Page 45

43

CIERRE

from radical suffering

to spiritual-activism:

G loria Anzaldúa's hope TEXTO: CHELA SANDOVAL

I struggle to “talk” from the wound’s gash, make sense of the death and destruction, and pull the pieces of my life back together. I yearn to pass on to the next generation the spiritual activism I’ve inherited from my cultures. Gloria E. Anzaldúa, Let us be the Healing of the Wound The great liberation philosopher Gloria Anzaldúa always signed her books “contigo”… I go with you. And surely she travels with us through “death and destruction,” humiliation and loss---though wounded herself, Anzaldúa’s writings are designed to increase survivors on every side. When she says she was born “with eyes that never close” she means she lives her life as a determined witness who does not turn away from painful truths. Instead, Anzaldúa witnesses and describes it all: the shock of economic and state-supported repression, incarcerations, disappearances and destruction; traumatic planetary transformations including earthquakes and tsunamis; the despair and hopelessness caused by our betrayals of those we love, their betrayals of us, and perhaps most difficult of all, our betrayals of ourselves. However different from one another such traumas are, for Anzaldúa they are all “arrabatos.” The arrabato is an upheaval, a shattering that can (should we survive it) provide passage to another realm. This passage, Anzaldúa believes, alters our uniquely formed mind-body-emotion matrix, the personality and its perceptions. The arrabato breaks apart everyday perception —it releases one, at least momentarily, from the narrative

of everyday social being— it awakens our perceptions from their conditioned prison-house of being. The tramatic break that is the arrabato thus invites us to an alter-space, a space Anzaldúa identifies by using the Nahual word “nepantla,” which means the “space between worlds.” Anzaldúa’s life work was aimed toward teaching us how to enter, navigate and traverse this strange and hopeful topography that is nepantlan space, time and meaning.1

1  Numerous indigenous words of the Americas that signify ancient philosophical and mystical concepts such as the Hopi “koyannisqatsi,” the Nahuatl “Nepantla” and “Coatonatiuh, ” the Aztec “Coyoxahi” and “Coatlicue” and the Mayan “In Lak’Ech,” “Hunab Ku” and “Panche Be” have been introduced to academic scholarship through ethic studies curricula. They are being deployed, as in Anzaldúa’s example of “nepantla,” as puncta for interpellating, calling into being, a global tribal consciousness. Anzaldúa honored the Mayan prophecy that the completion of the Great Cycle of 13 Baktuns will bring about a shift in human consciousness to more compassionate modes of being and social gathering. The coming new phase of being will require an intimate knowledge of nepantlan forms of knowledge. For Anzaldúa, being a “spiritual-activist” means that one navigates the realm of nepantla. Doing so brings about the end of human History understood as suffering, destruction and death. Flight through nepantlan realms reveal an intergender, inter-cultural world where participants develop a profound ability to perceive and enact egalitarianism.

Profile for musac_museo

Hipatia nº 4_Revista bimensual de las mujeres de la cárcel de Mansilla de las Mulas (León)_  

Edición especial último número Hipatia con las colaboraciones de Maria Galindo, Eva Garrido y Yera Moreno, Sara Rosenberg, Virginia Villapla...

Hipatia nº 4_Revista bimensual de las mujeres de la cárcel de Mansilla de las Mulas (León)_  

Edición especial último número Hipatia con las colaboraciones de Maria Galindo, Eva Garrido y Yera Moreno, Sara Rosenberg, Virginia Villapla...

Profile for musac_ara
Advertisement