PI)

National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Federal

Specialized Center Research (SCOR) on Sex and Gender Factors Affecting 07/01/2011 Women's Health (Year 11); Project 4: Gender, Menstrual Cycle, and Smoking 06/30/2012 Cue Reactivity

Saladin, M. 15%

College of Medicine, Psychiatry (Brady, PI)

National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Federal

The Impact of Real-time fMRI Feedback on Response to Nicotine Cues (Year 5)

07/01/2011 06/30/2012

Saladin, M. 5%

College of Medicine, Psychiatry (Brady, PI)

National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Federal

D-Cycloserine Facilitation of Cocaine-Cue Extinction (Year 5)

07/01/2011 05/31/2012

Saladin, M. 5%

College of Medicine, Psychiatry (Gray, PI)

National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Federal

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Varenicline for Adolescent Smoking Cessation

06/01/2012 06/30/2012

Saladin, M. 10%

College of Medicine, Surgery (Fakhry, Ford, Co-PIs)

National Institutes of Health/National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Federal

Critical Care Excellence in Sepsis and Trauma (CREST, Year 3; ARRA-funded RC1 Challenge Grant)

07/01/2011 03/31/2012

Simpson, K. 8%

College of Medicine, General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics (Moran, PI)

Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration

Federal

Data Mining for Moran Development Project (Year 4)

07/01/2011 12/31/2011

Simpson, K. 4.68%

College of Medicine, Pediatrics (Basco, PI)

Department of Health and Human Services/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Federal

Assessment of Pediatric Look-Alike, Sound-Alike (LASA) Substitution Errors 07/01/2011 (Year 3) 03/31/2012

Simpson, K. 1%

College of Medicine, Neurology (Slaughter, PI)

Department of Defense/U.S. Army/ Activity

Federal

Southeastern Virtual Institute of Equity & Wellness (SE View; Project 8)

07/01/2011 06/30/2012

Simpson, K. 20%

College of Medicine, Radiology ( Schoepf, PI)

General Electric Healthcare/Siemans Medical Solutions

Corporate

Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Benefit of Multi-Slice Coronary CT Angiography versus Cardiac Catheterization in Patients with Abnormal Myocardial Perfusion Studies

07/01/2011 12/31/2011

Simpson, K. 1.7%

College of Medicine, Pulmonary & Critical Care (Ford, PI)

South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute/NIH/NCRR CTSA Federal

Transitions in Care Among Critically Ill Patients: A Mixed Methods Investigation of Inter-Hospital Transfers

12/01/2011 06/30/2012

Simpson, K. 3%

U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition


APPENDIX C: STUDENT PRODUCTIVITY REPORT


Appendix C: Student Productivity Report 91

Publications: Division of Physical Therapy Merritt, K.J., Raburn, C.E., & Dean J. C. (2012). Adaptation of the preferred human bouncing pattern toward the metabolically optimal frequency. Journal of Neurophysiology. 107: 2244-2249. Raburn, C.E., Merritt, K.J., & Dean J. C. (2011). Preferred movement patterns during a simple bouncing task. Journal of Experimental Biology. 214(22): 3768-3774.

Publications: Division of Health and Rehabilitation Science Bryant, D.C., Williamson, D., Cartmell, K.B., & Ford, M. (2011). A lay patient navigation training curriculum targeting disparities in cancer clinical trials. Journal of the National Black Nurses Association, 22(2), 68-75. Carpenter, M.J., Ford, M.E., Cartmell, K.B., & Alberg, A.J. (2011). Misperceptions of nicotine replacement therapy within racially and ethnically diverse groups. Journal of the National Medical Association, 103 (9-10), 879-888. Carter, C.L., Onicescu, G., Cartmell, K.B., Sterba, K.R., Tomsic, J. & Alberg, A.J. (2011). The comparative effectiveness of a team-based versus group-based physical activity intervention for cancer survivors, Supportive Care in Cancer. Cartmell, K.B., Miner, C., Carpenter, M.J., Vitoc, C.S., Biggers, S., Onicescu, G., Hill, E.G., Nickerson ,B.C. & Alberg, A.J. (2011). Secondhand smoke exposure in young people and parental rules against smoking at home and in the car. Public Health Reports, 126, 575-582.

Ellis, C., Simpson, A.N., Bonilha, H.S., Mauldin, P.D., & Simpson, K.N. (2012). The one-year attributable cost of post-stroke aphasia. Stroke, 43:1429-1431. Hernandez-Tejada, M.A., Campbell, J.A., Walker, R.J., Smalls, B.L., Davis, K.S., & Egede, L.E. (2012). Diabetes empowerment, medication adherence and self-care behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Technology and Therapeutics, 14(7). Hunt, K. J., Marlow, N.M., Gebregziabher, M., Ellerbe, C. N., Mauldin, J., Mayorga, M. E., & Korte, J. E. (2012). Impact of maternal diabetes on birthweight is greater in non-Hispanic blacks than in non-Hispanic whites. Diabetologia, 55(4), 971-980. Krause, J.S., Terza, J.V., Erten, M., Focht, K.L., & Dismuke, C.L. (2012). Prediction of post-injury employment and years worked after spinal cord injury. Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation, 93(2), 373-375. Price, K.L., DeSantis, S.M., Simpson, A.N., Tolliver, B.K., McRae-Clark, A.L., Saladin, M.E., Baker, N.L., Wagner, M.T., & Brady, K.T. (2011). The impact of clinical and demographic variables on cognitive performance in methamphetamine-dependent individuals in rural South Carolina. American Journal on Addiction, 20, 447-455. Ravenel, M. C., Salinas, C. F., Marlow, N.M., Slate, E. H.,Evans, Z. P., & Miller, P. M. (2012). Methamphetamine abuse and oral health: a pilot study of meth mouth. Quintessence International, 43(3), 229-237. Ryan, K.K., Garrett-Mayer, E., Alberg, A.J., Cartmell, K.B. & Carpenter, M.J. (2011). Predictors of cessation pharmacotherapy use among black and non-hispanic white smokers. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 13(8), College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX C

Cooley, M.A., Fresco, VM, Dorlon, M.E., Twal, W.O., Lee, N.V., Barth, J.L., Kern, C.B., Iruela-Arispe, M.L., Argraves, W.S. (2011). Fibulin-1 is required during cardiac ventricular morphogenesis for versican cleavage, suppression of ErbB2 and Erk1/2 activation, and to attenuate trabecular cardiomyocyte proliferation. Developmental Dynamics, 241(2), 303-14.


92 Appendix C: Student Productivity Report

646-652. Saunders, L.S., Krause, J.S., & Focht, K.L. (2012). A longitudinal study of depression in survivors of spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 50(1), 72-77. Smalls, B.L., Walker, R.J., Hernandez-Tejada, M.A., Campbell, J.A., Davis, K.S., & Egede, L.E. (2012). Associations between coping, diabetes knowledge, medication adherence and self-care behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes. Abstract. General Hospital Psychiatry, 34(4): 385-389. Tolliver, B.K., Price, K.L., Baker, N.L., LaRowe, S., Simpson, A.N., McRae-Clark, A.L., Saladin, M.E., DeSantis, S.M., Chapman, E., Garrett, M., & Brady, K.T. (2012). Impaired cognitive performance in subjects with methamphetamine dependence during exposure to neutral versus methamphetamine-related cues. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. 38(3): 251-259. Yuen, H. K., Marlow, N. M., Reed, S. G., Mahoney, S., Summerlin, L. M., Leite, R., Silver, R. M. (2012). Effect of orofacial exercises on oral aperture in adults with systemic sclerosis. Disability and Rehabilitation, 34(1), 8489.

Presentations: Division of Cardiovascular Perfusion Davis, G.R., Shackelford, A.G., McClain, B.D., & Sievert, A.N. (2012). Assessment of the effect of temperature on global coagulation using a thromboelastogram. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology 50th International Conference, Orlando, FL. Floyd, L., & Holmes, T. (2011). Contributors to ankle proprioception for static and dynamic tasks. American Society of Biomechanics (ASB) Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA. Franz, C. & Monsch, E. (2011). Effects of varying gait strategy on metabolic cost and stability. American Society of Biomechanics Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA. APPENDIX C

Hutchinson, J., Relle, M., Mattison, A., Shackelford, A.G., Sievert, A.N. (2012). Using Binomial Proportions and a Linear Regression to Predict Adoption of Perfusion Techniques and Technologies. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology 50th International Conference, Orlando, FL. McClain, B.D, Shackelford, A.G., Davis, G.R., & Sievert, A.N. (2012). Differences in perfusionist and surgeon retrograde autologous priming volumes of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology 50th International Conference, Orlando, FL.

Rowell, T., Mooney, Y., Shackelford, A.G., Michaud, N.M., & Sievert, A.N. (2012). Separation of biocompatible cardiopulmonary bypass tubing connections. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology 50th International Conference, Orlando, FL. Snyder, A. (2011). Simulation Labs: Making us better one student at a time. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology Pediatric Meeting, Philadelphia, PA.

Presentations: Division of Health and Rehabilitation Science Barth, J.L., Fresco, V.M., Gittinger, C.K., Twal, W.O., & Argraves, W.S. (2012, February). Leading edge protein and genomic services at the MUSC Proteogenomics Facility. EPSCoR/IDeA South Carolina INBRE Scientific Symposium (poster), Columbia, SC. Bonilha, H., Gerlach, T., Sutton, L., & McGrattan, K. (2011, November). Are patient reports of laryngeal mucus accurate? American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, San Diego, CA. Bonilha, H., Simpson, A.N., Ellis, C., Mauldin, P.D., & Simpson, K.N. (2011, November). One year cost of dysphagia post-ischemic stroke. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, San Diego, CA. 2012 Annual Report


Appendix C: Student Productivity Report 93

Carnes, B., Bonilha, H., Blair, J., Humphries, K., McGrattan, K., Michel, Y., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, November). Effect of frame rate on swallowing function judgments via MBSImP. American Speech-LanguageHearing Association Annual Convention, San Diego, CA. Cartmell K.B., Bryant, D.C., Carpenter, M.J., Ford, M.E., Cummings, M.K., Sterba, K.R., Wallace, K., Current, J. & Alberg, A.J. (2012, March). Racial Differences in Lifestyle Factors among Uninsured Women Screened for Cancer on a Mobile Health Unit, American Society of Preventive Oncology (poster), Washington, DC. Cartmell, K.B., & Matson, T. (2011, July). Navigate: Navigation to increase guidance and awareness of trials for thoracic and esophageal cancers. American Association of Cancer Institutes, American Association of Cancer Institutes’ Clinical Research Initiative Meeting, Chicago, IL. Cartmell, K.B., Bryant, D.C., Carpenter, M.J., Cummings, M.K., Ford, M.E., Wynne, K.L., Biggers, S., Wallace, K., Sterba, K.R., Current, J. & Alberg, A.J. (2012, March). Mobile Community outreach to intervene with medically underserved smokers, American Society of Preventive Oncology (poster), Washington, DC. Charalambous, C., & Dean, J.C. (2012). Does a passive elastic exoskeleton with two degrees of freedom at the hip make walking easier? Annual Human Movement Science Research Symposium (poster), Chapel Hill, NC. Charalambous, C., & Dean, J.C. (2012). Magnitude and time course of adaptation during walking with a passive elastic exoskeleton. American Society of Biomechanics (poster), Gainesville, FL. Ellis, C. Simpson, A.N., Bonilha, H., Mauldin, P.D., & Simpson, K.N. (2011, November). The one-year attributable cost of post-stroke aphasia. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, San Diego, CA.

Focht, K.L., Simpson, K.N., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, September). Business case for pretreatment swallowing exercises. American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery (poster), San Francisco, CA. Focht, K.L., Simpson, K.N., Day, T., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, November). Business case for pretreatment swallowing exercises. Hollings Cancer Center Annual Scientific Research Retreat (poster), Daniel Island, SC. Focht, K.L., Simpson, K.N., Day, T., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, November). Business case for pretreatment swallowing exercises. Perry V. Halushka MUSC Student Research Day (poster VA Honorable Mention), Charleston, SC. Focht, K.L., Simpson, K.N., Day, T., & Martin-Harris, B. (2012, March). Markov Modeling to evaluate pretreatment swallowing exercises in head and neck cancer. Annual Meeting of Dysphagia Research Society (Postdoctoral/Fellow Plenary Poster Award), Toronto, Ontario, CA. Focht, K.L., Skinner, M., & Martin-Harris, B. (2012, July). Physiological components of swallowing related to outcomes in HNC. Oral presentation at the 8th International Conference on Head & Neck Cancer, Toronto, Ontario, CA. Fresco, V.M. (2012, February). Fibulin-1 regulates a Shh-Forkhead-Tbx1-Fgf8 genetic pathway required for pharyngeal arch and cardiac outflow tract development. EPSCoR/IDeA South Carolina INBRE Scientific Symposium (poster), Columbia, SC. Fresco, V.M. (2012, May). Fibulin-1 regulates a Shh-Forkhead-Tbx1-Fgf8 genetic pathway required for pharyngeal arch and cardiac outflow tract development. National Predoctoral Clinical Research Training College of Health Professions MUSC

APPENDIX C

Focht, K.L., Simpson, K.N., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, November). Business case for pretreatment swallowing exercises. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (poster), San Diego, CA, November 2011.


94 Appendix C: Student Productivity Report

Program Meeting (oral presentation), Rochester, MN. Fresco, V.M., Cooley, M.A., Twal, W.O., Lee, K.H., Barth, J.L., & Argraves, W.S. (2011, November). Fibulin-1 and fibronectin act in opposition to regulate the Shh-Forkhead-Tbx1-Fgf8-Map Kinase pathway critical for neural crest cell motility and survival. MUSC Student Research Day (poster), Charleston, SC. Harikrishnan, K., Cooley, M.A., Twal, W.O., Fresco, V.M., Kern, C.B., Broude, E., & Argraves, W.S. (2012, May). Fibulin-1 regulation of cell cycle progression in developing cardiac valves. Weinstein Cardiovascular Development Conference (poster), Chicago, IL. Horton, A., Cooley, M.A., Twal, W.O., Fresco, V.M., Zhang, B. Argraves, W.S., & Lee, K.H.(2012, May). Mutual regulation of Nkx2.5 and fibulin-1 in the SHF regulatory network. Weinstein Cardiovascular Development Conference (poster), Chicago, IL. Humphries, K., Blair, J., Bonilha, H., Carnes, C., McGrattan, K., Hill, E., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, November). Radiation exposure time during VFSS: An analysis of influencing factors. American Speech-LanguageHearing Association Annual Convention, San Diego, CA. Kazley, A.S., Simpson, K.N., Simpson, A.N., Jauch, E.C., & Adams, R.J. (2012, February). rt-PA Use improves economic impact and health benefits in stroke. International Stroke Conference, New Orleans, LA. Magro, T., Lewis, T., Simpson A.N., Wright, T., & Anton, R. (2012, May). A retrospective study comparing VA patients receiving long-acting injectable naltrexone versus oral naltrexone maintenance therapy for alcohol dependence. American Psychiatry Association 2012 Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA. Marlow, N.M., Bonilha, H.S., & Short, E.B. (2012, January). Efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review. MUSC Department of Medicine Research Day (poster), Charleston, SC.

APPENDIX C

Marlow, N.M., Bonilha, H.S., & Short, E.B. (2012, November). Efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review. MUSC Student Research Day (poster), Charleston, SC. Martin-Harris, B., Focht, K.L., McGrattan, K., & Sandidge, J. (2011, November). Mapping dysphagia phenotypes using standardized measures of swallowing impairment. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, San Diego, CA. McGrattan, K. (2011, August). Development and measurement of sucking physiology. Evelyn Trammell Institute for Voice and Swallowing Rounds, Charleston, SC. McGrattan, K. (2012, May). The infant feeding mechanism: an overview of the anatomy and physiology of sucking and swallowing. Keynote Address: Improving Breastfeeding for the Preterm Infant, Charleston, SC. McGrattan, K., Bonilha, H., Hill, E., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, November). Effects of bolus variables on physiologic components of swallowing impairment. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, San Diego, CA. Moreau, N.G., Marlow, N., & Holthaus, K. (2011, October). Differential adaptations of muscle architecture in response to high velocity versus traditional strength training in cerebral palsy. American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (oral presentation), Las Vegas, NV. Pardue, E., Barth, J.L., Guffy, S., Fresco, V.M., Braun, K., Mecham, B., Mecham, R., Wight, T.N.,& Argraves, W.S. (2012, February). Comparative transcriptome analysis to identify maturogens to normalize Elastogenesis during tissue fabrication. EPSCoR/IDeA South Carolina EARB Project for Organ Biofabrication Meeting (poster), Columbia, SC. 2012 Annual Report


Appendix C: Student Productivity Report 95

Savage. A., Hudson, M., & Marlow, N. (2012, March). Cost comparison of two surveillance options for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Biennial Clinical Meeting of the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (oral presentation), San Francisco, CA. Simpson, A.N., Ellis, C., Bonilha, H., Mauldin, P.D., & Simpson, K.N. (2011, November).The one-year attributable cost of post-stroke aphasia. MUSC Student Research Day, Charleston, SC. Smalls, B.L., Walker, R.J., Hernandez-Tejada, M.A., Campbell, J.A., Davis, K.S., & Egede, L.E. (2011, September). Associations between coping, diabetes knowledge, medication adherence and self-care behaviors in adults with type 2 diabetes. 18th Annual Diabetes Fall Symposium for Primary Health Care Professionals, Charleston, SC. Smith, V., McGrattan, K., McGhee, H., Martin-Harris, B., & White, D. (2012, April). Swallowing patterns in children with type 1 laryngeal clefts. American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (poster), San Diego, California, April 2012.

Grants: Division of Health and Rehabilitation Science Focht, K.L. (Principal Investigator). Clinical & Translational Research Training Program (TL1) South Carolina Clinical and Translational Institute. Quantifying Normal Swallow Physiology Across the Adult Lifespan. $50,332. Fresco, V.M. (Principal Investigator). Clinical & Translational Research Training Program (TL1) South Carolina Clinical and Translational Institute. Investigating the role of fibulin-1 in cardiac outflow tract and pharyngeal arch development associated with DiGeorge Syndrome. $36,800.

APPENDIX C

Simpson, A.N. (Principal Investigator). 2012-2013. Experimental and Clinical Studies of Presbyacusis with applications to Health Services. n

College of Health Professions MUSC


96 Acknowledgements

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We extend great appreciation to all of our faculty, staff, and students in the College who have contributed to our remarkable accomplishments in FY 2012. The content of this report was generated through a team effort of the entire College. Further, we express appreciation to the team that effectively worked together to compile, edit, design, and produce this report: Dr. Dusti Annan-Coultas, Ms. Lauren Dickerson, Ms. Melissa Freeland, Mr. David Howell, Ms. Naomi Sampson, Ms. Debra Battjes Siler, Ms. Lauren Stitely n

2012 Annual Report


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