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SO AR IN G

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Medical University of South Carolina College of Health Professions 151A Rutledge Avenue | Charleston, South Carolina | (843) 792-3328 www.musc.edu/chp


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MISSION D N THE MEDICAL A N UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH O I IS CAROLINA COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS SEEKS TO ACHIEVE

N AT I O N A L D I S T I N C T I O N IN HEALTH PROFESSIONS’ EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND SERVICE. AS A COLLEGE DEDICATED TO EDUCATING A DIVERSE RANGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONALS, WE BENEFIT OUR STUDENTS, THE UNIVERSITY, AND COMMUNITY THROUGH OUR SYNERGISTIC APPROACH TO CREATING NEW KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERTISE. THROUGH INTERPROFESSIONAL COLLABORATION AND INNOVATION, WE ENRICH THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT, INCREASE OUR CAPACITY TO CONDUCT RESEARCH, AND AUGMENT OUR ABILITY TO PROVIDE SERVICE. WE ARE A DYNAMIC AND RESPONSIVE COLLEGE THAT GENERATES SOLUTIONS AND CONTRIBUTES TO THE OVERALL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING OF THE CITIZENS OF OUR STATE AND BEYOND.

watch us soar


ts n te n co of e bl ta

Executive Summary................................ 4 Organizational Chart............................ 10 Education........................................................... 12

Research & Scholarship....................................... 14 Service.............................................................................. 16 Faculty Awards.................................................................... 18

Department of Health Professions......................................... 22 Center for Rehabilitation

Research in Neurological Conditions........................................... 25 Department of Health Sciences and Research.................................. 27 Development......................................................................................................... 31

Financial Highlights............................................................................................... 34 Staff Accomplishments.................................................................................................. 35 Student Accomplishments................................................................................................ 37 Editor and Editorial Board.................................................................................... 46 Editorial Reviewer..................................................................................................... 46 Journal Publications.................................................................................................. 47

APPENDIX

Books and Book Chapters........................................................................................ 51 Presentations................................................................................................................ 52 Professional Service Activities............................................................................. 58 Community Service Activities................................................................................. 59 Grants.............................................................................................................................. 60 CHP Faculty Participating in Outside Grant Awards.................................... 62 Grant Submissions with CHP Faculty as Principal Investigator............... 63 CHP Faculty Participating in Outside Grant Submissions............................ 65 Acknowledgements..................................................................................................... 66


executive summary Our 45 year history as a College of Health Professions has enabled us to mature and develop into one of the top Colleges of Health Professions in the country. Currently offering nine different academic degrees, we continue to have the largest student enrollment on campus and our reputation for educational excellence is well documented. Our commitment to excellence in clinical, professional and community service has expanded over the years with faculty, students and staff actively engaged in these critical areas of our mission. However, it is the area of research that has seen exponential growth over this last year. Recently, we have made significant strategic investments targeted at building research capacity within the College and establishing a national reputation for excellence in research. These investments have produced outstanding results over a short period of time and are documented in this report. This 2010-2011 annual report provides an in-depth review of the significant achievements across all areas of our mission and highlights the extraordinary accomplishments of our faculty, staff and students. This executive summary identifies the significant changes within the College over the last year and presents key accomplishments that characterize the College’s advancement over this past year.

Significant Changes: Leadership and Administrative Appointments MARK S. SOTHMANN, PhD Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at MUSC In July 2010, Dr. Mark Sothmann, Dean of the College of Health Professions, was asked to serve as MUSC’s Interim Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost upon the departure of Dr. John Raymond. After a national search, Dr. Sothmann emerged as the top candidate and became the new MUSC Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost in April 2011. “Dr. Sothmann has repeatedly shown that he is a thoughtful decision-maker and that he is a consensus builder,” said MUSC President Ray Greenberg, MD, PhD. “Most noteworthy among his accomplishments as interim provost are the successful negotiations of a revised post-tenure review process and the development and refinement of a new financial model for resource flow within the institution. Mark S. Sothmann, PhD., was appointed Professor and Dean of the College of Health Professions in 2007. During his time in this role, he established a new vision for the College, effectively restructured the College in order to maximize efficiencies and adapt to substantial reductions in state funding, established a Department of Health Sciences and Research and strategically allocated funds to develop the research capacity within the College. Dr. Mark Sothmann

To assume this prestigious role within the Medical University of South Carolina is an honor and a testament to the respect Dr. Sothmann has earned for his leadership. The faculty and staff of the College are proud of Dr. Sothmann’s accomplishments and wish him well in his new role. LISA K. SALADIN, PT, PhD Interim Dean Dr. Lisa Saladin, previously Executive Associate Dean of the College and Chair of the Department of Health Professions, was asked to serve as Interim Dean for the College of Health Professions in July 2010. Subsequent to the announcement that Dr. Sothmann 4

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Dr. Lisa Saladin


Executive Summary

had been selected as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, a national search was launched to identify a new Dean for the College. At this time, Dr. Saladin is one of three top candidates for the position and an announcement regarding the final decision is expected sometime in September 2011. MARALYNNE MITCHAM, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA Interim Chair of the Department of Health Professions

Dr. Maralynne Mitcham

Dr. Maralynne Mitcham has served as Interim Chair for the Department of Health Professions since July 2010. Once the permanent Dean for the College is appointed, a decision regarding this position will be forthcoming.

BECKI TRICKEY, BS, MHS, PhD Interim Executive Associate Dean Retires as Professor Emerita Dr. Becki Trickey, appointed as Interim Executive Associate Dean in July 2010, retired from the Medical University of South Carolina June 20, 2011. Dr. Becki Trickey served the Medical University of South Carolina with distinction since 1972, and has held an active faculty appointment within the College for thirty-two years serving as educator, scholar, administrator and mentor. She has provided leadership within the College of Health Professions with loyalty and longstanding dedication. Dr. Trickey was the visionary leader responsible for the initiation and development of the Occupational Therapy academic degree program within the College. Her administrative appointments have included Interim Dean, Dr. Becki Trickey Associate Dean, Interim Executive Associate Dean, Special Assistant to the Dean, Chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Director of the Occupational Therapy Program. At the University level she has made many substantial contributions in the areas of institutional assessment, academic excellence, interprofessional education, and university accreditation. Dr. Trickey has been a leader in the development and

acquisition of training grants, curriculum design, programmatic evaluation and assessment, and new program development and this leadership has resulted in higher standards and efficiencies for us all. Dr. Trickey has always been an active and visible advocate and supporter of the University and the College. She retires with the University rank of Professor Emerita bestowed by the Medical University of South Carolina Board of Trustees. The College of Health Professions expressed its sincere admiration for Dr. Becki Trickey’s many remarkable professional accomplishments and appreciation for her long and distinguished career through the establishment of the Dr. Becki A. Trickey Educational Enhancement Fund. Her colleagues have established this development fund in Dr. Trickey’s honor to celebrate her commitment to excellence in education. It will be used to finance equipment and new initiatives that will advance the educational mission of the College. EMILY MOORE, EdD Associate Dean for Academic and Faculty Affairs Dr. Emily Moore was appointed as Associate Dean for Academic and Faculty Affairs as of July 1, 2011. Dr. Moore has 40 years of experience in higher education as an educator, a scholar and an academic leader. She has held the rank of professor since 1995 in various institutions of higher education with roles that included Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Dillard University, Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty at Concordia University, and Dean of Teacher Education and Chair of the Division of Education and Dr. Emily Moore Psychology at Concordia College. Dr. Moore has demonstrated expertise in program development, program assessment and accreditation. She has evaluated academic programs for state agencies, military bases and educational institutions across the country and she has been invited to participate in the accreditation process in three of the six regional accreditation agencies in the United States (North Central, West and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools). With five accredited academic degree programs in the College, her accreditation experience will be vital to our continued success. Dr. Moore will also play a significant role in the execution of MUSC College of Health Professions 5


Executive Summary

programmatic reviews, the development of new academic initiatives, the revision of promotion and tenure criteria, mediation of faculty concerns and contract issues, and the development and mentorship of faculty. DAVID MORRISETTE, PT, OCS, PhD Director, Physical Therapy Division After an extensive national search, Dr. David Morrisette was selected from a well-qualified pool of applicants to serve as Director of the Physical Therapy Division in the Department of Health Professions. Dr. Morrisette has almost 30 years of clinical experience as a licensed physical therapist and more than 20 years of experience in academics as an educator, scholar, and administrator. Dr. Morrisette is a fellow Dr. David Morrisette of the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists and a distinguished educator recognized by the MUSC Health Sciences Foundation as 1998 Educator-Lecturer of the year and 2007 Educator-Mentor of the year. Dr. Morrisette recently provided excellent leadership to the Physical Therapy Division as Interim Director and we look forward to his continued leadership as Director. NAOMI SAMPSON, MHA Director, Executive Operations and Project Management Ms. Naomi Sampson accepted a new position in the College as Director of Executive Operations and Project Management in May 2011. Ms. Sampson had previously served as the Director of Educational Outreach and Strategic Initiatives in the College. In this new role, Ms. Sampson is a key member of the College of Health Professions executive team responsible for the central coordination of execMs. Naomi Sampson utive activities (operations and planning) and ensuring timely flow of information to and from the executive office. Ms. Sampson will assist the Dean in the overall operational management of the executive functions within the College to optimize 6

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operational efficiency, to provide high-level oversight, to serve as a special project manager and to facilitate key strategic initiatives.

Significant Changes: Faculty and Staff Hires FACULTY HIRES The following individuals were recruited into the Department of Health Sciences and Research: Mr. Michael Meacham, Associate Professor; Dr. Mark Bowden, Assistant Professor; Dr. Chris Gregory, Assistant Professor; Dr. Cameron Nott, Assistant Professor; Dr. Michelle Woodbury, Assistant Professor; and two Research Associates Dr. Aaron Embry and Ms. Jenna Nott. The following individuals were recruited into the Department of Health Professions: Dr. Angela Mund, Assistant Professor; Dr. Christine Otruba, Assistant Professor; and Mr. David Howell-Keith, Instructor. STAFF HIRES The following individuals were recruited to our College: Ms. Becky Hamrick (Office of the Dean), Ms. Meghan Hann (Health Professions), Ms. D. Renee Hutson (Research Administration), Ms. Nikki Lowry (Health Science & Research), Ms. Christie MacConnell (Clinical Education), Ms. Ashley Martindale (Finance & Administration), and Ms. Kim Rang (Clinical Education).

Significant Changes: Educational Programs CLOSURE OF THE BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE PROGRAM The Bachelor of Health Sciences program was formally discontinued with the last class graduating in May 2011. The mission of this program was to enhance the education of health care providers in South Carolina who had one or two years of higher education by providing them with an opportunity to obtain a bachelor’s degree. While the quality of this program was outstanding, it no longer fit with the strategic focus of the College. In order to ensure the continuation of this type of program in the State, we


Executive Summary

have worked collaboratively with Coastal Carolina University (CCU) to transition a version of this program to their institution. At this time, CCU is awaiting final approval from the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education to offer a similar degree program. NEW EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES The inaugural class of the DHA-Interprofessional Studies track began their studies fall 2010 semester. This program is intended for healthcare clinical practitioners who desire an advanced degree in administration. The curriculum of the program includes topics such as leadership, strategy, policy, evidence-based decisionmaking, and interprofessional studies with the goal of improving patient quality of care and safety. Graduates of the program are expected to teach or lead quality improvement initiatives in the healthcare delivery system. The DHA-Information Systems and Leadership track recruitment was opened for fall 2011 admission. Students in this new track are practicing information systems specialists who either are in, or who seek to be in, positions that can influence adoption of the Institute of Medicine’s vision to promote the delivery of patientcentered care. The central themes of the curriculum are information systems practice; and building on the domains of change, leadership and health informatics.

Major Accomplishments for the College 20102011 STRATEGIC PLAN Faculty and staff collaboratively developed a new five year strategic plan for the College of Health Professions that incorporates critical elements of the new University Strategic Plan. The new goals for the College are as follows: • Enhance national and international distinction in neuro-rehabilitation research. • Attain national and international recognition for innovative, entrepreneurial activities in health professions research, education, and service. • Be recognized by stakeholders as having faculty and staff who are motivated, consumer oriented, talented and professionally prepared.

“Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision; the ability to direct individual accomplishments toward organizational objectives. It is the fuel that allows common people to attain uncommon results.” -Andrew Carnegie

• Lead South Carolina and the nation in translating research into the classroom and clinic of our respective professions. • Achieve national and international distinction as leaders in interprofessional education and practice. • Demonstrate the value and maximize the ability of all health professions represented in the College to participate in new models of health care delivery emerging from health care reform. • Educate and graduate students who reflect and are culturally sensitive to the communities in which we serve.

MUSC College of Health Professions 7


EDUCATION The College of Health Professions has experienced record increases in the number of student applications across all of its academic programs, with this year’s total reaching 1,370. This is a remarkable increase of 137% since 2006. The quality of the incoming students continues to be impressive as evidenced by an entering grade point average of 3.5 and an average score of 1640 on the Graduate Record Examination (across all academic programs combined). Pass rates on national board exams ranged from 94-100% across the five programs in the Department of Health Professions that require licensure and exams. Student satisfaction with all of our academic programs remains high with 97% of graduating students agreeing with the statement that they made the right choice in selecting the College of Health Professions at the Medical University. Dr. K. Jackson Thomas received the Dorothy Baethke and Eleanor Jane Carlin Excellence in Academic Teaching Award from the American Physical Therapy Association. This prestigious award recognizes excellence in physical therapy education with only one recipient each year selected from across the 213 accredited programs in the country. Dr. Thomas was also recognized with the College of Health Professions Anesthesia for Nurses Program Didactic Teacher of the Year award. Ms. Nicole Michaud was recognized as the College of Health Professions’ Teacher of the Year. Ms. Michaud joined the College of Health Professions’ Cardiovascular Perfusion (CVP) program in 2008. Two students, Ms. Katherine Schichtel (CHP-MHA) and Ms. Hailey James (CHP-MHA) participated on the interprofessional MUSC team that recently won 2nd place and a $5,000 scholarship in the finals of the Interprofessional Team Case Competition of the 2011 National Clinician Administrator Relationship Improvement Organization (CLARION) Competition, held in Minneapolis, MN. RESEARCH

The College of Health Professions educates talented and dynamic healthcare leaders of the future to serve the residents of South Carolina and beyond and we are emerging as leaders in health professions research.

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There was a 27% increase in the number of Grants and Contracts awarded to researchers in the College compared to FY 2010. The dollar value of the awards for FY 2011 totaled $6,088,407; up from $3,712,219 for FY 2010. This is a noteworthy 64% increase in grant funding compared to FY 2010 and is the largest amount of grant funding in the history of the College of Health Professions. The College celebrated the grand opening of the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions in May 2011. This event provided the opportunity to showcase three new fully equipped state of the art research laboratories. More than one hundred people attended this celebration which showcased the cutting edge technologies available to our researchers that will enable them to engage in research targeted at improving the quality of life for individuals with neurological disorders.


Executive Summary

Dr. Paul Jacques, Interim Director of the Physician Assistant Studies Division, was awarded a $1.6 million dollar five year training grant from HRSA. The grant focuses on four programmatic initiatives: expanding the current oral health curriculum to include oral health assessments and fluoride varnish application with pre-school children, incorporating a three week course to promote physician assistant (PA) students’ transition from the classroom to the clinical phase of the program by learning and experiencing the complexities of how a rural healthcare facility functions, increasing the use of simulation technology within the PA curriculum, and continuing the highly successful PA academic fellowship which prepares physician assistants to make the transition from clinician to academician. Dr. Bonnie Martin-Harris, Director of the PhD program in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, was recognized as the College of Health Professions Scholar of the Year. Dr. Lee Saunders, Department of Health Sciences and Research, was recognized as the College of Health Professions Developing Scholar of the Year. Drs. Bonnie Martin Harris and Heather Bonilha were the recipients of the 2010 Manuel Garcia Prize at the Dysphagia Research Society Eighteenth Annual Meeting, International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP). Ms. Alicia Sievert, Assistant Professor, Division of Cardiovascular Perfusion, was the 2011 winner of the 12th Annual Utley Award at the 31st Annual Cardiothoracic Research and Education Foundation (CREF) Conference. Dr. James Krause, Associate Dean for Research, received the 2011 National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Center’s award for the outstanding published article in the previous year. All funded projects from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) qualify (its annual budget exceeds $100 million) so the award is highly competitive. SERVICE Dr. Wanda Gonsalves, Division of Physician Assistant Studies, was presented the South Carolina Governor’s Volunteer Award by Governor Nikki Haley and

the South Carolina Association for Volunteer Administration in May 2011 at the S.C. State House. The award was to recognize the volunteer efforts associated with the MUSC Community Aid Relief Education Support (CARES) Clinic. CARES is an outreach clinic initiated in 2005 by Dr. Gonsalves to enhance the preclinical experience of medical, physical therapy, pharmacy, health administration, and physician assistant students while providing much needed health care to the uninsured population in the Tri-county (Berkley, Charleston, Dorchester) areas and beyond. College of Health Professions’ staff provided the leadership and coordinated a joint faculty/staff effort to raise more than $2,500 in school supplies for MurrayLaSaine Elementary School. This Title 1 school has more than 90 percent of its population qualifying for free or reduced lunches. The parents of these children are not required to buy school supplies; therefore, teachers are tasked with getting classroom supplies on a meager budget. The money raised by the College went towards educational supplies requested by teachers in the school. Another staff initiated service activity resulted in approximately $274 to help provide meals for the families staying at the local Ronald McDonald House. Dr. Patty Coker-Bolt was recognized with the 2010 College of Health Professions Faculty Service Award. In addition, she received the 2011 Patterson Award for community volunteerism at the AOTA conference in Philadelphia. The Patterson Award is for occupational therapists who demonstrate commitment, excellence and/or innovation in providing communitybased volunteer services using occupational therapy skills. The award is co-sponsored by The Patterson Foundation of St. Paul, Minnesota. In summary, the College of Health Professions has made significant progress toward our vision of national distinction in health professions’ education, research and service. Today, the College offers academic programs that are ranked nationally, and the College is considered one of the best in the country. The College of Health Professions educates talented and dynamic healthcare leaders of the future to serve the residents of South Carolina and beyond and we are emerging as leaders in health professions research.

MUSC College of Health Professions 9


ORGANIZATIONAL CHART Lisa K. Saladin, PT, PhD Interim Dean

Becki Trickey, PhD Special Assistant to the Dean

Maralynne Mitcham, PhD Interim Chair for Department of Health Professions

Steven Kautz, PhD Chair for Department of Health Sciences and Research, Co-Director of Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions

James Krause, PhD Associate Dean for Research and Director for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions

Anthony Chipas, PhD

Bonnie Martin-Harris, PhD

James Zoller, PhD

Director of Anesthesia for Nurses Division

Director of PhD in Health & Rehabilitation Science

Director of Healthcare Leadership Division

James Zoller, PhD

Joseph Sistinio, MPA Director of Cardiovascular Perfusion Division

Director of Doctor of Health Administration Program & Clinical Doctor of Health Administration

Andrea White, PhD

James Zoller, PhD

Director of Health Administration and Policy Division

Director of Master in Research Administration Program

Maralynne Mitcham, PhD Director of Occupational Therapy Division

Paul Jacques, DHSc Interim Director of Physician Assistant Studies Division

David Morrisette, PhD Director of Physical Therapy Division

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Karen Wager, DBA

Kristi Beeks, MHA

Naomi Sampson, MHA

Vacant

Associate Dean for Student Affairs

Assistant Dean for Finance and Administration

Melissa Freeland, MSM

Julie Parrish, MBA

Lauren Dickerson, BA

Director of Student Services

Director of Finance and Administration

Assistant Director of Development and Alumni Affairs

Cami Meyer, MEd

Dusti Annan-Coultas, EdD

Lauren Stitely, BS

Director of Student Life and Recruitment

Director of Educational & Information Technology

Communications & Advancement Coordinator

Director of Development

Director of Executive Operations & Project Management

Debra Siler, MS Director of Research Administration

MUSC College of Health Professions 11


education Entering Students As part of the College of Health Professions recruitment initiative, we hosted over 500 students on campus who participated in information sessions, private tours and/or group visits. Other recruitment initiatives include visiting campuses throughout the state and an online marketing Ad Button among “Big 10 schools” to include the University of Michigan, Michigan State, Ohio State, Purdue, Indiana University, Penn State, Illinois University, and University of Iowa.

College of Health Professions Academic Degree Programs • Bachelor of Science in Cardiovascular Perfusion • Master in Health Administration • Master in Research Administration • Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia • Master of Science in Occupational Therapy

• Master of Science in Physician Assistant Over the past five years, the College of Health Professions Studies has experienced record number increases in student appli• Doctor of Health Administration cations across all of its academic programs, with this year’s • Doctor of Philosophy in Health and total reaching 1,370. This is a remarkable increase of 137% Rehabilitation Science since 2006. Equally impressive is the caliber of incom• Doctor of Physical Therapy ing students. This year’s class (for all academic programs combined) had an entering grade point average of 3.5 and an average score of 1640 on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). In addition, new students have come to our College with a wide range of professional and community service activities and life experiences. The College of Health Professions remains the largest college at the Medical University of South Carolina in terms of its student body, with 725 students enrolled. Our students demonstrate a wide range of achievements that are reflected in the student accomplishments section of this report.

Graduating Students Our programs are nationally accredited and the quality is demonstrated by an overall pass rate of 98.8% on the national board exams.

97%

of graduating students believe they made the right choice in selecting the MUSC College of Health Professions 12 2011 Annual Report

The College enjoyed another successful graduation this year with 327 students earning their degrees. One of the highlights of the graduation events was this year’s Commencement Speaker, Darius Rucker. Grammy winner and former front-man of “Hootie and the Blowfish,” Mr. Rucker offered the graduates three pieces of advice during his speech: “find something to make you laugh;” “always believe in yourself;” and “try to make the world a better place.”


Education

lenging is designing opportunities for our students to take what they learn about teamwork and collaboration and put it into practice during their external rotations where they have to adapt to novel conditions that are arduous and demanding.

Program Closure

Physician assistant studies students participate in advanced life support training

Interprofessional Education In concordance with the MUSC Creating Collaborative Care (C3) initiative, the College serves as a key leader for interprofessional education and its inclusion in our academic programs. Exposure to interprofessional education begins at college orientation with team training and experiential learning. All students take a required interprofessional course (IP 710 Transforming Health Care for the Future) that integrates them with students from the other MUSC colleges to explore and assess the complexities of current health care delivery. The course challenges students to work collaboratively in a hybrid learning context, using learning management systems and faceto-face engagement, to complete root cause analyses across several case-based conditions. Students generate creative responses that will improve safety and efficacy of systems of health care delivery. Many of our students go on to take a variety of university-wide interprofessional elective courses and others choose to complete an interprofessional fellowship, which is recognized at graduation and on their final transcript. (See student accomplishments section for a list of this year’s fellowship students) Engagement in interprofessional education requires dedication and innovation on the part of our faculty members, several of whom lead exciting health care service initiatives in the community and overseas. For example, under faculty guidance, occupational therapy and dental students provided a range of oral health care services to children with severe disabilities at Pattison’s Academy; physician assistants and others participated in Smiles for Life; and students from several professions provided health care services on a mission trip to Masindi, Uganda. Even more chal-

The Bachelor of Health Sciences program was formally discontinued due to various factors. The last class in the program graduated May 2011. With collaboration and support from the Medical University, Coastal Carolina University requested approval from the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education to offer a similar degree effective fall 2011.

Nurse anesthetist student learns how to perform an epidural block in the simulation lab

Ms. Beth Landy, Master in Health Administration student, had a summer internship at St. Jude Hospital and took a picture with Danny Thomas Bust

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research & scholarship Grants Awarded Overall FY 2011 For FY 2011, 28 new Grant and Contract Awards were awarded to College of Health Professions (CHP) Faculty members as principal investigator (PI). This is a 27% increase in the number of awards compared to FY 2010. More importantly, the dollar value of the awards for FY 2011 totaled $6,088,407; up from $3,712,219 for FY 2010. This is a noteworthy 64% increase in grant funding compared to FY 2010 and is the largest amount in the history of the College of Health Professions. Clearly, CHP faculty have aggressively and successfully pursued major grant opportunities to support new and ongoing lines of research.

BY FUNDING SOURCE 4% 64% Federal Corporate

14%

$6.1

MILLION

$3.7

MILLION FY 2010

FY 2010

Sources of Funds

AWARDS 18%

VALUE OF GRANTS AWARDED

State Foundation

Federal grants made up 64% of the College’s new awards, with the balance divided among 14% from corporate sources, 18% from the state, and 4% from foundations. Compared to last year, this is a 4% decline in federal awards, indicative of the increasingly competitive nature of federal funding. There was also a 9% decrease in corporate awards. There were increases in state awards by 13% and foundation funding by 1%.

Sponsors of New Awards FEDERAL SPONSORS • United States Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration • United States Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center • United States Department of Education • National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development • National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism • National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina 14 2011 Annual Report


Research and Scholarship

• National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/University of Texas (Federal Flowdown) • National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development/National Capital Area Rehabilitation Research Network at Georgetown University/Georgetown University (Federal Flowdown) FOUNDATION SPONSOR Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina CORPORATE SPONSOR Abbott Laboratories STATE SPONSOR South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Fund

White Paper Summary SUMMIT ON COMMUNITY INTEGRATION OF THE TRAUMATICALLY INJURED WARRIOR AND NATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD MEETING Charleston, South Carolina, December 3-4, 2010 Spearheaded by Dr. Mark Sothmann (then MUSC Interim Vice President and Provost), this collaborative event brought together academicians from multiple disciplines, national and state elected officials as well as community leaders and non-profit organizations from across the country for a day-long Summit in Charleston, SC. The overarching topic centered on key initiatives to better help traumatically injured veterans transition into their communities. The Summit was held at Charleston Place and was sponsored generously by Force Protection and South Carolina Research Authority (SCRA). The Summit’s keynote speaker, Dr. Peach Taylor, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, highlighted the progress the Military Health System has made in support of its wartime mission and in its continuum of care. The Summit then focused on the dominant

themes of Learning from the Past and Looking to the Future. Researchers from the Indiana-Ohio Center for Traumatic Amputation Rehabilitation Research reported on their nearly four years of research with over 450 Vietnam era veterans with warrelated amputation. Their informative findings were on effective coping strategies in building successful lives despite such life-long issues of pain, prosthetics use, comorbidities, and mental well-being (particularly post-traumatic stress disorder and depression). Such strategies included the critical role of the caregiver, community support services, adaptation, and education, among others. The dominant theme that emerged for future research and practice initiatives is centered on the concept of Resiliency, Reset, and Reintegration. Photo courtesy of Disabled American Veterans (DAV)

Clinical and Translational Research Institute

With additional participating institutions, the Veterans with Traumatic Amputation Registry will expand and now be housed at the Medical University of South Carolina.

Dr. Peach Taylor, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs giving the keynote speech at the 2010 Summit on Community Integration of the Traumatically Injured Warrior

MUSC College of Health Professions 15


service Faculty Community Service Activities The College of Health Professions faculty members are involved in a variety of community service initiatives that benefit not only service recipients but provide real-world learning experiences and mentorship for students outside of the classroom. This year, we feature two faculty-led community service initiatives.

Dr. Patty Coker-Bolt at Charleston Miracle League Game Day with her “Buddy.”

Physical and occupational therapy students assisted participants in recreational activities on the water

CHARLESTON MIRACLE LEAGUE

ADAPTIVE WATER SPORTS CLINICS

The mission of the Charleston Miracle League is to “make memories by providing a life-changing experience for children and adults with mental and physical challenges through a community supported baseball league.” Dr. Coker-Bolt shares the following accounts: “Our first games were played in the fall of 2004 and we now have over 70 youth players and 80 adult players with physical and mental disabilities. We play both spring and fall seasons and provide recreational activities between seasons (i.e. bowling, trip to Sting Rays game). For the last two years, we have provided an allexpense paid trip to a Braves game in Atlanta for players and their family members. Currently, the Charleston Miracle League has four CHP alumni on the Board of Directors, Dr. Aaron Embry (PT), Ms. Nicole LaRose (OT), Ms. Erin Carlton (PT), and myself. In addition, for the past two years, students from the Master in Health Administration program have completed projects and fundraising activities to benefit the league.”

Under the mentorship and guidance of Dr. Sara Kraft, Division of Physical Therapy, 30 physical therapy students and 15 occupational therapy students participated in the Adaptive Water Sports Clinics sponsored by Achieving Wheelchair Equality and Anchors Away. These clinics were held June 2011 at Lyon’s Beach, Monck Corner, SC, and are designed to introduce a variety of water sports to individuals with various disabilities including stroke, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, and amputation. The students and Dr. Kraft were involved with fitting the 15 participants in their specially designed sit ski, performing water safety tests, helping launch skiers, and skillfully rescuing those who fell. This experience was meaningful and memorable for the participants and all the volunteers.

16 2011 Annual Report


Service

Staff Community Service Activities

Spring 2011- Ronald McDonald House

In the spring of 2011, the College of Health The CHP Staff Congress is a group that meets reguProfessions’ faculty and staff donated approximately larly throughout the year to act as a voice of the staff. $274 to help provide meals for the families stayThis group collaborates with the College community, ing at the local Ronald and fosters accountability and McDonald House located best practices in support of on Calhoun Street in the College’s vision, mission Charleston, SC. 45 people and goals. Staff Congress in residence at the house works to provide a channel graciously appreciated the of communication among generosity. staff, faculty, and executive leadership. This has led to In addition to providing an increased sense of idenmeals for the families, tity, recognition and worth enough funds were generof each staff member in his ated to provide two nights or her relationship to the stay for a family. College. The 2010-2011 March of Dimes Front row: Treyshawn Patterson and Kayshawn Hamilton holding banner. Officers are Mr. Jim Moore, Second Row: MUSC CHP staff: Ms. Karen Richardson, Ms. Melissa Serrano, This year the CHP Staff Chair; Ms. Julie Parrish, Mr. Wally Pregnall, Ms. Mary Steffens, Ms. Debra Siler and students from MLE: Jawon Heyward, Lamar Anderson, Augustis Frasier, Jessica Tisdale, and Iris Smith participated in the Co-Chair; and Ms. Lauren annual MUSC March of Dickerson, Secretary. One Dimes Campaign. Fundraisers included Blue Jeans for of the predominant themes of this year’s group was Babies, Purses for Preemies, and the March for Babies. community outreach. CHP Staff members organized CHP staff played a major role in each fundraiser by and participated in several service projects over the making gifts as well as volunteering their time to year. Three projects are featured in this report. organize and run the events. As an added attempt to MUSC College of Health Professions plays Santa for increase CHP support towards the March of Dimes, Murray-LaSaine Elementary School Teachers volunteers from all around the College contributed College of Health Professions’ staff provided the lead- goodies for a bake sale held in the lobby of the chilership and coordinated a joint faculty/staff effort to dren’s hospital and the atrium of the college. The raise more than $2,500 in school supplies for Murray- College raised over $500 for the March of Dimes this LaSaine Elementary School. This Title 1 school has year while MUSC as whole raised over $24,000! more than 90 percent of its population qualifying for free or reduced lunches. The parents of these children are not required to buy school supplies; therefore, teachers are tasked with getting classroom supplies on a meager budget. The money raised by the College went towards educational supplies requested by teachers in the school. The College’s faculty and staff generously gave to fill every wish list of each teacher at Murray-LaSaine. Items such as bean bag chairs, colorful carpets, crayons, hot glue guns, and even a laser printer were delivered by “elves” in Santa hats. Teachers, as well as students, were overwhelmed by the generosity of the faculty and staff at the College. CHP staff members (left to right) Ms. Lauren Smith, Ms. Lauren Dickerson, and Mr. Jim Moore with statue of Ronald McDonald

MUSC College of Health Professions 17


faculty awards Education 2010 COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS TEACHER OF THE YEAR Nicole Michaud, MS, CCP Ms. Nicole Michaud joined the College of Health Professions’ Cardiovascular Perfusion (CVP) program in 2008. Her background in simulation and biomedical engineering has been instrumental to the CVP program’s success in developing a world-class simulation lab. The simulation lab has allowed our students the opportunity to supplement, practice and perfect their clinical skills. Ms. Michaud uses her personal time to teach the perfusion students in the simulation lab and frequently spends weekends preparing the students for their externship clinical rotations.

Ms. Nicole Michaud helps a student in the simluation lab

One student described Ms. Michaud as the “most passionate, knowledgeable, dedicated, caring professor I have had the pleasure of working with here at MUSC. “ Quote: “Being awarded the College of Health Professions Teacher of the Year in 2010 was both an honor and an achievement. It was an honor to receive the award within a College that is nationally known for the instructional methods of their faculty and the pass rate of their graduates on certifying exams. To teach students to ‘love the art of perfusion’ is my aspiration. I believe being honored by my students and the committee with this award suggests that I have impacted the future of my profession in a positive way; therefore, it is an achievement. I would like to sincerely thank the College of Health Professions for recognizing me.”

2011 DOROTHY BAETHKE-ELEANOR JANE CARLIN EXCELLENCE IN ACADEMIC TEACHING AWARD K. Jackson Thomas, EdD Dr. K. Jackson Thomas has been awarded the prestigious Dorothy E. Baethke-Eleanor J. Carlin Excellence in Academic Teaching Award from the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). This award was established in 1981 and is given to an individual who has made significant contributions to physical therapy education through teaching excellence as exemplified in the careers of Baethke and Carlin. Dorothy Baethke was a pioneer in physical therapy. In 1972, after 25 years of exceptional service, Baethke retired as chair Dr. K. Jackson Thomas of the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Allied Medical Professions. Eleanor J Carlin was known as a leader in quality physical therapy education. Carlin’s professional accomplishments and exceptional contributions to APTA include serving as president from 1956 to 1958. This award is the highest honor for academic teaching awarded by the physical therapy profession and a signif18 2011 Annual Report


Faculty Awards

icant tribute to Dr. Thomas’ excellence as an educator. Dr. Thomas shared that he took several continuing education courses taught by Eleanor Carlin. He passionately expressed that Carlin’s teaching tips have contributed to his knowledge about the application of anatomical concepts that is incorporated in his teaching. As duly expressed by one of his colleagues, “Dr. Thomas is a ‘one of a kind’ educator and serves as an exceptional role model for students, faculty, and clinicians. He truly represents the core values associated with professionalism in physical therapy: accountability, altruism, compassion/caring, excellence, integrity, professional duty, and social responsibility.”

K. Jackson Thomas, Ed.D.

principal investigator of four grants and one subaward. She has actively integrated her research into the clinic at MUSC and across the country through her clinical education activities. She has developed a training module that pairs clinical swallowing scans and movies of simulated swallowing impairment to teach clinicians across the country her diagnostic tool. Dr. Martin-Harris has continued her level of excellence by helping to initiate and currently directing the PhD program in Health and Rehabilitation Science. Besides her leadership and teaching in this program, she has funded three PhD student stipends from her research grants. Not only does Dr. Martin-Harris excel in scholarship but also she is a master clinician. Dr. Martin-Harris has 20 years of clinical swallowing and voice practice and is the Director of the MUSC Trammel Institute for Voice and Swallowing.

Dr. K. Jackson Thomas is also the recipient of the Didactic Instructor of the Year Award through the MUSC College of Health Professions’ Division of Nurse Anesthesia. This award is presented to an individual who has made a significant contribution to the education of nurse anesthetist students in the classroom. It recognizes the commitment of individuals to the profession of nurse anesthesia and to the advancement of educational standards that further the art and science of anesthesiology and result in high quality patient care.

Quote: “Being awarded, ‘Scholar of the Year,’ in the College of Health Professions came with complete surprise and honor. I feel like I should be the one granting the award to my colleagues who allow me to work with a seasoned, collaborative, and genuine group of interprofessional scientists and educators. . . My dual appointments in the Colleges of Health Professions and Medicine have allowed me to bridge gaps in knowledge and resources in mentored studies of disorders across the translational continuum. . . I surely don’t need an award for something I enjoy so much – but this public acknowledgement of my contributions from my peers is humbling and very much appreciated.”

Research and Scholarship

2010 COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS DEVELOPING SCHOLAR AWARD

2011 ANESTHESIA FOR NURSES PROGRAM DIDACTIC TEACHER OF THE YEAR AWARD

2010 COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLAR OF THE YEAR Bonnie Martin-Harris, PhD Dr. Martin-Harris has been an exemplary leader in scholarship, research education, mentoring and clinical service. This year Dr. Martin-Harris published a ground breaking paper in an esteemed journal detailing a clinDr. Bonnie Martin-Harris ical diagnostic tool for quantifying swallowing impairment. She is also senior author on a paradigm changing paper that investigated the role of respiration on swallowing impairment as well as co-author on two other published papers. During the past year, Dr. Martin-Harris has been

Lee Saunders, PhD Dr. Lee Saunders has made substantial contributions to the College of Health Professions since joining the faculty in 2008. She has an outstanding record of scholarship and research in both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI). Dr. Saunders has developed two studies as principal investigator (PI) that were fundamental to securing grant funding for five-years from the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation

Dr. Lee Sanders (left) with Interim Dean Dr. Lisa Saladin

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Faculty Awards

Research (NIDRR) of the United States Department of Education. Dr. Saunders is also PI on one of three studies that comprise the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Secondary Conditions after SCI, a five-year grant from NIDRR with a total budget of just under $4M. Dr. Saunders has a total of 21 publications in refereed journals, including five as first author. She has also made 15 presentations at national conferences (24 total including co-authored presentations). These publications and presentations have contributed to the state-of-the-art understanding of TBI and SCI outcomes and have contributed to national and international recognition for the research team, College, and University. Quote: “I am honored to have received the Developing Scholar Award from CHP. This award has continued to inspire me to strive for excellence in all aspects of my research.”

2010 MANUEL GARCIA PRIZE - INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LOGOPEDICS AND PHONIATRICS WORLD CONGRESS (IALP) Bonnie Martin-Harris, PhD Heather Bonilha, PhD Drs. Bonnie-Martin Harris and Heather Bonilha are the recipients of the 2010 Manuel Garcia Prize at the Dysphagia Research Society Eighteenth Annual Meeting, International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP). In January 1966, the then Secretary, J. Perelló announced that the Sandoz firm of Basel in Switzerland would donate a prize of one thousand Swiss Francs, to be named after Manuel Garcia. The prize is awarded by the IALP Board for the best article in Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, and is bestowed every three years. The paper submitted and awarded was:

Drs. Bonnie Martin-Harris and Heather Bonilha reviewing data.

• Deliyski D., Petrushev P., Bonilha H.S., Gerlach T., Martin-Harris B., & Hillman R. (2008). Clinical implementation of laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy: challenges and evolution. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 60(1):33-44. 2011 UTLEY AWARD AT CARDIOTHORACIC RESEARCH AND EDUCATION FOUNDATION (CREF) Alicia Sievert, MS

Ms. Alicia Sievert

20 2011 Annual Report

Ms. Alicia Sievert, Assistant Professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Perfusion, was the 2011 winner of the 12th Annual Utley Award presented at the 31st Annual Cardiothoracic Research and Education Foundation (CREF) Conference in Newport Beach, CA. The Utley Award is for the best abstract, with preference given to those in which a perfusionist is first author. Joe R. Utley, M.D. was the Founder and Director of the Cardiothoracic Research and Education Foundation (CREF). The abstract submitted and awarded was: Sievert, A. & Sistino J. Renal Benefits of Pulsatile Perfusion in Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis.


Faculty Awards

Service 2010 COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS SERVICE AWARD Patty Coker-Bolt, PhD Dr. Coker-Bolt gives tirelessly of herself to various organizations in the local area and abroad. She serves as the Board president for the Charleston Miracle League (CML) where she organizes fundraisers and events. She is known for volunteering every Saturday for the CML baseball games for children with disabilities during game season. Dr. Coker-Bolt serves as the President of the Board of Directors at Pattison’s Academy. In addition, Dr. CokerBolt provides medical care and training to local medical staff on medical mission trips to Uganda. She takes students from MUSC on these trips where she teaches them about mission work. Dr. Coker-Bolt directs a summer camp for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy called Camp Hand-to-Hands which provides constraint-induced movement therapy in an intensive manner. In recognition of her altruistic service, Dr. Coker-Bolt is the Community Service Finalist from the Charleston Regional Business Journal. Quote: “I am very honored to be awarded the Service Award for 2011. I don’t think a person gets involved in service activities expecting or even having a desire to be recognized. Really, participation and working in the community is a reward in itself. You get more than you give in so many ways. The people you meet, the memories you make, just knowing that the time you spent really had an impact on the people you were called to serve.”

2011 PATTERSON FOUNDATION AWARD FOR COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERISM Patty Coker-Bolt, PhD The American Occupational Therapy Foundation Patterson Award, established in 2010, is for occupational therapists who demonstrate commitment, excellence and/ or innovation in providing community-based volunteer services using occupational therapy skills. The award is co-sponsored by The Patterson Foundation of St. Paul, Minnesota. Dr. Coker-Bolt is the recipient of the 2011 Patterson Foundation Award for her dedication to developing and helping sustain community based programs for children with disabilities. She not only assists in growing essential community programs for adults and children with disabilities, but benefits future occupational therapy practitioners.

Dr. Coker-Bolt (right) works with Makisa during Uganda Medical Mission Trip

Volunteering can be an exciting, growing, enjoyable experience. It is truly gratifying to serve a cause, practice one’s ideals, work with people, solve problems, see benefits, and know one had a hand in them. Harriet Naylor

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DEPARTMENT OF

health professions

Dr. Maralynne Mitcham, Department Chair

The Department of Health Professions is home to six programs, each of which is dedicated to educating students for entry into the health care delivery system. These programs rank highly among their peers across the country and five of the six programs rank in the top 40 Best Jobs in America according to the CNN Money Report, assuring that graduates are well sought after by health care employers nationwide. Each program has a strong applicant pool and a steadily increasing class size. All programs are nationally accredited, have high pass rates on national boards and certification examinations, and are competitive among their peer benchmark institutions.

While each of these programs is unique, the Department as a whole is committed to inter-professionalism as a key ingredient for successful team work in the service delivery context. Consequently, all programs have worked diligently to create innovative opportunities for students to learn with, from, and about each other. Several examples are highlighted in this report and demonstrate the commitment of faculty and the eagerness of students to participate. As students develop these skills at early stages of their professional preparation, they are better equipped to utilize them in a variety of practice environments and serve as role models for their colleagues. Ultimately, it is the health care recipient who is the direct beneficiary of coordinated care and good team work, and the one for whom improvement in health outcomes is critical. Funded by the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, the Caring Professional Program offers interprofessional teams of students the opportunity to develop caring attitudes and empathic behaviors that promote the delivery of caring and compassionate service. Led by an interprofessional team of faculty members, the Caring Professionals Program has generated curricular change and embedded key learning activities into several curricula. DIVISION OF ANESTHESIA FOR NURSES This division offers a Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia degree and is committed to excellence in the use of educational technology in the preparation of nurse anesthetists; students develop and hone their clinical skills with simulated mannequins prior to rotations. All students received support through traineeships from the Advanced Nurse Training Grant funded by Health Resources Services Administration. One of the highlights for the division this year was the success of the 24th Annual Continuing Education Conference in Charleston, SC. More than 200 certified nurse anesthetists were in attendance. Faculty have statewide and national prominence with Dr. Anthony Chipas, Division Director, serving as the President of the South Carolina Association of Nurse Anesthesia and the Editor of CRNA Today. DIVISION OF CARDIOVASCULAR PERFUSION This division offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Cardiovascular Perfusion (CVP) and takes pride in its innovation using technology for educating students, especially in its simulated operating room. The simulation lab allows students to supplement, practice and perfect their clinical skills prior to engagement with patients at MUSC and on clinical externships. Programming options in the technology allow the instructor to design individualized and nuanced settings which require students to quickly make sound decisions and respond to unexpected and changing conditions. Several CVP students have received prestigious, national awards this year and these are listed in the student accomplishments section. 22

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Department of Health Professions

Mr. Jeff Acsell, CVP faculty, led a very successful Update on Perfusion Devices Conference that attracted 100 perfusionists and 33 vendors to Charleston, SC for a continuing education experience. The purpose of this meeting was to describe and demonstrate new perfusion technology.

clients achieve outstanding results. He has more than 500 clients that include many large healthcare systems. Mr. Studer is the author of two well respected books, Hardwiring Excellence: Purpose, Worthwhile Work, Making a Difference and Results that Last: Hardwiring Behaviors that Will Take Your Company to the Top.

The first grant in perfusion simulation at MUSC The Divisions of Health Administration and Policy was awarded in 2011 and Healthcare by the Thoracic Leadership helped Surgery Foundation host the 2011 for Research and Annual Meeting of Education Simulation the Association of in Thoracic Surgery University Programs in Education (TSFRE). Health Administration The title is “Multiin Charleston, SC and Disciplinary a significant number of Simulation and MHA students volunPictured left to right: Dr. Thomas McKee, Ms. Naomi Sampson, Dr. Karen Wager, Training in Cardiac teered to support the Mr. Quint Studer, Dr. Walter Jones, Dr. Abby Kazley, Mr. Michael Meacham Surgical Crisis event. A panel of MHA Management.” The principal investigator is Dr. John faculty members, Drs. Abby Kazley, Thomas McKee S. Ikonomidis, Chief, Division of Cardiothoracic and Karen Wager, along with student Ms. Hailey Surgery, and co-Investigators from CHP include Mr. James, presented “Creative and Engaging ProblemJoe Sistino, Division Director, along with faculty Solving Activities for Teaching Health Administration members Mr. Adam Fernandez and Ms. Nicole Students” in which they demonstrated how the MHA Michaud. division is truly at the forefront in developing the skills of future health administration professionDIVISION OF HEALTH als. Dr. James Zoller moderated the “Practitioner ADMINISTRATION AND POLICY Panel: Leadership Requirements for Award-Winning This division offers a Master of Health Administration Performance.” (MHA) degree for residential and executive students. DIVISION OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY The most significant accomplishment this year was success in the recent Commission on Accreditation This division offers the Master of Science in of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME) site Occupational Therapy degree and takes pride in its visit. The degree program is noted for its integration experiential based curriculum. As part of ongoing of content through team-based coursework, students are heavily project work and participation engaged in the following activities: in interprofessional activities, in clinical and community based work on national board, cer tification particular, students serving as busithroughout their course of study; and licensure examinations ness managers for the Community actively participating with commuAid, Relief, Education and Support nity agencies and providing activ100% Pass Rate (CARES) clinic. ity programming for older adults CARDIOVASCULAR PERFUSION in adult day care centers, assisted OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY This year’s highlight for the diviliving and memory care centers; a PHYSICAL THERAPY sion was a visit by Mr. Quint summer camp for inner city youth Studer, Chief Executive Officer 96% Pass Rate at Cannon Street YMCA; hippoof the Studer Group. The Studer therapy (equine-assisted) programs ANESTHESIA FOR NURSES Group is an outcomes management for individuals with physical company that focuses on evidence 94% Pass Rate disabilities; dance camps for chilbased leadership systems that help PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT dren with autism; and community

PASS RATES

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Department of Health Professions

re-entry for individuals with traumatic brain injury. Two student research teams competed successfully at MUSC Student Research Day, placing first and second in the clinical/professional master’s category. Like many other divisions, students are active participants in interprofessional education, engaging in interprofessional elective courses, with many working to complete the MUSC Interprofessional Fellowship experience. Several faculty members have active research projects across a broad spectrum of interests: Dr. Peter Bowman, ergonomics; Dr. Hazel Breland, chronic rheumatic conditions and health disparities; Dr. Patty Coker-Bolt, constraint-induced movement therapy and detection of atypical motor patterns in early infancy; Dr. Nancy Carson, sensory modulation in adults with mental illness; Dr. Maralynne Mitcham, interprofessional education; Drs. Coker-Bolt and Mitcham, caring and compassion. Faculty members are engaged at the local and national levels contributing their expertise to a variety of community and professional organizations, in many cases working alongside students and providing pro bono services at Pattison’s Academy and the CARES Clinic to name two local examples. DIVISION OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDIES

An interprofessional team of occupational therapy and dental students work on

oral health initiatives at Pattison’s Academy This division offers the Master of Science degree in Physician Assistant Studies (PA) and focuses its educational experiences for students on rural health care. Students learn through educational technology and direct experience how to provide assistance to physicians in a variety of settings. A survey of previous classes demonstrated that 50% of our PA graduates are working in primary care, thus they are well positioned to help address the healthcare issues of our country.

The graduates of the PA program continue to excel in multiple measures. Beginning in 2009, the U.S. News and World Report ranked MUSC PA among the top 20% of all PA programs in the nation. The Class of 2010, as a group, achieved a mean score of 614 on the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants Exam (as compared to the national average of 555). Six (of 57) earned 800 on this test, which is the highest possible score. The most significant accomplishment this year was the award of a $1.6 million, five-year grant from the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA). In this grant cycle only nine grants of this type were awarded nationally and the CHP PA division received the largest. The grant, “Transitioning and Integrating Graduate Education in Rural Settings”, with Dr. Paul Jacques as principal investigator, focuses on four programmatic initiatives: expanding the current oral health curriculum to include oral health assessments and fluoride varnish application with pre-school children, incorporating a three week course to promote students’ transition from the classroom to the clinical phase of the program by learning and experiencing the complexities of how a rural healthcare facility functions, increasing the use of simulation technology within the curriculum, and continuing the highly successful PA academic fellowship which prepares physician assistants to make the transition from clinician to academician. DIVISION OF PHYSICAL THERAPY This division offers the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree and is committed to innovation and leadership in education with students and faculty making their mark at state and national levels. The educational program received 10 year accreditation status from the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education and received very complementary feedback related to its students, facilities, faculty, clinical education processes, and support from the College and University administration. 24

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Recognition for teaching excellence went to Dr. Jack Thomas who received two awards this year: the Dorothy Baethke and Eleanor Jane Carlin Award for Academic Excellence in Teaching from the American Physical Therapy Association and the College of Health Professions Anesthesia for Nurses Program Didactic Teacher of the Year award. Dr. Thomas is recognized for his skill and expertise in teaching anatomy. The Division of Physical Therapy is strongly committed to interprofessional education and seven faculty members taught in university-wide interprofessional courses, two of whom served as instructors in multiple interprofessional courses. Several students in the program participated in the first efforts towards integration of interprofessional education and practice during the clinical practicums, and nine graduates completed the Interprofessional Fellowship. Dr. Holly Wise served as faculty for the university’s Presidential Scholars Program and three DPT students were Presidential Scholars. Drs. Jesse Dean, Noelle Moreau, Mark Bowden, and Chris Gregory are involved with the College’s Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions, and two have joint appointments with the Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Administration Medical center. Four students had peer-reviewed abstracts accepted and presented their research at national conferences. Dr. David Morrisette, Division Director, was invited to present in Aix Le Bains, France the results of an ongoing study on low back pain. Dr. Sarah Kraft renewed her Board Certification in Neurological Physical Therapy (Neuro Rehab) and, along with Dr. Gretchen Seif, has been involved in developing an MUSC CARES clinic for physical therapy in the downtown area. Several 2011 graduates are entering orthopaedic physical therapy residencies and one other graduate was accepted into the Brooks Rehabilitation Hospital Neurological Physical Therapy Residency, in Jacksonville, FL.

CENTER FOR

REHABILITATION RESEARCH IN NEUROLOGICAL CONDITIONS GRAND OPENING An impressive accomplishment for the year was the Grand Opening of the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions. Held on May 4th, 2011 and attended by more than one hundred people, it was a spectacular event that brought the new research capabilities of the College to the attention of the MUSC community. This event provided the opportunity to showcase three new fully equipped state of the art laboratories. There were remarks from MUSC President Dr. Ray Greenberg, MUSC Provost Dr. Mark Sothmann, CHP Interim Dean Dr. Lisa Saladin, Ralph H Johnson VA Medical Center Director Ms. Carolyn Adams, Center Director Dr. James Krause and Center Co-Director Dr. Steven Kautz. Force Protection and two of the Centers equipment architects, Aretech and Woodway were sponsors of this event. The Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions has a comprehensive research agenda that spans work from the population level to the individual, with strengths in traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke rehabilitation research. There are key areas of focus within this Center. The first is Risk Assessment and Prevention of Adverse Outcomes lead by Dr. James Krause, Associate Dean for Research and Director of the Center and the second is Measurements and Treatments led by Dr. Steven Kautz, Chair of the Department of Health Sciences and Research and Co-Director of the Center. RISK ASSESSMENT AND PREVENTION OF ADVERSE OUTCOMES Dr. James Krause leads a research focus in a series of interrelated studies to identify psychological, behavioral and economic risk factors of secondary health conditions and mortality among those with neurologic injuries, emphasizing spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury. Significant Accomplishment

Dr. James Krause

The research team has continued investigations of health outcomes and longevity after neurologic injury, including both spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). This success is reflected in the ongoing grants, new collaborations, training, publications, presentations, and awards. MUSC College of Health Professions 25


Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions

Grants Currently, there are three active grants from the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) of the Department of Education. These grants include: • Center on Health Outcomes Research and Capacity Building for Underserved Populations with SCI and TBI (October 2008-September 2013), • Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Secondary Conditions in Individuals with SCI (October 2009-September 2014), • Ambulation and Secondary Complications: Participants with Chronic SCI (October 2009-September 2012). In addition, our research team is in the process of completing a large-scale study of secondary conditions and SCI funded by the National Institutes of Health. Training

Ribbon cutting at the Center for Rehabilitation Research in Neurological Conditions Grand Opening. Pictured left to right: Drs. Mark Sothmann, Steven Kautz, Lisa Saladin, Ray Greenberg, James Krause, and Ms. Carolyn Adams

Members of the team have worked with two graduate assistants who are enrolled in the PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Science program and each has contributed to multiple manuscripts. Our team has also mentored three medical students, four undergraduate students, and two graduate students as part of summer training opportunities. This effort has led to two manuscripts with students as lead investigators that have been published in refereed journals and several other manuscripts that are currently under review.

Publications Collectively the team has published 26 articles in refereed journals over the last year and has made 13 presentations at national and international conferences. As an indicator of the quality of this scholarship, the team received the 2011 National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Center’s award for the outstanding published article in the previous year. This was the second time Dr. Krause and his team received this award in the four years since its inception. All funded projects from NIDRR qualify (its annual budget exceeds $100 million) so the award is highly competitive. Additionally, at the annual meeting of the American Spinal Injury Association, one of the team’s platform presentations was awarded second best presentation of the conference. MEASUREMENTS AND TREATMENTS Dr. Steven Kautz leads a research team focusing on the assessment of movement dysfunction and impairments associated with neurologic conditions and the development of rehabilitation therapies intended to enhance motor functions and quality of life. Significant accomplishments for this line of research are in the Department of Health Sciences and Research section of this report. 26

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DEPARTMENT OF

health sciences and research Building Research Infrastructure At the end of last academic year the Department of Health Sciences and Research had a newly recruited chair, Dr. Steven Kautz, three new assistant professors (Drs. Mark Bowden, Chris Gregory and Michelle Woodbury) and was beginning the process of integrating the new personnel. With the arrival of these four new investigators at the beginning of the 2010-2011 academic year, the Department began in earnest to work toward the College’s strategic goal of developing a nationally prominent research Dr. Steven Kautz, Department Chair program in neurorehabilitation. The focus of this program includes a number of projects developing reliable measurements of motor dysfunction associated with neurological conditions and effective therapies targeted at improving movement, function and quality of life. An emerging theme of the work in this area is the development of theory-based measurement frameworks that facilitate clinical decision-making and allow therapists to better choose the appropriate intervention for each individual. LABORATORIES The research program housed within the Department is based on the concept of shared common core resources, and thus the first step was to build the laboratory infrastructure needed for the new investigators to establish their research programs. Building three new laboratories proved to be a massive undertaking that would require nearly all of the academic year to complete. While the investigators had a vision of how they wanted the laboratories to function, there was a need for additional technological expertise to equip the laboratories with the necessary cutting edge technologies. Having established similar laboratories previously, Dr. Kautz knew it was crucial to find the right engineer to lead the development. The Department needed someone who could work equally well with both hardware and software – hardware to equip the laboratories and software that would need to be developed to establish all of the data processing pipelines and data analysis routines. Dr. Cameron Nott had all the skills and expertise we required. He received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Florida while working with Dr. Kautz. In November 2010, he was hired as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Sciences and Research. Researchers from the College of Health Professions now have some of the most advanced rehabilitation research capabilities in the country available to them in the three new laboratories: the Locomotion Energetics and Assessment Laboratory, the Locomotor Rehabilitation Laboratory and the Upper Extremity Motor Function Laboratory. Locomotion Energetics and Assessment Laboratory

Dr. Aaron Embry demonstrates ZeroG mobile body weight support system

The Locomotion Energetics and Assessment Laboratory (developed by Drs. Steven Kautz, Cameron Nott, and Jesse Dean) can evaluate neurologically impaired subjects during walking in a safe environment by taking complex and accurate measurements. These measurements will provide insight into the control mechanism MUSC College of Health Professions 27


Department of Health Sciences and Research

of persons with stroke and spinal cord injury and will then be related to clinically practical measurements that do not require high cost equipment. The laboratory also provides novel post processing capabilities to accommodate diverse application of the data to various studies. Cutting edge instrumentation in this 1379 square foot lab includes: a 12 camera motion capture system (PhaseSpace, Inc.); Instrumented Split Belt Treadmill (Bertec, Inc.) with incline; custom-made system for balance perturbation during treadmill walking; 16 channel EMG system; metabolic cart with integrated 12-lead ECG for measurement of physiologic performance; and a variety of other specialized instrumented measurement equipment. Locomotor Rehabilitation Laboratory The Locomotor Rehabilitation Laboratory (developed by Drs. Chris Gregory and Mark Bowden) is designed to offer a full range of locomotor interventions for those with impaired walking secondary to neurologic injury. The overall goal is to understand and improve clinical decision-making relative to locomotor interventions. This 808 square foot laboratory houses a ZeroG mobile body weight support system (only the 6th one installed nationally) designed to create a permissive environment for retraining walking ability over a treadmill (customized Woodway split-belt treadmill with integrated therapist seating) and also over level ground, environmental obstacles, up a set of several steps, or even on exercise equipment such as a Precor elliptical trainer. Additional equipment include a Shuttle System lower extremity exercise machine for training cardiovascular endurance as well as lower extremity strength and power; step activity monitors; accelerometric, gyroscopic and inertial sensor systems; and Gaitrite Platinum instrumented walkway for spatiotemporal measurements and M2 system for spatiotemporal measurement of mobility tasks other than straight line walking. Upper Extremity Motor Function Laboratory The Upper Extremity Motor Function Laboratory (developed by Dr. Michelle Woodbury) aims at develop28

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ing, refining and implementing cutting edge, theoretically grounded, rehabilitation interventions to improve functional upper extremity motor recovery after neurologic injury or disease. This 762 square foot lab includes one room for neuromechanical assessment and two separate rooms for treatment. It is equipped with Mr. Wally Pregnall shows off the PhaseSpace an 8 camera 3-D movement analysis system Motion Capture System (PhaseSpace, Inc.), a 16 Channel EMG System, two AMTI force plates for assessment of ground reaction forces during standing reach, ActiGraph Upper Extremity Activity Accelerometers, and Advanced Statistical Analysis Software Programs to perform Item Response Theory and Structural Equation Modeling. A final accomplishment related to the laboratories was the approval by the Department of Veteran Affairs for the research space of the CHP Research Building to be designated as official Veterans Administration (VA) space in a memorandum of understanding between MUSC, the local Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, and Department of Veteran Affairs Central Research Office. This is a very important designation as it allows VA funded research to be performed in the laboratories and the VA is the second highest funder of rehabilitation research nationally. Five departmental faculty members have joint appointments with the VA and in the current year they held VA research awards totaling nearly $600,000. In addition, CHP investigators submitted new applications to the VA totaling nearly $7.3 million dollars in the current year. As NIH research funding continues to come under pressure from economic conditions, the Department and College have made a strategic decision to grow the VA research presence as a means to strengthening the research program.

Drs. Mark Bowden, Chris Gregory, Steven Kautz, and Aaron Embry discussed center technology with Mr. Charlie Cole, a retired bank executive with a spinal cord injury.


Department of Health Sciences and Research

Building Partnerships and Collaborations

Dr. Kautz received an adjunct appoint as a professor in the Clemson University Department of Bioengineering and went to Clemson University in the fall to give the Page Morton Hunter Distinguished Lecture in the Another of the major goals for the department in this Department of Bioengineering. Also, Dr. Michelle academic year was to build research collaborations Woodbury has established a collaborative relationship and partnerships across campus and beyond. We were with Dr. Larry Hodges of Clemson University to apply very successful in developing new relationships with his group’s expertise in virtual reality to post-stroke the MUSC Stroke Center of Excellence, the MUSCrehabilitation of the upper extremity. It is expected that Clemson Bioengineering program, the Center for within the next year PhD students in Bioengineering Advanced Imaging Research and the South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research Institute. These are all will become involved in research in the Departmental laboratories. in addition to the above-mentioned VA rehabilitation Center for Advanced Imaging Research (CAIR) research partnership. Primary Stroke Center of Excellence The departmental research program has a very close collaboration with the JCAHO-certified Primary Stroke Center of Excellence directed by Robert Adams, MD, which is part of a large stroke and cerebrovascular disease program at MUSC. The neurorehabilitation research program and the Stroke Center of Excellence work together to facilitate recruitment of subjects; provide medical consultation for rehabilitation researchers; build databases containing behavioral, neuromechanical, neurological and outcomes information; and to perform innovative stroke rehabilitation research projects. Over the past year we have partnered to organize an MUSC-wide retreat for neurorehabilitation research in the fall, to coordinate the state-wide SCTR sponsored scientific retreat “Regeneration, Recovery, Rehabilitation, and Return of Function in Persons with Neurological Disease/ Injury,” and to establish a bi-weekly stroke rehabilitation research interest group meeting. One of the exciting new elements of the collaboration is the recruitment by the Stroke Center of Dr. Wuwei Feng, a stroke neurologist who will perform his stroke rehabilitation research in the Department of Health Sciences and Research’s laboratories. MUSC-Clemson Bioengineering program The departmental research program has built collaborations with the MUSC-Clemson Bioengineering program.

In addition, the departmental research program has built collaborations with the Center for Advanced Imaging Research (CAIR), which serves as a hub for generating and refining imaging studies, facilitating access to imaging machines, and assisting with image data analysis. Drs. Heather Bonilha and Chris Gregory have been leaders in the collaboration with CAIR and assisting other Departmental investigators to gain access to the cutting edge neuroimaging techniques available through CAIR. South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research Institute (SCTR) Further, the departmental research program was successful in increasing its interactions with the South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research Institute (SCTR), which is the large institutional NIH grant that supports translational research in the state of South Carolina and is headquartered at MUSC. Dr. Heather Bonilha was exceptionally successful in being awarded two SCTR grants this year– a pilot grant and a career development award. Dr. Kautz was selected to serve as key personnel on the SCTR grant in the role of Director of the Novel Methodologies program. The higher profile of the College of Health Professions with respect to SCTR should lead to increased opportunities for College faculty to take advantage of the SCTR resources.

Pictured from left to right: (front) Drs. Heather Bonilha, Michelle Woodbury, Noelle Moreau, (back) Mark Bowden, Chris Gregory, Ms. Jenna Nott, Dr. Cameron Nott, Dr. Steven Kautz, Dr. Jesse Dean, Dr. Aaron Embry

Overall, the department has had great success

MUSC College of Health Professions 29


Department of Health Sciences and Research

in reaching out to the greater MUSC community for partnerships. Other examples include Dr. Mark George, University Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and the Director of the Brain Stimulation Laboratory, collaborating with Drs. Mark Bowden and Steven Kautz on two grant submissions, the participation of Dr. Kautz on a Department of Clinical Neurosciences search committee for a basic scientist to do translational stroke rehabilitation research, and the collaboration of Dr. Chris Gregory on translational research project submissions with the basic science laboratory of Dr. Naren Banik.

The inaugural class of the DHA-Interprofessional Studies track began their studies fall 2010 semester. This program is intended for healthcare clinical practitioners who desire an advanced degree in administration. The curriculum of the program includes topics such as leadership, strategy, policy, evidencebased decision-making, and interprofessional studies with the goal of improving patient quality of care and safety. Graduates of the program are expected to teach or lead quality improvement initiatives in healthcare delivery systems.

The DHA-Information Systems and Leadership track recruitment was opened for fall 2011 admission. Grants Students in this new track are practicing information systems specialists who either are in, or who seek to For a year of transition with little ability to collect be in, positions that can influence adoption of the pilot data in several laboratories, it was a very successInstitute of Medicine’s vision to promote the delivery ful year with grant submissions. Departmental faculty of patient-centered care. The central themes of the submitted 25 applications totaling $16.8 million. As curriculum are information systems practice; and mentioned above, Dr. Heather Bonilha received two building on the domains of change, leadership and awards from SCTR totaling $145,000. Drs. Mark health informatics. Bowden and Chris Gregory each received $150,000 awards from the South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury PHD IN HEALTH AND REHABILITATION SCIENCE Research Fund. Drs. Michelle Woodbury and Chris The PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Science Gregory each received one year extensions of their program was established in the 2009. This year VA Career Development awards for a total of nearly the program admitted seven students from a vari$250,000. Dr. Steven Kautz received a one year renewal of an NIH R01 for $375,000. Dr. Kit Simpson ety of backgrounds who will become translational researchers of the future. The mandate for translareceived a new $42,000 corporate grant, along with tional research teams is ever growing as we discover amendments to ongoing projects totaling $172,000. it requires persons with different skill sets working Also, Dr. Chris Gregory was awarded an American together to answer the most pressing health and rehaHeart Association grant for just over $150,000. bilitation questions. This program is a critical aspect of College of Health Professions’ research initiative Academic Programs and its strategic vision to achieve national distinction. DHA IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION AND The 2010-2011 first and second year PhD students’ LEADERSHIP motivation and efforts clearly shows by their distinThe Doctorate of Health Administration & guished and numerous accomplishments. This year, Leadership (DHA)—Executive program was estabthe students have published nine articles, have had lished in 1996. This year the DHA-Executive program five more articles accepted for publication, and admitted 10 students into Cohort 11 and four currently have 16 papers in review. They have also students successfully completed their doctoral disser- participated in 20 research presentations. Four of the tation defense. Titles of the dissertations are listed in PhD Students received research funding to advance the student accomplishments section. their scientific goals. Beyond research, the PhD students have served as educators and contributors With the proven success of the program, the College to health care policy. The student accomplishments implemented two new tracks, DHA-Interprofessional section highlights some of these achievements, which Studies and DHA-Information Systems and demonstrate a bright future for these exceptional Leadership. Both tracks have been approved by the students. Medical University Board of Trustees. 30

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development College of Health Professions Public Advisory Board Led by the Chairman, Mr. Samuel Steinberg, the fourteen members of the Public Advisory Board engaged in discussions about its purpose, structure, and areas of need. These discussions resulted in a revision of the Bylaws. The revised purpose of the Board and a description of the three new committees are included below. The purpose of the Board is to act in an advisory capacity to the College of Health Professions of the Medical University of South Carolina in areas including, but not limited to, strategic planning, public relations, government advocacy, fundraising, development of corporate partnerships and entrepreneurial activities, and resource management. The Board shall also be available upon request of the College of Health Professions and/or the Medical University of South Carolina to undertake associated activities.

“Real generosity toward the future lies in giving all to the present.� Albert Camus

Standing committees shall be formed in the areas of Public Relations and Government Advocacy, Philanthropy, and Academic Advisory. The Public Relations and Government Advocacy Committee will recommend and counsel the College in the development of information presented through print, broadcast, and electronic media, to foster statewide support for the College and will participate in the development of opportunities for public awareness for the College and its programs throughout the state. The Philanthropy Committee will take an active role in the planning, execution, and evaluation of key fundraising/development programs for the College, working to secure private sector funding for academic centers, endowed chairs, programs, capital needs, scholarships and other initiatives. The Academic Advisory Committee shall advise the Dean and the College on issues that affect the academic mission (education, research, and clinical service) of the College of Health Professions. The committee will provide an external perspective and advice to the College on issues including but not limited to; new program development, student recruitment and retention, achieving benchmarks, employer satisfaction, student and faculty diversity, graduate job placement, and recruitment of clinical sites/internships/fellowships. MEMBERS

Portraits from left to right: Mr. Samuel Steinberg - Chair, Mr. Rhett Dunaway - Vice Chair, Dr. Tray Dunaway, Ms. Anne DuRant, Mr. Boyd Gainey, Dr. David Garr, Dr. Brian Poplin, Dr. Mark Rutledge and Dr. Richard Toomey. Not pictured: Ms. Karen DeMarco, Mr. John Jordan Sr., Ms. Sandra Poulnot, and Dr. Larry Winn. MUSC College of Health Professions 31


Development

College of Health Professions Alumni Board The overall mission of the growing CHP Alumni Board is to promote and continue the bond of good fellowship among alumni, faculty, staff, and students. The Board also strives to provide members opportunities for involvement in the progress and growth of the College and the University. This year the Board spent significant time studying an alumni survey emailed to all CHP alumni. From the results of this survey, the Board has taken an interest in the communication initiatives of the College beginning with critiquing the College’s e-newsletter. Meet the Alumni Board:

Portraits above from left to right: Ms. Anne DuRant (President) - MHA ‘01, Mr. Don Lundy (Immediate Past President) - BHS ‘97, Ms. Jeannie Grooms (Secretary/ Treasurer) - MUSC Executive Director of Alumni Affairs, Ms. Adriene Williams - BS in Health Information Administration ‘83, Ms. Alice Edwards - MHA ‘07, Ms. Alicia Sievert - CVP ‘02, Mr. Bruce Cross - MHA ‘00, Mr. Casey Liddy - MHA ‘02 and Ms. Christine Beckett Ramsey - OT ‘05

Portraits above from left to right: Ms. Cindy Hipps - Radiation Therapy ‘88, Ms. Courtney O’Neill - MHA ‘07, Ms. Helen Seubert Fortner - Dental Hygiene ‘83, Ms. Janelle Hicks - MHSA ‘87, Dr. Janet Craig - DHA ‘02, Ms. Jeanne R. Martin - PA ‘96, Ms. Judi Bucknam - BHS ‘07, Mr. Kevin Briggs - Cytotechnology ‘00 and Ms. Lisa P. Montgomery - MHSA ‘93,

Portraits above from left to right: Ms. Nina Epps - MHPE ‘99, Ms. Patricia M. Houser - Cytology and Biosciences ‘81, Ms. Rebecca Derrick Campbell - OT ‘07, Ms. Sara Tavares - PT ‘03, Dr. Sarah King - DHA ‘07, Mr. Sean Irvin - PA ‘01 and Ms. Susan Tucker - BHS ‘95

Yearly Employee Support (YES) Campaign The YES Campaign is MUSC’s annual internet fundraising drive. It gives employees an opportunity to make a charitable gift to any fund within the MUSC Foundation. The money raised through the YES Campaign directly supports the University and its programs, departments, scholarships, research projects, clinics, building renovations and more. Since its inception in 1985, employees have generously given more than $6 million to support the University’s effort to save lives, conquer illness and end human suffering. This year, MUSC employees once again showed their overwhelming generosity and donated more than $346,000 in our 2011 YES Campaign, exceeding our goal of $300,000. Appreciation is expressed to all our employees for their generosity. To capitalize on this opportunity, kudos go out to the College of Health Professions’ employees who have participated in the YES Campaign for more than 10 consecutive years! 32

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EMPLOYEE

GIVING 21 YEARS

Ms. Mary F. Steffens

19 YEARS Ms. Paula C. Butler

18 YEARS

Ms. Mary M. McCall

11 YEARS Dr. K. Jackson Thomas


Development

New Endowed Scholarship In January 2011, Ms. Mary Carpenter paid a heartfelt tribute to her husband by naming the Ernest W Carpenter, M.D. Endowed Scholarship for Physician Assistant Studies in his memory. Dr. Carpenter, a MUSC College of Medicine class of ‘62 alumnus, dedicated his life to the care of his patients, most of whom lived in northwest Michigan. Ms. Carpenter felt strongly that his legacy reflects his commitment to quality primary care for all, especially those in rural areas. As these populations are served more by Physician Assistants, Ms. Carpenter chose to have the scholarship benefit the College’s Physician Assistant Studies program and its students. The Ernest W Carpenter, M.D. Endowed Scholarship is the second endowed scholarship benefitting the Division.

Planned Gift Designated for Health Administration and Policy

Dr. Brian Poplin

Dr. Brian Poplin, DHA alumnus, established the Poplin Leadership Development Fund in the spring of 2011. His hope in establishing this endowed fund is to provide sustained support for the Master in Health Administration and Doctorate in Health Administration program. The College thanks Dr. Poplin for his generous gift.

Tribute to D. Glen Askins By Wally Pregnall with adaptation When Glen Askins, M.D. passed away on May 2, 2011, the obituaries that followed were appropriately extensive, noting the many achievements and honors of a lifetime spanning 76 years. For the MUSC community and beyond, it is the qualities known to those closest to Askins, College of Health Professions professor and clinical services department chair, that make his legacy and his loss all the more profound. Colleagues repeated certain words to describe Askins: thoughtful, insightful, steady, lowkey, unflappable, caring, empathetic, humble, endearing and intellectually curious are among the most common.

Dr. D. Glen Askins

Not one to hesitate expressing what he thought, Askins was often direct, a quality sometimes misunderstood until it was evident that his motivation was simply the desire for the best for the patients, students, colleagues and institutions he served. As Mr. Arnie Metz, assistant professor in the Physician Assistant Studies Program recalled, “At first, when we were trying to get the PA Program off the ground, I thought of him as a gruff, smoking doctor. As our relationship developed, we both opened up and I saw the kind, thoughtful man behind the deep Southern drawl.” The qualities which endeared Askins to colleagues, students and patients transcended formal relationships and resulted in deep, lasting friendships. Dr. Becki Trickey, former Interim Executive Dean, described Askins as a “southern gentleman and a true friend.” She shared a quote of George Washington that depicted her relationship with Askins, “True friendship is a plant of slow growth, and must undergo and withstand the shocks of adversity before it is entitled to the appellation.” For innumerable reasons, both personal and professional, Askins will be missed by the MUSC community. As shared by Dr. Lisa Saladin, Interim Dean, “Askins was a gifted clinician and outstanding educator whose impact on the physician assistant profession in South Carolina is immeasurable. He will be truly missed as a friend and colleague.” His legacy will live on not only through his achievements and the many students he sent forth to practice, but through the manner in which he lived life. MUSC College of Health Professions 33


FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS The College ended this fiscal year with a positive operating margin despite the considerable decreases in revenue the College faced. State appropriations were yet again reduced, as they have been over the last several years, now totaling only 12% of total College annual revenue. Revenue from tuition and fees also declined in FY2011. Despite these financial hurdles, the College maintained a commitment to the implementation of its strategic plan and continued to invest strategically in the area of research. Building enhancements, renovations, and key hires have facilitated tremendous growth in research. In FY2011 research awards reached nearly $6.1M up from $3.7M in FY2010. This is an unprecedented accomplishment for the College. The investments that were made possible through the financial stability of the College played an integral role in this significant growth. The College continues to monitor and analyze our financial status through the utilization of many analytical tools. One of these tools has been our forecasting model, PFM, Future Perfect. This model allows the College to project future results using past performance trends for project planning. We are very excited about this strategic planning tool and the financial advantage and efficiency it will bring to our College. Challenging economic times and the reduction in revenue for FY2011 have not prevented the College from continuing to grow and prosper. The finance team continuously analyzes the direct effect and financial impact potential decisions will have on the bottom line.

College of Health Professions Statement of Personnel & Operations YTD as of June 30, 2011 Combined MUSC & UMA FY11 BUDGET Original Adjustments Adjusted

Combined Actual June YTD

Revenue Total Revenue

$ 16,675,713

$ (225,498)

$ 16,450,214

$ 16,275,108

Total Personnel

$ 11,953,621

$ (434,570)

$ 11,519,051

$ 11,225,637

Total Operating

$ 3,291,604

$ 1,463,745

$ 4,755,349

$ 4,597,054

Total Expenitures

$ 15,245,225

$ 1,029,175

$ 16,274,400

$ 15,822,691

Total Other Additions (Deductions) $ (817,050)

$ 1,036,467

$

219,417

$

231,334

Revenue Over/(Under) Expenditures $

$ (218,207)

$

395,230

$

683,751

Expenditures

34

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613,437


STAFF

accomplishments The College of Health Professions has established a reward and recognition program to acknowledge staff who continuously go beyond their respective roles. Congratulations to all the recipients who have been recognized throughout the year. In addition to monthly awards, the College of Health Professions has recognized a 2010 Staff Annual Legend and eight quarterly champions.

2010 Staff Annual Legend

Mr. Gary Melancon with Interim Dean, Dr. Lisa Saladin

Mr. Gary Melancon received the Staff Annual Legend award for his service as the College’s Audio Visual Production Manager. Those who nominated him described him as “always enthusiastic, prompt, polite and responsive in addressing technology issues in the classroom. He encourages faculty to experiment with new technology and has implemented some creative ways to equip faculty with the tools needed to use the technology available. Mr. Melancon is very enthusiastic about educational technology and is approachable and happy to help others. He certainly goes above and beyond the call of duty, and is very deserving of recognition for his service.”

Employees of the Quarter July 2010 – June 2011 Ms. Paula Butler (Finance and Administration, 4th Qtr 2010) received the 4th quarter award for her dedication to her position as a Business Administrator for the Dean’s Office as well as being the “ultimate team player.” As we have moved to a Shared Services model in the College, her dedication to the Finance & Administration team and to the College as a whole has been instrumental in its success. Her ability to streamline processes and reduce duplication in financial reporting has led to better forecasting for the College and will be the key in guiding the financial decisions of the College moving forward, especially during these challenging financial times in higher education. She also received the 3rd quarter award in 2011 for her continued efforts in revising the financial reporting system, especially as it pertains to research financials. Ms. Butler was noted again for her willingness to go above and beyond to assist co-workers no matter what time of day or night. Nominees praised her ability to treat others with respect and make others feel that MUSC and the College of Health Professions is truly a great place to work. She is a wonderful representative for the College of Health Professions and MUSC. Mr. Jim Moore (Information Technology, 4th Qtr 2010) received nominations for the 4th quarter for his efficiency and productivity in the face of sweeping information technology changes. He successfully led the transition of the College from Dell to the Mac workstation which was a huge undertaking for the College as a whole. This can be directly attributed to his

Pictured left to right: Ms. Kelly Long, Ms. Paula Butler, Ms. Melissa Freeland, Mr. Jim Moore and Ms. Ann Brown

MUSC College of Health Professions 35


Staff Major Accomplishments

dedication to providing exceptional customer service and being extremely responsive to both faculty and staff requests during this time. The transition could not have happened so smoothly without Mr. Moore’s leadership and willingness to go above and beyond. Ms. Ann Brown (Student Services, 1st Qtr 2011) received her quarterly award for her commitment to the College and for her exceptional customer service that she provides to students, as well as faculty, within the three programs she oversees. The three programs include Anesthesia for Nurses (AFN), Masters in Health Administration (MHA), and Masters in Research Administration (MRA). Ms. Brown was also noted for her caring attitude towards students and her ability to make them feel welcome from their initial date of application to the day they first arrive on campus as a first-year student. She is always ready to respond in a timely fashion and is an excellent representative for the College. Ms. Debra Frasier (Finance and Administration, 1st Qtr 2011) was recognized for her dedication to the new Department of Health Sciences & Research (HS&R) as well as her oversight of the renovation of the CHP research building classroom. She was noted for her ability to handle multiple tasks as well as provide seamless support during a time of great change within both the CHP research building and HS&R. Due to her great relationships with procurement and other MUSC service areas, she was able to ensure the project stayed on time and was ready for student and faculty use in the fall of 2010. Ms. Kelly Long (Student Services, 2nd Qtr 2011) was nominated for the second quarterly award and the nominations highlighted Ms. Long’s continued devotion to the Physician Assistant Studies program at MUSC. She was noted not only for her enthusiasm and willingness to go the extra mile no matter the circumstances, but also for her caring attitude towards students and faculty alike. Her ability to keep the program running smoothly for them at all times was also a big key to her win! Ms. Terri Bozzelli (Administrative Support, 2nd Qtr 2011- Photo unavailable) received nominations for the superior work and administrative support she provided for the Division of Physical Therapy’s (PT) 36

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accreditation report. Nominees noted her exceptional work ethic, including working overtime on nights and weekends, to ensure the PT report for accreditation was well prepared. In addition to the heavy workload that the report required, Ms. Bozzelli continued to provide outstanding administrative support to the Occupational Therapy & Physical Therapy divisions during this time. Ms. Melissa Freeland (Student Services, 3rd Qtr 2011) was nominated for her superior work in developing a database for the tracking of student achievements which has been enthusiastically received by both faculty and students. This database will allow for quicker retrieval of information for student awards as well as for items such as the annual report. Ms. Freeland was noted for not only creating the database but also for presenting, refining and training students on its use. In addition, she was also recognized for her enthusiastic attitude and willingness to help whenever needed.

2010 Team of the Year FINANCE TEAM Although the work of the Finance Team is mostly behind the scenes, it is critical to the success of the College. This team earned recognition for significant accomplishments while covering vacant positions during a time of restructuring. The members were able to refine and improve the financial statements; close out and open over 200 new cost centers for associated revenues and expenses; address changes related to facilities, operation and administrative policies; build and implement the PFM Future Perfect forecasting model; and manage the daily financial operations activities. We are fortunate to have a team of individuals who works well together and provides outstanding results in service.

Presenting the Staff Team of the Year Award to Finance is College of Health Professions Interim Dean Dr. Lisa Saladin, from left right: Ms. Angie DeVeaux, Ms. Debra Frasier, Ms. Shari Bergquist, Ms. Katie Weas, Ms. Paula Butler and Ms. Julie Parrish. Not pictured are Ms. Kristi Beeks, Ms. Marisah Daniels, and Mr. Ashley Walpole.


STUDENT

accomplishments Student Service Accomplishments LOCAL COMMUNITY The Student Health Professionals United in Recognizing Diversity (SHPURD) is a student organization within the College whose purpose is to increase awareness of and appreciation for diversity, and to provide service to underserved communities in the Charleston area. Through SHPURD’s fundraising activities this year, over $400 was donated to the Charleston Miracle League.

Students in the College of Health Professions continue to make significant contributions to the local and global communities through various volunteer activities. Students have donated

OVER 4,000 HOURS of community service this year.

Through a College-wide initiative involving students from all programs, over $15,000 was raised and donated to the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Society. Other examples of organizations that benefited from CHP Students volunteering and/or fundraising events: A.W.E. (Achieving Wheelchair Equality) • Camp Happy Days • Charleston Miracle League • Florence Crittenton March of Dimes • Mission trips to Uganda and South Africa • Relay for Life • Ronald McDonald House • Special Olympics • Water Mission Works GLOBAL COMMUNITY Students from the Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Physician Assistant Studies programs, along with Assistant Professor Patty Coker-Bolt, participated in a mission trip organized by Palmetto Medical Initiative to Masindi, Uganda May 2011. The two-week experience required students to be creative in the care they provided and it gave them an opportunity to experience the challenges and rewards of working within a different culture. Students worked closely with other health professions to provide much needed services to the people of Masindi. There were approximately 1500 patients seen and treated through local clinics and orphanages in Uganda. College of Health Professions’ students were part of an interprofessional medical team of 105 students and preceptors from MUSC Colleges of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Professions

Awards and Activities The College of Health Professions students have numerous accomplishments on the national, University and College levels to include awards, presentations, scholarships, and members of distinguished organizations. NATIONAL HONORS National Alpha Eta Honor Society Among the graduating class of 2011, 61 students were inducted into the National Alpha Eta Honor Society for their academic achievements. Alpha Eta is a prestigious national scholastic honor society that is exclusively devoted to the allied health professions. Recipients of this honor are individuals who are devoted to the MUSC College of Health Professions 37


Student Major Accomplishments

promotion and recognition of scholarship, leadership and health services. 2011 National Clinician Administrator Relationship Improvement Organization A team representing MUSC, with significant contributions from CHP participants, recently won 2nd place and a $5,000 scholarship in the finals of the Interprofessional Team Case Competition of the 2011 National Clinician Administrator Relationship Improvement Organization (CLARION) Competition, held in Minneapolis, MN on April 15-16, 2011. CLARION is a student-driven, faculty-supported program created in 2000 at the University of Minnesota that supports interprofessional experiences among its health profession students. The competition is designed to promote the values of teamwork, leadership, organization and good communication skills as keys to building effective health care teams for the future, and derives its origins from the emphasis placed on interprofessional education in healthcare disciplines.

Student Award Winners: Mr. Ted James (Medicine), Ms. Katherine Schichtel (CHP-MHA), Ms. Jacqui Pratt (Pharmacy), and Ms. Hailey James (CHP-MHA) pictured with PT Division Director Dr. David Morrisette

3rd Annual National Predoctoral Clinical Research Training Program Meeting. Southeastern Pre-doctorial Clinical and Translational Research (SPCTR) TL1 Training Award | St. Louis, MO Ms. April Taylor - PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Science Program 2010 recipient Mr. Victor Fresco - PhD in Health and Rehabilitation Science Program 2010 and 2011 recipient The SCTR Southeastern Predoctoral Clinical and Translational Research Training Program is designed to increase the number of well-trained clinical researchers who will assume leadership roles in the design, conduct, and oversight of future multidisciplinary clinical investigations critical to the mission of National Institute of Health (NIH). The program is designed for PhD candidates with strong interest in clinical and translational research careers. The training program will provide early exposure and appropriate training in clinical research methodology, the application of cutting edge technology to clinical research, and address pipeline issues by stimulating interest from doctoral students in health and disease related disciplines. 32nd Annual Seminar of the American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion | Reno, Nevada Ms. Jessica Bui - Cardiovascular Perfusion Program Presentation topic: Burnout in the Perfusion Profession 2011 Eighteenth Annual Wisconsin Perfusion Society Meeting | Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin Mr. Trevelyn Rowell - Cardiovascular Perfusion Program Presentation topic: Tubing Fatigue 2011 Florida Perfusion Society Case Competition: Deborah Ann Pacheco Memorial Scholarship | Tampa, Florida Ms. Andrea “Dafne� Chianella - Cardiovascular Perfusion Program Presentation topic: Heart Failure Due to Viral Cardiomyopathy 2010 National Association of Health Services Executives (NAHSE) 25th Annual Educational Conference | Memphis, Tenneessee First year MHA students, Mr. James Tolley, Ms. Michelle Somers and Ms. Jenny Chen participated in the 15th Annual Everett V. Fox Student Case Competition held in Memphis, TN in October 2010, during the National Association of Health Services Executives (NAHSE) 25th Annual Educational Conference. NAHSE is a nonprofit association of black health care executives founded in 1968 for the purpose of promoting the advancement and development of black health care leaders and elevating the quality of health care services rendered to minority and underserved communities.

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Student Major Accomplishments

2011 National Association of Health Services Executives (NAHSE) case competition at the University of Alabama – Birmingham Birmingham, AL MHA Students from the Class of 2011, Ms. Maggie Herbert, Ms. Carolyn Lindsborg, and Mr. Andy Sobczyk represented MUSC at the National Association of Health Services Executives (NAHSE) case competition at the University of Alabama – Birmingham. The competition utilizes the case study methodology of teaching to provide graduate students with an educational experience that enhances their problem analysis and presentation skills while further exposing them to real-life health services administration issues. It was the first time that MUSC participated in the prestigious competition. The students are shown here with Mr. Quint Studer, a supporter of the case competition and a guest lecturer in the MHA program at MUSC this past year. Pictured left to right: Ms. Maggie Herbert, Ms. Carolyn Lindberg, Mr. Quint Studer, Mr. Andy Sobczyk

State Honor COMMUNITY AID, RELIEF, EDUCATION AND SUPPORT CLINIC (CARES) The outstanding community service offered by Dr. Wanda Gonsalves, College of Health Professions’ Medical Director for the Physician Assistant Program, and the students who operate the Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic (CARES), has garnered recognition at the highest level of state government. In May, Dr. Gonsalves was presented with the 2011 South Carolina Governor’s Volunteer Award by Governor Nikki Haley and the South Carolina Association for Volunteer Administration in a ceremony at the South Carolina State House. Accepting the award with her were thirteen present and past student board members who have helped organize and operate the clinic. In addition to healthcare benefits to the community, for the College of Health Professions the CARES clinic represents a popular opportunity for CHP physical therapy and physician assistant studies students to gain real world experience in a clinical setting. One of the key factors in the clinic’s popularity among students is that it is not only student-operated, but to a large degree also student organized. This, says Dr. Gonsalves, is by design. Because of being fully invested in the clinic’s operation, students learn decision-making skills, leadership, costeffective care, and ways to effectively communicate with their colleagues - all in the pursuit of making the clinic work to the benefit of its patients. This studentcentered model allows for continuous quality improve- Dr. Wanda Gonsalves and MUSC Students recieving award from Governor Nikki Haley. ment through ongoing discussions of how procedures can be refined to maximize available resources. Students from the College’s Master in Health Administration Program often assume leadership roles in managing the overall operations of the clinic. Patients in the CARES setting present with a wide variety of symptoms, many of which are masked by other conditions or lack of previous healthcare, making a collaborative, interdisciplinary approach a necessity. MUSC College of Health Professions 39


Student Major Accomplishments

Students find this learning experience as rewarding as it is challenging, as evidenced by the number of students who volunteer to serve even after they have met their class requirements. The success of the CARES clinic lies in its ability to serve the needs of the medically underserved while simultaneously helping students gain experience in an interdisciplinary, real world setting. Having been recognized for its success in the Charleston community and on the MUSC campus, the program has now rightfully earned wider recognition as a model of community service and education worthy of being emulated.

University Honors PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARS

College of Health Professions Presidential Scholars Ms. Rachel Binder

Physical Therapy

Ms. Bethany Clark Physical Therapy The MUSC Presidential Scholars Program is the University’s premiere interprofessional Ms. Elizabeth Douglas Physician Assistant Studies program for students. It was originated by Ms. Laura Fitzgerald Physical Therapy Dr. Raymond Greenberg when he was the Ms. Hailey James Health Administration University Provost as a mechanism to enrich Ms. Deepthi Meruva Health Administration the academic culture of the University and promote greater interprofessional underMs. Kathryn Roberts Health Administration standing among health professional students. Mr. Erik Sederstrom Health Administration The scholars, representing all colleges, are selected for their two-semester experience through a competitive application process. They are joined by selected faculty scholars representative of each college. This co-curricular program allows students to bring an interprofessional perspective to the study of complex social, political, and human issues of broad interest to health care professionals and biomedical researchers. Students learn more about the complex issues involved in health and health care delivery through interactive didactic sessions and the design and implementation of community projects. INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FELLOWSHIP The purpose of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Interprofessional Education Fellowship is to encourage interprofessional engagement among students and faculty. The program seeks to foster a new generation of graduates who are capable of demonstrating interprofessional competencies that go beyond those developed within individual academic programs. Further, the fellowship strives to enrich collaborative learning experiences for MUSC students and promote a new level of professional development and leadership so that graduates will function as effective collaborators when they move into interprofessional healthcare delivery or research contexts. Physical Therapy Program Ms. Kristen Merritt Ms. Sarah Hite Ms. Hannah Foster Ms. Rachel Smalley Ms. Andrea Grunberger Ms. Sarah Goncalves Ms. Addie Lynch Ms. Meghan Valipour Ms. Tara Ward

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Health Administration Program Ms. Amanda Cooper Ms. Roxana Popa Physician Assistant Studies Program Mr. Christopher Egan Mr. Mason Hicks Mr. Zachary Sutton


Student Major Accomplishments

MUSC Student Leadership Society Mr. Theodius Oates - Physical Therapy Program Mr. John ‘Jay’ Wagner - Master in Health Administration Program The MUSC Student Leadership Society was established in 2007-08 to recognize students who have made notable contributions to the University through their character, service and commitment to enhancing the University environment. Provost Award Ms. Kelly Anderson – Occupational Therapy Program Mr. Steven Alvarez – Physical Therapy Program In 2004, MUSC administration established the Provost’s Scholarship Awards to recognize two students from each college for their excellence in academic achievement, leadership skills and dedication to community service.

Front Center: Mr. Hyman Fowler pictured with other MUSC students who received the 2011 Earl B. Higgins scholarship. Pictured left to right: Mr. Daniel Odongo (College of Pharmacy), Ms. Bridgette Copeland (College of Nursing), Ms. Crystal Johnson (College of Medicine), and Ms. Danielle Gill (College of Dental Medicine).

College of Health Professions Honors CHP STUDENT ALUMNI COUNCIL

Through collaborative efforts between the MUSC Office of Alumni Affairs and the College of Earl B. Higgins Award Health Professions, a student alumni council has Mr. Hyman Fowler – Physician Assistant Studies formed. This council includes representatives Program from Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Established to honor a former director of minority Cardiovascular Perfusion, Master in Health affairs, the award acknowledges persistence and dedi- Administration (MHA), Physician Assistant Studies, cation to positive contributions to diversity enhanceand PhD in Health and Rehabilitation. Two determent with the Medical University of South Carolina. mined first year MHA students, Mr. Will Wantland and Ms. Amy McLeod, formed the group in an effort Student Government Association “Member of the Year” to involve CHP students with alumni and the Alumni Mr. John ‘Jay’ Wagner - Master in Health Association in hopes of fostering a relationship that Administration Program will continue after students have graduated. The group Jay Wagner was selected “Member of the Year” by meets regularly and plans to execute a variety of his peers university-wide for his outstanding dedicaeducational, social, philanthropic and/or professional tion and service to Student Government Association events to promote fellowship, personal growth, and throughout the year. This is a wonderful honor for an enjoyment of CHP students and alumni. individual who is a model leader. CARING HEALTH PROFESSIONALS STUDENT Exchange Club of Charleston AWARDS Mr. James Tolley, III – Master in Health Administration Program The Caring Professionals Program, funded by the The Exchange Club solicits nominations from Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, aims to develop students from across the university. Students must be caring professionals through transforming students’ from the tri-county area to be eligible. Leadership and educational and cultural experiences at the Medical community service are important criteria, as well as University of South Carolina and in the community. financial need. The goal of the program is to awaken in students the realization that they will benefit from and find fulfillment through a life of caring and service for others. The Caring Professionals Program Student Award MUSC College of Health Professions 41


Student Major Accomplishments

showcases those students who model caring and compassionate behaviors towards others. Students that are awarded the Caring Professionals Program Student Award shows a genuine compassionate attitude and selflessness to others (including fellow students), models caring behaviors, empathy, and sensitivity when engaged with those in need and participates in activities which benefit others in the community. 2010 Recipients: Ms. Hannah Foster (Physical Therapy), Mr. Victor Fresco (PhD in Rehabilitation Science), Ms. Roxana Popa (Master in Health Adminstration), Mr. Darren Johnson (Physician Assistant Studies) D. G. ASKINS, JR., M.D. SCHOLARSHIP In 2004 the D. G. Askins, Jr., M.D. Scholarship was established by former CHP Professor and Department Chair, Dr. Askins. The purpose of the scholarship is to advance the Physician Assistant (PA) profession by providing awards to deserving students of the CHP PA program who demonstrate the commitment to practice their profession according to the highest standards of excellence and leadership as exhibited by Dr. Askins. In 2010, on the 50th anniversary of his graduation from the Medical University of South Carolina’s College of Medicine, the D. G. Askins, Jr., M.D. Scholarship was fully endowed. Now, in the first year of endowment, Dr. Askins would undoubtedly be proud that the scholarship in his name has been awarded to PA student Hyman Fowler, who embodies the excellence and leadership promoted by the scholarship. Despite not having the opportunity to meet Dr. Askins prior to his passing in May 2011, Fowler shares the same commitment to excellence that inspired the scholarship. For Fowler, the commitment was borne from personal experience at a young age. When he was about 10 years old, Fowler’s sister was diagnosed with thyroid cancer, a disease that is often asymptomatic until it reaches an advanced stage. Thankfully for the Fowler family, her primary care physician and other providers caught the disease in an early, treatable stage. Hyman Fowler attributes his sister being alive today to the care she received from her primary care team. Another motivating factor to go into primary care came from Fowler’s recent trip to South Africa. He saw up close the impact that primary care, or lack thereof, can have on vulnerable populations. The ability to manage or prevent disease through primary care made an impact on his career goals. He sees himself practicing in the southScholarship award recipients from left to right: (front row) Ms. Lesley Dillard, Ms. Kelly Anderson, Ms. Kristen east, if not South Carolina, and Merritt, Ms. Rebecca Jones, Ms. Andrea Grunberger, Ms. Amanda Cooper, Ms. Gretchen Reibold, Ms. Elizabeth Douglas, Ms. Sarah Enoch, (back row) Mr. Christopher Franz, Mr. Sean Wittorf, Mr. Steven Johnson, Mr. Steven helping to serve the medically Alvarez, Ms. Jill Polhemus, Ms. Melissa Turpin, Mr. Johnathan Ahearn, Ms. Tatyana McElveen. underserved in rural areas. It’s that sense of compassion and commitment to excellence that makes Fowler such a fitting recipient of the Askins Scholarship, and another reason why Dr. Askins would be proud that his scholarship is contributing to Hyman Fowler’s success as a Physician Assistant. SHOWCASING SUCCESS - STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS The College of Health Professions held its annual awards ceremony, Showcasing Success, on October 8, 2010 at St. Luke’s Chapel in Charleston, SC. This awards ceremony is held annually to honor individuals who are outstanding student representatives with extraordinary accomplishments. Scholarships are a critical means by which the College of Health Professions can support its students. We appreciate the support of our alumni and friends who have made these 2010 scholarships possible. 42

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Student Major Accomplishments

College of Health Professions Student Scholarships Recipients STUDENT

PROGRAM

NAME OF SCHOLARSHIP

Mr. Richard Cordrey

Anesthesia for Nurses

Mary Ann Cone

Ms. Shijuana Scotland

Anesthesia for Nurses

Anne Pappas Scholarship

Ms. Sarah Enoch Anesthesia for Nurses

CHP Public Advisory Board; CHP Alumni Association Scholarship

Mr. Sean Wittorf

James Palmer Dearing Memorial Scholarship

Cardiovascular Perfusion

Ms. Sarah Boyd Master in Health Administration

Health Administration and Policy Alumni Association Scholarship

Ms. Amanda Cooper Master in Health Administration

College of Health Professions-Student Government Association

Ms. Rebecca Jones

Master in Health Administration

CHP Alumni Association Scholarship

Mr. Clinton Larkins

Master in Health Administration

CHP Public Advisory Board

Ms. Kathryn Roberts

Master in Health Administration

HCA/DeMarco Endowed Scholarship

Ms. Hailey James

Master in Health Administration

David Munday Scholarship

Ms. Jenna Funke

Occupational Therapy

Eric Michael Hardy Memorial Scholarship

Ms. Tatyana McElween Occupational Therapy

Rowley Award for Education in Rehabilitation Sciences

Ms. Melissa Turpin Occupational Therapy

Rowley Award for Education in Rehabilitation Sciences

Mr. Jonathan Ahearn Physical Therapy

Rowley Award for Education in Rehabilitation Sciences

Ms. Andrea Grunberger

Physical Therapy

Catherine Michele Poulnot Scholarship

Mr. Chris Franz

Physical Therapy

Catherine Michele Poulnot Scholarship

Ms. Kristin Merritt Physical Therapy

Rowley Award for Clinical/Research Excellence in Rehabilitation Sciences

Ms. Jill Polhemus Physical Therapy

Kenneth and Cozie Thomas Memorial Scholarship

Ms. Becky Witkop

Physical Therapy

Relax the Back/Lowery Family

Ms. Leslie Dillard

Physician Assistant Studies

Will Hagood

Ms. Elizabeth Douglas

Physician Assistant Studies

Elizabeth Gouge

Mr. Hyman Fowler

Physician Assistant Studies

David Glen Askins, Jr. MD

Mr. Steven Jones

Physician Assistant Studies

CHP Alumni Association Scholarship

Mr. Christopher Kelly

Physician Assistant Studies

Physician Assistant Scholar

Ms. Gretchen Reibold

Physician Assistant Studies

Sushma Rao; Reamer Lorenzo Cockfield

Ms. Katlyn McGratten

PhD in Health & Rehabilitation Science Rowley Award for Academic Enhancement

Ms. Annie Simpson

PhD in Health & Rehabilitation Science Rowley Award for Academic Enhancement MUSC College of Health Professions 43


Student Major Accomplishments

Doctor of Health Administration Student Doctoral Dissertation Defense The College of Health Professions congratulates four doctoral candidates who have successfully completed their doctoral defense. These are trained leaders who are prepared for the roles they will assume as the era of healthcare reform evolves. Candidates’ names and dissertation titles are listed below. Dr. Salvador J. Esparza- Nurse Staffing and Skill Mix Patterns: Are There Differences in Outcomes? Dr. Catrin C. Jones-Nazar- Impact of Staphylococcus Aureus Infections on Cost and Length of Stay at hospitals in Louisiana: An analysis of the 2000-2007 Louisiana Inpatient Discharge Data Dr. Miles Franklin Meyer- The Relationship of Employee Empowerment and Hospital Profitability for a Sample of Acute Hospitals in the United States Dr. Wayne Oliver Winney - Target income Hypothesis: A study of Cardiology Compensation

Student National Conference Presentations The students in the PhD for Health and Rehabilitation Science Program and in the Doctorate of Physical Therapy Program have participated in mentored research presented at national and international meetings. These forums exhibit the early research accomplishments of the students and the exceptional interdisciplinary mentorship teams in the College of Health Professions and College of Medicine. Dew, A. (2011, April). Getting the most out of a 2D ultrasound measure of muscle thickness in children with cerebral palsy gait & clinical movement analysis society (GCMAS). National Institutes of Health. Bethesda, MD. Krause, J., Focht, K., Bozard, J., & Saunders, L. (2011, June). A longitudinal study of depression after spinal cord injury. The American Spinal Injury Association. Washington, DC Krause, J., Focht, K., Bozard, J., & Saunders, L. (2011, April). Does pain interference mediate the relationship between pain intensity and total pain symptoms with depressive symptoms after spinal cord injury. National Association of Rehabilitation Research Training Centers Annual Conference. Bethesda, MD Fresco, V., Cooley, M., Twal, W., Barth, J.,& Argraves, W. (2011, May). Fibulin-1 dysregulation of Fgf8 signaling is associated with a DiGeorge Syndrome-like phenotype in mice. National Predoctoral Clinical Research Training Program Meeting. St. Louis, MO. Hendrix, E. & Hunter, L. (2010, August). Walking downhill: The trade-off between energetics and stability. American Society of Biomechanics. Providence, RI. Sora, N.D., Marlow, N.M., Bandyopadhyay, D., Leite, R.S., Slate, E.H., & Fernandes, J.K. (2011, February). Association between metabolic syndrome and extent of severe periodontitis in Gullah. Southern Society for Clinical Investigation 2011 Southern Regional Meeting. New Orleans, LA. Leite, R.S., Sora ,N., Marlow, N.M., Bandyopadhyay, D., & Fernandes, J.K. (2010, December) . Metabolic Syndrome and Extent of Severe Periodontitis in Gullah. 12th RCMI International Symposium on Health Disparities. Nashville, TN. Hunt, K.J., Marlow, N.M., Mauldin, J., & Korte, J.E. (2010, October). Impact of maternal obesity and diabetes on birth weight is greater in blacks than in whites. Obesity 2010 28th Annual Scientific Meeting. San Diego, CA. Bonilha, H., Ellis, C., McGrattan, K. (2011, November). Understanding evidence in dysphonia and dysphagia: Importance of study design. Poster: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention. 44

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Student Major Accomplishments

Philadelphia, PA. Ellis, C., Bonilha, K., McGrattan, K. (2010, November). Understanding evidence in dysphonia and dysphagia: importance of participant demographics. Poster: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention. Philadelphia, PA. McGrattan, K., Bonilha, H., Hill, B., Martin-Harris, B. (2011, March). Differential effects of bolus variables on physiologic components of swallowing impairment. Poster: Dysphagia Research Society Annual Convention. San Antonio, TX. Raburn, C. & Merritt, K. (2010, August). Preferred frequency during a simple bouncing task. American Society of Biomechanics. Providence, RI. Taylor, A. (2011, May). Nhanes survey analysis of sexual minority women. National Predoctoral Meeting (Poster presentation). St. Louis, MO.

Student Journal Publications Barley, J. L., Mooney, J. F., Glazier S. S., Johnson, T., Kornegay, A. L., Turner, R. P., & Edwards, J.C. (2010, September). Sudden appearance of ne w upper extremity motor function while performing neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring during tethered cord release. (Case report). Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, 30(6), 624-628. Carter, C.L., Onicescu, G., Cartmell, K. B., Sterba, K. R., Tomsic, J., Fox, T., Dunmeyer, E., & Alberg, A. J. (2010, December). Factors associated with cancer survivors’ selection between two group physical activity programs; Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 4(4), 388-398. Ford, M.E., Wahlquist, A.E., Ridgeway, C., Streets, J., Mitchum, K.A., Harper Jr., R. R., Hamilton, I., Etheredge, J. J., Jefferson, M. S., Varner, H., Campbell, K., & Garrett-Mayer, E. (2011, May). Evaluating an intervention to increase cancer knowledge in racially diverse communities in South Carolina. Patient Education Counseling, 83(2), 256-260. Fedewa, S. A., Edge, S. B., Stewart, A. K., Halpern, M. T., Marlow, N. M., & Ward, E. M. (2011). Race and ethnicity are associated with delays in breast cancer treatment (2003-2006). Journal of Health Care Poor Underserved, 22(1), 128-141. Marlow, N. M., Slate, E. H., Bandyopadhyay, D., Fernandes, J. K., & Salinas C. F. (2011, April). An evaluation of serum albumin, root caries, and other covariates in Gullah African Americans with type-2 diabetes. Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 39(2), 186-192. Yuen, H. K., Marlow N. M., Mahoney, S., Slate, E., Jenkins, C., & London S. (2010, October). Oral health content in diabetes self-management education programs. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 90(3), 82-84. Barth, J. L., Clark, C. D., Fresco, V. M., Knoll, E. P., Lee, B., Argraves, W. S., & Lee, K. H. (2010). Jarid2 is among a set of genes differentially regulated by Nkx2.5 during outflow tract morphogenesis. Developmental Dynamics, 239(7), 2024-2033.

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Appendix

APPENDIX Editor and Editorial Board Chipas, A. CRNA Today, Editor in Chief Graber, D. Journal of Health and Human Services Administration, Editorial Review Board Member Jones, W. J. Journal of Health Administration Education (AUPHA), Editorial Board member Kautz, S. Journal of Applied Biomechanics Editorial Board Member; Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, Editorial Board Member Krause, J. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Editor-in-chief; Rehabilitation Psychology, Editorial Board Member Martin-Harris, B. Dysphagia Journal, Editorial Board Member, Associate Editor; Bulgarian Journal of Communication Disorders, Editorial Board; Journal of Applied Physiology, Editorial Consultant; Laryngoscope, Editorial Consultant; Archives of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Editorial Consultant; American Journal of SpeechLanguage Pathology, Editorial Consultant; Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Editorial Consultant; Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Editorial Consultant McKee, T. E. International Journal of Auditing, Editor Mitcham, M. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Reviewer; Occupational Therapy International, Editorial Board Member; Journal of Occupational Science, Reviewer Sistino, J. Journal of ExtraCorporeal Circulation Associate, Editor Wager, K. A. Journal of Health Administration Education, Editorial Review Board Woodbury, M. Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, Editorial Review Board

Editorial Reviewer Breland, H. L. Journal of Aging and Health, Reviewer; Military Medicine, Reviewer; Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Reviewer Bonilha, H.S. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Reviewer; Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, Reviewer; Current Bioinformatics, Reviewer; Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, Reviewer Bowden, M. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Reviewer; Stroke, Reviewer; Physical Therapy Journal, Reviewer; Spinal Cord, Reviewer; Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Reviewer; Journal of Biomechanics, Reviewer; Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Reviewer; Medical Engineering and Physics, Reviewer 46

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Brotherton, S. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Reviewer Carson, N. Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, Reviewer Coker-Bolt, P. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Clinical Rehabilitation, Reviewer; Occupational Therapy International, Reviewer; Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, Reviewer Gregory, C. Journal of Applied Physiology, Reviewer; Muscle & Nerve, Reviewer; Physical Therapy Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Reviewer; Spinal Cord, Reviewer; Clinical Neurophysiology, Reviewer; Neurorehabilitation & Neural Repair, Reviewer; Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development , Reviewer Hewett, M. Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, Reviewer Jones, W. J. Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA, ) Journal of Health Administration Education, Reviewer Kazley, A. Journal of the American Medical Association, Reviewer; Neurology, Reviewer; Health Care Management Science, Reviewer; Medical Care Research and Review, Reviewer; Recent Patents on Biomedical Engineering, Reviewer; Journal of Health Care Engineering, Reviewer Meacham, M. American College of Healthcare Executive (ACHE), Journal of Health Care Management, Reviewer Mitcham, M. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Reviewer; Journal of Occupational Science, Reviewer Moore, E. L. Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA), Journal of Health Administration Education, Reviewer Morrisette, D.C. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Treatment Guidelines for Shoulder Osteoarthritis, Reviewer; Spine and Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Reviewer Thomas, K. J. Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal, Reviewer; Anatomical Sciences Education, Reviewer Wise, H. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, Reviewer

Journal Publications Phadke, C.P., Thompson, F.J., Kukulka, C.G., Nair, P.M., Bowden, M.G., Madhavan, S., Trimble, M.H., & Behrman, A.L. (2010). Soleus H-reflex modulation after motor incomplete SCI: Effects of body position and walking speed. Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, 33(4), 371-378 Kelechi, T. J., Green, A., Dumas, B., & Brotherton, S. S. (2010). Online coaching for a lower limb physical activity program for individuals at home with a history of venous ulcers. Home Healthcare Nurse, 28, 596-605. Yuen, H.K., & Burik, J.K. (2011). Brief report-Survey of driving evaluation and rehabilitation curricula in occupational therapy programs. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 65, 217-220. Blue, A.V., Charles, L., Howell, D., Koutalos, Y., Mitcham, M., Nappi, J., & Zoller, J. (2010). Introducing students to patient safety through an online interprofessional course. Advances in Medical Education and Practice, 1, 107-114. MUSC College of Health Professions 47


Appendix

Chipas, A. (2011). Laryngeal mask airway: Uses and designs. Outpatient Surgery Magazine, 12(4), 55-58. Chipas, A., McKenna, D. (2011). Stress and burnout in nurse anesthesia. Journal of American Association of Nurse Anesthetists, 79(2), 28-34. Hunter, L.C., Hendrix, E.C., & Dean, J.C. (2010). The cost of walking downhill: Is the preferred gait energetically optimal? Journal of Biomechanics, 43(10), 1910-1915. Dean, J.C., & Kuo, A.D. (2011). Energetic costs of producing muscle work and force in a cyclical human bouncing task. Journal of Applied Physiology, 110(4), 873-880. Ellis, C., Zhao, Y. & Egede, L. (2010). Depression and increased risk of death in adults with stroke. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 68(6), 545-551. Ellis, C., Zhao, Y., & Egede, L. (2010). Racial/ethnic disparities in post-stroke outpatient rehabilitation in veterans. Journal of National Medical Association, 102(9), 817-822. Ellis, C. (2010). Stroke in young adults. Disability and Health Journal, 3(3), 222-224. Egede, L, Ellis, C. & Grubaugh, A. (2010). The effect of major depression on preventive care and quality of life among adults with diabetes. General Hospital Psychiatry, 36(6), 563-569. Ellis, C., Grubaugh, A., & Egede, L. (2010). The effect of minority status and rural residence on actions to control high blood pressure in the United States. Public Health Reports, 125(6), 801-809. Hewett M.L. (2010). What is an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator? Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, 23(5), 61-62. Hewett M.L. (2010). What is hypertension? Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, 23(7), 4647. Hewett M.L. (2010). What is MRSA? Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, 23(9), 59-60. Hewett M.L. (2011). How do I treat my high cholesterol? Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, 24(5), 63-64. Pilcher, E.S., Mauldin, M., Howell, D., & McDougall, C. (2011). Interprofessional faculty development institute: Empowering leaders in advanced teambuilding. Journal of Dental Education, 75(2) 190-256. Trinastic, J.P., Kautz, S.A., McGregor, K., Gregory, C.M., Bowden, M.G., Benjamin, M.B., Kurtzman, M., Chang, Y.L., Conway, T., & Crosson, B. (2010). An fMRI study of the differences in brain activity during active ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Brain Imaging and Behavior, 4(2), 121-131. Peterson C.L., Cheng J., Kautz S.A. & Neptune RR (2010). Leg extension is an important predictor of paretic leg propulsion in hemiparetic walking. Gait & Posture, 32:451-6. Peterson, C.L., Kautz, S.A. & Neptune, R.R. (2011). Braking and propulsive impulses increase with speed during accelerated and decelerated walking. Gait & Posture; 33:562-7. Hall, A.L., Peterson, C.L., Kautz, S.A. & Neptune, R.R. (2011). Relationships between muscle contributions to walking subtasks and functional walking status in persons with post-stroke hemiparesis. Clinical Biomechanics; 26:509-15. Allen, J.L., Peterson, C.L., Kautz, S.A. & Neptune, R.R. (2011). Step length asymmetry is representative of compensatory mechanisms used in post-stroke hemiparetic walking. Gait & Posture; 33:538-43. Shoemaker, L., Kazley, A., Stichler, J., White, A. (2010). Making the case for evidence-based design: A descrip48

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tive study of organizational decision-making. Health Environments, Research and Design Journal. 4(1): 22-41. Kazley, A.S., & Diana, M.D. (2011). Does hospital CPOE use mean better quality? A National Study. Health Care Management Review, 36(1), 86-94. Fine, S.H., Loeheide, L., Swanson-Kazley, A., Clarke, R.L., & Simpson K.N. (2010). Assessing the benefits of teleintensivist coverage in the ICU. Healthcare Financial Management, 64(12), 84-88. Krause, J. S., & Reed, K. S. (2010). Barriers and facilitators to employment after spinal cord injury: Underlying dimensions and their relationship to labor force participation. Spinal Cord, 49, 285-291. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., Wise, H., & Backus D. (2010). Center for the prevention of secondary conditions after spinal cord Injury: Background and overview of coordinated activities. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, 6(2): 1-9. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., Adkins, R., & Selassie, A. W. (2010). Coordinated program of research: Theoretical risk model, literature, and shared methodology. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, 16(2), 10-21. Krause, J. S., Terza, J. V., & Dismuke C. E. (2010). Factors associated with labor force participation after SCI. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 33, 89-99. Krause, J. S., Reed, K. S., & McArdle, J. J. (2010). Factor structure and predictive validity of somatic and nonsomatic symptoms from the PHQ-9: A longitudinal study after spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 91, 1218-1224. Krause, J. S., & Saunders, L. L. (2010). Life expectancy estimates in the life care plan: Accounting for economic factors. Journal of Life Care Planning, 9, 15-28. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., & Newman, S. (2010). Posttraumatic stress disorder and spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 91, 1182-1187. Krause, J.S., & Saunders, L.L. (2010). Risk and protective factors for secondary conditions: A 15-year longitudinal study. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, 16(2), 22-29. Krause, J. S., DeVivo, M. D., Saunders, L., Reed, K. S., & Johnson, E. (2010). Risk factors for mortality after spinal cord injury. Future Neurology, 5(5), 757-764. Krause, J.S. (2010). Risk for subsequent injuries after spinal cord injury: A 10-year longitudinal study. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 91(11), 1741-1746. Krause, J.S., & Saunders, L.L. (2010).Risk of mortality and life expectancy after spinal cord injury: The role of health behaviors and participation. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, 16(2), 53-60. Hoffman, J. M., Bombardier, C. H., Graves, D. E., Kalpakjian.C. Z., & Krause, J. S. (2011). A longitudinal study of depression from one to five years after spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92, 411-418. Krause, J.S., Edles, P., & Charlifue, S. (2011). Changes in employment status and earnings after spinal cord injury: A pilot comparison from pre- to post-injury. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, 16(4), 74-79. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., & DeVivo, M. (2011). Income and risk of mortality after spinal cord injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92, 339-345. Meade, M.A., Forcheimer, M., Krause, J.S., & Charlifue, S. (2011). The influence of secondary conditions on job acquisition and retention in adults with SCI. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92(3), 425-432. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., Staten, D., & Rohe, D.E. (2011). Vocational interests after recent spinal cord injury: MUSC College of Health Professions 49


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Comparisons related to gender and race. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 92, 626-631. Dismuke, C. E., Krause, J. S., & Terza, J. V. (2011). Racial disparities in poverty status among families of individuals with spinal cord injury. Poverty and Public Policy, 3 (1), 9. Yuen H.K., Fallis, M., & Martin-Harris, B. (2010). A Survey of Head and Neck Cancer Curriculum in United States Speech Language Pathology Masters Programs. Journal of Cancer Education. Brodsky, M.B., McFarland, D.H., Dozier, T.S., Blair, J., Ayers, C., Michel, Y., & Martin-Harris, B. (2010). Respiratory-swallow phase patterns and their relationship to swallowing impairment in patients treated for oropharyngeal cancer. Head and Neck, 32, 481-489. McKee, T.E. (2010). Citation “Snapshot� of three leading international auditing journals. Managerial Auditing Journal, 25 (8), 724-733. McKee, T.E. (2010 ). Lessons in healthcare receivable securitization control form the fraud/bankruptcy of NCFE. Group Practices Journal, 50(8), 30-36. Blue, A.V., Mitcham, M.D., Smith, T.G., Raymond, J.R., & Greenberg, R.S. (2010). Changing the future of health professions by embedding interprofessional education within an academic health center. Academic Medicine, 85(8), 1291-1295. Moreau, N. G., Simpson, K. N., Teefey, S. A., & Damiano, D. L. (2010). Muscle architecture predicts maximum strength and is related to activity levels in cerebral palsy. Physical Therapy, 90, 1619-1630. Nott, C.R., Zajac, F.E., Neptune, R.R. & Kautz, S.A. (2010). All joint moments significantly contribute to trunk angular acceleration. Journal of Biomechanics; 43:2648-52. Price, K.L., Saladin, M.E., Baker, N.L., Tolliver, B.K., DeSantis, S.M., McRae, A.L., & Brady, K.T. (2010). Extinction of drug cue reactivity in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Behavior Research and Therapy, 48(9), 860-865. Clements, K., Schumacher, J.A., Coffey, S.F., & Saladin, M.E. (2011). Ongoing intimate partner victimization in the lives of trauma survivors with and without substance use disorders: The need for supplemental assessment. Partner Abuse, 2(1), 46-60. Saunders, L. L., Krause, J. S., & Selassie, A.W. (2010). Association of health services with secondary conditions: Use of a population-based cohort of persons with spinal cord injury in South Carolina. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, 16(2), 30-39. Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2010). Personality and behavioral predictors of pressure history. Topics in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation, 16(2), 61-71. Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2010). Psychological factors affecting alcohol use after spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 23. Saunders, L.L., Krause, J.S., Peters, B., & Reed, K.S. (2010). The relationship of pressure ulcers, race, and socioeconomic conditions after spinal cord injury. Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, 33(4), 387-395. Shackelford, A., & Hodge, A. (2011). A technique for autologous priming of the veno-venous bypass circuit during liver transplantation. Journal of Extracorporeal Technology,43, 89-92. Sievert, A., Uber, W., Laws, S., & Cochran, J. (2011). Improvement in long-term ECMO by detailed monitoring of anticoagulation: A case report. Perfusion, 26, 59-64. Hornberger, J., Simpson, K., Shewade, A., Gietz, B., Baran, R., & Podsadecki, T. (2010) Broadening the perspec50

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tive when assessing evidence on boosted protease inhibitor-based regimens for initial antiretroviral therapy. Advances in Therapy, 27(11), 763-773. Moore, B.R., Simpson, K., Kaye, W.,& Swanson-Kazley, A. (2010). Piloting a method to measure satisfaction with HIV care. American Journal of Medical Quality, 25(5), 384-391. Fine, S., Loheide, L., Simpson, K.N., Kazley, A.S.,& Clarke, R. (2010). Tele-Intensivist coverage of the community hospital ICU: Feasibility, costs, and consequences. Health Care Financial Management. Basco Jr., W.T., Ebeling, M., Hulsey, T.C., Simpson, K.N. (2010). Using pharmacy data to screen for look-alike, sound-alike substitution errors in pediatric prescriptions. Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, 10(4), 233-237. Basco Jr., W.T., Ebeling, M., Hulsey, T.C., Simpson, K.N. (2010). Evaluating potential health disparities for pediatric drug substitution errors. Journal of Investigative Medicine,58(2),479. Simpson, K.N. , Dietz, B., Baran, R., Bhor, M., Garren, K.W., Riddler, S.A., & Haubrich, R.H. (2011). Economic modeling of the combined effects of HIV-disease, cholesterol and lipoatrophy based on ACTG 5142 trial data. Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation. Sistino, J.J. (2010). Back to the stacks--looking at classic papers related to the current practice of cardiopulmonary bypass. The Journal of Extra-Corporeal Technology, 42(4), 265-267. Thomas, K.J., Denham, B., & Dinolfo, J. (2011). Perceptions among occupational and physical therapy students of a non-traditional methodology for teaching laboratory gross anatomy. Anatomical Science Education, 4, 7177. Clement, D., Hall, R., O’Connor, S., Qu, H., Stefl, M, & White, A. (2010). Competency development and validation: A collaborative approach among four graduate programs. Journal of Health Administration Education, 27(3), 151-173. Lehman, L., Woodbury, M., & Velozo, C. A. (2011). Examination of the factor structure of the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand questionnaire. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 65(2), 169-178. Woodbury, M.L., Velozo, C.A., Thompson, P.A., Light, K., Uswatte, G., Taub E., Winstein, C.J., Morris, D., Blanton, S., Nichols-Larsen, D.S., & Wolf, S.L., (2010). Measurement structure of the wolf motor function test: Implications for motor control theory, Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 24(9), 791-801. Bradford, W., Zoller, J.S., & Silvestri, G. (2010). Estimating the effect of individual time preferences on the use of disease screening. Southern Economic Journal, 76(4), 1005-1031. Freedy, J., Magruder, K., Yeager, D., Zoller, J.S., Hueston, W. & Carak, P. (2010). Posttraumatic stress disorder screening test performance in civilian primary care. Family Practice, 27(6), 616-624.

Books and Book Chapters Leigh, P.R., Blake, J.H. & Moore, E.L. (2011). Digital equity in a traditional Gullah culture: Gullah communities in South Carolina. In P. R. Leigh (Ed), International exploration of technology equity and the digital divide: Critical, historical and social perspective (pp. 173-192). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference, IGI Global. Bonilha, H.S. (2010). Normal vocal fold vibratory amplitude and mucosal wave. In K. Kendall & R. Leonard (Eds.), Laryngeal evaluation: Indirect laryngoscopy to high-speed digital imaging. New York, NY: Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc. Chipas, A. (2010). Herbal Medications. Pharmacology of Nurse Anesthesiology (pp. 315-322). Boston, MA: MUSC College of Health Professions 51


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Jones & Bartlett Learning. Chipas, A. & Bushardt, R. (2010). Pharmacology of Congestive Heart Failure. Pharmacology of Nurse Anesthesiology (pp. 481-489). Boston, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Coker-Bolt, P., Garcia, T., & Nabor, E. (2010). Cerebral Palsy. In J.W. Soloman & J.C. O’Brien (Eds.), Pediatric skills for occupational therapy assistants (3rd Ed., pp. 301-321). St. Louis, MO: Mosby-Elsevier. Bickel, C.S., Gregory, C.M., & Bellew, J.W. (2011). Electrotherapy for Musculoskeletal Disorders. In: S.L. Michlovitz, J. W. Bellew, & T.P. Nolan (Eds.), Modalities for Therapeutic Intervention and Diagnosis (5th ed., pp. 281299). Philadelphia, PA: FA Davis. Mund, A. (2010). Healthcare Policy for Advocacy in Health Care. In M.E. Zaccagnini & K.W.White, The Doctor of nursing practice essentials: A new model for advanced practice nursing. Boston, MA: Jones and Barlett Publishers. Saladin, M. E., Back, S. E., and Payne, R. A. (2011). Post-traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorder comorbidity. In C. A. Cuvacuiti (Ed.) Principles of addiction medicine: The essentials. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins. Wager, K.A. and Diana, M. (2011). Health information systems and strategy. In L.R. Burns, E.H. Bradley & B.J. Weiner (Eds.) Shortell & Kaluzney’s Health Care Management Organization Design and Behavior (6th ed., pp. 379398). Clifton Park, NY: Delmar. Headley J.L., Maynard F. M., Machell, S. T. Wise, H. H. (2011). International Post-Polio Health Care Considerations for Families and Friends. St. Louis, MO: Post-Polio Health International. Available from http://www.postpolio.org/edu/healthcare/index.html

Presentations Acsell J.R. (2011, April). Managing perfusion disasters. Society of Cardiac Anesthesiologists, Savannah, GA. Acsell J.R. (2011, January). Behavior of Bubbles in Extracorporeal Circuits. Winter Park Perfusion Conference. Winter Park, CO. Acsell J.R. (2011, January). Perfusion Myths, Mysteries, and Half Truths. Winter Park Perfusion Conference. Winter Park, CO. Bistrick, C., Ikonomidis, J., Spinale, F., Stroud, R, & Holt, D. (2011, April). The efficacy of washing allogeniec PRBC’s to decrease the systemic inflammatory response. Amsect 49th International Meeting, New Orleans, LA. Bonilha, H.S., Gerlach, T.T., Sutton, L.E., & McGrattan, K.E. (2011, June). Improved voice quality after forward focused voice as measured by perturbation in the acoustic signal as a method for engaging patients. 40th Symposium of The Voice Foundation: Care of the Professional Voice. Philadelphia, PA. Halstead, L., McBroom, D., & Bonilha, H.S. (2011, June). Task-specific singing dystonia: vocal instability that technique can’t fix. 40th Symposium of the Voice Foundation: Care of the Professional Voice. Philadelphia, PA. Bonilha, H., Blair, J., Carnes, B., Humphries, K., McGrattan, K., Michels, Y., & Martin-Harris, B. (2011, March). Effect of frame rate on judgment of swallowing function using the MBSImP. 19th Annual meeting of the Dysphagia Research Society. San Antonio, TX. Humphries, K., Blair, J., Bonilha, H., Carnes, B., McGrattan, K. Hill, E., Martin-Harris, B. (2011, March). Influence of clinician experience, medical diagnosis, and MBSImP protocol on radiation exposure time during VFSS. 19th Annual meeting of the Dysphagia Research Society. San Antonio, TX. 52

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Bonilha, H., Finneran, D., McLeod, A., & Whiteside, J. (2011, February). 7 steps to evidence-based practice. Abstracts: Convention of the South Carolina Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Columbia, SC. Bonilha, H.S., Gerlach, T.T., & Sutton, L. E. (2010, November). Laryngeal sensation pre- & post-clearing. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention. Philadelphia, PA. Bonilha, H.S., Ellis, C., & McGrattan, K. (November, 2010). Understanding evidence in dysphonia and dysphagia: Importance of study design. Poster: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Philadelphia, PA. Bowden M.G., Behrman A.L., Gregory C.M., Patten C., & Kautz S.A. (2011, February). Translational Biomechanics: Development of portable quantitative measurement. Poster: American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting. New Orleans, LA. Brotherton, S.S., Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2011, June). Association between reliance on devices and people for walking and ability to walk community distances among individuals with spinal cord injury (Poster presentation). Physical Therapy 2011: APTA’s Annual Conference & Exposition. National Harbor, MD. Burik, J.K., & Coker-Bolt, P.C. (2011, April). Enhancing professional behaviors in OT students. Poster: American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference & Exposition. Philadelphia, PA. Carson, N.E. (April 16, 2011). Occupational Roles of Meal Planning and Food Preparation of Adults with Chronic Mental Illness. Poster: American Occupational Therapy Association Annual Conference, Philadelphia, PA. Chipas, A. (2010, July). Anesthesia update. The Institute for Post-Graduate Education, Skagway, AK. Chipas, A. (2010, September). Error in anesthesia. Stress and substance abuse. North Carolina Association of Nurse Anesthesia. Wilmington, NC. Chipas, A. (2010, October). Anesthesia for the difficult airway. Georgia Association of Nurse Anesthesia. Atlanta, GA. Chipas, A. (2010, October). Anesthesia for the difficult airway. Barry University. Miami, FL. Chipas, A. (2010, October). Stress and substance abuse when things go wrong. The anesthetists role in prevention of surgical site infection. Kentucky Association of Nurse Anesthesia. Louisville, KY. Chipas, A. (2011, March). Anesthesia for the difficult airway. The anesthetists role in prevention of surgical site infections. Allergic reactions. Coast to Coast Anesthesia Update. Key West, FL. Chipas, A. (2011, March). Awake intubation. The anesthetists role in prevention of surgical site infections. Allergic reactions. West Virginia Association of Nurse Anesthetists Annual Meeting. Beckley, WV. Chipas, A. (2011, April). Awake intubation. The anesthetists role in prevention of surgical site infections. Allergic reactions. North Dakota Association of Nurse Anesthetists Annual Meeting. Fargo, ND. Chipas, A. (2011, May). The anesthetists role in prevention of surgical site infections. Charleston Anesthesia Conference. Charleston, SC. Coker-Bolt, P., Poon, J., Moreau, N., Perkel, J., & Jenkins, D. (2011, April). Life after the NICU: How to tell if your baby is okay? Pediatric Grand Rounds, Medical University of South Carolina. Charleston, SC. Coker-Bolt, P. (2011, April). A camp based model for providing constraint induced movement therapy (Poster presentation). American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Annual Conference and Exposition. Philadelphia, PA. Coker-Bolt, P., Bower, B., Perkel, J., Holthaus, K., Bean, K., Carn, K., Mays, L., Pender, S., Rowland, L., & Shell, MUSC College of Health Professions

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S. (2011, April). Early motor skill patterns in low and high risk infants. Poster: AOTA Annual Conference and Exposition. Philadelphia, PA. Trucks, MR., Coker-Bolt, P., & Reidy, T. (2011, April). Pediatric constraint induced therapy for diverse populations. Short Course: AOTA Annual Conference and Exposition. Philadelphia, PA. Hendrix, E.C., Hunter, L.C., & Dean, J.C. (2010, August). Walking downhill: The trade-off between energetics and stability. 34th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Biomechanics. Providence, RI. Merritt, K.J., Raburn, C.E., & Dean, J.C. (2010, August). Preferred frequency during a simple bouncing task. 34th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Biomechanics. Providence, RI. Ellis, C., Grubaugh, A., Ruggerio, K., & Egede, L. (2010, September). Achieving equitable access to care in the veterans’ health administration in the 21st century and beyond. Arlington, VA. Ellis, C., Bonilha, H., & McGrattan, K. (2010, November). Understanding evidence in dysphonia and dysphagia: Importance of participant demographics. Poster: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention. Philadelphia, PA. Hentz, B., & Ellis, C. (2010, November). Stroke knowledge among stroke survivors: Are there racial/ethnic differences. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Meeting. Philadelphia, PA. Ellis, C., & Dismuke, C. (2010, November). Does aphasia influence hospital length of stay and costs? American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Annual Meeting. Philadelphia, PA. Fernandez, A. (2010, October). Perfusion simulation: Comparisons, opportunities, perceptions and future directions. AmSECT Perfusion Safety and Best Practices. Toronto, CA. Fernandez, A. (2011, January). The Current State of Perfusion Simulation in North America. 2nd Annual Orpheus Perfusion Simulator Users Conference, University of Bristol NHS Trust. Bristol, UK. Fernandez, A. (2011, February). Simulation in perfusion: Evolution from the bucket to the microchip. NeSECC 35th Jubilee Conference. Nunspeet, The Netherlands. Fernandez, A. (2011, May) Simulation in perfusion. Georgia State Perfusion Society Meeting. Augusta, GA. Graber, D., Mitcham, M., Coker-Bolt, P., Wise, H., Jacques, P., Edlund, B.,& Annan-Coultas, D. (2011, June). The Caring professionals program: Enhancing empathy and humanism among health professions students. Association of University Programs in Health Administration Annual Meeting. Charleston, SC. Bickel, C.S.,& Gregory, C.M. (2011, October). Impact of electrical stimulation parameters on muscle torque and fatigue in people with spinal cord injury. American Congress of Rehab Medicine. Atlanta, GA. Hewitt, M. (2011, March). Hereditary angioedema in the emergency department. Viropharma Advisory Board. San Francisco, CA. Jacques, P.F., Kraft, S., Coker-Bolt, P., Edlund, B., Graber, D., Wise, H., Mitcham, M.D., & Burik, J. (2010, October). An interprofessional problem-based learning activity to enhance caring/compassion in students. Poster: Physician Assistant Education Association Annual Education Forum. Baltimore, MD. Jacques, P.F., Beatty, K., Garrison, C., Maxwell, E., & Gonsalves, W. (2010, October). Physician assistant student’s appraisal of oral health issues in the health care system. Poster presentation at Physician Assistant Education Association Annual Education Forum. Baltimore, MD. Givens, P.,& Jones, W.J. (2010, November). Use of asthma management plans: Challenges to achieving national compliance standards. 138th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association. Denver, CO. 54

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Givens, P., & Jones, W.J. (2010, November). Reforming pediatric asthma services to improve access, education and care. 138th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association. Denver, CO. Givens, P, & Jones, W.J. (2010, November). Child asthma care systems: Serious gaps in education and insurance. Presented at the 138th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association. Denver, CO. Kautz, S.A., Nott, C.R. & Neptune, R.R. (2011, April). Angular momentum based assessment of dynamic balance performance in hemiparetic walking. Poster presentation at Neural Control of Movement Annual Meeting. San Juan, PR. Kazley, A., McKee, T., Wager, K., & James, H. (2011, June). Creative and engaging problem solving activities for teaching health administration students (panel presentation). Association of University Programs in Health Administration Annual Conference. Charleston, SC. Kraft, S.V., Wise, H.H., Jacques, P.F., Burik, J. K., Edlund, B. J., & Mitcham, M. M. (2011, February). An interprofessional learning activity to enhance caring/compassion in students. Platform presentation: American Physical Therapy Association Combined Section Meeting. New Orleans, LA. Krause, J.S. (2010, July). Secondary conditions: Spinal cord injury. OT/PT students, RRTC training. Charleston, SC. Krause, J.S., Saunders, L.L., & Newman, S. (2010, September). Posttraumatic stress disorder after spinal cord injury. Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals. Las Vegas, NV. Krause, J. S., Reed, K. S., & McArdle, J .J. (2010, September). Natural course of depressive symptoms after spinal cord injury. Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals. Las Vegas, NV. Krause, J. S. (2010, October). Funded research of studies relevant to disability: Funding opportunities through the department of education. South Carolina State University. Orangeburg, SC. Krause, J.S., Focht, K.L., Bozard, J.L., & Saunders, L.L. (2011, April). Does pain interference mediate the relationships between pain severity and total pain symptoms with depressive symptoms after spinal cord injury. National Association of Rehabilitation Research Training Centers. Bethesda, MD. Krause, J.S., & Saunders, L.L. (2011, June). Do risk factors for mortality after SCI parallel those from the general USA population? American Spinal Injury Association/International Spinal Cord Society Annual Conference. Washington, DC. Martin-Harris, B., Blair, J.A., & Brodsky B.B. (2010). Pinpointing the deficits: Challenging cases, diverse etiologies: The MBSImP edge. American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Meeting. Philadelphia, PA. Blair, J, Ahn, C., Castell, D., & Martin-Harris, B. (2010, March). MBSImP and combined MII and esophageal manometry: An analysis of correlation and predictive value. Dysphagia Research Society. San Diego, CA. Martin-Harris, B. (2011, February). Moving toward standardizing dysphagia practice: Introducing the modified barium swallow impairment profile (MBSImP). Phoenix, AZ. Martin-Harris, B. (2011, February). Moving toward standardizing dysphagia practice: Introducing the modified barium swallow impairment profile (MBSImP). Orlando, FL. Martin-Harris, B., Hill, E., Bonilha, H., McGrattan, K. (2011, March). Differential effects of bolus variables on interdependent swallowing movements. 19th Annual meeting of the Dysphagia Research Society. San Antonio, TX. Martin-Harris, B. (2011, March). Moving toward standardizing dysphagia practice: Introducing the modified barium swallow impairment profile (MBSImP). Toronto, CA. MUSC College of Health Professions 55


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Martin-Harris, B. 2011, March). Moving toward standardizing dysphagia practice: Introducing the modified barium swallow impairment profile (MBSImP). Seattle, WA. Martin-Harris, B. 2011, April). Moving toward standardizing dysphagia practice: Introducing the modified barium swallow impairment profile (MBSImP). Kansas City, KS. Martin-Harris, B. (2011, May). Moving toward standardizing dysphagia practice: Introducing the modified barium swallow impairment profile (MBSImP). Edmonton, CA. Martin-Harris, B. (2011, May). Moving toward standardizing dysphagia practice: Introducing the modified barium swallow impairment profile (MBSImP). Edinburgh, Scotland. Martin-Harris, B. (2011, June). Mapping dysphagia phenotypes using standardized measures of swallowing impairment. Communication Sciences Research Colloquium. Communication Sciences Research Center. University of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Cincinnati, OH. McCall, M., Bogany, L., Michaud, N., Shackelford, A., McCall, M., & Fernandez, A. (2011, April). Preparing today’s student for tomorrow’s technology (Poster presentation). MUSC Technology Fair. Charleston, SC. Michaud, N. (2011, April). Utilization of Simulation. Wisconsin Perfusion Society Meeting. Wisconsin Dells, WI. Moreau, N.G., Knight, H., & Olson M.W. (2011, February). To decline or not to decline: A potential mechanism by which torque output is preserved in cerebral palsy. American Physical Therapy Association Combined Section on Pediatric Meeting. New Orleans, LA. Moreau, N.G., Falvo, M., & Damiano, D.L. (2011, April). Rapid force generation of the knee extensors is more impaired than strength in cerebral palsy and is related to decreased muscle size and functional mobility. Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society Annual Meeting. Bethesda, MD. Dew, A.D., Moreau, N.G. (2011, April). Getting the most out of a 2D ultrasound measure of muscle thickness in children with cerebral palsy. Gait and Clinical Movement Analysis Society Annual Meeting. Bethesda, MD. Morrisette, D.C, Seif, G.A., & Cholewicki J. (2011, February). Short-term effects of an inextensible lumbosacral orthoses (Poster presentation). American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting. New Orleans, LA. Cholowicki, J., Morrisette, D.C., Lee, A.S., Reeves, N.P., & Seif, G.A. (2011, March). Efficacy of lumbosacral orthoses in the management of low back pain: biomechanical and clinical comparison of two designs. Scientific Testing of Orthotic Devices, 1st International Congress. Aix Le Bains, FR. Morrisette, D.C. (2011, April). Efficacy for low back pain management. South Carolina Chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association Annual Meeting. Greenville, SC. Morrisette DC, Cholewicki J, Lee AS, Reeves NP, Seif GA. (2010, June). Biomechanical and clinical efficacy of lumbosacral orthoses in the management of low back pain. International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology, XVII Congress. Aalborg, DK. Mund, A. (2010, September). Goal Directed Fluid Therapy. Hennepin County Medical Center. Minneapolis MN. Mund, A. (2011, February). Curricular mapping: Crosswalking the DNP competencies with the AACN essentials.American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Faculty Assembly. Orlando, FL. Mund, A. (2011, May). Fluid Responsiveness and Goal Directed Therapy. Anesthesia Conference. Charleston, SC. 56

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Saladin, L.K. (2011, March). International education: Logistical issues to consider. Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions Spring Meeting. New Orleans, LA. Hartwell, K.J., Gray, K.M., Saladin, M.E., Shaftman, S.R., McCullough, S.A., Klintworth, E.M., Carpenter, M.J. & Schiller, C. (2011, February). Body composition and metabolic rate changes in women during a smoking cessation attempt. Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 17th Annual Meeting. Toronto, CA. Carpenter, M.J., Alberg, A.J., Gray, K.M., Saladin, M.E., & Hughes, J.R. (2011 February). Cessation induction for unmotivated smokers: A randomized clinical trial of NRT sampling. 17th annual meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Toronto, Ontario, CA. Schiller, C.E, Saladin, M.E., Gray, K.M., Shaftman, S.R., McCullough, S.A., Klintworth, E.M., Hartwell, K.J., & Carpenter, M.J. (2011 February). Changes in ovarian hormones predict smoking cessation in women. Paper presented at the 17th annual meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Toronto, Ontario, CA. Carpenter, M.J., Alberg, A.J., Gray, K.M., Saladin, M.E., & Hughes, J.R. (2011 February). Effectiveness of referrals to quitlines in a real-world setting (Poster presentation). 17th annual meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Toronto, Ontario, CA. Carpenter, M.J., Wahlquist, A.E., Alberg, A.J., Gray, K.M., & Saladin, M.E. (2011 February). To quit or not to quit: Reach and enrollment of a nationwide clinical trial (Poster presentation). 17th annual meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Toronto, Ontario, CA. Saladin, M.E., Gray, K.M., Carpenter, M.J., Hartwell, K.J., Shaftman, S.R., McCullough, S.A., Klintworth, E.M., & Schiller, C.E. (2011, February). Do measures of ovarian hormones predict smoking cue-elicited craving? 17th annual meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. Toronto, Ontario, CA. Gray, K.M., Saladin, M.E., Schiller, C.E., Carpenter, M.J. & Hartwell, K.J. (2011, September). From Cycles and phases to levels and ratios: Refining methods to investigate ovarian hormone effects on smoking behaviors in women.  Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco Europe Annual Meeting. Antalya, TR. Saunders, L.L., Krause, J.S., Brotherton, S., & Morrisette, D. (2010, September). Walking distance and spinal cord injury (Poster Presentation). Academy of Spinal Cord Injury Professionals Conference. Las Vegas, NV. Saunders, L.L., Krause, J.S., Peters, B., & Reed, K.S. (2010, November).The relationship of pressure ulcers, race, and socioeconomic conditions after spinal cord injury (Poster presentation). American Public Health Association Conference. Denver, CO. Saunders, L.L., & Krause, J.S. (2010, November). Psychological factors affecting alcohol use after spinal cord injury (Poster presentation). American Public Health Association. Denver, CO. Shackelford, A.G. (2010, September). Apico-aortic valve conduit for aortic stenosis and previous coronary artery bypass. Florida Perfusion Society’s Case Reports in the Sun VI. Tampa, FL. Sievert A. (2011, March). Renal benefits of pulsatile perfusion in cardiac surgery: A meta-analysis. 31st Annual Cardiothoracic Surgery Conference. Newport Beach, CA. Lazenby, G.B., Unal, E. R., Lintzenich, A., & Simpson, K.N. (2011, August). A cost-effectiveness analysis of anal cancer screening in HIV positive women. The 38th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society for Obstetrics and Gynecology. Chicago, IL. Church, E.C., Simpson, K.N., & Church, L.W.P. (2010, October). Low Rates of Case Detection with Annual Syphilis Screening in An HIV Infected Veteran Cohort. Infectious Disease Society of America. Boston, MA. Sistino, J J. (2011, June). Safety in extracorporeal circulation practice.  Foundation European Congress for Extracorporeal Circulation (FECECT). 14th European Congress on Perfusion. Dukrovnik, Croatia. MUSC College of Health Professions 57


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Sistino, J.J., & Ellis. C. (April, 2011). Effects of health disparities on survival after neonatal heart surgery- why racial, ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic status should be included in the analysis. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. New Orleans, LA. Sistino, J.J., & Bonilha, H.S. (April, 2011). Improvements in survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes in surgical treatment of hypoplastic left heart syndrome -a meta-analysis. American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. New Orleans, LA. Woodbury, M.L. (2011, February). Overview of research in the upper extremity motor function laboratory. SCTR Scientific Retreat on Rehabilitation, Recovery and Return of Function for Persons with Neurological Injury. North Charleston, SC. Woodbury, M.L. (2011, February). Measurement Issues in Clinical Trials of Rehabilitation. Panel Discussion: Unraveling dose from ingredients of therapy. International Stroke Conference. Los Angeles, CA. Woodbury, M.L. (2011, April). Upper Extremity Assessment Items. NeuroRecovery Network National Summit. Louisville, KY.

Professional Service Activities The College is proud of the many faculty members’ service to their respective professions and related associations. Our colleagues give so generously of themselves to their profession that it not only benefits those professional organizations, but also serves as a source of recognition to the achievements of faculty, the College, and ultimately the Medical University of SC. Breland, H. American Occupational Therapy Association Conference Abstract, Reviewer Bonilha, H.S. South Carolina Speech-Language and Hearing Association’s Research Committee, President; American Speech-Language and Hearing Association Convention 2011, Voice, Resonance and Alaryngeal Speech Program, Committee Member; Symposium of The Voice Foundation: Care of the Professional Voice, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2010 Poster Judge; Academic-Research Careers program of the American SpeechLanguage and Hearing Association, Mentor; American Speech-Language and Hearing Association Grant, Reviewer Bowman, P. National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Clinical Simulation Question Item Development and Validation Committee, Member Brotherton, S. South Carolina Chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Board of Directors Member, Executive Board Member, APTA House of Delegates, Chief Delegate Burik, J. K. Trident Technical College Occupational Therapy Assistant Educational Program, Charleston, SC, Advisory Board Member Embry, A. E. South Carolina American Physical Therapy Association Board of Directors, Member Jones, W. J U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Editorial Board member & Manuscript Reviewer; Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) Scientific Research and Prevention Programs Committee, Scientific Reviewer; Pennsylvania Department of Health and Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Scientific Reviewer Kraft, S. V. American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Neuro Specialty Examination, Item writer; APTA Neurology Sections Consumer Advocacy Committee, Member; APTA Wheeled mobility and Seating Task Force, Member 58

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Kautz, S. VA RR&D Maryland Exercise and Robotics Center of Excellence External Advisor Board, Member Kazley, A.S. Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA), Annual Meeting Committee Member and Fundraising Committee, Member Martin-Harris, B. OESO Permanent Scientific Committee Member; Board of Councilors for the International Society for Maxillofacial Rehabilitation (ISMR), Member; Medical Advisory Board, Support for People with Oral Head and Neck Cancer (SPONCH), Member Meacham, M. Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA), 2012 Annual Meeting Planning Committee, Member; Law, Liability and Ethics 5th Edition by Frank, M., Contributor Mitcham, M. National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Educational Advisory Board, Member; Board of Directors of the American Occupational Therapy Foundation, Honorary Life Member; Center for Occupational Therapy Education at Colorado State University, Senior Consultant Moreau, N.G. Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association, Research Committee, Awards Committee, Chair Moore, E. L. College of Charleston Low Country Graduate Center Executive Director Search Committee, Member; Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), Commission on Colleges, Evaluator Registry Morrisette, D.C. American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Combined Sections Meeting, Poster Presentation Reviewer; APTA Expert Quality Measurement Panel, Member; APTA Orthopaedic Section Practice Affairs Committee, Member; APTA Academic Counsel Cultural Transformation Task Force, Member Saladin, L. K. American Physical Therapy Association Executive Committee Member, Board Member, and Government Affairs Committee Member; Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions, Southern Deans Consortium, Secretary Seif, G.A. South Carolina American Physical Therapy Association, President- Elect, Board of Directors, Member; American Physical Therapy Association Federal Affairs, Liaison Sievert, A. American Society of Extracorporeal Circulation Ethics Committee, Chair Sword, D. O. American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS), Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Specialty Area, Specialization Academy of Content Experts (SACE) Item Writer Member Wager, K. A. Healthcare Information Technology Curriculum Project, Curriculum Design Task Force, Member; Commission on Accreditation for Healthcare Management Education (CAHME,) Fellow White, A.W. Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME) Commissioner and Council; CAHME Candidacy Committee, Chair; South Carolina Chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives Board, Member; Graduate Studies for the Association of University Programs in Health Administration, Editorial Review Board, Member

Community Service Activities Bowman, P. Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic (CARES) Faculty Co-Advisor Breland, H. L. Center for Community Health Partnerships, Mentoring/Consultation Core, Co-Director; Persistent Organic Pollutants in Autoimmunity (POPAI), Steering Committee; Lowcountry AHEC – Lowcountry Coalition for Health Careers, Member; Howard University Occupational Therapy Alumni & Friends Advisory Board MUSC College of Health Professions 59


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Brotherton, S. USA Swimming Stroke and Turn Official, Chief Judge; South Carolina High School League Stroke and Turn Official for High School Swimming; Spoleto Festival USA Volunteer Usher Burik, J. Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic (CARES) Faculty Co-Advisor Coker-Bolt, P. Charleston Miracle League Board, Member; Pattison’s Academy Executive Board President, Finance Committee Member, Fundraising Committee Member; Play Today Foundation Executive Boarding Founding Member; Palmetto Medical Initiatives, Medical Campus Outreach Community Preceptor; Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic (CARES) Faculty Co-Advisor Embry, A. E. Charleston Miracle League Board of Directors Member; Coastal Center - Human Rights Committee Member Morrisette, D.C. Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic (CARES) Volunteer Clinician; Low Country Splash, Cooper River Bridge Swim Volunteer Seif, G.A. Community Aid, Relief, Education and Support Clinic (CARES) Faculty Co-Advisor Sievert, A. Junior League of Charleston Member

Grants SIGNIFICANT EXTERNAL AWARD Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)/Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry: Physician Assistant Training in Primary Care (ARRA). PI: Jacques, Paul, (09/01/2010 – 08/20/2015), Total FY 11: $1,630,281 (all five years of funding has been awarded). This highly competitive award was granted with stimulus funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). NEW GRANT AWARDS WITH CHP FACULTY AS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute. Standardizing Laryngeal Endoscopy. PI: Bonilha, H. (10/15/2010 - 03/31/2013), Total for FY 11: $93,729. National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute. Impact of Acute Stroke Brain Lesion and Swallowing Impairment on Short-term Swallowing Outcomes. PI: Bonilha, H. (10/01/2010 - 09/30/2011), Total for FY 11: $49,779. National Institutes of Health/Georgetown University. Task-specific Propulsion Training after Neurological Injury. PI: Bowden, M. (08/01/2010 - 07/31/2011), Total for FY 11: $25,000. South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund. Propulsive Training in Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury. PI: Bowden, M. (12/01/2010 - 11/30/2014), Total for FY 11: $124,943. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Evaluation of Walking Specific Motor Learning in Chronic Stroke. PI: Bowden, M. (02/01/2011 - 01/31/2012), Total for FY 11: $106,222. Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration. Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program. PI: Chipas, T. (07/01/2010 - 06/30/2011), Total for FY 11: $6,768. Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration. Nurse Anesthetist Traineeship 2010. PI: Chipas, T.(07/01/2010 - 06/30/2011), Total for FY 11: $4,754. Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina. Camp Hand to Hands. PI: Coker-Bolt, P. (08/01/2010 07/31/2011), Total for FY 11: $2,500. 60

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National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Development of a Passive Elastic Exoskeleton for Gait Rehabilitation. PI: Dean, J. (04/15/2011 - 03/31/2013), Total for FY 11: $173,670. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Post-Stroke Outcomes. PI: Ellis, C. (08/01/2010 - 07/31/2011), Total for FY 11: $95,800. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Skeletal Muscle Properties and the Metabolic Cost of Walking Post-Stroke. PI: Gregory, C. (08/01/2010 - 09/30/2012), Total for FY 11: $170,929. South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund. Development of a Rehabilitation Research Program to Study the Biomechanics of Walking Following Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury. PI: Gregory, C. (12/01/2010 - 11/30/2014), Total for FY 11: $122,848. Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration. Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry: Physician Assistant Training in Primary Care. PI: Jacques, P. (09/01/2010 08/20/2015), Total for FY 11(all five years awarded): $1,630,281. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/University of Texas. Development of a SimTK-based Framework for Hemiparetic Walking Assessment. PI: Kautz, S. (07/01/2010 03/31/2011), Total for FY 11: $30,203. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Intermuscular Coordination of Hemiparetic Walking (ARRA). PI: Kautz, S. (09/07/2010 - 08/31/2011), Total for FY 11: $363,805. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Research Career Scientist Award. PI: Kautz, S. (01/01/2010 12/31/2013), Total for FY 11: $94,912. United States Department of Education. Center on Health Outcomes Research and Capacity Building for Underserved Populations with SCI and TBI. PI: Krause, J. (09/01/2010 - 09/30/2011), Total for FY 11: $353,133. South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund. Research Development Core. PI: Krause, J. (07/01/2009 06/30/2010), Total for FY 11: $64,526 (Received in FY 11 for FY 10) South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund. Research Development Core. PI: Krause, J. (07/01/2010 06/30/2011), Total for FY 11: $69,985 United States Department of Education. Ambulation and Secondary Complications: Participants with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury. PI: Krause, J. (10/01/2010 - 09/30/2012),Total for FY 11: $399,964 United States Department of Education. Rehabilitation and Research Training Center on Secondary Conditions in Individuals with SCI. PI: Krause, J. (10/01/2010 - 09/30/2014), Total for FY 11: $797,646. South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund. Measuring Outcomes after Spinal Cord Injury Throughout South Carolina: A System of Tracking, Research and Referral. PI: Krause, J. (12/01/2010 - 11/30/2015), Total for FY 11: $195,000. National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Treatment Implications of Trauma Memory Modulation for PTSD and Alcohol Dependence (Yr 2). PI: Saladin, M. (09/01/2010 08/31/2011), Total for FY 11: $798,470. Abbott Laboratories. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Schools. PI: Simpson, K. (03/01/2011 - 12/31/2011), Total for FY 11: $42,000. Abbott Laboratories. Economic Estimates Based on the ACTG5142 Data for Five Countries (Amended Award). PI: Simpson, K. (07/16/2009 - 12/21/2010), Total for FY 11: $7,500. Abbott Laboratories. JIA Economic Model (Amended Award). PI: Simpson, K. (05/26/2010 - 12/31/2011),Total for FY 11: $124,500. MUSC College of Health Professions 61


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Abbott Laboratories. Economic Models of Kaletra for Europe (Amended Award). PI: Simpson, K. (03/18/2009 06/30/2011), Total for FY 11: $40,000. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. A Toolbox for Measuring Post-Stroke Upper Extremity Motor Ability. PI: Woodbury, M. (09/01/2010 - 08/31/2012), Total for FY 11: $99,540. CHP Faculty also demonstrated their collaborative spirit by participating as researchers on sixteen other grantfunded projects being conducted on MUSC’s campus.

CHP Faculty Participating in Outside Grant Awards College of Medicine, Dept. of Rheumatology & Immunology (Kamen, PI). National Institutes of Health /NIEHS. Environmental Determinants of Autoimmunity among African Americans in Coastal SC - Diversity Supplement (Year 2). Participating Faculty: Breland, H., Effort: 75%, (07/01/2010 – 06/30/2013). College of Medicine, Dept. Psychiatry & Behaviorial Sciences (Brady, PI). National Institutes of Health/NCRR. South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research Institute (SCTR). Participating Faculty: Kautz, S., Effort: 24%, (07/01/2009 – 03/30/2014). College of Medicine, Dept. of Neuroscience (Adams, PI). National Institutes of Health /NHLBI. Prevention of Stroke after STOP (Post STOP; Year 2). Participating Faculty: Kazley, A., Effort: 10%, (07/01/2010 – 06/30/2014). College of Medicine, Dept. of Neuroscience (Slaughter, PI). Department of Defense/United States Army/U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity. Southeastern Virtual Institute of Equity & Wellness (SE VIEW; Project 9). Participating Faculty: Kazley, A., Effort: 30%, (07/01/2010 – 07/01/2013). College of Medicine, Dept of Surgery/Transplant (Baliga, PI). National Institutes of Health /NIDDKD. A Program to Increase Living Donations in African Americans (Year 4). Participating Faculty: Kazley, A., Effort: 5%; Simpson, K., Effort: 2.5%, (08/01/2010 – 07/31/2012). College of Medicine, Dept. of Neurosciences (See, PI). National Institutes of Health /NIDA. Translational Research in Addiction Center (TRAC; Year 4). Participating Faculty: Saladin, M., Effort: 11.25%, (09/30/2006 – 08/31/2010). Hollings Cancer Center & College of Medicine, Dept. Psychiatry & Behaviorial Sciences (Carpenter, PI). National Institutes of Health /NIDA. A Novel Treatment of Boost Quit Attempts and Cessation Among Unmotivated Smokers (Year 4). Participating Faculty: Saladin, M., Effort: 10%, (09/30/2007 – 05/31/2011). College of Medicine, Dept. Psychiatry & Behaviorial Sciences (Brady, PI). National Institutes of Health /NIAMS. Specialized Center Research (SCOR) on Sex and Gender Factors Affecting Women’s Health (Year 10). Participating Faculty: Saladin, M., Effort: 15%, (09/30/2002 – 06/30/2012). College of Medicine, Dept. Psychiatry & Behaviorial Sciences (Brady, PI). National Institutes of Health /NIDA. The Impact of Real-time fMRI Feedback on Response to Nicotine Cues (Year 4). Participating Faculty: Saladin, M., Effort: 5%, 09/15/2008 – 06/30/2011). College of Medicine, Dept. Psychiatry & Behaviorial Sciences (Brady, PI). National Institutes of Health /NIDA. D-Cycloserine Facilitation of Cocaine-Cue Extinction (Year 4). Participating Faculty: Saladin, M., Effort: 5%, (06/01/2008 – 05/31/2012) College of Medicine, Dept of Surgery (Fakhry, Ford, Co-PIs). National Institutes of Health /NCMHHD. Critical Care Excellence in Sepsis and Trauma (CREST; Year 2) – ARRA-Funded RC1 Challenge Grant. Participating Faculty: Simpson, K., Effort: 5%, (09/20/2009 – 08/31/2011). College of Medicine, Dept. of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics & Epidemiology (Palesch, PI). National Institutes of Health /NINDS. Statistical and Data Coordinating Center for the ALIAS and IMS III Trials (Year 4). Participating Faculty: Simpson, K., Effort: 1%, (09/01/2009 – 08/31/2010). 62

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College of Medicine, Dept. of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics (Moran, PI). Health Resources and Services Administration. Data Mining for Moran Development Project (Year 3). Participating Faculty: Simpson, K., Effort: 5%, (07/01/2009 – 06/30/2010). College of Medicine, Dept. of Pediatrics (Basco, PI). Department of Health and Human Services/AHRQ. Assessment of Pediatric Look-Alike, Sound-Alike (LASA) Substitution Errors (Year 2). Participating Faculty: Simpson, K., Effort: 1%, (04/01/2010 – 03/31/2012). College of Medicine, Dept. of Neuroscience (Slaughter, PI). Department of Defense/United States Army/U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity. Southeastern Virtual Institute of Equity & Wellness (SE VIEW; Project 8). Participating Faculty: Simpson, K., Effort: 20%, (07/01/2010 – 07/01/2013). College of Medicine, Dept. of Family Medicine (Chessman, PI). Health Resources and Services Administration. Pre-Doctoral Training in Primary Care: Motivate for Health. Participating Faculty: White, A., Effort: 7%, (07/01/2008 – 06/30/2011).

Grant Submissions with CHP Faculty as Principal Investigator National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute. Standardizing Laryngeal Endoscopy. PI: Bonilha, H. (10/15/2010 - 03/31/2013), Total: $93,729. National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute. Impact of Acute Stroke Brain Lesion and Swallowing Impairment on Short-term Swallowing Outcomes. PI: Bonilha, H. (10/01/2010 - 09/30/2011), Total: $49,779. South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund. Propulsive Training in Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury. PI: Bowden, M. (12/01/2010 - 11/30/2014), Total: $124,943. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Mechanisms of Response Guide Decision-Making for Walking Recovery Post-Stroke. Co-PIs: Bowden, M/Gregory C. (07/01/2011 06/30/2014), Total: $442,380. National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute. Factors Contributing to Falls Early After Stroke. PI: Bowden, M. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2012), Total: $49,959. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Augmentation of Locomotor Adaptation Post-Stroke. PI: Bowden, M. (02/01/2012 - 01/31/2017), Total: $924,500. Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration. ExCEL Project. PI: Charles, L. (09/01/2011 – 08/31/2014), Total: $2,079,545. Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration. Nurse Anesthetist Traineeship 2011. PI: Chipas, T. (07/01/2010 - 06/30/2011), Total: $54,000. Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina. Camp Hand to Hands. PI: Coker-Bolt, P. (07/01/2011 06/30/2012), Total: $2,500. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Development of a Passive Elastic Exoskeleton for Gait Rehabilitation. PI: Dean, J. (04/15/2011 - 03/31/2013), Total: $173,670. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Mechanical Contributions to Gait Stability and Energetic Cost. PI: Dean, J. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2014), Total: $399,553. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Post-Stroke Contributors to Increased Energetic Cost and Decreased Gait Stability. PI: Dean, J. (06/01/2011 - 05/31/2014), Total: $396,200. MUSC College of Health Professions 63


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Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Post-Stroke Contributors to Increased Energetic Cost and Decreased Gait Stability. PI: Dean, J. (11/01/2011 - 10/31/2015), Total: $639,100. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Tailored Intervention for Stroke Risk Reduction for Minority and Rural Veterans. PI: Ellis, C. (01/01/2012 - 12/31/2016), Total: $877,500. South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund. Development of a Rehabilitation Research Program to Study the Biomechanics of Walking Following Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury. PI: Gregory, C. (12/01/2010 - 11/30/2014), Total: $122,848. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Skeletal Muscle Properties and the Metabolic Cost of Walking Post-Stroke (Renewal). PI: Gregory, C. (08/01/2010 - 09/30/2012), Total: $142,338. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Lower Extremity Power and Locomotor Function After Stroke. PI: Gregory, C. (06/01/2011 - 05/31/2013), Total: $200,000. American Heart Association. Lower Extremity Power and Locomotor Function after Stroke. PI: Gregory, C. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2013), Total: $153,975. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Skeletal Muscle Plasticity as an Indicator of Functional Performance Post-Stroke. PI: Gregory, C. (10/01/2012 - 09/30/2016), Total: $1,087,000. National Institutes of Health/ National Institute of Child Health and Human Development/Aretech, LLC. ZeroG: Dynamic Over-Ground Body-Weight Support System. PI: Kautz, S. (11/01/10 - 10/31/2012), Total: $58,315. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Intermuscular Coordination of Hemiparetic Walking (ARRA). PI: Kautz, S. (09/07/2010 - 08/31/2011), Total: $374,310. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Advancing Patient-Specific Neurorehabilitation Evaluation, Therapy and Outcomes. PI: Kautz, S. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2016), Total: $1,850,000. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Measurement of Dynamic Balance Performance in Hemiparetic Walking. PI: Kautz, S. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2013), Total: $405,625. Department of Health and Human Services/Agency for Healthcare Research Quality. Evaluating the Use of Telemedicine to Treat Stroke. PI: Kazley, A. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2016), Total: $531,547. United States Department of Education/National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. A Population-Based Study of Adverse Health Outcomes After Spinal Cord Injury: Psychological, Socio-Epidemiologic, and Behavioral Risk Factors. PI: Krause, J. (10/01/2011 - 09/30/2014), Total: $599,996. United States Department of Education/National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Participation, Subjective Well Being, Health, and Spinal Cord Injury: A 40-Year Longitudinal Study. PI: Krause, J. (10/01/2011 - 09/30/2014), Total: $599,998. Pedal with Pete Foundation. Effects of a Summer Camp Model for Intensive Activity on Motor Performance and Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy . PI: Moreau, N. (01/01/2011 - 12/31/2011), Total: $29,169. Pedal with Pete Foundation. In Vivo Assessment of Quadriceps Muscle Plasticity in Children with Cerebral Palsy. PI: Moreau, N. (01/01/2011 - 12/31/2011), Total: $14,085. Cerebral Palsy International Research Foundation. Effects of Lateral Stability on Multiplanar Gait Deviations in Cerebral Palsy. PI: Moreau, N. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2014), Total: $225,000. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Drug Abuse. A Human Laboratory Study of DCS Effects on Smoking Cue Reactivity and Behavior. PI: Saladin, M. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2016), Total: $3,407,340. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Drug Abuse. Neuromodulation of Memories that Inflate Relapse Risk in Smokers with PTSD. PI: Saladin, M. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2016), Total: $1,807,840. National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Drug Abuse. Novel Pharmaco-Behavior Therapy to Augment 64 2011 Annual Report


Appendix

Craving Reduction & Smoking Cessation. PI: Saladin, M. (04/01/2012 - 03/31/2017), Total: $2,965,129. Abbott Laboratories. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Schools. PI: Simpson, K. (03/01/2011 - 12/31/2011), Total: $42,000. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Patient-Tailored Upper Extremity Motor Rehabilitation. PI: Woodbury, M. (06/01/2011 - 05/31/2013), Total: $200,000. American Heart Association. Post-Stroke Upper Extremity Motor Rehabilitation: Linking Measurement to Treatment. PI: Woodbury, M. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2013), Total: $153,411. National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute. A Virtual Reality Environment for Post-Stroke Upper Extremity Motor Rehabilitation. PI: Woodbury, M. (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2012), Total: $49,859. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. A Toolbox for Measuring Post-Stroke Upper Extremity Motor Ability (Renewal). PI: Woodbury, M. (08/01/2011 - 08/31/2012), Total: $107,835. Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center. Patient-Tailored Upper Extremity Motor Rehabilitation. PI: Woodbury, M. (09/01/2012 - 08/31/2016), Total: $1,097,900. CHP researchers also collaborated on an additional sixteen applications submitted by faculty outside the College of Health Professions.

CHP Faculty Participating in Outside Grant Submissions College of Medicine, Radiology (Helpern, PI). National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute. Identifying the Micro-structural Markers of Recovery from Aphasia. Participating Faculty: Bonilha, H., Effort: .01%, (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2012). College of Medicine, Dept. of Rheumatology & Immunology (Kamen, PI). NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Environmental Determinants of Autoimmunity among African Americans in Coastal SC - Diversity Supplement (Year 3). Participating Faculty: Breland, H., Effort: 75%, (04/01/2010 – 06/30/2012). College of Medicine, Pediatrics (Macias, PI). Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration. Leadership Education in Neurodevelopment and Related Disabilities (LEND). Participating Faculty: Coker-Bolt, P., Effort: 10%, (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2016). College of Medicine, Pediatrics (Jenkins, PI). United States Food and Drug Administration. Biomarkers of Infant Muscle and Motor Skill After Birth: A Novel Biomarker Platform. Participating Faculty: Coker-Bolt, P., Effort: 15%; Moreau, N., Effort: 15%, (09/15/2011 - 09/14/2014). College of Medicine, Internal Medicine (Egede, PI). National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Financial Incentives and Telephone Education and Skills Trial in AA with T2DM. Participating Faculty: Dismuke, C., Effort: 10%, (12/01/2011 - 11/30/2015). College of Medicine, Internal Medicine (Egede, PI). National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. Center for Research and Education for Social Transformation (CREST). Participating Faculty: Ellis, C., Effort: 30%, (12/01/2011 - 11/30/2016). College of Medicine, Radiology (Falangola, PI). National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources/South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute. Diffusional Kurtosis Assessment of Brain Plasticity in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome. Participating Faculty: Gregory, C., Effort: 3%, (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2012). College of Medicine, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences (Brady, PI). National Institutes of Health/National Center for Research Resources. South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute. Participating Faculty: Kautz, S., Effort: 24%, (04/01/2011 - 03/31/2014). MUSC College of Health Professions 65


Appendix

College of Medicine, Transplant Surgery (Baliga, PI). Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration. A Workplace Intervention to Increase the Number of Hard to Reach Registered Organ Donors in South Carolina. Participating Faculty: Kazley, A., Effort: 30%; Simpson, K., Effort: 5%, (09/01/2011 - 08/31/2013). College of Medicine, Transplant Surgery (Baliga, PI). National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. A Program to Increase Living Donations in African Americans (Year 10). Participating Faculty: Kazley, A., Effort: 5%; Simpson, K., Effort: 2.5%, (08/01/2011 - 07/31/2012). College of Medicine, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences (Gray, PI). National Institutes of Health /National Cancer Institute. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Varenicline for Adolescent Smoking Cessation. Participating Faculty: Saladin, M., Effort: 10%, (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2016). College of Medicine, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences (Brady, PI). National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Drug Abuse. The Impact of Real-time fMRI Feedback on Response to Nicotine Cues (Year 4). Participating Faculty: Saladin, M., Effort: 5%, (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2013). College of Medicine, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences (Brady, PI). National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Drug Abuse. ORWH: SCOR on Sex and Gender Factors Affecting Womens Health (Year 10). Participating Faculty: Saladin, M., Effort: 15%, (07/01/2011 - 06/30/2012). College of Nursing (Kennedy, PI). Duke Endowment. IP GAPPS: Interprofessional Gaming Applications Promoting Patient Safety. Participating Faculty: Seif, G., Effort: 5%, 01/01/2012 - 12/31/2014. College of Medicine, Pediatrics (Basco, PI). Department of Health and Human Services/Agency for Healthcare Research Quality. Assessment of Pediatric Look-Alike, Sound-Alike (LASA) Substitution Errors (Year 3). Participating Faculty: Simpson, K., Effort: 1%, (04/01/2011 - 03/31/2012). College of Medicine, Medicine (Palesch, PI). National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Interventional Management of Stroke Phase III Trial – SDCC. Participating Faculty: Simpson, K., Effort: 1%, (12/01/2011 - 11/30/2016).

Acknowledgements WE EXTEND GREAT APPRECIATION TO ALL OF OUR FACULTY AND STAFF IN THE COLLEGE WHO HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO OUR REMARKABLE ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN FY 2011. THE CONTENT OF THIS REPORT WAS GENERATED THROUGH A TEAM EFFORT OF THE ENTIRE COLLEGE. Further, we express appreciation to the team that effectively worked together to compile, edit, design and produce this report: Mr. Jerry Burik • Ms. Lauren Dickerson • Ms. Melissa Freeland • Mr. David Howell-Keith • Mr. Michael Meacham • Ms. Naomi Sampson • Ms. Debra Battjes Siler • Ms. Lauren Stitely

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2011 Annual

Report


Mail: 151A Rutledge Avenue, MSC 960, 3rd floor | Charleston, South Carolina Call: (843) 792-3328 Visit: www.musc.edu/chp Copyright 2011

2011 Annual Report  

The Medical University of South Carolina College of Health Professions 2011 Annual Report - For more information, please visit http://www.mu...

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