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THE BIG BOOK OF AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY


M U R R A Y

B O O K S

Exclusive Books, Gifts and Stationery

First published in 2017 by Murray Books www.murrayboooks.com Copyright Š 2016 Murray Books ISBN 978-0-9943730-3-8

All rights reserved. This publication or any part thereof may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright holder. Compiled by Lorri Lynn and Peter Murray

Images: Shutterstock, Dreamstime, Wikimedia

The author and publisher have made every effort to ensure the information contained in this book was correct at the time of going to press and accept no responsibility for any loss, injury or inconvenience sustained by any person or organisation using this book. Some images may have been used from the Public Domain.

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Contents 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80

Holden Ford Ĺ koda Renault Peugeot CitroĂŤn Bugatti Venturi Facel Vega Simca Mercedes-Benz BMW Porsche Opel Volkswagen Audi NSU Moterenwerke Jaguar Austin-Healey Rolls-Royce Humber Triumph MG Lotus Alvis Lagonda Jensen Ford UK to 1960 Ford UK 1961 to 1970 Hillman Morris Bristol Bentley Reliant TVR Riley Land Rover (inc Range Rover) Mini Wolseley

82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 112 114 116 118 120 122 124 126 128 130 132 134 136 138 140 142 144 146 148 150 152 154 156 158 160 162 164

Rover Vauxhall Sunbeam (inc Talbot) Morgan Austin Other British Cars De Soto Lamborghini Alfa Romeo Fiat Ferrari Maserati Lancia Honda Toyota Subaru Datsun Nissan Mazda Mitsubishi Formula One Racing Cars (1950 to present) Touring Cars (1987 to present) Rally Cars (1977 to present) Famous Movie Cars Electric & Hybrid Cars Concept Cars Hyundai Volvo Saab Koenigsegg Ford Studebaker Lincoln Mercury Buick Cadillac Chevrolet Pontiac Oldsmobile Packard Shelby Chrysler


Car Year Engine Power

Holden FJ 1953-1956 2.2 L / 6-cyl 60 hp (45 kW)

The Holden FJ was General MotorsHolden's second major release since 1948. It was available in a 4-door sedan, a 2-door panel van or a 2door coupĂŠ utility.

Australia - Holden GM Holden Ltd began life in 1856 as an Australian saddlery business known as J A Holden & Co. Within three decades, the company became Holden & Frost Ltd, and by the turn of the century it was repairing upholstery for early motor cars. Following World War I, Holden began producing motor body shells as Holden's Motor Body Builders Ltd, and by 1931, it had merged with General Motors (Australia) to become General Motors-Holden's Ltd. In 1948, the company released the first of its Australian cars in the 48-215 model (later known as the FX Holden), and uniquely Australian models were to follow over the ensuing decades. The 1950s were known for the F-Series Holden, followed by the American inspired E-Series in the 1960s. In the 1970s, it was the H-Series that dominated Australian car sales, but by the 1980s, the Holden Commodore had debuted to become the company's greatest selling vehicle. Today, Holden continues to produce cars for the domestic and international market, including police vehicles for the USA market. 4


Car Year Engine Power

Holden Torana LX SS 1976 2.85 L / 6-cyl to 5.0L / V8 118 hp (88 kW) to 240 hp (180 kW)

The Holden Torana was manufactured from 1967. The LX model was released in 1976 with round headlights and changes to the body colour and window surrounds.

Car Year Engine Power

Holden HZ Premier 1979 3.3 L / 6-cyl to 5.0 L / V8 118 hp (88 kW) to 215 hp (161 kW)

The Holden HZ replaced the Holden HX and was assembled in Australia and New Zealand. It was available in a Kingswood, Premier and GTS version.

Car Year Engine Power

Holden EH Special 1963-1965 2.4 L / 6-cyl 95 hp (71 kW)

The Holden EH was available in a number of models, including the Standard, Special, Premier, Panel Van and Utility. The Premier had a larger 2.9 litre engine than the Standard and Special.

Car Year Engine Power

Holden Commodore VZ 2005 3.6 L / V6 235 hp (175 kW)

The Commodore VZ was the final of the third generation Commodores produced by Holden. The range was continued as the Holden Calais and the Holden Berlina.

Car Year Engine Power

Holden HQ Monaro 1971 - 1974 2.8 L / 6-cyl to 5.7 L / V8 112 hp (84 kW) to 275 hp (205 kW)

The Holden HQ was produced in many variants between 1971 and 1974. The Monaro version of the HQ is considered one of Holden's most iconic and collectible cars.

Car Year Engine Power

Holden JG Cruze CD 2008 - 2010 1.4 L (petrol) to 2.0 L (diesel) 111 hp (83 kW) to 181 hp (135 kW)

The Chevrolet Cruze was released in Australia as the Holden Cruze. The globally developed vehicle was also known as the Daewoo Lacetti Premiere in South Korea.


Car Year Engine Power

Ford Fairlane ZG 500 1973 - 1976 5.75 L / V8 300 hp (225 kW)

Also known as the Ford LTD, the Fairlaine was Ford Australia's luxury model. It was available only in a 4door sedan and had a longer wheelbase than the standard Falcon model.

Ford Ford Australia is a subsidiary of the Ford Motor Company in the USA. Originally established as a branch of Canada's Ford Motor Company in 1925, the Geelong based company began by assembling Model T Fords in kit form. Between the World Wars, the company designed a coupĂŠ utility based on Ford USA's pick-up truck. The vehicle was an instant success during the Depression years, as banks were prepared to finance the purchase of 'working' vehicles to farmers. By the 1950s, Ford Australia had established itself as one of Australia's two largest car manufacturers, and within two decades released the Australian designed Ford Falcon after years of assembling international models. The company's most successful models were the Ford Falcon, Fairlaine and Laser, while most recent releases have been Fiesta, Focus, Mustang, Mondeo, Kuga, EcoSport and Everest. The Ford Falcon was in production for nearly 60 years, with more than four million units produced and a reputation for race-winning success that continues today.

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Car Year Engine Power

Ford Capri SA Turbo 1989 - 1994 1.6 L Turbo 101 hp (75 kW)

The Australian-built Capri was intended primarily for export to the US as the Mercury Capri. The base model was powered by a 1.6 litre 4cylinder engine, and the turbocharged model was available only in a manual version.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford V8 Customline 1957 Ford 'Flathead' V8 173 hp (129 kW)

An American car, the Australian Ford V8 Customline was manufactured between 1952 and 1959. Assembled from imported kits, all Australian cars were powered by the Flathead V8 engine.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Falcon 351 GT 1967-1976 5.75 L / V8 300 hp (225 kW)

The Ford Falcon GT was designed as a performance model of the Ford XR Series in 1967. Modifications to the model saw the Falcon GT become one of Ford Australia's most beloved cars.

Car Year Engine Power Car Year Engine Power

Ford Falcon FG X XR6 2014 4.0 L / 6-cyl 261 hp (195 kW)

Part of the FG X Falcon range, the XR6 is one of Ford Australia's most technologically advanced vehicles in the company's history.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Fiesta (Fifth Generation) 2002 - 2008 1.3 L & 2.0 L Petrol. 1.4 L & 1.6 L Diesel 111 hp (83 kW)

The fifth generation of Ford Fiesta began life in 1976 and was manufactured all over the world, including Australia. It became Ford UK's best selling model of all time.

Ford Meteor GA GL 1982 1.5 L / 4 cyl 73 hp (54.5 kW)

In Australia, the Ford Meteor was the sedan version of the compact Ford Laser hatchback from 1981 to 1987. Styled as a practical small family car, it was available only in a 1.5 litre 4cylinder version.


Car Year Engine Power

Škoda Type 860 1929 - 1933 4.0 L / 8-cyl 60 hp (44 kW)

During the Great Depression, Škoda introduced a range of models with a new chassis design. The Type 860 was one of a number of models that sold well.

Czech Republic - Škoda Škoda began life in the Czech Republic as Laurin & Klement in 1895. By 1905, the company's founders (Václav Laurin and Václav Klement) commenced automobile production with the Laurin & Klement Type A, and grew to become the largest of Austria-Hungary's car companies. In 1925, Škoda Works purchased Laurin & Klement and it became Škoda Auto. In 1930, a fully operating assembly line was introduced, but the advent of WWII saw it taken over by the Nazi regime and eventually fall into the hands of the post war communist regime. Between that time in 1960, Škoda's Octavia, Spartak, Felicia and 1000MB were released, as well as American inspired V8s and coupé models. Following a sharp decline in quality, Škoda was reinvigorated in the 1990s when communism fell and the Volkswagen Group partnered with the company. Since that time, the Škoda name has become one commensurate with quality and technological advancement, and its reputation continues to grow today.

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Car Škoda Fabia Year 1999 - Present Engine 1.0 to 1.2 L Petrol / 1.4 L Diesel Power 59 hp (44 kW) to 108 hp (81 kW) Petrol 89 hp (66 kW) to 104 hp (77 kW) Diesel Three generations of Škoda Fabia have been produced since 1999. The model was the successor to the popular Škoda Felicia, which was last produced in 2001.

Car Year Engine Power

Metalex / Škoda MTX Roadster 1991 1.3 L / 4-cyl 58 hp (43 kW)

The Metalex company converted the Škoda Favourit into the MTX Roadster and created a coveted classic that remains collectible in the Czech Republic today.

Car Year Engine Power

Škoda 100L 1969 - 1977 1.0 L / 4-cyl 41 hp (30.9 kW)

The Škoda 100L succeeded the Škoda 1000 MB in 1969. It was produced in tandem with the Škoda 110, and more than one million units were sold.

Car Year Engine Power

Škoda Citigo 2011 - Present 1.3 L / 3-cyl 59 hp (44 kW)

The Škoda Citigo is a rebadged Volkswagen Up, with modifications to the car's fascias. It is produced in the same factory alongside the SEAT Mii and available as a 3-door or 5-door hatchback.


Car Year Engine Power

Renault Viva Grand Sport 1934 - 1939 4.0 L / 6-cyl 95 hp (70 kW)

With a body designed by an aeronautical engineer, the Renault Viva Grand Sport debuted in 1934 as the Renault Vivastella Grand Sport before a name change. It was an update of Renault's earlier Nervastella.

France - Renault Renault was established in 1899 as Société Renault Frères by Louis, Fernand and Marcel Renault. The company's first car was the 1CV Renault Voiturette in late 1898. Early Renaults were powered by De Dion-Bouton engines until Renault introduced its own engine in 1903. By World War I, Renaults were transporting French troops to the front, as well as operating as taxis in London and Paris. Renault added trucks, buses, agricultural machinery and military vehicles to its product line, exporting to the USA during the inter war years. Following the end of World War II, the company unveiled the successful 4CV and the Dauphine. The 1960s saw the emergence of the Renault 4, the Renault 10 and the Renault 8. The latter was the last of Renault's rear-engined cars. Since the 1970s, Renault has produced many iconic cars, including the Renault 12 and Renault 16, as well as partnering with major international manufacturers. Since the 1980s, such successful partnering has seen the release of many iconic models internationally, including the Mégane, Koleos and Clio. 10


Car Year Engine Power

Alpine Renault A110 Berlinette 1961 - 1978 Renault 1.3 L to 1.6 L / 4-cyl 87 hp (56 kW) to 102 hp (76 kW)

The Alpine 110 series was designed by Alpine around Renault engines and parts, moving from the Dauphine to the R8. In 1973, Renault purchased Alpine.

Car Year Engine Power

Renault Captur 2013 - Present 0.9 L to 1.2 L Petrol. 1.5 L Diesel 90 hp (66 kW) to 116 hp (85 kW)

The Renault Captur debuted in 2013 as a subcompact crossover SUV. It achieved a 5-star EuroNCAP rating on debut, and replaced Renault's Modus.

Car Renault Mégane Year 1995 - Present Engine 1.2 L to 2.0 L Petrol or Turbo-Petrol / 4-cyl. 1.9 L Diesel or Turbo-Diesel / 4-cyl In recent years, the Renault Mégane has been the company's standout mainstay model, topping French sales figures by 2003. An all electric version is currently in the design phase.

Car Year Engine Power

Renault 16 1965 - 1980 1.4 L, 1.5 L & 1.6 L / 4-cyl Average 82 hp (61 kW)

The Renault Captur debuted in 2013 as a subcompact crossover SUV. It achieved a 5-star EuroNCAP rating on debut, and replaced Renault's Modus.

Car Year Engine Power

Renault Clio V6 Sports 2001 - 2005 3.0 L / V6 227 hp (169 kW) to 252 hp (188 kW)

The Clio V6 Sports was initially built for Renault by Tom Walkinshaw Racing, with Porsche involved in the model's second phase.

Car Year Engine Power

Renault Caravelle 1958 - 1968 0.9 L to 1.1 L / 4-cyl 37 hp (28 kW)

The Renault Caravelle was launched in 1958 and marketed outside of the USA and Great Britain as the Renault Floride. It was built as a 2+2 cabriolet, a 2+2 coupé and a convertible.

Car Year Engine Power

Renault 4L 1961 - 1992 0.7 L to 1.1 L / 4-cyl Average 34 hp (25 kW)

The Renault 4L (AKA Renault 4) was the company's response to Citroën's iconic 2CV. It was available in pickup, hatchback and van versions.


Car Year Engine Power

Peugeot 302 1936 - 1937 1.8 L / 4-cyl 42 hp (32 kW)

The beautifully streamlined Peugeot 302 had a short life and was available in saloon, cabriolet and roadster models. It sported a foldaway Georges Paulin designed steel roof.

Peugeot Peugeot began life as a French family business involved in the manufacture of salt, pepper and coffee grinders in the 1840s. Eventually manufacturing steel rods for crinoline gowns, production techniques allowed for the advent of bicycle manufacturing - specifically Armand Peugeot's 'Penny Farthing' in 1882. The company's first car arrived as a steam powered three-wheeler in 1889, with petrol fuelled models following before the turn of the century. By the time of the Great Depression, Peugeot was producing France's cheapest car (Peugeot 201), followed by later numerical models through the ensuing decades. One of Peugeot's most successful cars was the Peugeot 403, released in 1955, and by the 1960s, the company was selling in the USA. The 504 marked the 1970s, while the 505 and the 205 Supermini were Peugeot's successful 1980s releases. In 1987, the Peugeot 405 Saloon won European Car of the Year. The 21st century brought new challenges for the company, which moved in the Asian, Russian and South American markets and currently produces vehicles in China. 12


Car Peugeot 404 Year 1960 - 1975 Engine 1.5 L & 1.6 L Petrol / 4-cyl. 1.9 L Diesel / 4-cyl Power 59 hp (44kW) to 95 hp (71 kW) Petrol 63 hp (47 kW) Diesel

The Pininfarina styled Peugeot 404 was a popular French taxi, as well as a large family car. It was produced in saloon, pick-up, estate, convertible and coupĂŠ variants over its 15 year life.

Car Peugeot 205 Year 1983 - 1998 Engine 1.0 L to 1.9 L / 4-cyl Power 43 hp (32 kW) to 104 hp (77 kW) GTI Petrol 58 hp (43 kW) Diesel

When Peugeot took over Chrysler Europe in 1978, it inherited small car manufacturing expertise. That expertise led to the development of the Supermini Peugeot 205. The 205 was Car Magazine's 'Car of the Decade' in 1990

Car Year Engine Power

Car Peugeot 308 Year 2007 - Present Engine 1.4 L to 1.6 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.2 L / 3-cyl Petrol. 1.6 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl Diesel Power Max 200 hp (149 kW) - Turbocharged Version The Peugeot 308 was designed as a small family car and was the first of Peugeot's X08 Generation. The second generation release received the European Car of the Year award in 2014.

Peugeot 203 1948 - 1960 1.3 L to 1.5 L / 4-cyl 59 hp (44 kW)

From its 1948 release until 1954, the 203 was Peugeot's only model. Known for its durability and strength, the Peugeot 203 was the winner of the Redex Round Australia Trial in 1953.

Car Year Engine Power

Peugeot 304 1969 - 1980 1.3 L / 4-cyl 59 hp (43 kW) to 75 hp (55 kW)

Peugeot's small family car was introduced in 1969 and was in production until 1979. It was preceded by the Peugeot 204 and superseded by the Peugeot 305.

Car Peugeot RCZ Year 2009 - 2015 Engine 2.0 L / 4-cyl Turbo Petrol & Turbo Diesel Power 154 hp (115 kW) to 266 hp (199 kw) Petrol. 161 hp (120 kW) Diesel. The Peugeot RCZ was designed purely as a concept car, but public acclaim saw the company producing a road model. Designers ensured that the RCZ remained as close as possible to the original concept.

Car Peugeot 106 Year 1991 - 2003 Engine 1.0 L to 1.6 L / 4-cyl Petrol, 1.5 L / 4-cyl Diesel & 15 hp (11 kW) Electric Power 45 hp (33 kW) to 118 hp (88 kW) Petrol. 51 hp (38 kW) to 58 hp (43 kW) Diesel.

The Supermini Peugeot 106 was originally released with a carburettor, but within the year, it had a fuel injection system.


Car Year Engine Power

Citroën C4 1928 0.9 L / 4-cyl 11 hp (8 kW)

The Citroën C4, along with the C6, replaced the Citroën Type A and B Series during the 1920s.

Citroën Armaments builder André Citroën moved into automobile production following the end of World War I, and the Citroën 10HP Type A was released in March, 1919. Clever marketing techniques quickly became the Citroën hallmark, and a much publicised round-Australia trip did much to boost the reputation of the Citroën 5CV Type C Torpedo in 1925. The company's breakthrough into the international market came with the design of the famous Citroën Traction Avant in 1934. The technologically advanced prototype cost André Citroën his company and his life, but the name and the ingenuity was saved by Pierre Michelin. In 1948, Citroën released the iconic 2CV, which replaced the horse in many towns and saw nearly nine million units sold until 1990. The release of the Citroën DS in 1955 saw more technological advancement, and by the 1960s, the company's name was synonymous with great engineering. A takeover by Peugeot in the 1970s saw Citroën grow as an international brand in many countries aside from the USA, and today it maintains its position as one of the world's most innovative carmakers. 14


Car Citroën BX Year 1982 - 1994 Engine 1.1 L to 1.9 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.8 L to 1.9 L / 4-cyl Diesel. Power 53 hp (40 kW) to 158 hp (118 kW) Petrol. 59 hp (44 kW) to 88 hp (66 kW) Diesel.

The BX was Citroën's large family car of the 1980s and 1990s. Sport and performance versions were made, including a 16 valve GTi in 1987.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Citroën Traction Avant 1934 - 1956 1.3 L to 1.9 L / 4-cyl & 2.9 L / 6-cyl. 59 hp (44 kW) - 4-cylinder Model

The DS arrived in 1955 with unique suspension design and futuristic styling. Today, it remains an icon of French automotive design.

The DS arrived in 1955 with unique suspension design and futuristic styling. Today, it remains an icon of French automotive design.

Car Year Engine Power

Citroën DS 1955 - 1975 2.0 L to 2.3 L / 4-cyl 63 hp (47 kW) to 141 hp (105 kW)

Citroën 2CV 1948 - 1990 0.4 L to 0.6 L / 2-cyl Petrol 9 hp (7 kW) to 29 hp (21 kW)

The 2CV was Citroën's answer to the need for a cheap post-WWII car in both town and country. Over its 42 year run, nearly 4 million units were produced.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Citroën DS23 Pallas 1973 2.5 L / 4-cyl 141 hp (105 kW)

The luxury model of the Citroën DS line was the Pallas. On the DS23, upgrades included a height adjustable driver's seat.

Citroën C1 2005 - Present 1.0 L / 3-cyl Petrol. 1.4 L / 4-cyl Diesel. 67 hp (50 kW) Petrol. 54 hp (40 kW) Diesel.

The C1 city car was a joint ToyotaPeugeot-Citroën project. Each manufacturer has its own version, and each is slightly different from the other.

Car Citroën C4 Picasso Year 2006 - Present Engine 1.6 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl Petrol and Diesel Power 120 hp (89 kW) to 163 hp (122 kW) Petrol. 90 hp (67 kW) to 148 hp (110 kW) Diesel. The C4 Picasso MPV is produced in Spain at the Vigo PSA manufacturing facility. It is available in both five and seven seat versions.


Car Year Engine Power

Bugatti Type 37 1928 - 1929 1.5 L / 4-cyl 60 hp (44 kW)

The Type 37 Bugatti sports car was built using a Type 35 body and sported a straight-four engine. It was an immensely successful racing car.

Bugatti The name of Bugatti has been associated with high-performace motor cars since the foundation of Automobiles Ettore Bugatti in 1909 in France's Alsace region (then in Germany). Ettore Bugatti was a creative genius who released three Bugatti designs at the 1919 Paris Motor Show and instantly set the motor racing world on fire. By the mid 1920s, Bugatti cars were first over the line in the 1924 Grand Prix, and won the Targa Florio five years in a row. In 1939, Ettore's son Jean was killed while testing a racing car. After World War II, Ettore went on to produce road and racing Bugattis, but his death in 1952 ended the line. Following a few attempts to revive the Bugatti name, Volkswagen launched Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S in 1999. Concept cars were released before the first Bugatti Veyron 16.4 was launched in 2005. Since then, the Galibier and the Chiron have joined the fold of one of the world's most coveted high-performance car manufacturers.

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Car Year Engine Power

Bugatti Type 23 1920 - 1926 1.3 L to 1.5 L / 4-cyl 30 hp (22.4 kW)

The first of the true Bugattis was the Type 13, which was followed by Types 15, 17, 22 and 23. The 23 was a twovalve Type 17 sporting a boattail body.

Car Year Engine Power

Bugatti 37A Grand Prix Racer 1928 - 1929 1.5 L / 4-cyl 60 hp (44 kW)

The Type 37A was a limited run sports car that enjoyed success on the racing circuit. The engine was used on the subsequent Bugatti Type 40.

Car Year Engine Power

Bugatti Type 57 1934 - 1940 3.3 L / 8-cyl 135 hp (100 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

The Bugatti Type 57 was produced in a number of models within the range. Bugatti's most iconic 57s were the S and SC variants, which were lowered.

Car Year Engine Power

Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 2005 - 2011 8.0 L / 16-cyl 1,000 hp (746 kW)

The Bugatti Veyron exploded into the car world in 2005 and has since been released in the 16.4, Grand Sport, Super Sport and Grand Sport Vitesse models.

Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse 2012 - Present 8.0 L / 16-cyl Turbocharged. 1,184 hp (880 kW)

Bugatti's Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse is a version of the Veyron Grand Sport and is equipped with a Super Sport engine. It retails at around â‚Ź2 million.


Car Year Engine Power

Venturi Fétish 2006 - Present 180 kW to 220 kW 4-cyl electric 177 hp (132 kW)

The Fétish had an top speed of 200 km/h (124 mph) for its 2011 release. The original 2006 Fétish reached 171 km/h (106 mph.

Venturi Venturi Automobiles released its first model in 1984. Equipped with a VW Golf GTi engine, the Venturi was designed to compete against Porsche, Aston Martin and Ferrari. In the following year, Venturi's model was powered by Peugeot's 505 turbo engine, but the company began manufacturing in 1987 with its own PRV V6 engine. Over the ensuing two decades, Venturi produced over 750 cars. Until 1990, the company designed PRV powered roadsters and coupés equipped with Renault gearboxes. Venturi also raced a limited edition vehicle at Le Mans and briefly dabbled in Formula One Racing in the early 1990s. The Venturi 400 GT Atlantique was designed on the back of the race car design, and is capable of reaching 100 km/h (62 mph) in only 4.7 seconds. Race wins against Ferrari and Porsche saw the name of Venturi brought to international prominence. At the turn of the 21st century, Venturi was purchased by Gildo Pallanca Pastor, who turned to specialising in electric engines and the advent of the Venturi Fétish. Following on from the Fétish were the Eclectic and the Astrolab. 18


Car Year Engine Power Car Year Engine Power

The Atlantique 300 superseded the Atlantique 260, which in turn was an upgrade of the original Venturi APC 260.

Venturi America 2015 53 kW Lithium-ion Electric Twin Motor 401 hp (299 kW)

The Venturi America allows for three distinct driving modes, those being Sport, Supersport and Cruising. Due to the high price tag, less than 20 models will be made available for purchase.

Car Year Engine Power

Venturi 260 LM 1994 - 1996 2.8 L / V6 260 hp (194 kW)

TheVenturi 260 LM Coupé was the last model produced in the Coupé 260 line. Only 33 units were produced between 1994 and 1996.

Venturi Atlantique 300 1991 - 2000 2.8 L or 3.0 L / V6 Turbo 210 hp (157 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

Venturi America 2015 53 kW Lithium-ion Electric Twin Motor 401 hp (299 kW)

The Venturi America has a carbon coposite body and sits at a similar height to a crossover SUV. The side view highlights the body's buggy-style shape.

Car Year Engine Power

Venturi Fétish 2006 - Present 180 kW to 220 kW / 4-cyl electric 177 hp (132 kW)

The Fétish was first introduced as a concept car in 2002 sporting a Renaul petrol engine. When it was released, it was the world's first production sports car that was electrically powered.

Car Year Engine Power

Venturi 400 GT 1994 - 1999 3.0 L / 6-cyl Turbo 408 hp (304 kW)

The Venturi 400 GT was powered by a twin turbocharged PRV engine the result of a collaboration between Peugeot, Renault and Volvo.


Car Year Engine Power

Facel Vega Facel III Cabriolet 1963 - 1964 1.8 L / 4-cyl 90 hp (66 kW)

The Facel III was equipped with a Volvo P1800 engine and was the Facellia's sucessor. The model's chassis, braking system and steering were from the Facellia.

Facel Vega French company Facel S.A. was established in 1939 as a steel furniture and military aircraft component maker. In the last year of World War II, the company moved into making bodies for Ford, Panhard and Simca among others. By 1953, the emergence of the monocoque body saw the company move into designing their own cars, and the Facel Vega was released in 1954. The initial model was powered by a Chrysler V8 engine and was heavily influenced by American design. The 1950s were prominent for the company with the release of the Facel Vega FV, the Facel Vega II and the HK500. In the 1960s, the Facel Vega III was produced with a Volvo B18 engine alongside the poorer performing Facel Facellia, but the company was not a profitable one. The most successful of all company cars produced was the Facel 6, which was powered by a 2.8 litre Austin-Healey engine. Sadly, only 30 models were produced before Facel S.A. closed its doors due to financial problems. The name Facel Vega remains an inconic one in French automobile manufacturing. 20


Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Facel Vega Facel III Cabriolet 1963 - 1964 1.8 L / 4-cyl 90 hp (66 kW)

Facel Vega FV1 1955 4.8 L /V8 DeSoto 200 hp (149 kW)

Only 33 FV1 models were produced, which was 23 more than its predecessor, the FV. The addition of a centre console made it the first French car to have one.

The cabriolet version of the Facel Vega Facel III was one of the most beautiful models of its time. Standard trim was faux leather, with an option to upgrade to real leather.

Car Year Engine Power

Facel Vega FVS 'Typhoon' 1958 6.3 L / V8 Typhoon 325 hp (242 kW)

The Facel Vega FVS range was produced between 1954 and 1962, and cars were powered by DeSoto and Chrysler engines. The FVS Typhoon sported the largest engine in the range.

Car Year Engine Power

Facel Vega Facel III Coupé 1963 - 1964 1.8 L / 4-cyl 90 hp (66 kW)

Both the Facel III Cabriolet and Coupé bore the hallmarks of the best of European automotive styling. Optional overdrive made the model even more attractive, and over 600 Facel III units were produced.

Car Year Engine Power

Facel Vega HK500 1959 - 1962 6.3 L /V8 (Later Model) 360 hp (268 kW)

The HK500 was part of the Facel Vega FVS range, released in 1959 as an upgrade. It was replaced by the Facel II in 1962, and was a particularly heavy model.

Car Year Engine Power

Facel Vega Facellia 1961 - 1963 1.6 L / 4-cyl 113 hp (84.5 kW)

The Facellia was produced in a 4-seat coupé, a 2+2 coupé and a cabriolet. The pictured model took part in the 1961 Monte Carlo Rally.


Car Year Engine Power

Simca 8 Cabriolet 1937 - 1951 1.1 L & 1.2 L / 4-cyl 32 hp (24 kW)

The Simca 8 was produced in a wide range of styles, including 2-door and 4-door saloons, an estate, a cabriolet and a coupé. From 1948, it was powered by a 1.2 litre engine designed by Fiat.

Simca The FIAT company established Simca in 1935 following the purchase of the French Donnet company. An acronym for 'Société industrielle de Mécanique et de Carrosserie Automobile', Simca began producing Fiat cars with Simca badges. The result was the Simca-Fiat 6CV, 11CV and the Simca Cinq (5CV). Unlike most French car manufacturers, Simca produced vehicles during World War II and dodged nationalisation to release the Simca-Gregoire in 1946. The Simca 5 and the Simca 8 followed, and 70 percent of its product was exported. In 1951, the Simca Aronde was released as a stand-alone Simca vehicle, and its success saw the company grow throughout the decade. Simca purchased Talbot-Logo in 1958 and produced the Simca Vedette (AKA Simca Esplanada). Owned by the Chrysler Corporation by the late 1950s, the company produced the Fulgar and followed it up with the Simca 1000, the SimcaAbarth and the 1000 Coupé in the 1960s. In 1970, the company name was changed to Chrysler France, and the last of the Simca based models was produced in 1990. 22


Car Year Engine Power

Simca 1000 1962 - 1978 1.0 L / 4-cyl 45 hp (33.5 kW)

The Simca 1000 was also known as the Simca Mille. In its final year of production, Simca added the Simca 1000 Rallye to the range, which was powered by a much sportier 60 to 103 hp (45 to 77 kW) engine.

Car Year Engine Power

Simca Chambord 1958 - 1961 2.3 L / V8 84 hp (63 kW)

The Simca Chambord was available in both a two-tone and solid colour model. It was also known as the Vedette among other names, and was the last of Simca's V8 powered cars.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Simca Chambord 1957 - 1961 2.3 L / V8 84 hp (63 kW)

The Chambord was the last of the V8 powered Simcas and came as a 4door sedan. It was the first Simca to be manufactured in Brazil.

Simca 1000 1962 - 1978 1.0 L / 4-cyl 45 hp (33.5 kW)

The Simca 1000 resembled Fiat's 850 Coupé and was extremely popular when first released. Exports were weak, and the 1200S Coupé was added to the range in 1967.

Car Year Engine Power

Simca 1200S Coupé 1967 - 1971 1.2 L /4-cyl 52 hp (38 kW)

The 1200 Coupé was released shortly after Simca's 1000 Coupé. The car was popular with the younger affluent set in France.

Car Year Engine Power

Simca Rallye 2 1972 - 1977 1.0 L / 4-cyl 82 to 86 hp (61 to 64 kW)

The Simca Rallye 2 was the second of three sports versions of the Simca 1000. It sported two horizontal twin carburettors and weighed only 860 kg.


Car Year Engine Power

Mercedes-Benz 170S 1949 - 1952 1.8 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 52 hp (38 kW)

The 170 S (W191) was an upgrade of the 170V and was available as a two or four seater. In 1952, the model was superseded by the 170 SB and 170 DS petrol and diesel versions respectively.

Mercedes-Benz In 1886, Karl Benz invented the petrol-powered Benz Patent-Motorwagen and began a legacy that contiues today. Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft (Daimler Motors Corporation) was established by Gottlieb Daimler in 1901, and the company's first car was named after entrepeneur Emil Jellinek's daughter, Mercedes. In 1926, Benz and Daimler merged their companies to become Mercedes-Benz. The SSK racing car was the first model released, followed by the Mercedes-Benz 770 ceremonial car. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, war interrupted production, but the company produced the world's first diesel-powered production car in 1936 (Mercedes-Benz 260D). In the 1950s and 1960s, the company began producing quality cars, two of which are the highly prized 1954 300SL Gullwing and the 1962 200SL Pagoda. A new generation of compact cars began in 1968 with the release of the W114, and by the late 1970s, a Mercedes-Benz estate (station wagon) was released. The 1990s saw the emergence of the AMG brand, with the first release being the 1995 C43 AMG, and by 2004, the company partnered with McLaren to release the SLR McLaren. Today, the name of Mercedes-Benz remain synonymous with the highest quality in automotive manufacturing. 24


Car Year Engine Power

Mercedes-Benz SLK 350 2011 - 2015 3.5 L / V6 302 hp (225 kW)

The SLK 350 is part of the MercedesBenz SLK class, which was launched in 1996 and continues today. The car was part of the R172 release, which was in development from 2005

Car Year Engine Power

Mercedes-Benz 300 SL 'Gullwing' 1954 - 1963 3.0 L / 6-cyl 215 hp (160 kW)

The most sensational of all Mercedes-Benz models was the 300 SL grand tourer. It came with a top speed of 320 km/h (200 mph) and distinctive 'gull-wing' doors. The Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II was known as one of the 'Big Healeys', which included all 3000 models and the 6 cylinder Austin-Healey.

Car Year Engine Power

Mercedes-Benz SL63 AMG 1995 - 2001 7.3L / V-12 525 hp (391 kW)

The Mercedes-Benz SL63 AMG is part of the SL Class, which has been in production since 1954. Only 85 models were produced.

Car Year Engine Power

Mercedes-Benz 190SL 1955 - 1963 1.9 L / 4-cyl 104 hp (77 kW)

The 190 SL (W121) was a 2-door roadster first shown in 1954 at the New York Auto Show. The model came with a removable hardtop as an option. The 190 SL was considered a super luxury car.

Car Year Engine Power

Mercedes-Benz 280 SL 1967 - 1971 2.8 L / 6-cyl 167 hp (125 kW)

The 280 SL was part of the MercedesBenz SL Roadster class and was in production from 1954. It was the last model in the W113 line before the R107 was released in 1971.

Car Mercedes-Benz CLS Year 2004 - Present Engine 3.0 L / V6 to 5.5 L / V8 Petrol. 3.0 L / V6 Turbo Diesel. Power 231 hp (170 kW) to 388 hp (281 kW) Petrol. 224 hp (165 kW) Diesel.

Sitting between the E-Class and SClass, the Mercedes-Benz CLS Class is a 4-door luxury coupĂŠ. Both of its generations have been available with AMG modifications.


Car Year Engine Power

BMW 326 1936 - 1941 2.0 L / 6-cyl 49 hp (37 kW)

The BMW 326 bore similarities to the CitroĂŤn, and its suspension and braking system were inspired by the iconic French car. It was also BMW's first 4-door sedan and sold at a reasonably high price.

BMW BMW began life in Germany as an aircraft manufacturer. Following the end of World War I and the restrictions of the Treaty of Versailles, the company began producing motor cars. The first BMW released was the BMW Dixi, which was primarily an Austin 7 built under license. World War II saw BMW abandon automobile manufacture until the early 1950s, when the BMW 501 was released to mediocre results. An upgrade saw it and the ensuing 501A and 502 receive a far warmer reception. Motorcycles were BMW's main focus at the time, but the release of the Isetta Bubble Car in 1954 changed the company's fortunes for the better. In 1955 alone, the company sold over ten thousand units in competition with the Goggomobil and the Messerschmitt. Compact sedans followed in the 1960s, and the first of the 5-series was released in the 1970s. In the 1980s, BMW's range included convertibles, estates and coupĂŠs, along with the Z1 Roadster. By the turn of the 21st century, BMW was renowned for vehicles that ranged from hatchbacks to SUVs, and today the company continues to represent style and performance in German automotive design and production. 26


Car Year Engine Power

BMW 507 1956 - 1959 3.2 L / V8 147 hp (110 kW)

The 507 Roadster was initially designed for the US market, but failed to meet sales expectations. Only 252 cars were made, and the company sustained heavy losses as a result.

Car Year Engine Power

BMW 2002 1969 - 1974 2.0 L / 4-cyl 101 hp (75 kW)

Part of the BMW 02 Series that was first launched in 1966, the 2002 was an upgrade of the entry-level 1600-2. It was also produced as the 2002 ti and 2002 tii fuel injected versions.

Car Year Engine Power

BMW Z3 1996 - 2002 1.8 L to 3.2 L / 6-cyl 114 hp (85 kW) to 320 hp (236 kW)

The Z3 was available as a 2-door roadster or coupĂŠ and was in development for over three years. In 1995, the car featured in the James Bond film 'GoldenEye'.

Car Year Engine Power

BMW Isetta 300 1956 - 1962 0.3 L / Single-cyl 13 hp (10 kW)

Over 160,000 Isettas were produced by BMW after it took on a license to produce the Italian bubble car. The company modified the 300 model to suit changes to Germany's licensing regulations.

Car Year Engine Power

BMW 316i 1994 - 1999 1.6 L & 1.9 L / 4-cyl 101 hp (74kW) & 104 hp (77 kW)

The BMW 316i was part of the company's compact 3 Series range. The series was later available in a petrol/gas and diesel powered version.

Car Year Engine Power

BMW M3 GTS 2010 4.4 L / V8 444 hp (331 kW)

The BMW M3 GTS was a special release within the BMW M3 range. The M3 was in production from 1985 and continues today.

Car Year Engine Power

BMW F10 M5 2011 - Present 4.4 L / V8 553 hp (412 kW)

The F10 M5 is part of the BMW M5 range, which was first released in 1985. Louder and larger than previous models, the F10 was nevertheless more fuel efficient.


Car Year Engine Power

Porsche 914 CoupĂŠ 1969 - 1976 1.7 L / 4-cyl to 2.0 L / 6-cyl 70 hp (59 kW) to 99 hp (74 kW)

The mid-engined Porsche 914 (AKA VW-Porsche 914) originally sported a VW 1.7 L engine and served as a replacement for Volkswagen's Karmann Ghia. The chassis was manufactured by Karmann.

Porsche Ferdinand Porsche established his company in 1931 in Stuttgart, Germany. The company was responsible for the early design of the car that would become the Volkswagen Beetle. Using Beetle componentry, the first Porsche released was the Porsche 64. In 1947, Porsche's son designed a new car - the iconic Porsche 356. The vehicle was released in 1948 using Volkswagen components. By the 1960s, Porsche entered motor racing and launched the Porsche 911, which became the company's most popular and iconic model. In 1969, Porsche collaborated with Volkswagen to create the VW-Porsche 914. Additional collaboration saw the release of the 924 in 1976. The name of Porsche was one of the world's most popular in performance motoring in the late 20th century, and it is considered the most prestigious production car manufacturer in Europe. Today, Porsche manufactures the Panamera, Cayenne, Macan, 718 Boxter and the long-running and much beloved Porsche 911.

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Car Year Engine Power

Porsche 718 Boxster 2016 - Present 2.0 L & 2.5 L / 4-cyl 295 hp (220 kW) & 345 hp (257 kW)

The 718 Boxster model was released as part of the ongoing 1996 Boxster line in 2016. Both variants sport a horizontally opposed turbocharged engine with increased horsepower and torque.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Porsche 924 1976 - 1988 2.0 L & 2.5 L / 4-cyl 123 hp (92 kW) to 160 hp (119 kW)

The Porsche 924 was the first Porsche to offer fully automatic transmission. As well as the base model, it came as the 942S and 924S Special, Carrera GT and 924 Turbo.

Car Year Engine Power

Porsche 911 1963 - Present 1.6 L to 2.7 L / 6-cyl (3.0L in 1976) 128 hp (96 kW) to 210 hp (150 kW)

The Porsche 901 was the original name for what became the Porsche 911. The Peugeot company's models were identifiable by a 'middle-zero', and thus Porsche was forced to change the designation.

In 2013, Porsche celebrated half a century of 911 releases. Considered by many as the ultimate sports car, the 911 is the flagship model of the company and remains one the world's most successful sports cars.

Car Year Engine Power

Porsche 901 1963 1.6 L / 6-cyl 128 hp (96 kW)

Porsche 356 Cabrio 1948 - 1965 1.1 L to 1.6 L / 4-cyl 40 hp (30 kW) to 107 hp (80 kW)

Before the Porsche 911 arrived, the 356 was the luxury sports car of choice for lovers of the iconic German car brand. The innovative sports car was produced in four separate series.

Car Year Engine Power

Porsche 981 Boxster 2012 - 2016 2.7 L to 3.8 L / 6-cyl 261 hp (19 5kW) to 370 hp (276 kW)

The 981 Boxster was released in 2012 as part of Porsche's Boxster line. It was a third generation Boxster and was released in a Spyder version in 2015.

Car Year Engine Power

Porsche 911 1963 - Present 1.6 L to 2.7 L / 6-cyl (3.0L in 1976) 128 hp (96 kW) to 210 hp (150 kW)

Over its long and successful life, the Porsche 911 has been produced for all forms of sports motoring. It was originally labelled the 901, but was changed to 911 after complaints from Peugeot.


Car Year Engine Power

Opel P4 1935 - 1937 1.2 L / 4-cyl 23 hp (17 kW)

The Opel P4 was the replacement for the Opel 1.2 Litre in 1935. A choice of three or four-speed manual gearbox was available, and the braking system wasc cable operated.

Opel Opel was established as a sewing machine manufacturer in 1862 and moved into bicycle manufacturing in 1886. The first Opel cars produced independently by the company were unveiled in 1906, and production on the Opel 4/8 PS began in 1909. The model became a favourite vehicle for doctors due to Opel's reputation for toughness and reliability. Opel was Germany's largest car manufacturer at the outbreak of World War I. A bright green open seater was released in 1924 and named the Laubfrosch (Tree Frog). In 1929, General Motors bought 80 percent of the company and the Olympia and the Kapitän were released in the 1930s. Following the end of World War II, the Olympia and Kapitä were upgraded and placed the company in the mid-price bracket. Outperforming Vauxhall in the 1970s, Opel's fortunes surged, and by 1984, the company's first turbocharged automobile was released. Today, Opel is allied with PSA Peugeot Citröen and is committed to eco-technology as part of its manufacturing future.

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Car Year Engine Power

Car Opel Corsa Year 1982 - Present Engine 1.0 L / 3-cyl to 1.8 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.3 L to 1.7 L / 4-cyl Diesel. Power 89 hp (66 kW) to 204 hp (152 kW) Petrol. 64 hp (48 kW) to 128 hp (96 kW) Diesel.

Opel Adam 2012 - Present 1.0 L to 1.4 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.0 L / 3-cyl Turbo. 69 hp (51kW) to 113 hp (85 kW) Petrol Models.

Known as the Vauxhall Adam in Great Britain, the Opel Adam is named in honour of the company's founder. In 2014, the range was increased to include a model sporting a 1.0 litre 3-cylinder turbo engine.

Car Year Engine Power

Opel Admiral 1937 - 1939 3.6 L / 6-cyl 74 hp (55 kW)

The Opel Corsa is also manufactured as the Vauxhall Nova, Vauxhall Corsa, Chevrolet Corsa, Chevrolet Classic, Holden Barina, Buick Sail and Opel Vita. It is not sold in North America.

Not to be confused with Opel's later Admiral and Admiral B models, the original Admiral was released as a low-priced luxury car. The car's long range tank made it ideal for Germany's brand new Autobahn.

Car Year Engine Power

Opel Kapitän P2 1959 - 1963 2.6 L / 6-cyl 89 hp (66 kW)

The Kapitän P2 was Opel's biggest selling Kapitän model. In its four year life, over 145,000 units were produced.

Car Year Engine Power

Opel Tigra Twin Top B 2004 - 2009 1.3 L / 4-cyl Diesel. 1.4 L & 1.8 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 88 hp (66 kW) to 123 hp (92 kW)

Opel manufactured the Tigra A from 1994 to 2000 and resurrected the name in 2004. The 2-seater coupé had a retractable hard top. It was available in Australia as the Holden Tigra, sporting the 1.8 litre engine.

Car Opel Astra Year 1991 - Present Engine 1.4 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.3 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl Diesel. Power 60 hp (45 kW) to 276 hp (206 kW) Petrol. 79 hp (59 kW) to 192 hp (143 kW) Diesel. The Opel Astra is marketed in many countries under various names. Vauxhall, Chevrolet, Holden and Saturn use the Astra name, while others include Vectra, Astra Classic and Kadett (in South Africa).

Car Year Engine Power

Opel Kadett C 1973 - 1979 1.0 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl 39hp (29 kW) to 108 hp (81 kW)

The Opel Kadett C was released in the same year as the 1973 Oil Crisis occurred, and received a number of facelifts throughout its six year life.


Car Year Engine Power

Volkswagen Beetle 1938 - 2003 1.1 L / 4-cyl to 1.5 L / 4-cyl 25 hp (18.6 kW) to 60 hp (45 kW)

Originally designed before World War II, the Volkswagen Beetle went into serious production after the war. In its lifetime, models were designated according to engine capacity from 1200 to 1302 and 1303.

Volkswagen Volkswagen's beginnings were political, and the company was created in 1936 by the German Labour Front to create a 'people's car'. That car was the Volkswagen Beetle, and in the early post-World War II years, it became a symbol of Germany's rebuilding after the Nazi Regime. By the 1950s, Volkswagen was exporting to the USA and sold one million units by 1955. By the early 1970s, that figure reached a worldwide total of over 16 million Beetles. In 1961, the company expanded its product range with the introduction of the Karmann Ghia, followed by a Super Beetle and the Type 181. Following a downturn, the company rebounded with the release of the Passat in 1973, followed in ensuing years by the Sirocco, the Golf and the Polo. Another downturn in the 1980s resulted in a second generation of Volkswagen's existing range, and by the 1990s, a third generation saw the Golf awarded European Car of the Year. In the 21st century, Volkswagen diversified to include an SUV line-up, and continues today as one of Europe's most powerful automotive companies. 32


Car Year Engine Power

Volkswagen Type 3 1961 - 1973 1.5 L & 1.6 L / 4-cyl 44 hp (33 kW) to 53 hp (40 kW)

Initially launched as the Volkswagen 1500, the Type 3 was manufactured in both 1500 and 1600 format. It was available in coupĂŠ, squareback (estate) and fastback models as well as a notchback saloon.

Car Volkswagen Golf Year 1974 - Present Engine 1.4 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.6 L / LPG. 1.6 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl Diesel. Power 79 hp(59 kW) to232 hp (197 kW) Petrol. 96 hp (72 kW) LPG. 103 hp (77 kW) to 168 hp (125 kW) Diesel - Sixth Generation.

Car Year Engine Power

Volkswagen Cross Polo 2010 - Present 1.2 L / 3-cyl & 1.5 L / 4-cyl 74 hp (55 kW) and 88 hp (66 kW)

Known as the Caribe in Mexico and the Rabbit in North America, the Volkswagen Golf is the company's best selling car. It is manufactured in Germany, Brazil and Mexico and has also been marketed as the Jetta and Bora.

Car Year Engine Power

Volkswagen Karmann Ghia 1955 - 1975 1.2 L to 1.6 L / 4-cyl 34 hp (25 kW) to 65 hp (48 kW)

The Karmann Ghia was a 2+2 and convertible sports car manufactured between 1955 and 1974 (1975 in Brazil). It was initially named the Volkswagen Type 14.

The Cross Polo is a small SUV suited to various conditions and terrain. It is only one of the numerous Polo models, which have been in production since 1975.

Car Year Engine Power

Volkswagen Scirocco (Third Generation) 2008 - Present 1.4 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl 120 hp (90 kW) to 168 hp (125 kW)

The original Scirocco sports compact coupĂŠ was released in 1974. In its third generation, the Scirocco has also been released as the Scirocco R (2009) and the Scirocco GTS (2015).

Car Year Engine Power

Volkswagen Beetle GSR (Third Generation) 2013 - Present 2.0 L / 4-cyl 210 hp (156 kW)

The GSR came into being in 1973 and is part of the Beetle A5 line. The Special Edition is known in Germany as the Gelb Schwarz Renner (Yellow Black Racer).

Car Volkswagen Transporter Year 1950 - Present Engine 1.1 L / 4-cyl to 3.2 L / V6 Petrol. 1.6 L / 4-cyl to 2.5 L / 5-cyl Diesel. Power 24 hp (18 kW) to 232 hp (173 kW) Petrol. 52 hp (39 kW) to 177 hp (132 kW) Diesel.

Volkswagen's Transporter is the world's largest selling van, and has sold more than 12 million units in 65 years. The line includes campervans, pick-ups, vans, minibuses and minivans.


Car Year Engine Power

IFA F8 Cabrio 1948 - 1955 0.6 L & 0.7 L / 2-cyl 18 hp (13.2 kW) and 20 hp (14.7 kW)

Audi's history includes iconic models produced by IFA and DKW. Available as a 2-door saloon or cabriolet, the F8 was first released with a DKW badge in 1939 and was known as the Reichsklasse.

Audi Audi's origins lie in several automobile manufacturing companies. Forming an alliance in the early 20th century, Audiwerke AG released their first automobile in 1904. The Audi Type A was a 10/22 hp vehicle, which was quickly followed up by the Audi Type B 10/28 PS. In 1932, Audiwerke officially merged with Wanderer, Horch and DKW to form a new company - Auto Union AG Chemnitz. All four companies are represented in the four rings that make up Audi's logo. Early success was shortlived, and Audi did not re-form until 1949. In the 1960s, Audis in the form of the 60, 75, 80 and Super 9 were sold until the early 1970s. By that time, the Audi 100 had been released, followed by the Audi Fox and the Audi 50. In 1980, the turbocharged Audi Quattro entered the market, and the Audi 90 and Audi V8 followed by the end of the decade. Since that time, the Audi TT roadster and coupĂŠ have become sought after models that have placed Audi at the top of the automotive engineering ladder.

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Car Year Engine Power

Audi H-Tron Quattro 2016 - Present 220 to 280 Volt / Hydrogen Powered 147 hp (110 kW)

The Audi-H-Tron Quattro is a hydrogen powered SUV. Released as a concept car in 2016, it promises to revolutionise the future of SUVs around the world.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Audi R8 GT 2010 - 2013 5.2 L / V10 552 hp (412 kW)

The Audi R8 arrived as a road car in 2006, and was based on the racing car of the same designation. It has a top speed of 320 km/h (199 mph) and can reach 100 km/h in 3.6 seconds.

Audi TT RS 2009 - Present 2.5 L / 5-cyl 335 hp (250 kW)

The Audi TT was first released in 1998. The TT RS arrived in 2009 and was developed by Quattro GmbH for Audi. It was available in both roadster and coupĂŠ models.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Auto Union 1000 Pillarless CoupĂŠ 1957 - 1960 1.0 L / 3-cyl 44 hp (33 kW)

The roots of Audi lie in the Auto Union, which bore the four rings that became Audi's logo. The compact Auto Union 1000 was a front wheel drive model that replaced an earlier DKW model.

Car Year Engine Power

Audi 80 LS 1969- 1979 1.5 L / 4-cyl 74 hp (55 kW)

Also known as the Audi Fox and the Audi 4000 , the Audi 80 shared a platform with the Volkswagen Passat. The 80 LS was part of the B1 line, which was introduced in the post Auto Union era.

Audi Quattro 1980 - 1991 2.1 L & 2.2 L / 5-cyl 197 hp (147 kW)

The Quattro was so named due to its permanent 4WD system,and it became a popular rally car as a result. It was the first car produced in a turbocharged version with 4WD.


Car Year Engine Power

NSU Spider 1964 - 1967 0.5 L / Rotary Wankel 50 - 54 hp (37 - 40 kW)

The NSU Spider was the first car worldwide to carry a Wankel rotary engine. All NSU Spiders came in either a white or red livery and were rear-engined.

NSU Moterenwerke Originally established as a knitting machine manufacturer in the 1870s, NSU Moterenwerke began manufacturing bicycles in 1886 and progressed to motorbikes by 1901. Four years later, the company's first car was released, but there was no significant growth until the late 1950s. At that time, NSU released the 600cc NSU Prinz, following it up with the Wankel Spider in 1964. As motorcycle manufacturing ended for NSU, car production increased with the release of the Prinz 1000, the Sport Prinz and the Typ 110 (1200SC). 1967 saw the release of the four-door Ro 80, which initially won design awards but was ultimately unsuccessful. Following a Volkswagen takeover in 1969, NSU merged with Audi, and the name was eventually phased out by the late 1970s. NSU is renowned for being the first car maker to produce the world's first Wankel engined car, and is one of only four companies to produce vehicles with rotary Wankel engines. The last model produced with the NSU badge was the NSU K70, which eventually became the Volkswagen K70. 36


Car Year Engine Power

NSU Thurner RS 1969 - 1974 1.2 L / 4-cyl 135 hp (100 kW)

NSU Thurner was a boutique sports car manufacturer established by Rudolf Thurner. The Thurner RS was developed using an NSU 1200 underbody and an NSU TT engine within a fibreglass body.

Car Year Engine Power

NSU 10-30 1911 - 1916 2.6 L / 4-cyl 29 hp (21 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

NSU Sport Prinz 1958 - 1968 0.6 L / 2-cyl 20 hp (15 kW)

The NSU Sport Prinz was a variant of the NSU Prinz, which was first released in 1958. Over 20,000 units were manufactured in its lifetime, with the first few hundred bodies turned out by Bertone.

Car Year Engine Power

NSU Prinz 1000 TTS 1967 - 1972 1.2 L / 4-cyl 81 hp (61 kW)

The NSU Prinz 1000 TTS was initially built as a competition racer and was also released for sale as a road going vehicle. It was identifiable by its distinctive stripes.

The NSU 10-30 was released only five years after the company produced their first automobile. It was the last of three '10 series' models released between 1907 and 1916.

Car Year Engine Power

NSU Ro 80 1967 - 1969 / 1969 - 1977 1.0 L / Rotary Wankel 113 hp (85 kW)

Although the Ro 80 was voted Car of the Year in 1968, it nevertheless became known for its unreliability as a result of faulty rotor tip seals.

Car Year Engine Power Car Year Engine Power

NSU Prinz 4 1961 - 1973 0.6 L / 2-cyl 20 hp (15 kW)

The Prinz 4 was part of the Prinz line, which was introduced by NSU in 1958. The compact, two-cylinder model was released when the Prinz 1 was in its last year of production.

NSU Ro 80 1967 - 1969 / 1969 - 1977 1.0 L / Rotary Wankel 113 hp (85 kW)

The Ro 80 was first produced by NSU Moterenwerke before the new Auto Union (Audi) continued its production. Powered by a rotary Wankel engine, it sported an innovative semi-automatic transmission.


Car Year Engine Power

Jaguar 340 1967 - 1969 3.8 L / 6-cyl 190 hp (142 kW)

In 1967, the 2.4 litre and 3.4 litre Jaguar Mark 2 models were renamed as 240 and 340 respectively. The new nomenclature was due to naming requirements in the USA.

Great Britain - Jaguar Jaguar was originally named The Swallow Sidecar Company when it was first established in 1922. By 1934, it became S.S. Cars Limited, and models released in the pre-World War II period included the SS Jaguar - a 2.5 litre saloon. Additional sports models were also released as the SS90 and the SS100. Due to the connotations involved with the 'SS' nomenclature during World War II, the name Jaguar came into being in 1945. Three years later, the XK120 was released. In 1954, the XK150 arrived, followed by Jaguar's crowning glory - the Jaguar E-Type in 1961. Sporting saloons in the form of the Mark VII, the Mark VIII and the Mark XI made Jaguar extremely popular in the luxury car market. Later models such as the smaller Marks I & II, as well as the XJ6 and XJ12 upheld Jaguar's reputation for grace, style and beautiful engineering. In the 21st century, ownership under Ford saw the rise of the S-Type and X-Type, followed by the Jaguar XE in 2015.

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Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Jaguar E-Type 1961 - 1975 3.8 L & 4.2 L / 6-cyl. 5.3 L / V-12 265 hp (198 kW) - 4.2 L Model

Like the earlier Jaguar XK models, the E-Type burst onto the motoring scene in 1961 to capture a generation of motoring enthusiasts. Enzo Ferrari described the E-Type as 'the most beautiful car ever built'.

Jaguar XK140 1954-1957 3.4 L / 6-cyl 190 hp (142 kW) to 210 hp (157 kW)

The Jaguar XK140 replaced the XK120 model in 1954. The newly designed car was capable of reaching 140 mph (hence the designation) and had upgraded brakes, steering and suspension.

Car Year Engine Power

Jaguar XK120 1951 - 1954 3.4 L / 6-cyl 180 hp (134 kW)

Before the Jaguar XK120, the company had not produced a sports model since before the war (the SS 100). The XK120 burst onto the sports motoring scene in 1951, and its designation indicated a top speed ot 120 mph.

Car Year Engine Power

Jaguar XJ (X351) 2010 - Present 2.0 L / 4-cyl, 3.0 L / V6 Diesel or Petrol & 5.0 L / V8 235 hp (175 kW) - 3.0 L / V6 Model

Jay Leno unveiled the new Jaguar XJ model in London in 2009. Since first entering production, the model has received three updates and a recent redesign.

Car Year Engine Power

Jaguar F-Type R 2014 - Present 5.0 L / V8 550 hp (410 kW)

The Jaguar F-Type R is capable of reaching 100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.0 seconds. It has a top speed of 300 km/h (186 mph).

Car Year Engine Power

Jaguar F-Type R 2013 - Present 5.0 L / V8 550 hp (410 kW)

Jaguar considers the F-Type to be the E-Type's 'spiritual successor'. Replacing the Jaguar XK, the F-Type has a top speed of 300 km/h (186 mph).


Austin-Healey Sprite Mark I Year 1958–1971 Engine 0.9 litre / 4 cyl

Speed 82.9 mph / 133.4 km/h

The Austin-Healey Sprite was known as the 'frogeye' in the UK and the 'bugeye' in the USA, due to headlights that were originally designed to retract.

Austin-Healey The British Motor Corporation's Austin division and the Donald Healey Motor Company formed a 20-year joint venture in 1952 to establish a new sports car. Heading the project were BMC's Leonard Lord and Healey's Donald Healey. For two decades, Austin-Healey sports cars were manufactured as the result of the joint venture, which became complex when BMC and Jaguar Cars merged in 1966. Donald Healey subsequently departed when British Leyland came into being in 1968, joining Jensen Motors as the Austin-Healey body building arm. British Leyland's successor (MG Rover Group) eventually went in to bankruptcy in 2005, but Donald Healy sold his firm, which became HFI Automotive and continues today.

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The beautiful (and now classic) Austin-Healey models were popular throughout their production life and well into the 21st century as sought-after collectible cars. Donald Healey's racing company raced Austin-Healeys at Le Mans and in the USA, and the largest of the vehicles were extremely successful. A modified Austin-Healey set a land speed record at Bonneville in the USA, and the last of the Healeys to win at Daytona was the Austin-Healey 100-6 in 1965.


Austin-Healey 3000 Mark I Year 1959 - 1962 Engine 3.0 litre / 6 cyl

Speed 112.9 mph / 181.7 km/h A concept coupé version of the Austin-Healey 3000 was on the drawing board, but never went in to full production. Examples are therefore rare.

Austin-Healey 3000 Coupé Year 1959 - 1967 Engine 3.0 litre / 6 cyl

Top Speed 112.9 mph / 181.7 km/h

A concept coupé version of the Austin-Healey 3000 was on the drawing board, but never went in to full production. Examples are therefore rare.

Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II Year 1962 Engine 3.0 litre / 6 cyl

Top Speed 112.9 mph / 181.7 km/h

Austin-Healey 3000S Year 1963–1967

The Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II was known as one of the 'Big Healeys', which included all 3000 models and the 6 cylinder AustinHealey.

Engine 3.0 litre / 6 cyl

Top Speed 115 mph / 185 km/h The Austin Healey 3000S was launched in 1963 and manufactured until 1967. It was a limited edition sports version.

Austin-Healey 100-6 Year 1958

Engine 2.6 litre/ 6 cyl

Top Speed 103.9 mph /

A concept coupé version of the Austin-Healey 3000 was on the drawing board, but never went in to full production. Examples are therefore rare.

Austin-Healey 3000 Mark I Year 1959 - 1962 Engine 3.0 litre / 6 cyl

Speed 112.9 mph / 181.7 km/h

167.2 km/h

The Austin-Healey 100-6 was in production from 1956 to 1959. It replaced the Austin-Healey 10 and was subsequently replaced by the Austin-Healey 3000.


Car Year Engine Power

Rolls Royce 20/25 1929 - 1936 3.7 L / 6-cyl 25 hp (19 kW)

The Rolls Royce 20/25 was produced between 1929 and 1936. The car's body was hand built and fitted to a Rolls-Royce chassis by a coachbuilder, and Rolls-Royce made the model's mechanical parts in-house.

Rolls-Royce In 1904, electrician and mechanic Henry Royce partnered with car dealer Charles Rolls to form Rolls-Royce. The first model unveiled at the Paris Salon in 1904 was the Rolls-Royce 10hp. The company was officially established two years later as Rolls-Royce Limited, and production began in 1908. Four models had been developed by 1906, but all were shelved in favour of the more powerful 40/50 - known in later years as the Silver Ghost. The company purchased the Bentley company in 1931, and both Rolls-Royce and Bentley models were identical aside from the grilles until 2002. By the end of World War II, Rolls-Royce models included three Phantom models, the Wraith and the Silver Wraith. After the war, the Silver Wraith, Silver Dawn and Phantom IV were released, followed by more Phantoms, the Silver Shadow, the Corniche and the Silver Spirit among others until the 1980s. Following a late 20th century take-over by Volkswagen and BMW, the Phantom, Phantom Drophead CoupĂŠ, Ghost, Wraith and Dawn were among others that now continue the famous marque. 42


Car Year Engine Power

Rolls Royce Phantom Drophead Coupé 2007 - 2016 6.7 L / V-12 453 hp (338 kW)

Debuting in the USA in 2007, the Rolls Royce Phantom Drophead Coupé was styled on the earlier 2003 100 EX concept car. Several of the new cars were used during the London Olympics closing ceremony in 2012.

Car Year Engine Power

Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow II 1977 - 1980 6.8 L / V8 189 hp (141 kW)

The Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow II arrived in 1977 with new steering and an upgraded front suspension. External modifications included rubber and alloy bumpers to meet changed US safety specifications.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Rolls Royce Wraith 2013 - Present 6.6 L / V12 623 hp (465 kW)

The Rolls-Royce Wraith was released in 2013 as a four-seat coupé based on the Rolls-Royce Ghost chassis. The Wraith name was first used on RollsRoyce models of the 1930s.

Rolls Royce 40/50 (Silver Ghost) 1906 - 1926 7.0 L & 7.4 L / 6-cyl 40 hp (30 kW) & 50 hp (37kW)

The Silver Ghost was retrospectively named and began life as the RollsRoyce 40/50 hp. The model set the standard for Rolls-Royce engineering and became the basis for a later range of armoured cars.

Car Year Engine Power

Rolls Royce Phantom III 1936 - 1939 7.3 L / V12 165 hp (123 kW)

The Phantom III was the last of the large Rolls-Royce models before the outbreak of World War II. It was the only model powered by a V12 engine until the release of the Silver Seraph in 1998.

Car Year Engine Power

Rolls Royce Phantom II 1929 - 1936 7.7 L / 6-cyl 120 hp (89 kW)

The third in the Rolls-Royce 40/50 line was the Phantom II, which sported an upgraded Pantom I engine and a completely new chassis.


Car Year Engine Power

Humber 9/28 1925 - 1930 1.1 L / 4-cyl 28 hp (20 kW)

The Humber 9/28 was produced at a time when Humber was manufacturing over 9,000 vehicles annually. The model was a larger version of the 9/20.

Humber In 1896, Humber Limited exhibited their first motor car at London's Stanley Cycle Show. The vehicle was a threewheeled cycle car, which was followed in 1901 by a four-wheeled vehicle. Before World War I, Humber was making a wide range of motor cars, including the 600cc Humbrette. Humber merged with Hillman in 1929 under the auspices of Rootes Limited, and products often looked similar or shared engines as a result. In the post-World War II era, Humber released the Hawk and the Super Snipe, and each was renowned for its luxurious interior. Chrysler took over the companies in 1967, when the last of Humber's large cars (Humber VA Super Snipe) was still selling. A second generation Humber Sceptre was released just before Chrysler began to badge Hillmans as Chryslers and the brands were discontinued. At its height in 1960, Humber's annual output was 200,000 units, and many of the original models are sought-after collectible cars today.

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Car Year Engine Power

Humber Super Snipe Series V 1964 - 1967 3.0 L / 6-cyl 128.5 hp (96 kW)

The Series V Super Snipe arrived with a complete upper body restyle to the saloon and the addition of twin carburettors and a revised transmission system. Options included the 'Hydrosteer' automatic transmission.

Car Year Engine Power

Humber Sceptre Mk II 1965 - 1967 1.7 L /4-cyl 70 hp (59 kW)

The Humber Sceptre was released in 1963 and was virtually a luxury Hillman Minx. The Mk II model had a re-styled front end and received a twin carburettor.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Humber (Singer) Vogue 1963 - 1966 1.6 L / 4-cyl 58 hp (43 kW)

The Humber Vogue was an Australian-only model of the Rootes Company's Singer Vogue. It was produced in three series, which included the Vogue Sports. Production ceased in 1966 when Chrysler took over Rootes Australia.

Humber Snipe 80 1930 - 1935 3.5 L / 6-cyl 60 hp (44 kW)

When the Snipe 80 was first released, it was simply called the Humber Snipe. In 1932, the engine bore (80mm) was included in the name. The radiator grille had opening and closing shutters to regulate cooling air.

Car Year Engine Power

Humber Super Snipe Mark IV 1952 - 1958 4.1 L / 6-cyl 116 hp (87 kW)

The Super Snipe Mk IV was the last of the chunky post war models produced by Humber. The car received acclaim as value for money, and was replaced by the all new Series I Humber in 1958.

Car Year Engine Power

Humber Hawk Mark VI 1954 - 1957 2.3 L / 4-cyl 70 hp (52 kW)

The Humber Hawk was first introduced in 1945 and then upgraded significantly. The Mark VI model received an OHV engine and a longer body than its predecessor. An estate version was also produced.

Car Year Engine Power

Humber Hawk Series II 1960 - 1962 2.3 L / 4-cyl 73 hp (54 kW)

The Hawk Series II was the second release of the new Hawk models that replaced the ageing post war Mark models. For the Series II, Humber dropped the option of automatic transmission.


Car Year Engine Power

Triumph 14/65 (Dolomite) 1938 1.7 L / 4-cyl 62 hp (46 kW)

The open tourer Triumph 14/65 was known as the Dolomite and was powered by a 1.7 litre engine sporting twin SU carburettors.

Triumph The Triumph Motor Company began life as the Triumph Cycle Company in the late 19th century. By 1921, Triumph had ventured into the world of car production and released the Triumph 10/2, following it up six years later with the Triumph Super 7. Changing the company name to the Triumph Motor Company in 1930, the company concentrated on low volume high-end models such as the Gloria and Southern Cross. Financial problems saw the Triumph name sold to the Standard Motor Company and the release of the aluminium-bodied Triumph Roadster in 1946. The Triumph Renown followed, and in turn was replaced by the Triumph Mayflower. In the 1950s, Triumph focussed on sports cars and produced the TR2, TR3, TR4 and TR4A, while standard cars were also relesased in the form of the Triumph Herald. In 1963, the Triumph 2000 arrived and was followed by a series of successful saloons and sports cars that included the Dolomite Sprint, the Stag, the TR6 and the GT6 among others. Triumph's last model was the Acclaim in 1981. 46


Car Year Engine Power

Triumph Herald 1959 - 1971 1.0 L to 1.3 L / 4-cyl 48 hp (35.8 kW) - 1.1 L Model

The Triumph Herald was a small twodoor model introduced in 1950 and produced for over a decade. It was one of Triumph's most successful models, released in several versions and with over 500,000 units manufactured.

Car Year Engine Power

Triumph GT6 1966 - 1972 2.0 L / 6-cyl 95 hp (71 kW) - 1966 Model

Triumph designed the GT6 as a GT version of the newly released but troubled Spitfire 4 convertible. Over 40,000 GT6s were produced in the successful model's lifetime, and the cars are highly collectible today.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Triumph Stag 1970 - 1977 3.0 L / V8 144 hp (107 kW) - 1977 Model

The Triumph Stag was designed as a luxury sports car that was originally an exercise in upgrading the Triumph 2000. The original 2.5 litre engine was increased to a 3.0 litre unit in 1968.

Car Year Engine Power

Triumph TR4 1961 - 1965 2.1 L / 4-cyl 100 hp (75 kW) - 1961 Model

When in the design phase, the TR4 was codenamed 'Zest'. It was based on the drivetrain and chassis of previous TR sports models but sported a Michelotti designed body. Over 40,000 units were produced.

Triumph TR3 1955 - 1962 2.0 L / 4-cyl 100 hp (75 kW)

In the history of Triumph, the TR3 was its third highest selling model. The TR3 replaced the TR2 and was upgraded to the TR3A. The TR3 was an extremely successful racer in a number of environments.

Car Year Engine Power

Triumph TR6 1968- 1976 2.5 L / 6-cyl - 1972 Model 125 hp (93 kW) - 1972 Model

The TR6 was Triumph's best selling model in the TR range. Only ten percent of the units produced were sold in Great Britain, but over 80,000 sold overseas. Karmann was involved in the body upgrade from the TR5 model.

Car Year Engine Power

Triumph Spitfire 1962 - 1980 1.3 L / 4-cyl 75 hp (56 kW) - 1967 Model

The Triumph Spitfire was released in five series, ending with the release of the Spitfire 1500 in 1974. The original design was modelled on the chassis and engine of the saloon sized Triumph Herald, and the body was designed by Michelotti.


Car Year Engine Power

MG TC Midget 1945 - 1950 1.2 L / 4-cyl 54 hp (40 kW)

The TC Midget was MG's first postwar car and was very similar to the pre-war TB. Exports to the US ensued in right-hand drive format, and over 10,000 models were produced for sale at home and abroad.

MG In 1924, MG (Morris Garages) released its first model - the MG 14/28. The car was an updated Morris, and it would take four years before a stand-alone MG was manufactured. The MG 18/80 was followed a year later by the M-Type Midget, and the company began participating in motor racing. The MG TB and Y-Type Saloons were also produced, and in the post-World War II years, the T-Series arrived in the form of the MG TC, TD and TF in succession. In 1955, the square-rigged T-Series was replaced by the MGA, and that in turn was succeeded by the MG Midget in 1961, the MGB in 1962 and the MGB GT in 1965. The MGB was so successful that it was in production until 1980. A revived MG company released the MGF in 1995, on the back of the Rover Group's MG RV8 three years earlier. From the turn of the century, the company has released the MG ZR, the ZS and the ZT.

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Car Year Engine Power

MG L2 Magna 1933 - 1934 1.1 L / 6-cyl 41 hp (31 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

The two-door MG L-Type was powered by a small six-cylinder engine that had been used in the Wolseley Hornet in 1930 and the MG F-Type Magna in 1931.

Car Year Engine Power

MGB GT 1965 - 1980 1.8 L / 4-cyl 95 hp (71 kW)

MG's sporty hard-topped hatchback arrived in 1965 as part of the globally popular MGB line. The body was designed by Pininfarina and offered estate wagon utility in a sports car.

MG TD Midget 1950 - 1953 1.2 L / 4-cyl 47 hp (43 kW)

The MG TD was first produced in 1950 bearing the familiar T-Series body and equipped with MG Y-Type suspension.

Car Year Engine Power

MGB Mark II 1965-1980 1.8 L / 4-cyl 95 hp (71 kW)

In 1962, the MGB succeeded the MGA. The Mark II model in the series arrived in 1965 and production ran until 1980. It was one of Great Britain's most successful sports cars.

Car Year Engine Power Car Year Engine Power

MG TA Midget 1936 - 1939 1.3 L / 4-cyl 50 hp (40 kW)

The MG TA Midget was the first of five T-Series MGs produced between 1936 and 1955. It superseded the MG PB model and was longer and more powerful than its predecessor.

MGA 1600 1959 - 1962 1.6 L / 4-cyl 75 hp (59 kW)

The MGA was first produced in 1955, and the MGA 1600 arrived four years later to see over 30,000 units produced in under three years. It was externally similar to the earlier 1500 model with slight lamp and badging differences.


Car Year Engine Power

Lotus Seven 1957 - 1972 1.6 L / 4-cyl - 1970 Model 125 hp (93 kW) - 1970 Model

When the Lotus Seven arrived in 1957, it spawned generations of Lotus enthusiasts and a number of kit car imitations. Its main attraction was that it could be legally driven on the road and also raced.

Lotus Lotus Engineering Ltd. was formed in 1952 by Colin Chapman and Colin Dare. Initially, Lotus cars were built for private racing enthusiasts, and cars could be purchased in kit form as a means of saving on taxation. The Lotus Seven and the Lotus Elite were popular models during the 1950s, and the Lotus Elan two-seater was a top seller for the company. Following the demise of kit cars, Lotus released non-kit models that included the Lotus Elan Plus Two, the Lotus Elite and the Lotus Eclat. The Lotus Europa was initially built for the European market but was later sold internationally, and both were manufactured into the 1970s. New models in the form of the Lotus Elite and Eclat arrived in the mid 1970s to appeal to buyers of high-end four-seater sports cars. The mid-engined Lotus Esprit arrived soon afterwards and became Lotus' most successful model, released in V8 and turbocharged versions. Following the death of Colin Chapman in the early 1980s, Lotus ran into trouble but was saved from bankruptcy. Today, Lotus continues to manufacture sports cars as well as providing specialist advice for a number of car manufacturers. 50


Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Lotus Europa Series I 1966 - 1975 1.5 L / 4-cyl - 1967 Model 78 hp (58 kW) - 1967 Model

Lotus Esprit (Fourth Generation) 1987 - 1993 2.2 L / 4-cyl - UK Turbo Model 215 hp (160 kW) - UK Turbo Model

The fourth generation of the Lotus Esprit was designed by Peter Stevens of McLaren F1 fame. The model added Kevlar reinforcement in the resin process to reinforce areas affected during rollovers.

Following a failed bid for the Ford GT 40 racing car in 1963, Lotus resurrected the drawings to create the Lotus Europa.

Car Year Engine Power

Lotus Elise 1996 - Present 1.8 L / 4-cyl 120 hp (89 kW) - 2000 Model

The two-seat mid engined Lotus Elise has been produced in a number of variants and many special releases. The second Elise series was redesigned to meet new racing specifications.

Car Year Engine Power

Lotus Elan +2 1967 - 1975 1.6 L / 4-cyl - 1967 Model 118 hp (88 kW) - 1967 Model

The Lotus Elan +2 was an upgrade to the existing Elan, which was launched in 1962. One of the most collectible of all Lotus models, it allowed for passengers to enjoy a fast and agile sports car.

Car Year Engine Power

Lotus Elite Type 14 1957 - 1963 1.2 L / 4-cyl - 1962 Model 83 hp (62 kW) - 1962 Model

The Lotus Elite arrived in 1957 and revolutionised the concept of fibreglass body design. The monocoque constructed model incorporated fibreglass into the car's load bearing properties.


Car Year Engine Power

Alvis Speed 25 1937 - 1940 4.4 L / 6-cyl 137 hp (102 kW)

Over its lifetime, the Alvis Speed 25 was lightly enhanced. The bodies for the model were made by Cross & Ellis and Vanden Plas, and fitted over heavy reinforced Alvis-built chassis. Later models were lighter.

Alvis Alvis' earliest roots began in 1919 with the foundation of T.G. John and Company, which changed its name to the Alvis Car and Engineering Company in 1921. The first true Alvis car was the Alvis 10/30, which set Alvis on the road to success. In 1923, the Alvis 12/50 was unveiled and remained in production until 1932. In 1927, the Alvis 14.75 arrived as the first of the company's luxury six-cylinder cars. During World War II. a number of Alvis models were released and included the 12/70, the Speed 25, the Crested Eagle and the 4.4 Litre. The Alvis TA 14 followed after the war, with the company forced to change in the face of post war austerity. In the 1950s and 1960s, a new 6-cylinder engine became the company's base engine and was used in the new TA 21, the limited edition TC 108G and the TD 21, TE 21 and TF 21. Alvis became part of British Leyland in the early 1970s, and although the name has faded into history, the manufacturer's iconic models continue to live on in beautifully restored examples all over the world.

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Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Alvis TF 21 1966 - 1967 3.0 L / 6-cyl 150 hp (112 kW)

Alvis TC 21 1953 - 1955 3.0 L / 6-cyl 100 hp (75 kW)

The Alvis TC 21 replaced the TA 21 and was not offered in a drophead coupĂŠ variant. The 100 mph rated Alvis TC 21-100 arrived in 1954.

The last model produced by Alvis Cars was the TF 21, which was part of the Alvis Three Litre Series. The model superseded the TE 21 and production ended in 1967.

Car Year Engine Power

Alvis 12/50 1923 - 1932 1.5 L / 4-cyl - 1927 Model 50 hp (37 kW)

The Alvis 12/50 was first introduced in 1923 and went through a series of different body styles and engines in its lifetime.

Car Year Engine Power

Alvis Speed 20 SC 1935 -1936 2.8 L / 6-cyl Data Unavailable

In 1931, Alvis replaced the Alvis Silver Eagle with the Alvis Speed 20 line. The Speed 20 SC was the the third generation in the model range, with an increase in engine size and modifications to the steering.

Car Year Engine Power

Alvis TE 21 1963 - 1966 3.0 L / 6-cyl 130 hp (97 kW)

The Alvis Three Litre Series III was more commonly known as the TE 21. Replacing the TD 21 (Series II), the model was a modified TC with body styling by the Swiss company, Graber.


Car Year Engine Power

Lagonda Rapier 1934 - 1938 1.1 L / 4-cyl 50 hp (37 kW)

The Lagonda Rapier was one of Lagonda's smallest cars. Its 1104 cc engine was newly designed by Tim Ashcroft and sported a twin overhead camshaft.

Lagonda Founded in 1906, Lagonda was the brainchild of opera singer and speed boat champion Wilbur Gunn. One year later, the American born British national launched the Lagonda Torpedo and raced it successfully in the 1910 Moscow-St. Petersburg Trial. Following successful exports to Russia, Lagonda then produced a smaller 4-cylinder vehicle (Lagonda 11.1) with an innovative hand-brake system designed for fast take off. The founder's death saw a change of leadership between the two world wars, and the sports 14/60 Lagonda was released in 1925. Producing larger, faster and more powerful cars with each model release, the 8-speed, 3181cc Lagonda arrived in 1933. The Lagonda Rapier arrived in the following year, and by 1938, Lagondas were capable of reaching 160 km/h (100 mph). A change of ownership in the late thirties coincided with the release of the Lagonda Rapide - a 12-cylinder, 200 hp model. Lagonda merged with Aston Martin in 1947. A brief resurrection of the name occurred in the 1970s and the release of several new models and concept cars. In 2008, Aston Martin unveiled the new hand built luxury Lagonda Taraf. 54


Car Year Engine Power

Lagonda V12 1938 - 1940 4.5 L / V12 180 hp (134 kW)

The Lagonda V12 drophead coupĂŠ was powered by a Bentley designed V12 engine, with cast iron cylinder heads and a single overhead cam shaft.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine

Lagonda LG45 1936 - 1937 4.5 L / 6-cyl

Lagonda 16/80 1932 - 1934 1.2 L / 6-cyl 68 hp (51 kW)

The Lagonda Rapier was one of Lagonda's smallest cars. Its 1104 cc engine was newly designed by Tim Ashcroft and sported a twin overhead camshaft.

The Lagonda LG45 was produced after Lagonda changed hands. The model was available in three versions, those being the Sanction 1, Sanction 2 and Sanction 3. All were powered by Bentley designed engines.

Car Year Engine Power

Lagonda V12 'Le Mans' 1939 4.5 L / V12 220 hp (164 kW)

In 1939, Lagonda fielded a specially built V12 racing car in the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Car Year Engine Power

Lagonda 2.6 Litre 1948 - 1953 2.6 L / 6-cyl Data Unavailable

The Lagonda 2.6 Litre was designed under the auspices of Aston Martin and David Brown, with Frank Feely heading the design team. The drophead coupĂŠ had a top speed of 145.2 km/h (90.2 mph).

Car Year Engine Power

Lagonda M45 Rapide 1934 - 1935 4.5 L / 6-cyl 140 hp (104 kW)

The M45 Rapide was powered by a naturally aspirated petrol engine. Lagonda claimed a top speed of 163 km/h (101 mph).


Car Year Engine Power

Jensen 541R 1957 - 1960 4.0 L / 6-cyl 152 hp (113 kW)

The Jensen 541 R was the second last of the 541 line. The model's sixcylinder engine was from the Austin range, and the car was equipped with independent suspension..

Jensen Brothers Alan and Richard Jensen spent several years working for car and truck manufacturers before launching Jensen Motors Limited in 1934. Having bought out their deceased employer's estate, the Jensens began building customised bodies for Singer, Morris and Wolseley. They designed a Ford V8 inspired car for Clark Gable in their first year of operation, and the finished vehicle became the catalyst for a series of Jensen-Fords and a lot of interest in their product. In 1935, the Jensen S-Type was released. Following World War II, Jensen released the Jensen PW luxury saloon before the Interceptor was launched as a coupĂŠ in 1950. The Jensen 541 followed the Interceptor in 1957, and the CV8 FF replaced the 541 in 1962. The Interceptor was Jensen's greatest model, and production lasted for seven years. The Jensen FF was more powerful than the Interceptor and went into production in 1966 as an outwardly identical model. The FF acknowledged an association with Ferguson Research and the 'Ferguson Formula' brought to the design phase. Only 320 Jensen FFs were produced, and Jensen stopped making cars in 1971. 56


Car Year Engine Power

Jensen C-V8 1962 - 1966 5.9 L & 6.3 L / V8 330 bhp (246 kW) - 6.3 L Model

The Jensen C-V8 superseded the Jensen 541 S. The four-seater fibreglass car was equipped with a Chrysler engine after 1964 and was one of the fastest cars of its type.

Car Year Engine Power

Jensen 541 Deluxe 1956 - 1959 4.0 L / 6-cyl 135 bhp (101 kW)

The Jensen 541 Deluxe was introduced in 1956 and was the first British fourseater car equipped with front and rear disc brakes.

Car Year Engine

Jensen Interceptor (First Generation) 1950 - 1957 4.0 L / 6-cyl

The Jensen Interceptor was Jensen's second post-war model. The name was then revised in 1966.

Car Year Engine Power

Jensen 541 1954 - 1959 4.0 L / 6-cyl 135 bhp (101 kW)

The Jensen 541 was a fibreglassbodied car mounted on a steel chassis. The engine was a six-litre version of an Austin four-litre engine and came with optional overdrive.

Car Year Engine

Jensen 541S 1960 - 1963 4.0 L / 4-cyl & 5.4 L / V8

The limited edition Jensen 541S was preceded by the 541 R and was the first British car fitted with seat belts as standard equipment. Models were equipped with Motorola radios, firstaid kits and fire extinguishers.

Car Year Engine Power

Jensen S-Type 1936 - 1941 2.3 L & 3.5 L / V8 90 hp (67 kW)

The Jensen S-Type was a limited edition saloon, tourer or convertible model released in 1936. Only 50 units were produced, and each was equipped with downdraft carburettors and overdrive.


Car Year Engine Power

Ford Model A1 1927 - 1931 3.3 L / 4-cyl 40 hp (50 kW)

The Ford Model A was produced in a number of styles, including standard and deluxe coupĂŠs, taxis, estate and commercial vehicles.

Ford UK to 1960 Ford USA imported Fords into Great Britain in 1903, and production began in England in 1911 in time for the release of the Model T. Early Fords were assembled from imported parts and chassis, with only the bodies locally sourced. By the end of World War I, nearly half of all registered cars in Britain were Fords, and models included the Model A, Model B and Model T. In 1931, Ford opened Europe's largest car manufacturing plant, and by 1935, the Model Y Ford rolled off the assembly line as the first non American Ford. It was followed in the pre-World War II years by the Ford 7Y, the Ford V8, the Ford Model C Ten, the Ford 7W, the Ford Anglia and the Ford Prefect. When manufacturing began after the war, cars included the Ford V8 Pilot, the Ford Consul and the Ford Zephyr. The Ford Zodiac and Ford Popular followed in the early 1950s, and the decade ended with the Ford Escort (Squire) between 1955 and 1961.

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Car Year Engine Power

Ford Consul Mark II 1956 - 1962 1.7 L / 4-cyl 59 hp (44 kW)

The second Ford Consul in the line retained the motor of the Mark I and the basic body shell, but had a longer wheelbase and a newly designed grille.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Zodiac Mark II 1956 - 1962 2.3 L to 2.5 L / 6-cyl 71 hp (53 kW) - 2.3 L Model

The Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II was known as one of the 'Big Healeys', which included all 3000 models and the 6 cylinder Austin-Healey.

The second of Ford's Zodiac models released came with body alterations that distinguished it from other variants. The most notable of those alterations was the accentuated tail end styling.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Prefect E493A 1949 - 1953 1.2 L / 4-cyl 31 hp (23 kW)

Ford Model Y 1932 - 1937 0.9 L / 4-cyl 22 hp (16.4 kW)

The Ford Model Y replaced the Ford Model A in Britain and Europe. It was also known colloquially as the Ford Eight on account of its fiscal horsepower.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Escort 100E (Ford Squire) 1955 - 1961 1.2 L / 4-cyl 36 hp (27 kW)

The Ford Escort 100E was a lower priced variant of the Ford Squire. It became more popular than the Squire and sold over 33,000 units in six years.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Zephyr Mark II 1956 - 1962 2.6 L / 6-cyl - 1956 Model 85 hp (63 kW) - 1956 Model

The Ford Zephyr Mark II was produced in a number of variants, including a four-door saloon, a fivedoor estate and a two-door convertible. It was also assembled in Australia and was powered by a number of engines.


Car Year Engine Power

Ford Cortina Mark I 1962 - 1966 1.2 L, 1.5 L & 1.6 L / 4-cyl 48.5 hp (36 kW) - 1.2 L Model

The Mark I Cortina was designed as Britain's new family car and was produced in Standard, Deluxe, Super and GT variants. Early Standard models were nicknamed 'Ironbar'.

Ford UK 1961 to 1970 In 1960, Ford of Britain was nearly half owned by British shareholders. By 1961, those shares were purchased by the USA parent company and Ford of Britain became a wholy owned subsidiary of the Ford Motor Company. With the Consul, Anglia, Zephyr, Zodiac and Popular still in production in the early 1960s, Ford released more iconic models during the decade. The Ford Consul Classic and Ford Consul Capri arrived in 1961 and were followed a year later by the Ford Cortina - one of Ford's most popular models. 1963 saw the release of the Ford Corsair, before a five year break that ended with the release of the Ford Escort in 1968 and the Ford Capri in 1969. Ford also produced a number of commercial vehicles, and none was so popular as the Ford Transit, which enjoyed a production run that lasted from 1965 until 2013.

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Car Year Engine Power

Ford Cortina Mark II 1600E 1967 - 1970 1.6 L / 4-cyl 88 hp (66 kW)

The 1600E Cortina was released a year after the Cortina Mark II. By that time, the base model had become Britain's most popular car. The 1600E had lowered suspension and a highly-tuned GT engine.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Zodiac Mark III 1962 - 1966 2.5 L / 6-cyl 109 hp (81 kW)

The Zodiac Mark III was a high end version of the Zephyr 6, sporting limousine features in the rear. Luxury interior fittings set it apart from the Zephyr, as did the power output from the re-tuned engine.

Ford Capri 1600 (Mark I) 1969 - 1974 1.6 L / 4-cyl 82 hp (61 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

The Ford Capri 1600 was part of the Capri Mark I line. Ford produced the Capri in a number of models with varying engine capacities in order to appeal to a wide range of customers.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Anglia 105E Deluxe 1962 1.0 L / 4-cyl 39 hp (29 kW)

The fourth generation of Anglia was the 105E, which included the Deluxe variant. The Standard and Deluxe models were identifiable through the difference in the car's front grille and headlamps.

Ford Consul Capri 1962 - 1963 1.3 L & 1.5 L / 4-cyl 54 hp (40 kW)

The Ford Consul Capri was the twodoor version of the Ford Consul Classic. It saw two upgrades, including a Cosworth GT version late in the line.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Consul Corsair GT Saloon 1963 - 1970 1.5 L / 4-cyl. 1.7 L & 2.0 L / V4 60 hp (45 kW) - 1.5 L Model

The Ford Consul Corsair was also known as the Ford Corsair and was produced in saloon and estate versions. A few rare models were convertibles built by Crayford.


Car Year Engine Power

Hillman Wizard 1931 - 1933 2.1 L & 2.8 L / 6-cyl 15.7 hp (11.7 kW) & 20.9 hp (15.5 kW)

The Hillman Wizard was first released in 1931 and sold more than 3,000 units in its first year. It was available in five body styles, including a saloon, saloon deluxe, cabriolet, sports saloon and tourer.

Hillman Like a number of British car manufacturers, Hillman's roots began in the manufacture of sewing machines in the mid 19th century. Moving into bicycles in the latter half of the century, car manufacture followed in 1907. In that year, Hillman released the Hillman-Coatalen, which was the result of a collaboration between William Hillman and Louis Coatalen. Coatalen left the partnership, and the Hillman Motor Car Company was established in 1910. Early Hillmans were large affairs that sported enormous engines, but the first successful model arrived in 1913 in the form of a 9 hp model. In 1925, Hillman produced a 14 hp model. In 1929, Hillman merged with Humber under the Rootes umbrella, and smaller cars such as the Wizard and Minx were produced. Also sold under the Humber badge, Hillmans were extremely successful. Following World War II, the Hillman Minx was followed by a number of Models with a 'Phase' prefix. In 1955, the Hillman Mk 8 arrived, followed by the Mk 8A and the Husky. The Hillman Imp was an iconic model of the 1960s, while the Hillman Hunter was introduced to excellent reviews in 1966. 62


Car Year Engine Power

Hillman Super Minx Mark II 1962 - 1964 1.6 L / 4-cyl - 1961 Model 62 hp (46 kW) - 1961 Model

The Super Minx Mark II was released in 1962, at the same time as the earlier model's Super Minx Estate was launched. The car was available with new Borg-Warner automatic transmission.

Car Year Engine Power

Hillman Imp Mark I 1963 - 1965 0.9 L / 4-cyl 39 hp (29.1 kW)

The Hillman Imp was released as a small economy car that would compete directly with the Mini. The Imp was a rear-engined car with rear wheel drive.

Car Year Engine Power

Hillman Super Minx Estate 1962 - 1967 1.6 L / 4-cyl - 1961 Model 62 hp (46 kW) - 1961 Model

The Super Minx was introduced in 1961, and was followed by an estate version in 1962. It was created by Rootes as an 'Audax' design.

Car Year Engine Power

Hillman Imp Californian 1966 - 1970 0.9 L & 1.0 L / 4-cyl 39 hp (29 kW) - 1963 Model

The Hillman Imp was manufactured by the Rootes Group between 1963 and 1967, and subsequently by Chrysler Europe between 1967 and 1976. The Californian was aimed at the American market.

Car Year Engine Power

Hillman Minx (New Minx) 1967 - 1970 1.5 L & 1.7 L / 4-cyl 61 hp (41.5 kW)

The retrospectively named New Minx was released following the end of the Series VI in 1967. The car was a reduced version of the Hillman Hunter and was built as a saloon and an estate.

Car Year Engine Power

Hillman Avenger 1500 1970 - 1978 1.5 L / 4-cyl - 1972 Model 75 hp (56 kW) - 1972 Model

The Hillman Avenger was designed with the American market in mind and sported 'coke bottle' body styling as a result. It was sold in the USA as the Plymouth Cricket.


Car Year Engine

Morris 12 Series III 1937 - 1948 1.6 L / 4-cyl

The third series in the Morris 12 family was initially called the Morris TwelveFour. It was powered with the same engine used by the MG VA and the Wolseley 12/48.

Morris In 1912, William Morris moved from car repair into car manufacturing, and within a year was operating out of a factory in Cowley, Oxfordshire. The Morris Oxford (Bullnose) was the first car produced by Morris and was followed by a van and a coupĂŠ in 1914. In the following year, the Morris Cowley was released and available in both two-seat and four-seat models. The Morris Oxford arrived after World War I, and the Morris Minor joined the stable in 1928. A need for smaller cars during the Great Depression saw the release of the Morris Eight and Morris Ten. Following World War II, Morris released the Morris Oxford MO, and by 1952, the company was merged into the British Motor Corporation (BMC). Until the early 1980s, Morris models continued in production, with the Morris Marina and Morris Ital emerging during the decade before the name was replaced by that of Leyland. Long after the Morris name faded from the forefront of car manufacturing in Great Britain, the brand is still recognised as one of the countrys most important and iconic in car manufacturing. 64


Car Year Engine Power

Morris Major Elite 1962 - 1964 1.6 L / 4-cyl 61 hp (45 kW)

The Morris Major Elite was released in 1962 as part of the Morris Major line that began in 1958. The Elite version had an upgraded engine and was considered one of the best value-formoney cars on the market.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Morris Quarter Ton 1953 - 1973 0.8 L to 1.1 L / 4-cyl 30 hp (22.4 kW) - 0.8 L Model

The Morris Quarter Ton van was manufactured alongside a flat-bed Morris Minor. Designed for commercial use, the van was used by the British Post Office and businesses of all sizes.

Morris Cowley 1919 - 1926 1.5 L / 4-cyl 26 hp (19 kW)

The Morris Cowley was updated in 1919 and released as the 'Bullnose Cowley'. It served as Morris' basic model alongside the Morris Oxford.

Car Year Engine Power

Morris 1100 1962 - 1971 1.1 L / 4-cyl 48 hp (35.8 hp)

The Morris 1100 was part of a far larger family of cars commonly grouped as BMC ADO16. Other marques included Austin, Wolseley, Riley and Vanden Plas.

Car Year Engine Power

Morris Marina 1971 - 1980 1.3 L / 4-cyl - 1971 Marina 1.3 Model 60 hp (45 kW) - 1971 Marina 1.3 Model

The Morris Marina was also marketed as the Morris 1700, Leyland Marina and the Austin Marina. It has been described as one of the worst cars ever built, yet retains many enthusiasts.


Car Year Engine Power

Bristol 405 1955 - 1958 2.0 L / 6-cyl 105 hp (78 kW)

Superseding the Bristol 403, both the 404 and 405 models were produced simultaneously. The 405 was produced in a four-seat saloon or a two-door drophead coupĂŠ.

Bristol Once the Armistice was signed in 1918, the aircraft manufacturing industry of Great Britain stalled. One of those aircraft manufacturers was the Bristol Aeroplane Company, which employed 70,000 people. Bristol thus moved into the manufacture of car and omnibus bodies between the wars, returning to aircraft manufacture during World War II. In 1945, the company established its car division and released the Bristol 400 within two years. The 401, 402 and 403 followed in subsequent years, and by 1958, the Bristol 406 was in production and remained so for eight years. In 1961, the company moved into V8 powered cars with the release of the Bristol 407, which was powered by a Chrysler engine. Until that point in time, Bristols had been powered by 6-cylinder BMW engines. During the 1960s, more numerical Bristols were released, and by 1975 the company began naming vehicles in recognition of their aeronautical history. The 412 / Beaufighter arrived in 1975, followed by the Britannia / Brigand in 1982, the Blenheim in 1993 and the Bristol Fighter in 2004. 66


Car Year Engine Power

Bristol 403 1953 - 1955 2.0 L / 6-cyl 105 hp (78 kW)

The Bristol 403 was powered by the same engine as its successor, but mechanical improvements saw a greater power output. It was the last Bristol model to carry the BMW styled grille.

Car Year Engine Power

Bristol 409 1965 - 1967 5.2 L / V8 250 hp (186 kW)

The Bristol 409 was in production at the same time as the 408 model, which was shortly superseded. The 409 was powered by a Chrysler V8 engine and underwent a number of changes to its chassis.

Car Year Engine Power

Bristol Fighter 2004 - 2011 8.0 L / V10 660 hp (492 kW)

The Bristol Fighter is powered by an engine based on the Dodge Viper and Ram engines. It has gull-wing doors and was designed by Max Boxtrom, a former Formula One designer.

Car Year Engine

Bristol Blenheim (Type 603) 1976 - Present 5.2 L & 5.9 L / V8

In 1976, Bristol launched the Type 603, which was also known as the Bristol Blenheim (in honour of the company's aircraft manufacturing past). Three series in all have been produced.

Car Year Engine

Bristol 412 1975 - 1993 6.6 L / V8

The Bristol 412 was a saloon in a Targa-type design. It had a removable roof that was tucked into the luggage compartment, and was the last of Bristol's '4 number' series.


Car Year Engine Power

Bentley 3 Litre Sports Tourer 1919 - 1929 3.0 L / 4-cyl 70 hp (42 kW)

The Bentley 3 Litre arrived equipped with four valves and two spark-plugs per cylinder, which made it one of the first production cars designed in such a manner.

Bentley When the first 3.0 litre Bentley car was released in 1921, it was an instant hit - both on the road and the racing circuit. Working from a production plant in Cricklewood, London, Bentley produced some of the world's most beautiful and luxurious cars between the two World Wars. Those included the the 4.5 litre 'Blower' and the 6.5 litre Bentley 30 in 1926, followed by the Speed Six in 1928 and an 8.0 and 4.0 litre model in the early 1930s. The Great Depression ruined the company, which was taken over by Rolls-Royce in 1931 and operated as a subsidiary. In the post-World War II years, the Bentley Continental of the 1950s and 1960s was one of the world's most coveted cars, and the model was upgraded many times. The Mulsanne arrived in the 1980s, and both names continue today with the Volkswagenowned Bentley brand. Since the take-over, a Bentley has been produced ever year, and models include several Continentals, the Flying Spur, the Mulsanne, the Zagato and the Bentayga.

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Car Year Engine Power

Bentley Continental Supersports 2009 - 2010 6.0 L / W12 Turbocharged 621 hp (449 kW)

The Continental Supersports was the first Bentley able to operate using either petrol or biofuel. It has a reputation as being the best handling Bentley in the car marque's history.

Car Year Engine Power

Bentley Azure (First Generation) 1995 - 2003 6.75 L / V8 Turbocharged 385 hp (287 kW)

The first of Bentley's Azure Series had its convertible top manufactured by Pininfarina. The model was based on the Bentley Continental R and had a base cost of nearly US$350,000.

Car Year Engine

Car Year Engine Power

Bentley Mark VI 1946 - 1952 4.3 L & 4.6 L / 6-cyl

The Bentley Bentayga is powered by Bentley's unique 'W' configured engine, which allows for more room in the engine bay. The Bentayga SUV is the world's fasted production SUV.

The Bentley Mark VI was Bentley's first luxury car produced following the end of World War II. It was also RollsRoyce's first model built with all steel coachwork.

Car Year Engine Power

Bentley Bentayga SUV 2015 - Present 6.0 L / W12 Turbocharged 600 hp (447 kW)

Bentley R-Type Continental Sports Coupé 1952 - 1955 4.8 L / 6-cyl 130 hp (97 kW)

The second of the post-war Bentleys was the R-Type, which replaced the Bentley Mark IV. The R-Type Continental was the fastest production car in the world when it was released.

Car Year Engine Power

Bentley Coupé De Ville 1934 - 1938 3.5 L / 6-cyl 110 hp (82 kW)

The Bentley Coupé De Ville is one of the cars known as the 'Derby Bentleys', on account of the models of the time being built in Rolls-Royce's Derby factory. Earlier models are called 'Cricklewood Bentleys'.


Car Year Engine Power

Reliant Robin 850 1975 - 1981 0.85 L / 4-cyl 39 hp (29 kW)

The Reliant Robin was the second most popular car built from fibreglass in the history of car manufacturing. It served as an economical commercial vehicle for small businesses.

Reliant Reliant's origins began with two Raleigh Bicycle Company employees who decided to construct their own motor car at home in 1934. Within a year, Reliant moved into an abandoned bus depot and turned out their first threewheeled car. Moving away from Austin engines, the company then developed a four-cylinder sand cast engine of their own. Following World War II, Reliant released the Regent van, and later modifications saw the release of a larger (but still three-wheeled) Regent and Prince Regent. In the 1950s, the Reliant Regal and the Regal Mk II were added to the Reliant stable. A fibreglass-bodied Regal 3/25 arrived in the 1960s, and the end of the decade marked the release of the company's best sellers - the Scimitar and Scimitar GTE. The four-wheeled Reliant Rebel was unveiled in saloon, van and estate models and was followed by the Kitten and Fox in the 1970s. The most significant and long lived of all Reliants however, was the Reliant Robin, which was in production for over 30 years.

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Car Year Engine Power

Reliant Scimitar GTE - SE5A 1972 - 1975 3.0 L / V6 135 hp (100 kW)

The GTE SE5A was an upgraded version of the 1968 released GTE SE5. The upgrade added a further 7 hp (5 kW) to the 3.0 litre engine. The outward difference between the two models lies in the rear lights.

Car Year Engine Power

Reliant Robin 1973 - 1981 and 1989 - 2001 0.75 L & 0.85 L / 4-cyl 35 hp (26 kW) & 40 hp (30 kW)

The Reliant Robin was produced over three series, with a hiatus between 1981 and 1989. In 2001, a license was granted to B&N Plastics for further manufacture, with only 40 cars produced in a single year.

Car Year Engine Power

Reliant Scimitar GTE - SE6 1976- 1976 3.0 L / V8` 135 hp (100 kW)

The Reliant Scimitar GTE SE6 was a luxury upgrade of the SE5 model, and marketing was aimed at the professional executive purchaser.

Car Year Engine Power

Reliant Rialto SE Estate 1982 - 1997 0.8 L / 4-cyl 39 hp (29 kW)

The Reliant Rialto was the successor to the Reliant Robin in 1982. As Reliant's only 3-wheeler in the 1980s, there was a 12 month waiting list for customers.

Car Year Engine Power

Reliant Rebel 700 1964 - 1974 0.6 L & 0.75 L / 4-cyl 25 hp (18.6 kW) & 35 hp (26 kW)

The Reliant Rebel was designed as a competitor to the popular Hillman Imp and Austin Mini. The model was available in van, estate and saloon variables with three different engines.

Car Year Engine Power

Reliant Regal 1953 - 1975 0.6 L, 0.7 L & 0.75 L / 4-cyl 25 hp (18.6 kW), 30 hp (22 kW) & 35 hp (26 kW)

Upon its release, the Reliant Regal was considered under British law to be a tricycle. It was released in many versions over its long lifespan.

Car Year Engine Power

Reliant Kitten DL Estate 1975 - 1982 0.85 L / 4-cyl 40 hp (30 kW)

The four-wheeled Reliant Kitten was eventually superseded by the Reliant Fox. Toward the end of its production life, it became a popular rally car in India.


Car Year Engine Power

TVR Vixen S3 1967 - 1973 1.6 L / 4-cyl 92 hp (68 kW)

The TVR Vixen S3 was the third model inthe Vixen line. It was powered by a Ford Capri engine and sported a Ford Zodiac grille. A total of 165 models were produced.

TVR TVR Engineering began life as Trevcar Motors in 1946, and the first TVR (TVR Number One) was sold in 1949. By the early 1950s, the company was producing fibreglass kit cars for sale, and the TVR Sports Saloon hit the racing circuit by 1954. In 1956, the company concentrated on its own body style and produced the TVR Open Sports,which was modified for daily use to become the TVR CoupĂŠ in 1958. The Grantura Mk I followed and was updated over the next decade. In 1965, the TVR Trident was released and was followed by the Griffith, Vixen and Tuscan. The M-Series followed in the 1970s and the Tasmin was released in 1980. New ownership in that decade saw the release of several models, including the Tamora, Chimaera, Cerberus, Typhon and Sagaris, and the company changed hands again within another 20 years, and yet again in 2013. The Speed Six, Sagaris and T37 have marked the progress of TVR in the 21st century, and the company continues to design and manufacture iconic road and race cars today.

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Car Year Engine Power

TVR 1600M 1972 - 1977 1.5 L / 4-cyl 84 hp (63 kW)

The TVR 1600 M was powered by a 1.6 litre Ford Capri GT engine. Discontinued in 1973, the model was resurrected following the 1973 oil crisis.

Car Year Engine Power

TVR Cerbera Speed Six 1995 - 2003 4.0 L / 6-cyl 350 hp (261 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

The Cerbera Speed Six was produced with the Cerbera Speed Eight. The Cerbera line was released behind the discontinued Chimaera and Griffith convertibles

TVR Sagaris 2005 - 2006 4.0 L / 6-cyl 406 hp (303 kW)

The TVR Sagaris was designed as an endurance racer and was based on the earlier TVR 350. It sported a wide array of air vents, intakes and other enhancements to maximise racing efficiency.

Car Year Engine Power

TVR 3000M 1972 - 1978 3.0 L / V6 138 hp (103 kW)

The TVR 3000M was a model in the TVR M Series. It was superseded in 1978 by the TVR 3000S.

Car Year Engine Power

TVR Chimaera 1992 - 2003 3.9 L / V8 - 1993 Model 240 hp (179 kW) - 1993 Model

The TVR Chimaera was designed as a long distance tourer with a modified Rover V8 engine. The model's name was derived from Greek mythology.

Car Year Engine Power

TVR Tamora 2002 - 2006 3.6 L / 6-cyl 350 hp (260 kW)

The TVR Tamora was designed and built alongside the TVR 350 range, and both were replacements for the discontinued Griffith and Chimaera models. The Tamora was the entry level model.


Car Year Engine Power

Riley One-Point-Five (Series I) 1957 - 1959 1.5 L / 4-cyl 68 hp (50 kW)

The Riley One-Point-Five shared its design and construction with the Wolseley 1500. The Riley was more powerful than the Wolseley, sporting twin SU carburettors.

Riley The Riley Cycle Company came into being in 1896, and the founder's sons moved into their own business to begin producing engines for cycles as the Riley Engine Company. In 1913, four of the Riley brothers formed Riley (Coventry) Limited to build motor cars using Riley engines. Throughout the 1920s, Riley produced a number of saloons, coupĂŠs, tourers, sports cars and limousines, but it was the Riley 9 engine that became the decade's stand-out achievement and gave rise to the development of the Riley Speed 9 (later the Riley Brooklands). Riley became part of Morris Motors in 1938 and subsequently BMC in 1958. The most notable Rileys were the 1927 Riley Brooklands Nine, the 1934 Riley MPH and the Riley Imp. In the post-World War II years, Riley produced two roadsters, five mid-size cars that were also badged as Wolseleys, and four large cars that included the Riley Pathfinder. Two of the company's last models were the 1961 Riley Elf (Mini) and the 1965 Riley Kestrel. The latter car was also badged as the Morris 1100.

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Car Year Engine Power

Riley Nine Merlin 1936 - 1937 1.0 L / 4-cyl 12 hp (9 kW)

The Merlin was the penultimate model released by Riley Motors before being taken over by Lord Nuffield (Morris). The streamlined sports saloon was reconfigured as the last true Riley model - the Riley Victor.

Car Year Engine Power

Riley Nine Brooklands 1926 - 1938 1.0 L / 4-cyl 50 hp (37 kW)

The Riley Nine Brooklands was a limited edition sports car fitted with high compression pistons and specially modified camshafts. In 1927, the Brooklands raced at an average speed of over 144 km/h (90 mph).

Car Year Engine Power

Riley 4/Seventy-Two 1961 - 1969 1.6 L / 4-cyl 68 hp (51 kW)

Known as the Riley Comet in Austria and the Riley 1500 in Argentina, the 4/Seventy-Two was the upgraded variant of the Riley 4/Sixty-Eight. It sported an upgraded suspension and anti-roll bars, and was a competitor to the Humber Sceptre.

Car Year Engine Power

Riley Nine Kestrel 1933 - 1936 1.0 L / 4-cyl 12 hp (9 kW)

By1935, Riley decided to slim down its existing Riley Nine line. The result was the Kestrel and Monaco saloons and the Lynx four-seater.

Car Year Engine Power

Riley Lynx 1933 - 1936 1.0 L / 4-cyl 12 hp (9 kW)

The Riley Lynx was a four-seat tourer produced alongside a number of new Riley models, which included the Kestrel, Monaco, Falcon, Lincock, Ascot, Imp and March Special.


Car Year Engine Power

Land Rover Series I 1948 - 1957 1.6 L / 4-cyl - 1948 Model 55 hp (41 kW) - 1948 Model

In 1948, Rover released the Land Rover in a single model. Constructed over a Jeep chassis, the new model was built from war surplus materials and changed the face of off-road vehicles.

Land Rover (inc Range Rover) Before 1978. the Land Rover company was part of Rover. The first prototype Land Rover was built in 1947 using Jeep components, and the Series I Land Rover was launched in the following year. By the early 1960s, the Series IIA was in production, and the Range Rover was released three years later. The Land Rover Series III was launched in 1971, and by 1976, Land Rover was a separate British Leyland subsidiary. It would take over a decade before the Range Rover would be released in the USA, but during that time it was a sensation in Great Britain and Europe. At the same time, the Land Rover 90 (later to become the Defender) arrived in the early 1980s, and the Discovery was released by the end of the decade. Land Rover existed at a time of great turbulence in the British car manufacturing industry, and it changed hands several times before becoming the property of Ford in 2000 and later Tata Motors in 2008. Today, over four million Land Rovers have been produced, while the Range Rover Evoque and Land Rover Discovery continue to dominate the luxury 4WD market. 76


Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Range Rover Sport Supercharged 2002 - 2012 4.2 / V8 395 hp (294 kW)

In its third generation, the Range Rover model was known simply as 'Range Rover',with variants including Evoque, Sport, Vogue and others.

Car Year Engine Power

Land Rover Series III 1971 - 1985 2.6 L / 6-cyl Diesel 86 hp (64 kW)

Land Rover's Series III was upgraded due to competition entering the marketplace. The 1970s saw the advent of a moulded plastic dashboard, along with the repositioning of the instrument panel.

Range Rover 4.6 HSE 1994 - 2002 4.6 L / V8 225 ho (168 kW)

The second series of Range Rover was released 25 years after its inaugural model was produced. Powered by a Rover V8 engine, the 4.6 HSE also came with an optional 2.5 litre BMW turbo-diesel engine.

Car Range Rover Evoque Year 2011 - Present Engine 2.0 L - 4-cyl Petrol. 2.2 L / 4-cyl Diesel. Power 150 hp (112 kw) to 180 hp (134 kW) Turbodiesel. 240 hp (179 kW) Petrol. Range Rover's fourth generation included the Range Rover Evoque. The crossover SUV was available in both three and five-door variants, and each came in either two-wheel or fourwheel drive.

Car Land Rover Series II Year 1958 - 1961 Engine 2.0 L & 2.25 L / 4-cyl Petrol 2.0 L Diesel Power 52 hp (31 kW) - 2.0 L Petrol Land Rover's Series III was upgraded due to competition entering the marketplace. The 1970s saw the advent of a moulded plastic dashboard, along with the repositioning of the instrument panel.


Car Year Engine Power

Mini Moke 1964 - 1993 0.85 L to 1.3 L / 4-cyl 60 hp (45 kW) - 1.0 L Model

The Mini Moke was first designed by BMC, sharing many components with the Morris Mini. It was marketed as the Austin Mini Moke, Morris Mini Moke and later as the Leyland Moke.

Mini When Sir Alec Issigonis first considered the concept of the Mini car, little did anybody know the effect it would have on the automotive industry across two centuries. Upon release in 1959, the Mini was marketed under both of Leyland's Austin and Morris brands as the Austin Seven and the Morris Mini-Minor. Following up with the Austin Seven Countryman and the Morris Mini-Minor Traveller in 1959, the company released several upgraded models into the 1960s. In 1961, the Mini Cooper was released with a larger engine, and the four Leyland brands of Austin, Morris, Riley and Wolseley each had their own Mini. Deluxe models arrived within the year, and the Mini Cooper brand lasted until 1965. For the ensuing 35 years, Mini production continued unabated and included the Clubman, Moke and Cooper S. Over five million Minis were sold until 2000. In 2000, the BMW Group took over the Mini Brand and have maintained the essence of the brand in their releases. Models include the Mini Hatch, Convertible/Cabria, Clubman, Countryman, Roadster, CoupĂŠ and Paceman among others. 78


Car Year Power Speed

Mini Cooper S 2001 - Present 1.6 L / 4-cyl 168 hp (125 kW)

The two-door Mini Cooper S convertible was equipped with a supercharged petrol engine and a sixspeed manual transmission.

Car Year Engine Power

Mini (Cooper) Mark VI 1990 - 1995 1.4 L / 4-cyl 62 hp (46 kW)

The Mark VI Mini was produced under Rover until 2000, when the name was taken over by BMW.

Car Year Engine Power

Morris Mini Mark III 1969 - 1976 0.9 L to 1.3 L / 4-cyl 60 hp (45 kW) - 1.0 L Model

In 1969, the separate Morris and Austin Mini brands were replaced simply by the Mini name. With the new model came outward changes that included concealed door hinges and window winders.

Car Year Engine Power

Austin Mini Countryman 1000 Estate 1961 - 1969 1.0 L / 4-cyl 40 hp (29.8 kW)

The estate version of the Austin Mini became a popular small commercial vehicle in its time.

Car Year Engine Power

Austin Mini Clubman 1961 - 1969 1.0 L / 4-cyl 40 hp (29.8 kW)

The Austin Mini Clubman was originally the Austin Seven. The name was changed to Mini in 1961, and the model eventually became part of the Mini marque after 1969.

Car Year Engine Power

Mini Cooper 2001 - Present 1.6 L / 4-cyl 168 hp (125 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

Mini Cooper 2001 - Present 1.6 L / 4-cyl 168 hp (125 kW)


Car Year Engine Power

Wolseley Super Six 1938 3.5 L / 6-cyl 108 hp (81 kW)

The Wolseley Super Six was also called the 25 hp Super Six. It was released in three series and included a short run of limousine variants.

Wolseley In 1901, the Wolseley Tool and Motor Car Company came into being and began producing early motor cars under managing director Herbert Austin. Austin produced two cars before 1898 and a third three-wheeled car in 1898. The turn of the century saw the advent of a four-wheeled Wolseley (the Wolseley Gasoline Carriage) before the company moved away from horizontal engines and began dabbling in vertical ones. Austin left the company during that time, and by 1913, Wolseley was selling over 3,000 cars per year. In 1927, Wolseley was taken over by William Morris (Viscount Nuffield) and the company became part of the dominant Morris Motors fold. Before World War II, Wolseley cars included the Nine, Wasp and Ten in 4-cylinder models, and the Twenty, Hornet Six and Super Six in 6-cylinder models. The company also produced 8-cylinder cars from the 1930s, and most of those models were also badged under the Austin and Morris brands. Until 1975, Wolseley was a dominant British marque, with the last Wolseley model produced being the 18-22 Wolseley Saloon series. 80


Car Year Engine Power

Wolseley 15/60 (First Generation) 1958 - 1961 1.5 L / 4-cyl 52 hp (39 kW)

The Wolseley 15/60 was the first of a number of British cars released by BMC in the late 1950s. Within months of the model's release, the corporation also released the similar Austin A55 Cambridge, Riley 4/68, Morris Oxford V and the MG Magnette.

Car Year Engine Power

Wolseley 14 1935-1937 2.6 L / 6-cyl 14 hp (10.5 kW)

There were three separate releases of the Wolseley Fourteen between 1923 and 1948. The second model was a mid-range car that was superseded by the Wolseley 14/56.

Car Year Engine Power

Wolseley 6/80 1948 - 1954 2.2 L / 6-cyl 72 hp (54 kW)

Along with the Wolseley 4/50, the Wolseley 6/80 was the first of Wolseley's post-war cars in 1948. The 6/80 was designed around the Morris Six MS and was widely used as a British and Colonial police car.

Car Year Engine Power

Wolseley 4/44 1953 - 1956 1.25 L / 4-cyl 46 hp (34 kW)

BMC produced the Wolseley 4/44, which was designed while the corporation was still under Nuffield control. The monocoqueconstructed car had independent rear suspension and a beautifully appointed interior.

Car Year Engine Power

Wolseley 1500 1957 - 1965 1.5 L / 4-cyl 48 hp (35 kW)

The Wolseley 1500 and the Riley OnePoint-Five were identical but for the Riley's twin SU carburettors. Each car had a Morris Minor floor and an MG Magnette gearbox, but the Riley was 20 hp (15 kW) more powerful.


Car Year Engine Power

Rover 8 1904 - 1924 1.0 L / Single-cyl 8.0 hp (6.0kW)

The British Rover company released its first car model in 1904, naming it the Rover 8. The initial release featured a 998 cc single-cylinder engine, which was upgraded to a 1.3 litre, twin-cylinder powertain following the end of World War I.

Rover Rover began manufacturing bicycles in 1883 and released the Rover Safety Bicycle in 1885. The Polish and Russian words for bicycle inspired the Rover name, which became the company name in the 1890s. Moving into motorcycles and cars in the first decade of the 20th century, the company produced the Rover Eight in 1901. Struggling financially through the 1920s, the company survived to release the Rover Scarab in 1931. In the post-World War II years, the company delivered Land Rover to the world, along with the Rover P3, P4, P5 and P6 up until 1963. In 1967, Rover became a subsidiary of the BMC/Leyland Group, and Land Rover became a separate entity. The Rover SD1 and Rover Quintet marked the 1980s as significant releases, while several Austin and Morris cars were rebranded as Rovers (Mini, Metro, Maestro and Montego). From 1986, the Rover Group produced the 200, 400, 600 and 800 Rover coupĂŠs and the Rover 75. From 2000, the newly established MG Rover Group launched a series of Minis, Superminis and family cars, along with the MG-F and the MG-TF. 82


Car Year Engine Power

Rover Quintet 1983-1985 1.6 L / 4-cyl 79 hp (59 kW)

The Rover Quintet began life in 1980 as the Honda Quint, which was a five door Honda Civic Version. Honda then exported it as the Honda Quintet, and it was marketed in Australia by Jaguar-Rover as the Rover Quintet.

Car Year Engine Power

Rover 75 Connoisseur 1998 - 2005 1.8 L / 4-cyl 118 hp (88 kW) - 1998 Mark I

During the design period for the Rover 75, BMW took over the company. The Connoisseur was part of the Mark I and Mark II models.

Car Year Engine Power

Rover P5B 1967 - 1973 3.5 L / V8 160 hp (120 kW)

Also known as the 'Rover 3½ Litre', the 'B' in the model name referred to the car's Buick engine. The P5 line was in production from 1958, and all models apart from the last sported 3.0 litre engines.

Car Year Engine Power

Rover P6 3500 Mark II 1970 - 1977 3.5 L / V8 153 hp (114 kW)

The Rover P6 line was launched in 1973, with the second series released in 1970. The car had the battery in its boot, and was sadly part of the worst period in British car manufacturing.

Car Year Engine Power

Rover 12 P1 1934 - 1948 1.5 L / 4-cyl 53 hp (39 kW)

Rover gave the Rover 12 name to a number of model releases between 1905 and 1948. The P1 was the first of two releases from 1934.


Car Year Engine Power

Vauxhall BX Big Six 1934 - 1935 2.4 L / 6-cyl 52 hp (39 kW)

The Vauxhall Big Six was the first General Motors model design for Vauxhall. The BX was designed in a saloon, convertible and coupĂŠ version.

Vauxhall Vauxhall was established in 1857 as a pump and marine engine manufacturer and built its first car in 1903. By 1908, the Vauxhall Y-Type Y1 was winning on the racing circuit and went into production to become the Vauxhall A09. Following World War I, the D-Type and E-Type were produced, and General Motors purchased the company in 1925. 1930 saw the release of the low priced Vauxhall Cadet. After 1945, Vauxhall resumed passenger car production, and the company's huge success began with the release of the Vauxhall Viva in 1963. The company's reputation grew with the Vauxhall Victor, which had Vauxhall's rust proofing included in the design. From that point, models such as the Ventura, Viscount and Viva dominated the car industry. In the 1970s, the company released the Senator, Viceroy, Magnum, Firenza, Equus, Carlton and Cavalier, while the remainder of the century saw the advent of models such as the Brava, Calibra, Belmont, Frontera, Nova, Monterey, Omega, Sintra, Tigra and Vectra. Today, Vauxhall manufactures concept cars alongside light commercial vehicles and passenger cars. Its European partner is Opel, 84


Car Year Engine Power

Vauxhall Velox PA 1957 - 1962 2.1 L & 2.6 L / 6-cyl 82 hp (61 kW) & 95 hp (71 kW)

Noted for its wrap-around windscreen and American inspired tail fins, the Vauxhall Velox PA was manufactured at the same time as the Vauxhall Cresta PA.

Car Year Engine Power

Vauxhall Cresta E 1954 - 1957 2.3 L / 6-cyl 62 hp (46 kW)

The Vauxhall Cresta E was the first of the Vauxhall Cresta line.By 1956, a susccession of changes saw the model sporting a new grille and electric windscreen wipers among other additions.

Car Year Engine Power

Vauxhall Cresta PA 1957 - 1962 3.3 L / 6-cyl - 1961 Model 140 hp (104 kW) - 1961 Model

The Vauxhall PA Cresta is the bestknown of the Cresta models. With styling reminiscent of the American cars of the time, it was modelled on the Buick Special. All PA Crestas were four-door estates and saloons.

Car Year Engine Power

The Firenza was designed as a development of the Vauxhall Viva but sporting a unique coupĂŠ body and two doors. It was marketed as the Chevrolet Firenza in South Africa.

Car Vauxhall Astra (Seventh Generation) Year 2015 - Present Engine 1.0 L & 1.4 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.6 L / 4-cyl Diesel. Power 99 hp (74 kW) to 200 hp (150 kW) Petrol. 94 hp (70 kW) to 159 hp (118 kW) Diesel. The Vauxhall Astra has been in production since 1979, when it was first released as the right-hand-drive version of the Opel Kadett.

Car Year Engine Power

Vauxhall Firenza 1970 - 1975 1.1 L to 2.2L / 4-cyl 81 hp (60 kW) - 1.6 L 1971 Model

Vauxhall Monaro 2004 - 2007 6.0 L / V8 398 hp (297 kW)

The Vauxhall Monaro is a re-badged third generation Australian Holden Monaro.


Car Year Engine

Sunbeam-Talbot Alpine 1953 - 1955 2.25 L / 6-cyl

The very first Alpine was produced by Sunbeam-Talbot in 1953 and remained in production for two years. It became a successful rally car in Europe.

Sunbeam (inc Talbot) In 1887, John Marston established the Sunbeamland Cycle Factory and began building cars in 1900. The Sunbeam Autocar was released in 1901 and sported a De Dion engine. In 1905, the Sunbeam Motor Car Company was established and produced the Sunbeam 14/20, which was upgraded in 1911 to become the 16/20. By 1924, the company was part of S T D Motors Limited. The Great Depression took its toll on Sunbeam and the company was purchased by Rootes Securities in 1935. Rootes decided to badge engineer using the Sunbeam name, and a complex series of buy-outs saw Clement Talbot purchase Sunbeam and become Sunbeam-Talbot. The Sunbeam Talbot 80 and 90 were released in the late 1940s, with the Sunbeam Alpine arriving in 1953. In 1955, the Sunbeam Rapier was unveiled and was followed by the Tiger, Imp Sport, Stilletto and fastback models until the mid 1970s. The Minx, Vogue and Arrow were built for export at the same time, and the last of the Sunbeam branded models was the Sunbeam Lotus-Horizon in 1982. 86


Car Year Engine Power

Sunbeam-Talbot 3 Litre (Talbot 3 Litre) 1938 - 1940 3.1 L / 6-cyl 80 hp (59 kW)

The Sunbeam-Talbot 3 Litre was originally the Talbot 3 Litre before the Rootes Company take-over. It was produced in a number of models, including a sports saloon, sports tourer, coupĂŠ and a traditional saloon.

Car Year Engine Power Car Year Engine Power

Sunbeam Alpine III 1963 - 1964 1.6 L / 4-cyl 77 hp (57 kW)

Sunbeam's third Alpine series arrived in 1963 and was available in removable hardtop and open models. Once the hardtop was removed, a soft top was available from behind the rear seat.

Car Year Engine Power

Sunbeam Tiger Mark I 1964 - 1967 4.3 L / V8 164 hp (122 kW)

The Sunbeam Tiger was manufactured in two series, with design undertaken by Carroll Shelby. The engine was a Ford V8, and the car was the high-performance version of the Alpine.

Sunbeam-Talbot 90 1948 - 1954 1.9 L / 4-cyl 64 hp (48 kW)

The Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II was known as one of the 'Big Healeys', which included all 3000 models and the 6 cylinder Austin-Healey.

Car Year Engine Power

Sunbeam (Imp) Californian 1967 - 1970 0.9 L / 4-cyl 37 hp (27.6 kW)

The Sunbeam Californian was a rebadged Hillman Imp Californian. The rear-wheel drive car had a top speed of 129 km/h (80 mph).

Car Year Engine Power

Sunbeam Rapier Fastback 1967 - 1976 1.7 L / 4-cyl 88 hp (66 kW)

The Sunbeam Rapier Fastback was also known as the Arrow Rapier. It was marketed in the USA as the Sunbeam Alpine GT.

Car Year Engine Power

Sunbeam Speed Twenty 1933 - 1935 3.0 L / 6-cyl 20.9 hp (15.5 kW)

The Sunbeam Speed Twenty was available in coupĂŠ and saloon versions. It featured a Zenith carburettor and a crash gearbox. In two years, 98 models were built.


Car Year Engine

Morgan Super Sports 1911 - 1939 1.0 L / V2

The modified V-Twin motorcycle engine was immediately recognisable on the Morgan Super Sports.

Morgan HFS Morgan established his business in 1904 as a motor garage and began producing cyclecars. In 1911, Morgan built a three-wheeled car for sale to the public and founded the Morgan Motor Company with his son. Cyclecar Grand Prix wins ensued in the pre-World War I years, and by 1933, the Morgan F-4 was in production as a four-cylinder threewheeler. The F-2 followed in 1935, with the F-Super arriving in 1937. The Morgan 4-4 was the company's first fourwheeler in 1936, and both three and four wheeled car production continued in parallel until 1952. The Morgan +4 arrived in 1950 and became one of Morgan's most successful automobiles. In 1955, the earlier 4-4 was superseded by the 4/4 and was followed by the Morgan Plus 8 in 1968, with the latter powered by a Rover V8 engine. In 2000, the Morgan Aero 8 series began, and four years later, the Plus 8 was replaced by the Mk 1 Roadster. Production by Morgan in the 21st century continued with the Aero series, and in 2011, a new Morgan 3-wheeler was released.

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Car Year Engine

Morgan Super Sports 1911 - 1939 1.0 L / V2

Morgan's V-Twin three-wheelers were in production until the outbreak of World War II. The engines were modified liquid-cooled motorcycle engines.

Car Year Engine Power

Morgan Plus 8 1968 - 2004 3.5 L / V8 160 hp (120 kW) - 1968 Model

The Morgan Plus 8 was originally designed using the Plus 4 chassis and developed in parallel with gearbox changes. In 2003, an anniversary model was produced.

Car Year Engine Power

Morgan Plus 4 1950 - 1969 2.0 L to 2.1 L / 4-cyl 100 hp (75 kW) - 2.0 L Model

Morgan's two-door convertible (cabriolet) of the 1950s and 1960s was also produced as the Plus 4 Super Sports in 1962 and went on to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in the 16012000cc GT Class.

Car Year Engine Power

Morgan Plus 4 Tourer 2005 - Present 3.7 L / V6 280 HP (209 Kw)

Morgan resurrected the Plus 4 between 1985 and 2000 to sit between the Plus 8 and 4/4. In 2005, the company revived the model again.

Car Year Engine Power

Morgan Aero 8 2001 - 2010 4.8 L / V8 362 hp (270 kW)

The Morgan Aero 8 competed at the 2002 and 2004 24 Hours of Le Mans, and has also raced in the 12 Hours of Sebring and the FIA and British GT Series.


Car Year Engine Power

Austin 7 Truck 1922 - 1939 0.7 L / 4-cyl 17 hp (12.7 kW)

The Austin 7 was manufatured in a number of commercial vehicles, as well as being built under license by BMW to become the BMW Dixi.

Austin Herbert Austin left the Wolseley company in 1905 and set up as a car manufacturer. He released his first car in the following year, but eventually ran into financial trouble in 1921. New financial arrangements saved Austin's company, and the Austin Twelve and Austin Seven were released in 1922. By 1930, the Austin was Great Britain's most widely purchased car, as well as the most widely produced taxicab. Austin modelled itself as Austin of England in the postWorld War II years, with a new Austin Seven released in 1959. Models such as the Farina, Hereford, Somerset, Cambridge and Westminster were also released in the 1950s. The luxurious Austin Princess was also released during the period, as was the A40 Sports. From 1952, the company merged into BMC and became part of the Leyland group in 1970. By 1980, the Austin-Rover era began, and models such as the Ambassador, Maestro and Montego were released as part of Austin's new face.

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Car Year Engine Power Model

Austin Metro 1980 - 1997 1.0 L , 1.3 L & 1.4 L / 4-cyl 47 hp (35 kW) - Metro 1.0

Car Year Engine Power

Austin 7 1922 - 1939 0.7 L / 4-cyl 17 hp (12.7 kW)

The Austin Metro was manufactured over 18 years, initially by British Leyland and later by the Rover Group after 1980. The supermini was originally developed to replace the Mini and was also sold as the Morris Metro.

Car Year Engine Power

Austin Maestro 1983 - 1987 1.3 L & 1.6 L / 4-cyl 86 hp (64 kW)

The small hatchback family car released in 1983 was also produced as a two-door van. Production of the Maestro continued through the transfer from Leyland to Rover.

Car Year Engine Power

The Austin 7 was the Ford Model T of Great Britain. It sold well at home and abroad, and was nicknamed the 'Baby Austin'.

Austin A40 Sports 1950 - 1953 1.2 L / 4-cyl 50 hp (37 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

The Austin A40 Sports was designed as a sports touring car, as opposed to a dedicated sports car. In its three year production life, over 4,000 units were sold.

Car Year Engine Power

Austin Vanden Plas Princess 1963 - 1967 1.1 L / 4-cyl 55 hp (41 kW)

The Vanden Plas Princess was the luxury version of BMC's ADO 16 line, which also included the Morris 1100, Riley Kestrel and Wolseley 1300.

Austin Freeway Six 1962 - 1965 2.4 L / 6-cyl 80 hp (59 kW)

Also known as the Morris Freeway, the Austin Freeway was based on the A60 Cambridge and produced in saloon and estate versions.

Car Year Engine Power

Austin A110 Westminster 1961 - 1968 2.9 L / 6-cyl 110 hp (82 kW)

The Austin Westminster replaced the Austin A70 Hereford in 1961. It was a large family car that was manufactured in saloon and estate versions.


Car Year Engine Power

AC Petite Mark II 1953 - 1958 0.35 L / 1-cyl 8.1 hp (6 kW)

The three-wheeled AC Petite was a microcar powered by a Villiers twostroke engine. There were two models released, and the car was capable of 64 km/h (40 mph).

Other British Cars Outside of Great Britain's major car manufacturers, many smaller companies produced iconic and much loved models during the 20th and 21st century. Jowett cars began in 1919 and was involved in the Swallow Sidecar Company (which eventually became Jaguar). AC Cars Limited was a short lived company that produced the threewheeled AC Petite between 1953 and 1955, while Caterham Cars was involved with Colin Chapman of Lotus to produce a number of racing cars. Today, independent car makers continue to produce iconic models in Great Britain, including Hawk Cars, which manufactures kit cars that are replicas of classic 1960s and 1970s models. In 1999, Farboud Limited was established as a sports car manufacturer, changing its name in 2006 to the Arash Motor Company Ltd. Although Great Britain's car industry is no longer the giant it once was, its legacy continues to inspire those dedicated to British car design.

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Car Year Engine Power

Caterham 21 1994 - 1999 1.6 L & 1.8 L / 4-cyl 115 hp (86 kW) - 1.6 Model

Car Year Engine Power

Caterham's two-seat roadster was based on the Caterham 7 and was released to commemorate 21 years since Caterham began manufacturing the Lotus Seven.

Arash AF8 2014 - Present 7.0 L / V8 505 hp (377 kW)

The mid-engined Arash AF was released in 2014. It followed the 2009 Arash AF 10 and was the fourth model produced by the company.

Car Year Engine Power

Swallow Doretti 1954 - 1955 4.0 L / 4-cyl 90 hp (67 kW)

The Swallow Coachbuilding Company released the two-seat sports Swallow Doretti in 1954. The car was intended for sale in the United States.

Car Year Engine Power

Armstrong Siddeley Hurricane Cabriolet 1946 - 1953 2.3 L / 6-cyl 75 hp (56 kW)

The Armstrong Siddeley Hurricane was released in 1946. Over its lifetime, a number of minor changes ensued.

Car Year Engine Power

Hawk Stratos 1986 1.6 L / V4 114 hp (85 kW)

The Hawk Stratos is a replica of Lancia's iconic Stratos. The Stratos replica was the first of a series of replicas that included Ferrari and AC Cobra among its number.


Car Year Engine Power

DeSoto Firedome 1956 4.8 L / V8 185 hp (138 kW) 1955 Model

In 1956, the DeSoto Firedome was released for the last years as an entrylevel model. In the following year, it was promoted to be part of the midline series.

De Soto Walter Chrysler established the DeSoto brand in 1928 and released the first model in the following year. Designed to compete with several mid-price Chrysler competitors, the first DeSoto model set a sales record that lasted until the early 1960s. Despite early setbacks, DeSoto's 1942 release featured pop-up headlights as an American first. In 1952, DeSotos came in 6-cylinder 'Powermaster' models or as V8-engined 'Firedomes'. The Firedome, Firesweep and Fireflite became extremely popular, while the DeSoto Adventurer arrived in 1956 as a performance coupĂŠ. Tail fins soon graced DeSoto bodies in the late 1950s, but the iconic brand was headed for disaster in the wake of the Recession late in the decade. In 1961, the new DeSoto model was not part of a series but a fairly ordinary design built over the wheelbase of the Chrysler Windsor. Available in either a two-door or four-door hardtop, the new model failed to stimulate the market, and after less than 50 days from release, the DeSoto brand was retired.

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Car Year Engine Power

DeSoto S5 Sedan 1938 3.8 L / 6-cyl 100 hp (74.5 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

In 1934, DeSoto became the recipient of Chrysler's disastrous 'Airflow' body, but a new 'Airstream' body arrived in 1935 and became the standard through future pre-war models that included the S5.

DeSoto Firedome 1955 - 1956 4.8 L / V8 185 hp (138 kW) - 1955 Model

The DeSoto Firedome initially sat in Chrysler's cheapest bracket upon release. By 1957, the Firedome moved into the mid-range price bracket.

Car Year Engine Power

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Car Year Engine Power

DeSoto Firedome (Second Generation) 1955 - 1956 4.8 L / V8 185 hp (138 kW) 1955 Model

DeSoto Adventurer 1957 4.5 L / V8 345 hp (257 kw)

The DeSoto Adventurer was produced from 1956 until 1960. In 1957, nearly 2,000 Adventurers were built.

The topline Firedome Series was released in 1953, but was pushed down the ladder when the second generation Fireflite released. The second generation Firedome was available only as a three-speed manual.

Car Year Engine Power

DeSoto Six 1929 6-cyl 21.6 hp (16 kW)

The DeSoto Six was an instant hit when it was first released in 1929, and the company continued the model unchanged into the following year as a result.

DeSoto Adventurer 1957 4.5 L / V8 345 hp (257 kw)

The DeSoto Adventurer was produced from 1956 until 1960. In 1957, nearly 2,000 Adventurers were built.


Car Year Engine Power

Lamborghini Miura 1966 - 1973 4.0 L / V12 345 hp (257 kW)

The Lamborghini Miura was the first car to feature a mid-engine, two-seat configuration and set the benchmark for all future supercars. When released, it was the world's fastest production car.

Lamborghini In 1963, Ferruccio Lamborghini founded a company dedicated to producing high-end grand touring cars. The Lamborghini 350 GT arrived in the mid 1960s, and was followed by the highly acclaimed Miura in 1966. Highly successful, Lamborghini's fortunes fell in the wake of the 1973 Oil Crisis, and company was eventually bought out of receivership by Patrick and Jean-Claude Mimran in 1980. The Countach range was expanded before the company was sold to Chrysler in 1987, and the subsequent Lamborghini Diablo replaced the Countach. Today, Lamborghini is part of the Volkswagen Group, and its history has seen the design and production of the world's most incredible cars. In the 1960s, the Miura and Espada were groundbreaking luxury sports cars, and they were followed by the Urraco, Jarama, Countach and Silhouette in the 1970s. By the 1990s, the Diablo dominated, while the MurciĂŠlago, Gallardo, ReventĂłn and Aventador arrived in the early 21st century. Today, the name of Lamborghini remains synonymous with quality and refinement in high performance sports cars. 96


Car Year Engine Power

Lamborghini Estoque 2008 5.2 L / V10 552 hp (412 kW)

The Lamborghini Estoque was a midengined two-seat sports concept car unveiled in 2008. Plans to put the Estoque into production in 2009 were cancelled.

Car Year Engine Power

Lamborghini Espada 1968 - 1978 3.9 L / V12 321 hp (239 kW) to 345 hp (257 kW)

The Bertone designed Lamborghini Espada was produced in two series. For the second series, Lamborghini made significant exterior changes, which included re-designed wheels.

Car Year Engine Power

Lamborghini Gallardo 2003 - 2013 5.0 L & 5.2 L / V10 513 hp (382 kW)

The Lamborghini Gallardo was produced in two generations and a number of special editions that included the Compact S, Spyder, Superleggera, SE and Nera.

Car Year Engine Power

Lamborghini Aventador 2011 - Present 6.5 L / V12 690 hp (510 kW)

The mid-engined Lamborghini Aventador was unveiled in 2011 as the replacement for the Lamborghini MurciĂŠlago. Within five years, 5,000 units had been sold.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

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Lamborghini Countach 1974 - 1990 4.0 L & 5.0 L / V12 350 hp (261 kW) to 748 hp (558 kW) - Turbo S Version

The wedge-shaped Lamborghini Countach revolutionised the world's concept of what a supercar should look like. The forward passenger compartment allowed room to accommodate the large engine.

The Aventador J was a roadster version of the Lamborghini Aventador. It was released only six months after the Aventador was unveiled and only two were produced.

Lamborghini Diablo 1990 - 2001 5.7 L & 6.0 L / V12 485 hp (362 kW) to 595 hp (444 kW)

The Lamborghina Diablo was the first car to exceed 200 mph (320 km/h). It superseded the Lamborghini Countach and was replaced by the Lamborghini MurciĂŠlago.

Lamborghini Aventador J 2012 6.5 L / V12 690 hp (510 kW)


Car Year Engine Power

Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Spider Corsa 1932 2.3 L / 8-cyl 330 hp (236 kW)

The 2300 8C Spider Corsa was one of the models released in the Alfa Romeo 8C range in the 1930s. The engine design was based on Alfa's 1924 'straight-eight'.

Alfa Romeo Alfa Romeo's beginnings can be traced back to 1906 and the formation of the SocietĂ Anonima Italiana Darracq, which produced and sold Darracq cars. A breakaway group set up A.L.F.A. in 1909, with the acronym standing for 'Anonima Lombarda Fabbrica Automobili'. The company's first car was the 24HP in 1910, and A.L.F.A. quickly became involved in motor racing. In 1920, the release of the Torpedo 20-30HP coincided with a company name change to Alfa Romeo. With young Enzo Ferrari heading up the Alfa Romeo racing team, the company's reputation was a stellar one in motor racing. By the 1960s, Alfa Romeo was the European small car of choice, and models such as the Giulia, Giulietta, Afletta, Spider and Bertone were popular for their beautiful styling and excellent performance. In the 1970s, the Alfasud and Montreal starred, and the 21st century brought even greater technological advancement with the Alfa Romeo 159 and the Brera.

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Car Year Engine Power

Alfa Romeo Montreal 1970 - 1977 2.6 L / V8 197 hp (147 kW)

Originlly a concept car in 1967, the Alfa Romeo Montreal went into production in 1970 as a 2+2 coupĂŠ sports car.

Car Year Engine Power

Alfa Romeo Giulia 1962 - 1978 1.3 L & 1.6 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.8 L / 4-cyl Diesel. 77 hp (57 kW) to 110 hp (82 kW) Petrol. 54 hp (40 kW) Diesel. Car Year Engine Power

The Alfa Romeo Giulia was a range of sporty four-doors that was updated over its lifetime to include models such as the Sprint, Sprint Speciale and Giulia Spider.

Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Veloce 1956 - 1962 1.3 L / 4-cyl 89 hp (66 kW)

The Giulietta Sprint Veloce was part of the Alfa Romeo Giulietta family, which was in production from 1954 until 1965. It was followed by the Sprint Speciale and the Sprint Zagato before the line eneded.

Car Year Engine Power

Alfa Romeo 2600 1962 - 1968 2.6 L / 6-cyl 145 hp (108 kW)

The Alfa Romeo 2600 was released in three styles - the Bertone styled Sprint, the Carrozzeria styled Spider and the Alfa factory-built Berlina (saloon).

Car Year Engine Power

Alfa Romeo Giuletta Spider 1954 - 1962 1.3 L / 4-cyl 79 hp (59 kW)

The Giulietta Spider was part of the Alfa Romeo Giulietta family, which was in production from 1954 until 1965.

Car Alfa Romeo MiTo Year 2008 - Present Engine 0.9 L / 2-cyl &1.4 L / 4-cyl Petrol 1.3 L & 1.6 L / 4-cyl Turbodiesel Power 85 hp (63 kW) to 167 hp (125 kW) Petrol 88 hp (666 kW) to 118 hp (88 kW) Turbodiesel

The Alfa Romeo MiTo's platform is based on Fiat's Grande Punto and is also used in Opel's Corsa D. In its first four years, 200,000 units were produced.

Car Year Engine Power

Alfa Romeo GTV6 1974 - 1987 2.5 L / V6 160 hp (119 kW)

The Alfa Romeo GTV 6 was part of the Alfetta family. It was an extremely successful racing car, winning the European Touring Car Championship between 1982 and 1985.


Car Year Engine Power

Fiat Topolino 1936 - 1955 0.6 L / 4-cyl 16 hp (12 kW)

The Fiat Topolino was produced in three different models over its production life. It became the vanguard for the later Fiat 500, and set the benchmark for small city cars into the future.

Fiat Fiat began life as Fabrica Italiana Automobil Torino in 1899 and produced the Fiat 4HP (AKA Fiat 3½ CV) in 1900. Designed to satisfy the high end of the market, Fiat soon became Italy's largest car manufacturer. Until 1937, the company designed and manufacturered a staggering 64 different models before introducing the famous Fiat Topolino. Following World War II, the Fiat 500 arrived to become one of the biggest selling cars in Europe over its long production life. The 1960s saw the release of iconic coupÊs, cabriolets and spiders alongside family cars such as the Fiat 1500. One of the most sought after and collectible Fiats of the 1960s remains the Fiat 124. Fiat fared well during the Oil Crisis in 1973, and by 1980, the Panda became the company flagship. In the 1990s, more Fiats arrived in the form of nearly 20 new models, which included the Barchetta, Cinquecento and Punto. Tody, Fiat manufactures re-designed Pandas, Tipos and other iconic models while continuing to dominate the European small car market.

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Car Fiat 500 Year 2007 - Present Engine 0.9 L / 2-cyl. 1.2 L & 1.4 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.3 L / 4-cyl Diesel. Power 44 hp (59 kW) to 200 hp (150 kW) Petrol. 74 hp (55 kW) to 94 hp (70 kW) Diesel.

The retrospective Fiat 500 was released in 2007 and is also known as the Nuova 500 and the New 500. The Abarth version is capable of speeds in excess of 200 km/h (120 mph).

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Fiat 500 'Bambino' 1957 - 1975 0.5 L / 2-cyl 18 hp (13.2 kW)

The Fiat 500 was the world's first 'city car', produced in the post-World War II years as Europe began to rebuild. Later in its life, it was produced in an Abarth sports version and fitted with a 600 cc engine.

The Fiat 500 was nicknamed the Bambino (Baby) and was Italy's answer to post-World War II economics. In many instances, the Fiat Bambino replaced the family horse with the world's first city car.

Car Year Engine Power

Fiat 500 1957 - 1975 0.5 L / 2-cyl 18 hp (13.2 kW)

Fiat 509 1924 - 1929 1.0 L / 4-cyl 22 hp (16 kW)

The Fiat 509 replaced the popular Fiat 501 in 1924. The model was available in both a two-door and four-door sedan, spyder or cabriolet and was also a popular taxi.

Car Year Engine Power

Fiat Barchetta 1995 - 2002 / 2004 - 2005 1.8 L / 4-cyl 130 hp (97 kW)

Originally developed as the Tipo B Spider 176, the Fiat Barchetta's production run was interrupted when the coach builder's company went into receivership.

Car Year Engine Power

Fiat Dino 2400 Spider 1966 - 1973 2.0 L & 2.4 L / V6 158 hp (118 kW) & 178 hp (132 kW)

The Dino reference in the 2400 Spider's name refers to the engine, which was a Ferrari Dino V6. The model was produced in sufficient numbers to qualify for Formula 2 racing.

Car Year Engine Power

Fiat 127 Series 3 1982 - 1983 1.0 L & 1.3 L / 4-cyl. 1.3 L / 4-cyl Diesel. 44 hp (33 kW) to 74 hp (55 kW)

The Series 3 Fiat 127 (known as the Fiat Stella in Finland) was the last of the 127 series, which began in 1971.


Car Year Engine Power

Ferrari 458 2009 - 2015 4.5 L / V8 570 hp (425 kW)

The Ferrari 458 was the replacement for the Ferrari F430. In turn, the 458 was replaced by the Ferrari 488. The mid-engined sports car featured a 7speed dual clutch Getrag gearbox.

Ferrari Enzo Ferrari was initially involved with Alfa Romeo as head of the company's racing team. He left to form his own company in 1939 and produced a single racing car in 1940 - the Fiat inspired Tipo 815. Ferrari's first true car was made in 1947 and released as the Ferrari 125S, and the decade was finished off by the release of the 166 Inter in 1949. Ferrari's best years were still to come, and the 1950s saw the release of the 250 Europa and 375 America alongside many other iconic models. The 1960s began with the 400 Superamerica and introduced the world to the California, the Dino and the Daytona. By the end of the decade, Fiat took a controlling interest in the company, which did not diminish the quality or quantity of models produced. The Mondial of the 1980s gave rise to years of upgrades and more exciting releases, and the new century began with an incredible array of cars and supercars. Of the latter, the Enzo and the LaFerrari are proof that Ferrari remains an iconic and exciting manufacturer.

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Car Year Engine Power

Ferrari 275 GTB 1964 - 1968 3.3 L / V12 280 hp (208 kW) to 300 hp (224 kW)

The 275 GTB sported a Pininfarina styled body and was also available in spyder and roadster variants, the latter of which was designed by Scaglietti. It was the first of the Ferraris to have a tranxaxle.

Car Year Engine Power

Ferrari 250 MM Vignale Spider 1953 3.0 L / V12 240 hp (180 kW)

The 'MM' in the Ferrari 250 MM Vignale Spider signified the vehicle's victory in the 1952 Mille Miglia. The racing car replaced the Ferrari 250 S and had a maximum speed of 250 km/h (155 mph).

Car Year Engine Power

Ferrari Mondial 1980 - 1993 3.0 L / V8 214 hp (159 kW)

The Ferrari Modial replaced the Ferrari Dino 308 GT4 and was the first Ferrari to be constructed with a tubular steel frame. Models included the Quattrovalvole, Mondial 3.2, Mondial T and Mondial Moneytron.

Car Year Engine Power

Ferrari Testarossa 1984 - 1996 4.9 L / 12-cyl 390 hp (290 kW)

The two-door coupĂŠ Ferrari Testarossa first debuted at the Paris Auto Show in 1984 and won many fans, including notable celebrities. Testarossa means 'redhead' in Italian.

Car Year Engine Power

Ferrari 348 1989 - 1995 3.4 L / V8 300 hp (224 kW)

The Ferrari 348 was in development during Enzo Ferrari's life, but was released for sale posthumously. Upgrades included the Serie Speciale, Spider and GT Competizione among others.

Car Year Engine Power

Ferrari 'Dino' 246 GTS 1969 - 1974 2.4 L / V6 192 hp (143 kW)

The Dino 246 GTS was part of the Dino Ferrari line that was in production between 1968 and 1976. Less than 1300 246 GTS models were produced.

Car Year Engine Power

Ferrari 599 2007 - 2012 6.0 L / 12-cyl 620 hp (456 kW) to 670 hp (493 kW)

The Ferrari 599 was a passenger coupĂŠ, first unvelied in 2006 in Geneva. Road versions included the GTB Fiorano, HGTE, GTO and SA Aperta.


Car Year Engine Power

Maserati 3500 GT Vignale 1957 - 1964 3.5 L / 6-cyl 217 hp (162 kW)

The 3500 GT Vignale was one of two 3500 GT models produced by the company. The coupé version was styled by Carrozzeria and the convertible grand tourer by Vignale.

Maserati By the 1950s, the name of Maserati was synonymous with championship cars and driving, and Juan-Manuel Fangio drove for the company's racing team. In 1957, the company released the Maserati 3500 GT as a grand tourer, which was the first Maserati produced in a series. A V8 powered Maserati GT followed, and the 1960s saw an explosion of new Maseratis. The 3500 GT arrived in 1962 and was followed by the Mistral Coupé and the Spider over the following two years. Also arriving in the early 1960s was the Maserati Quattroporte, which was powered by a 4.2 litre V8 engine and set the benchmark for future models. The 1960s ended with the launch of the Maserati Ghibli coupé, Spyder and SS, as well as the Maserati Indy. The Maserati Bora, Merak, Quattroporte II and Khamsin marked the early 1970s, with the latter replacing the Ghibli. By the 1980s, Maserati's range included saloons, and the Maserati Biburto was introduced during the decade. The 1990s heralded the arrival of the 3200 GT, and the new century continued to excite with such models as the Gran Turismo, GranCabrio, Levante and Alfieri among others. 104


Car Year Engine Power

Maserati 5000 GT 1959 - 1964 4.9 L / V8 325 hp (242 kW) to 340 hp (253 kW)

Several designers were used in the body styling through the Maserati 5000 GT's production life. A total of 33 models were ultimately produced.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Maserati Merak 1972 - 1983 2.0 L & 3.0 L / V6 187 hp (140 kW) to 217 hp (162 kW)

The Maserati Merak was similar in many ways to the more powerful Maserati Bora, and each car shared structural components. The 2+2 feature was available as the result of a more compact engine.

Maserati V4 Sport Zagato 1929 - 1931 3.9 L /V4 16-cyl 280 hp to 305 hp

Alfieri Maserati designed the V4 Sport Zagato using the existing 2.0 litre Tipo 26 engine and virtually pairing two of them to create a 16 cylinder engine. The car won the 1930 Tripoli Grand Prix.

Car Year Engine Power

Maserati Mistral 1963 - 1970 3.5 L to 4.0 L / 6-cyl 235 hp (175 kW) to 255 hp (190 kW)

The Maserati Mistral replaced the Maserati 3500 GT. Its name is translated to mean a wind, and the tradition continued through subsequent model names.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Maserati Gran Turismo 2007 - Present 4.2 L & 4.7 L / V8 399 hp (298 kW) to 454 hp (338 kW)

The Maserati Gran Turismo Sport four-seat, two-door coupĂŠ shares the Maserati Quattroporte V platform. The Gran Turismo Sport model has been in production since 2012.

Maserati Ghibli I 1967 - 1973 4.7 L & 4.9 L / V8 306 hp (228 kW) & 330 hp (246 kW)

The first of the Maserati Ghiblis was a two-door grand tourer that debuted in 1966 at the Turin Motor Show. Before it was replaced by the Maserati Khamsin in 1974, the Ghibli was lauded as one of the best sports cars of the 1960s.

Car Maserati Quattroporte VI Year 2013 - Present Engine 3.0 L / V6 & 3.8 L / V8 Petrol. 3.0 L / V6 Diesel. Power 404hp (302 kW) to 523 hp (390 kW) Petrol. 271 hp (202 kW) Diesel. The Maserati Quattroporte was first launched in 1963 and went through several generations that were punctuated by breaks. The VI luxury sports saloon was first manufactured in 2013.


Car Year Engine Power

Lancia Flavia 1961 - 1971 1.5 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl 75 hp (56 kW) to 124 hp (93 kW)

The Lancia Flavia was the precursor to the Lancia 2000 and was produced as an executive car. The original 1.5 litre engine was upgraded over the decade to feature 1.8 litre and 2.0 litre engines.

Lancia Lancia was established in 1906 by two racing drivers, and the first car produced was the Lancia Tipo 51. By 1910, Lancia was exporting to the USA. Between that time and the post-World War II years, Lancia was known as an innovative car designer and manufacturer well ahead of its time. In 1950, the Lancia Aurelia was released with a ground breaking V6 engine. Fiat took a controlling interest in Lancia in the late 1960s, and in the 1970s the company released the Stratos, Beta and Gamma. The Lancia Delta marked the 1980s as a significant Lancia model while the Stratos successfully took to the rallying circuit. Throughout its history, the name of Lancia has been synonymous with innovation and ground breaking automotive engineering. In the 21st century, the Lancia Thema and the Voyager set the tone for further success, and Lancia continues its reputation for impressive concept cars. That reputation began in 1970 with the Stratos Zero and has continued ever since.

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Car Year Engine Power

Lancia 2000 HF Coupé 1971 - 1975 2.0 L / 4-cyl 113 hp (85 kW) to 123 hp (92 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

The Lancia Flavia was the precursor to the Lancia 2000 and was produced as an executive car. The original 1.5 litre engine was upgraded over the decade to feature 1.8 litre and 2.0 litre engines.

Car Year Engine Power

Lancia Delta HF Integrale 1979 - 1994 2.0 L & 2.5 L / 4-cyl 185 hp (136 kW)

The Lancia Monetecarlo was first released as a Spider, followed by a Coupé one year later and a Corse in the last two years of production. A 1.8 litre model was released in the USA as the Lancia Scorpion.

The Delta HF Integrale was a 4WD 'hot hatch' version of the Lancia Delta, which was in production between 1979 and 1994. It came with a turbocharged petrol engine and was an extremely successful rally car.

Car Year Engine Power

Lancia Aurelia B20 1955 1.8 L to 2.5 L / V6 75 hp (66 kW) to 80 hp (60 kW)

The Lancia Aurelia B20 was released as part of the Lancia Aurealia's first generation of models. The car was named after the Via Aurelia Roman road between Rome and Pisa.

Car Lancia Musa Year 2004 - 2012 Engine 1.4 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.3 L to 1.9 L / 4-cyl Diesel. Power 77 hp (57 kW) to 94 hp (70 kW) Petrol. 69 hp (51 kW) to 100 hp (74 kW) Diesel. The Lancia Musa shares many components with the Lancia Idea and is a luxury mini MPV. The interior is luxuriously appointed.

Car Year Engine Power

Lancia Beta 1972 - 1984 1.3 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl 84 hp (63 kW) to 133 hp (99 kW)

The Lancia Beta was the company's first car following the Fiat takeover. Marketed as a compact executive car, it was produced in a number of models, including a 2-door coupé and a mid-engined sports car.

Lancia Montecarlo 1975 - 1978 / 1980-1981 2.0 L / 4-cyl 118 hp (88 kW)


Car Year Engine Power

Honda City FA 1981 - 1986 1.2 L / 4-cyl 65 hp (49 kW)

The Honda City FA was part of the Honda City's first generation. The FA designation referred to the model's cabriolet or turbo status.

Honda Honda began producing motor vehicles in 1963 with the release of a 'car-truck', and followed it up with the Honda S500 roadster. Six years later, the Honda 1300 arrived as a four-door sedan, which was upstaged by the iconic Honda Civic in 1972. Honda was a late comer to motor manufacturing in Japan, but it quickly made up for lost time against Nissan and Toyota. Its longest running model was the Honda Civic, a compact car with a sales record behind only Toyota Corolla. In the 1980s and 1990s, Honda went 'upmarket' with its Civic, Prelude and Accord models, and it increased its market share by introducing the Acura luxury model into the USA. The company's approach to technology has been different to that of its national rivals, and innovation has led to the development of hybrid and electric cars. The Honda Civic GX was voted the greenest car in the USA for seven years in a row as the impact of green energy in the car market continues to grow and set the benchmark for future design and manufacturing.

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Car Year Engine Power

Honda Vigor 1981 - 1995 1.8 L to 2.0 L / 4-cyl. 2.0 L & 2.5 L / 5-cyl 108 hp (80 kW) to 128 hp (96 kW)

The Honda Vigor was sold in the USA between 1992 and 1994 as the Acura Vigor. It was a premium saloon styled as an upmarket Honda Accord.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Honda S800 1966 - 1970 0.8 L / 4-cyl 79 hp (52 kW)

The Honda S800 was the replacement for the Honda S600. It was designed to create competition within the market against the popular MG Midget, Fiat 850 Spider, Austin-Healey Sprite and Triumph Spitfire.

Honda CR-Z Hybrid 2010 - 2016 1.5 L / iVTEC 4-cyl Hybrid-Electric 122 hp (91 kW)

The compact hybrid-electric Honda CR-Z was marketed as a 'sport hybrid' upon release in 2010. Outside of the USA, the CR-Z is a 2+2 sports car.

Car Year Engine Power

Honda S2000 1999 - 2009 2.0 L to 2.2 L / 4-cyl 239 hp (178 kW) to 247 hp (184 kW)

The Honda S2000 roadster was first unveiled as a concept car in 1995 and went into production in 1999.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine

Honda Small Hybrid Sports Concept 2007 4-cyl Petrol-Electric Hybrid

The Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II was known as one of the 'Big Healeys', which included all 3000 models and the 6 cylinder Austin-Healey.

Honda Fit (First Generation) 2001 - 2008 1.2 L to 1.4 L / 4-cyl 84 hp (63 kW)

Also known as the Honda Jazz in selected countries, the Honda Fit has evolved through a number of generations since its debut in 2001. It is renowned for having a relatively spacious interior for a small car.

Car Year Engine Power

Honda Civic 1972 - Present 1.2 L / 4-cyl to 1.5 L / VTEC Turbo 50 hp (37 kW) to 173 hp (129 kW)

Honda's extremely successful and long lasting Civic range began life as a subcompact car in 1972 and has since evolved into a compact car through several generations.


Car Year Engine Power

Toyota Crown Deluxe (Fifth Generation) 1974 - 1979 2.0 L / 4-cyl. 2.0 L & 2.6 L / 6-cyl Petrol. 2.2 L / 4-cyl Diesel. 86 hp (64 kW) to 110 hp (82 kW)

The Toyota Crown line was first released in 1955 and continues into the present day. The fifth generation included the S80, S90 and S100 models and came in four trims, including the Deluxe and Royal Saloon.

Toyota In 1937, the Toyota Motor Co. came into being and was seconded to produce military vehicles for the duration of World War II. The company produced the Toyota SA in 1947. Originally named the 'Toyopet SA', the name was changed for marketing purposes. Joining the SA were the Crown, Corona and Master. Designing and producing smaller cars in the wake of the 1973 oil crisis, Toyota was very successful throughout the decade. When the USA changed its import taxation rules, the company decided to set up a manufacturing plant in California in the early 1980s, and a number of new brands, including the luxury Lexus model, were built there. Compact Toyotas gave way to larger models in the 1990s and included the Camry and Scion. Placing Toyota squarely on the eco-map in the late 1990s was the release of the Toyota Prius, a hybrid car that revolutionised everyday motoring. Today, Toyota continues to lead the market in automotive design and engineering and has invested in robotics and artificial intelligence research with an eye firmly on the future. 110


Car Year Engine Power

Toyota Cressida X30 1976 - 1980 2.0 L / 4-cyl 90 hp (67 kW)

The Toyota Cressida X30 was released as Toyota's third generation of Cressida, which was first released in 1968 and ran until 2004.

Car Year Engine Power

Toyota Supra SZ 1993 - 2002 3.0 L / 6-cyl 320 hp (239 kW)

The Toyota Supra line was first introduced in 1978 and was also known as the Toyota Celica Supra. The fourth generation was the A80, first produced in 1993.

Car Year Engine Power

Toyota Corolla E30 1974 - 1981 1.2 L to 1.6 L / 4-cyl 53 hp (40 kW) to 122 hp (91 kW)

The Toyota Corolla E30 was the third generation in the Corolla series, which was first launched in 1966 and has continued ever since. Its release aligned with the global need for greater motoring fuel economy.

Car Year Engine Power

Toyota Celica T230 1999 - 2006 1.8 L / 4-cyl 140 hp (104 kW)

The Celica T230 was the seventh and last generation of Toyota Celica, which was in production from 1970.

Car Year Engine Power

Toyota Yaris 1999 - Present 1.2 L to 1.5 L / 4-cyl (59 kW) to (79 kW)

The Toyota Yaris subcompact was also marketed as the Toyota Echo for some export countries. It is available in saloon,hatchback and coupĂŠ models.

Car Year Engine Power

Toyota Land Cruiser J40 1960 - 1984 3.9 L to 4.2 L / 6-cyl Petrol. 3.0 L to 4.0 L / 6-cyl Diesel. 125 hp (93 kW) Petrol. 78 hp (58 kW)

The J40 was the second generation of Land Cruiser, following the Land Cruiser BJ and Land Cruiser FJ of 1950 to 1955.


Car Year Engine Power

Subaru BRAT (Brumby) 1978 - 1994 1.6 L & 1.8 L / 4-cyl 67 hp (50 kW) to 72 hp (54 kW)

The Subaru BRAT was known by many names outside of the USA, including the Brumby in Australia, the 284 in Great Britain and the Shifter, Targa, MV or MPV elsewhere.

Subaru Following the end of World War II and the rebuilding of Japan, Fuji Heavy Industries was created as part of organising the country's manufacturing future. The company's CEO named the car manufacturing division Subaru, and the Subaru 1500 was released in 1954. Four years later, the Subaru 360 arrived and was followed by the Sambar and the Subaru 1000 between then and 1965. The involvement of Nissan in Fuji Heavy Industries set the stage for a long term relationship between Subaru and Nissan, which saw Nissan components used in models released from the late 1960s. Some of those models included the 1969 Subaru R2, the 1978 Subaru BRAT (Brumby), the 1993 Subaru Impreza and the 1997 Subaru Forester. In the early 21st century, Subaru released its Baja and Tribeca models. Subaru has enjoyed success in Canada, the USA and the Philippines among other countries, and the brand is renowned for producing popular 4WD models.

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Car Year Engine Power

Subaru Outback (Subaru Legacy) 1994 - Present 2.5 L / 4-cyl & 3.0 L / 6-cyl 165 hp (123 kW) & 212 hp (158 kW)

The Subaru Outback was a development of the Subaru Legacy's second generation. It was named after the Australian outback and released in Japan as the Legacy Grand Wagon.

Car Subaru Legacy (Liberty) BC Year 1991-1994 Engine 1.8 L & 2.0 L / 4-cyl. 2.0 L & 2.2 L / Turbo. Power 100 hp (75 kW) & 147 hp (110 kW) 217 hp (162 kW) - Turbo

Subaru Legacy's first generation included the BC, BJ and BF models, which were the saloon, raised-roof wagon and wagon respectively. It was named the Subaru Liberty in Australia.

Car Year Engine Power

Subaru XV 2012 - Present 1.6 L & 2.0 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 2.0 L / 4-cyl Diesel. 147 hp (110 kW) - 2.0 L Petrol

The Subaru XV is part of the Subaru Impreza family, which was first launched in 1992. In Japan, early models were powered by a 2.0 litre engine, and European cars sported 1.6 litre engines.

Car Year Engine Power

Subaru Impreza 1992 - 2000 2.0 L & 2.5 L / 4-cyl turbocharged 236 hp (176 kW) to 310 hp (227 kW)

The Subaru Impreza was first released in 1992 as a compact car that replaced the Subaru Leone. Numerous models in the line included five-door hatchbacks, four-door saloons, coupĂŠs and the high powered WRX.

Car Year Engine Power

Subaru WRX (Impreza) 1992 - 2000 2.0 L & 2.5 L / 4-cyl turbocharged 236 hp (176 kW) to 310 hp (227 kW)

WRX signified 'World Rally Cross' in motoring circles, and Subaru released each of its Impreza generations with a WRX model.


Car Year Engine Power

Datsun Model 16 1937 0.7 L / 4-cyl 16 hp (12 kW)

The Datsun Type 16 replaced the Datsun Type 15 but sported the same motor as its predecessor. The radiator was more refined than previously, and chrome trim was introduced.

Datsun The line between Datsun and Nissan is defined by the export market. Until 1986, all of Nissan's cars were badged as Datsuns when exported. The DAT Motorcar Co. released its first small car protoyype in 1931 as the 'Datson'. Three years later, Nissan took over DAT and renamed the brand as Datsun. Sales were slow at first, but by 1935, the company had a Ford-style production line and began exporting to New Zealand. From 1937 to 1945, Japan was at war with China, the USA and their allies, and it wasn't until 1958 that the company was able to resume designing, producing and exporting cars. The first Datsun to reach international shores was the Datsun 113, which was powered by an 850cc engine and was sold in California. The Datsun 310 (Bluebird) arrived next in 1959, and exports continued to expand through the 1960s. By 1968, the Datsun 240Z wowed purchasers and set the standard for affordable sports cars around the world. By 1986, Nissan began exporting under the Nissan badge.

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Car Year Engine Power

Datsun 210 1957 - 1958 1.0 L / 4-cyl 37 hp (27 kW)

The Datsun 210 had an almost identical body to the Datsun 113. It was the first Datsun to have 12 volt electrics installed, with only 6 volt used previously.

Car Year Engine Power

Datsun 120Y 1973 - 1977 1.2 L / 4-cyl 70 hp (51 kW)

The Datsun 120Y was part of the Datsun (Nissan) Sunny range. A heavily modified Datsun 120Y reached 473 km/h (294 mph) at Bonneville in 1985.

Car Year Engine Power

Datsun 280Z 1975 - 1978 2.8 L / 6-cyl 149 hp (111 kW)

The Datsun 280 was part of the Nissan S30 range, which was first released in 1969. It replaced the Datsun 260Z.

Car Year Engine Power

Datsun Fairlady 1600 1966 - 1970 1.6 L / 4-cyl 96 hp (72 kW)

The Datsun Fairlady was Datsun's very first sports car range and included three models - the 1500, 1600 and 2000. The first model was released in 1961.

Car Year Engine Power

Datsun Sunny 1966 - 2006 1.2 L to 1.6 L / 4cyl (later in Diesel) 66 hp (49 kW) to 94 hp (70 kW)

The Datsun Sunny (later the Nissan Sunny) was designed to compete with the Toyota Corolla. It was known as the Sentra in the USA and the Tsuru in Mexico.

Car Year Engine Power

Datsun 14 1935 - 1936 0.7 L / 4-cyl 15 hp (11 kW)

The Datsun 14 came in tourer, roadster, saloon and van models. Aside from its grille, there was very little difference between the earlier Datsun 13 and the Datsun 14.


Car Year Engine Power

Nissan Figaro 1991 0.1 L /4-cyl Turbo 75 hp (56 kW)

The Nissan Figaro was a retro-styled 2+2 convertible available only in Nissan Cherry Stores in Japan. All models were right-hand drive.

Nissan Nissan began life as Nissan Motor Co. Ltd. in 1934 and immediately began producing Datsun cars for the export market. In Japan, vehicles were badged as Nissans, and the Nissan Bluebird arrived in 1957 for the Japanese market. By the end of the 1960s, the Nissan Skyline GT-R was a popular model at home and had been preceded by models such as the Fairlady, the Cedric, the Silvia and the Sunny among others. By the 1970s, the Nissan Stanza and Nissan Gazelle were stand out sellers, and the 1980s saw the release of the iconic 300ZX, which was the Fairlady Z at home in Japan. By 1986, all Nissan exports carried the Nissan badge around the world, and the company's renown skyrocketed. Nissan had a vehicle for almost every purpose and purchaser, and entered the 21st century with a plethora of new models that carry Nissan's reputation for technological advancement into the future.

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Car Year Engine Power

Nissan Juke DIG-T 2013 - Present 1.6 L / 4-cyl Turbo 197 hp (147 kW)

The Nissan Juke is a crossover SUV subcompact car. It was initially unveiled as the Nissan Qazana concept car in 2009 and was marketed in China as the infiniti ESQ after release.

Car Year Engine Power

Nissan 350Z (Nissan Fairlady Z) 2002 - 2009 3.5 L / V6 260 hp (193 kW)

The Nissan 350Z was released initially as a coupĂŠ in 2002 and later as a roadster in 2004. It was superseded by the Nissan 370Z.

Car Year Engine Power

Nissan Maxima Performance 1981 - Present 2.5 L / 4-cyl & V6 175 hp (130 kW) & 228 hp (170 kW) - current model

Car Year Engine Power

Originally debuting as the Datsun Maxima in 1981, the Nissan Maxima has been released in a number of models. As of 2015, it was in its eighth generation.

Nissan 300ZX Z32 1989 - 2000 3.0 L / V6 222 hp (165 kW) to 300 hp (224 kW)

The body of the Z32 was designed using early CAD software, and the model had rounder edges than its predecessor, the Nissan 300ZX Z31.

Car Year Engine Power

Nissan 200SX / Nissan Silvia 1995 - 2000 2.0 L / 4-cyl & 4-cyl Turbo. 2.4 L / 4-cyl. 140 hp (169 kW) & 216 hp (172 kW). 155 hp (116 kW).

Originally released as the Datsun 200SX, the model is part of the Silvia family, which was first released in 1974 under the Nissan umbrella.

Car Year Engine Power

Nissan Micra K13 2010 - 2016 1.2 L / 3-cyl. 1.5 L & 1.6 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.5 L / 4-cyl Diesel. 79 hp (59 kW)

The Nissan Micra was first released in 1982 and was sold in South America and Asia as the Nissan March. The Micra K13 is a fourth generation Micra.

Car Year Engine

Nissan Gripz Concept 2015 Petrol-Electric Hybrid

The Nissan Gripz is a concept crossover SUV first unveiled in Frankfurt in 2015. The colour scheme and styling are designed in homage to earlier Nissans such as the 240Z and the Datsun Fairlady.


Car Year Engine Power

Mazda Luce 1500 1966 - 1973 1.5 L & 1.8 L / 4-cyl. 1.3 L / Rotary Engine 98 hp (73 kW) - 1.8 L. 126 hp (94 kW) - Rotary Engine

The Mazda Luce was released in the USA with the smallest of the model's engines, but was upgraded later. In Australia, the car was released as the Mazda 1500.

Mazda Mazda began life as the Toyo Cork Kogyo Co in 1920, and by 1931 the company began manufacturing motorised rickshaws. Renamed Toyo Kogyo, the company began to build cars after World War II ,and each car was badged as a Mazda from that point in time. In 1960, the Mazda R360 was released, followed two years later by the Mazda Carol. In 1960, the company began to experiment with NSU's Wankel rotary engine and formed a partnership with the German company to produce the Cosmo Sport in 1967. Rotary engines enjoyed a wave of popularity, and Mazdas such as the RX series and the R100 were exported around the world before the 1973 oil crisis took its toll. Toyo Kogyo officially changed its name to Mazda in the mid 1980s, by which time small cars such as the Mazda Capella and the RX-7 had already found favour at home and abroad. The Mazda 121 marked Mazda's success in the 1990s while both the RX and MX series continue to rise in popularity today alongside CX crossover SUVs.

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Car Year Engine Power

Mazda Familia CoupĂŠ 1000 1963 - 1968 1.0 L / 4-cyl 67 hp (50 kW)

The Mazda Familia CoupĂŠ 1000 was a first generation Familia. The Bertone-styled body has a 'flat deck', reminiscent of the Chevrolet Corvair.

Car Year Engine Power

Mazda 616 (Capella) 1970 - 1978 1.4 L to 1.8 L / 4-cyl. 1.1 L Rotary Engine. 68 hp (74 kW) to 84 hp (63 kW). 126 hp (94 kW) - Rotary Engine

The first generation Mazda Capella was also known as the Mazda 616 and the Mazda RX-2. Earlier models had rectangular headlights, and the rotary models had round ones.

Car Year Engine Power

Mazda MX-5 / Miata 1989 - Present 1.5 L, 1.8 L & 2.0 L / 4-cyl 88 hp (66 kW) to 203 hp (151 kW)

The front-engined, two-seater Mazda MX-5 was released in Japan as the MX-5 Miata. In North America, it was marketed as the Eunos Roadster.

Car Year Engine Power

Mazda Tribute 2.0 2000 - 2004 2.0 L / 4-cyl 124 hp (92 kW)

The Mazda Tribute was developed jointly with Ford, and was released by Ford as the Ford Escape in 2000. The model was designed as a robust answer to larger pickups and smaller SUVs.

Car Mazda RX7 Year 1978 -2002 Engine 1.1 L & 1.3 L / Wankel Rotary Power 100 hp (75 kW) to 162 hp (121 kW) 135 hp (101 kW) - 1.3 L Model

Mazda's RX-7 was an iconic sports car. It was powered by a Wankel rotary engine, and had the option of a rear seat in US models.

Car Mazda 2 / Demio (DE) Year 2007 - 2014 Engine 1.3 L & 1.5 L / 4-cyl Petrol. 1.4 L & 1.6 L / 4-cyl Diesel. Power 97 hp (72 kW) & 111 hp (83 kW) Petrol. 67 hp (50 kW) & 109 hp (81 kW) Diesel

The Mazda 2 was released as the Mazda Demio in Japan and the Mazda 2 Jinxiang in China. It was available as a 3-door or 5-door hatchback and a 4-door sedan/saloon.


Car Year Engine Power

Mitsubishi GTO Twin Turbo 1990 - 1993 3.0 L / V6 Twin Turbo 296 hp (221 kW)

Known also as the Dodge Stealth and the Mitsubishi 3000 GT, the GTO Twin Turbo was the first of a line that delivered three distinct releases.

Mitsubishi Mitsubishi Heavy Industries developed a 4WD passenger car during World War II for military use, and later began assembling other manufacturers' vehicles in peace-time. The company's relationship with various manufacturers would become Mitsubishi's greatest strength in its future as it formed (and continues to form) strategic partnerships around the world. In 1960, the company unveiled its own car - the Mitsubishi 500 saloon. Two years later, the Mitsubishi Colt arrived as the first of many in its line, while the Mitsubishi Debonair was the first of the company's luxury cars built for the Japanese market in 1964. By 1969, the Mitsubishi Galant arrived as the company formed a strategic alliance with Chrysler. Following a financial downturn, the company rebounded in the 1980s with the Cordia and the Starion, which were sold successfully in the USA. In the 1990s, the 4WD Pajero was another successful model at home and overseas and was only one of a line of people movers and off-roaders that appealed to the international market and reached a pinnacle with the Mitsubishi Triton. 120


Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Mitsubishi Mirage G4 2012 - Present 1.0 L & 1.2 L / 3-cyl 69 hp (52 kW) & 76 hp (57 kW)

The Colt Galant GTO was first unveiled in 1969 at the Tokyo Motor Show, bearing the name Galant GTX-1. The name was revived in 1990 for the Mitsubishi GTO, 13 years after it was last used.

Having changed the model's name to Colt throughout previous generations, Mitsubishi reverted to the Mirage name for its sixth generation in 2012. It was also known as the Mitsubishi Space Star.

Car Year Engine Power

Mitsubishi Starion JB 1984 - 1985 2.0 L / 4-cyl 197 hp (147 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

The JB version of the Mitsubishi was released only for the Australian market. It replaced the the Starion JA and preceded the Starion JD.

Car Year Engine Power

Mitsubishi Magna TJ 2000 - 2003 3.0 L / V6 188 hp (140 kW)

The TJ Mitsubishi Magna was a model in the third Magna generation. The TJ was released in two series.

Car Year Engine Power

Mitsubishi Colt Galant GTO 1970 - 1977 1.6 L, 1.7 L & 2.0 L / 4-cyl 110 hp (82 kW) to 123 hp (92 kW)

Mitsubishi Cordia AB Turbo 1984 - 1985 1.6 L / 4-cyl Turbocharged 112 hp (84 kW)

The Cordia AB Turbo was part of the Cordia line, which was first released in 1982. It replaced the AA and preceded the AC. The latter model was upgraded to be operated on unleaded petrol.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT VR-4 1998 - 2001 3.0 L / V6 320 hp (238 kW)

Part of the later upgrade to the Mitsubishi GTO line, the 3000 GT VR4 sported a number of exterior modifications to distinguish it from eralier GTO models.

Car Year Engine Power

Mitsubishi Lancer CY2A/4A 2007 - Present 2.0 L / 4-cyl 148 hp (110 kW) to 153 (114 kW)

The Lancer CY2A/4A was released in Australia as the Lancer ES. Cruise control, traction control and passenger/knee airbags were included as standard features.


Car Season Engine Power

Porsche 718 1960 1.6 L / 4-cyl 160 hp (120 kW)

Team Williams Motul entered the March 711 in the 1972 Formula One season. Team drivers were Henri Pescarolo and Carlos Pace.

Formula One Racing Cars (1950 to present)

Today's Formula One competition began with the first World Driver's Championship staged at Silverstone in 1950, with plans for the championship having been laid before World War II. The very first race was won in an Alfa Romeo by Guiseppe Farina, who just managed to beat team mate Juan Manuel Fangio. Fangio went on to dominate the championship for a number of years. By the 1960s, technology and sponsorship began to have an impact on the championship, and Lotus paved the way in both areas. Aerodynamics came into play during the 1970s, along with the transformation of the sport at the hands of Bernie Ecclestone. In the 1980s, turbocharged engines dominated until they were banned in 1989. As McLaren and Williams dominated the podium for almost two decades, safety rules changed following the death of Ayrton Senna. Renault and Ferrari joined McLaren and Williams as part of the 'Big Four' into the 21st century, while Michael Schumacher set numerous lap records. Today, the world of Formula One Racing continues to undergo a metamorphosis that promises to deliver thrills and excitement well into the future. 122


Car Season Engine Power

Renault-Elf RE40 1983 1.5 L / V6 880 hp (656 kW)

Equipe Renault-Elf fielded the Renault RE 40 for the 1983 Formula One season with Alain Prost at the wheel. Prost finished second behind Nelson Piquet, with only two points between the drivers.

Car Season Engine Power

Car Season Engine Power

Ferrari 555 F1 1955 2.5 L / 4-cyl 260 hp (194 kW)

The Ferrari 555 F1 was also known as the Ferrari Supersqualo. It was the flagship of the Scuderia Ferrari racing team for the Formula One World Championship of 1955.

Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport (GS) 1950 4.5 L / 6-cyl 195 hp (145 kW)

The Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport competed in the 1950 FIA World Championship of Drivers. It was fielded by Automobiles TalbotDarracq.

Car Season Engine Power

Tyrrell 020 1991 3.5 L / V10 Honda RA101E 650 hp (484 kW)

The Braun Tyrrell Honda Team's Satoru Nakajima and Stefano Modena drove Tyrrell 020s for the 1991 Formula One season.

Car Season Engine Power

Lotus-Renault E20 2012 2.4 L / V8 Renault RS27-2012 650 hp (484 kW)

The Lotus F1 Team fielded the LotusRenault E20 for the 2012 Formula One Season. Drivers were Kimi Räikkönen, Romain Grosjean and Jérôme d'Ambrosio.

Car Season Engine

Jordan EJ12 2002 3.0 L / V10 Honda RA002E

The DHL Jordan Honda Team had drivers Giancarlo Fisichella and Takuma Sato on board for the 2002 season. The team managed an average fifth place.

Car Season Engine Power

March 711 1972 3.0 L / V8 Ford Cosworth DFV 440 hp (328 kW)

Team Williams Motul entered the March 711 in the 1972 Formula One season. Team drivers were Henri Pescarolo and Carlos Pace.


Car Year Engine Power

Honda Civic WTCC 2014 1.6 L Honda HR412E / 4-cyl 380 hp (283 kW)

Gabriele Tarquini drove the Castrol Honda World Touring Car Team's No 2 in the 2014 WTCC. Tarquini finished sixth overall in the Drivers' Championship.

Touring Cars (1987 to present) In 1987, the world's first WTCC (World Touring Car Championship) was held for Group A touring cars. The competition was a complex one and was controversial at first, having usurped the long running ETCC (European Touring Car Championship). The competition lasted a single year before concern over dropping Formula One takings rescinded it. In 1993, the World Touring Car Cup was staged at Monza and won by Ford, but the race was discontinued after 1995. Finally, the ETCC returned in 2001 and was changed to the WTCC in time for the 2005 season and aligning with Diesel 2000 and Super 2000 regulations. Andy Priaulx won the first three seasons in a BMW 320i, while Yvan Muller took line honours in 2008 in a diesel powered SEAT Leรณn TDI. By 2010, Chrysler began to dominate the competition, which is currently satged in Africa, Asia, Great Britain, Europe, South America and the USA.

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Car Year Engine

Chevrolet Cruze 1.6T 2011 1.6 L / 4-cyl Turbocharged

Driving for Chevrolet RML, Yvan Muller was victorious in the 2011 World Touring Car Championship. It was the Cruze's third year year of competition.

Car Year Engine Power

Audi A4 DTM 1996 4.0 L / V8 460 hp (343 kW)

Frank Biela won the British Touring Car Drivers' Championship in 1996 in an Audi Quattro A4 fielded by Audi Sport UK. Following the 1987 championship, the WTCC did not resume until 2005.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Sierra RS 500 1990 2.0 L / 4-cyl 560 hp (417 kW)

In 1990, Klaus Niedzwiedz drove the Ford Sierra RS 500 for Alan Moffat Racing. He drove in six Bathurst 1000 races during his term with the team.

Car Year Engine Power

Citroën C-Elysée WTCC 2015 1.6 L / 4-cyl 380 hp (283 kW)

Citroën Total WTCC entered the 2015 WTCC on the back of a stunning inaugural 2014 season. Sébastian Loeb headed up the team of Citroën CElysée WTCC drivers in the marque's last year of competition in the tournament.

Car Year Engine Power

BMW 320si 2005 2.0 L / 4-cyl 193 hp (147 kW)

BMW Team UK successfully raced the BMW 320si with champion Andy Priaulx at the wheel. Priaulx won the championship for three years in a row from 2005 to 2007.


Car Season Engine

Fiat 131 Abarth 1978 1.8 L / 4-cyl

Markku Alén drove the Fiat 131 Abarth for the World Rally Championship. Alén won the 1978 trophy.

Rally Cars (1977 to present) The pinnacle of rally car racing lies in the World Rally Championships, which is a series of three-day events sectioned in stages and run against the clock. The competition began in 1977 and was created using international championship rallies held in Europe and other countries. In a season of the WRC, between 12 and 16 rallies are contested on a number of surfaces, with points awarded to the top ten drivers. The world's most successful rally car driver is Sébastien Loeb, with nine drivers' championships to his name between 2004 and 2012. In terms of geography, Finland and France are the most successful WRC countries, each with 14 championships. Citroën has been the most successful WRC manufacturer since 1977, thanks to the talents of Sébastien Loeb. Behind Loeb, Tommi Mäkinen, Juha Kankkunen and Sébastien Ogier also have multiple championship wins to their names and continue to attract fans from all over the world.

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Car Season Engine Power

Opel Ascona 400 1982 2.4 L / 4-cyl 230 hp (172 kW)

Of the six teams to take part in the 1982 World Rally Championship, two teams raced the Opel Ascona 400. Only two other models, the Lancia 037 and the Audi Quattro, took part.

Car Season Engine

Volkswagen Polo R WRC 2013 1.6 L / 4-cyl

Volkswagen Motorsport fielded two teams for the 2013 World Rally Championship. Sébastian Ogier won the Drivers' Championship, with Sébastian Loeb defending a title he had won nine times.

Car Season Engine

Citroën C4 WRC 2007 2.0 L / 4-cyl

The 2007 World Rally Championship saw Sébastian Loeb at the wheel of a Citroën Total World Rally Team C4 WRC. Loeb and Citroën Total won the Drivers' and Manufacturers' championship respectively.

Car Season Engine

Car Season Engine Power

Lancia Rally 037 1983 2.0 L / 4-cyl 205 hp (153 kW)

For the 1983 World Rally Championship, Italy's Joly Club raced the Lancia Rally 037. Lancia won the 1983 Manufacturers' Title.

Car Season Engine

Subaru Impreza 555 1995 2.0 L / 4-cyl

Driving for 555 Subaru World Rally Team in 1995, Colin McRae won the Drivers' Championship for the season.

Citroën Xsara WRC 2003 2.0 L / 4-cyl

The 2007 World Rally Championship saw Sébastian Loeb at the wheel of a Citroën Total World Rally Team C4 WRC. Loeb and Citroën Total won the Drivers' and Manufacturers' championship respectively.


Car Year Engine Power

Mini 1000 1976 1.0 L / 4-cyl 39 hp (29 kW)

The 1990 to 1995 British comedy series 'Mr Bean' had the central character driving a Leyland Mini 1000.Throughout the series, Mr Bean had a long running rivalry with the driver of a Reliant Regal van.

Famous Movie Cars Outside of humans and animals, the motor car hold a very special place in the world of TV and movies. From the 1960s, cars have played an enormous role on the silver screen. As Batman's 'Batmobile' inspired a generation of rev heads on TV, Steve McQueen sent would-be racers into raptures during the famous Bullitt chase scene. In the 1970s, everybody fell in love with Herbie (the Love Bug), while James Bond thrilled audiences with an array of exciting sports cars over decades. On American television, the likes of Starsky & Hutch and the Dukes of Hazzard delivered iconic muscle car action, as did a certain Ferrari Testarossa in the Miami Vice Series. In Great Britain, cars were smaller and often associated with comedy, as borne out with Mr. Bean's Mini. From Knight Rider's K.I.T.T. to Magnum's Ferrari 308 GTS or the time travelling DeLorean DMC 12 in the Back to the Future movie series, the movie or television car is as much a part of our generation's social history as fashion, food and fads have been. What the future holds for cars on the silver screen is anybody's guess. 128


Car Year Engine Power

Ford Mustang 390 GT 1968 7.0 L / V8 400 hp (208 kW)

In 1978, the Steve McQueen movie 'Bullitt' opened to audiences who hung onto their seats during one history's greatest cinematic car chase scenes. The film won an Academy Award for Best Editing.

Car Year Engine

Ford Falcon XB GT 1973 5.8 L / V8

The Australian box office hit 'Mad Max' saw Mel Gibson driving what was called the Mad Max Pursuit Special. The original Pursuit Special started life as a white Ford Falcon XB GT CoupĂŠ

Car Year Engine Power

Dodge Charger (General Lee) 1969 3.7 L / 6-cyl 145 hp (108 kW)

The General Lee was a Dodge Charger owned by Bo and Luke Duke in the popular 'Dukes of Hazzard' series between 1979 and 1985. Under the hood was a much larger engine than the standard six-cylinder Dodge motor.

Car Year Engine Power

Ford Gran Torino 1974 5.8 L / V8 148 hp (110 kW)

The Ford Gran Torino featured in the television series 'Starsky & Hutch', which starred David Soul and Paul Michael Glaser between 1975 and 1979.

Car Year Engine Power

De Lorean DMC 12 1981 - 1983 2.8 L/ 6-cyl 130 hp (97 kW)

In the 1985 movie 'Back to the Future', the De Lorean DMC 12 starred as one of the silver screen's most iconic time machines. Today, the original car sits in the Petersen Automotive Museum.

Car Year Engine Power

Aston Martin DB5 1963 - 1965 4.0 L / 6-cyl 282 hp (210 kW)

The Aston Martin DB 5 was the car of choice for James Bond in the 1964 film 'Goldfinger'. It was also featured in subsequent Bond films and remains an iconic model as a result.

Car Year Engine Power

Volkswagen Beetle (Herbie) 1963 1.2 L / 4-cyl 40 hp (29.8 kW)

Cast as Herbie in the 1968 movie 'The Love Bug', was a 1963 Volkswagen Beetle described on movie posters as 'the incredible little car who shifts for himself'.


Car Renault Twizy Year 2012 - Present Power Supply 6.1 kW Lithium-Ion Battery Range 100 km (62 miles) The Renault Twizy is a two-seat city car that runs exclusively on electric battery power. It is manufactured in Spain and legally classified as a quadricycle in Europe.

Electric & Hybrid Cars Electric cars are known to be three times as efficient as those with internal combustion engines, as well as having a history that stretches back to the 1880s. Superseded by petrol fuelled cars in the early 20th century, the electric car would lie dormant until the fuel crises of the 1970s woke the world up to the need for fuel independent of OPEC. The USA, Western Europe, Japan and China currently dominate the world in electric car use, with more than 30 models in use. An alternative to the pure electric car is the hybrid car, which uses a combination of electric and internal combustion power in its operation. Hybrid cars also have a history that began in the late 19th century with early motorcycle technology. The world's first modern hybrid car was unveiled in 1975, and a number of prototype models were released by various manufacturers before Volvo released the first Gas turbine-electric EEC in 1992. In 1997, Toyota unveiled its Prius initially for the Japanese market, and three years later for the US market. Since then, hybrid cars have been developed by Japanese, European and US car manufacturers dedicated to eco-responsible motoring. 130


Car Tesla Roadster Year 2008 - 2012 Power Supply 1.5 to 2.5 / 3-Phase Electric Motor. 53 kW Lithium-Ion Battery Range 320 km (200 miles) Originally codenamed 'DarkStar', the Tesla Roadster was a sports batteryelectric vehicle (BEV). In 2009, a Tesla Roadster set a world record of 501 km (311 miles) on a single charge.

Car Smart Electric Car Year 2007 - Present Power Supply 13.2 kWh Sodium Nickel Chloride Battery Range 110 km (68 miles)

The world is filled with Smart Cars of every shape and size today, but when the first generation was released in 1998, they were an odd looking city car that became an acquired taste. Today, the Smart Car is an all electric vehicle.

Car Revenge Verde HP2ge Hybrid Supercar Year 2010

Revenge Designs began life as a tuner of GM cars, turning them into supercars. When their own hybrid car burst onto the scene in 2010, it sported a hybrid powerplant reputedly capable of producing well over 600 hp (447 kW).

Car Audi A3 e-tron Plug-In Hybrid Year 2014 - Present Power Supply 1.4 L petrol / 8.8 kWh Lithium-Ion Battery Range 940 km (580 miles) Hybrid / 50 km (31 miles) Electric Audi's plug-in hybrid A3 was first unveiled in 2013. It shares a powertrain with Volkswagen's Golf GTE plug-in hybrid, sporting Audispecific software.

Car Nissan LEAF Year 2010 - Present Power Supply Electric Synchronous Motor / 24 to 30 kWh Lithium-Ion Battery Range 172 km (107 miles) The LEAF in Nissan LEAF denotes the car as being 'Leading Environmentally-friendly Affordable Family car'.


Car Year Engine Power

Chrysler ME Four-Twelve 2004 6.0 L / V12 862 hp (634 kW)

Chrysler's high performance ME FourTwelve concept car was so named due to its mid-engine (ME), four turbochargers (Four) and twelve cylinders (Twelve).

Concept Cars Concept Cars are developed by manufacturers as a means of showcasing new ideas or technologies. Generally, the motor show is the platform used to introduce a concept car to the rest of the motoring world, and more often than not, they rarely go into production. The world's first concept car appeared in the 1930s and was either the Aston Martin Atom or the Buick Y-Job (the jury is still out). It was another two decades before Alfa Romeo's BAT cars, General Motors' 12 volt aluminium LeSabre and Cadillac's Cyclone wowed motoring enthusiasts. In the 1960s and 1970s, Cadillac, Ford, Chevrolet, Ferrari and Volvo all brought radical design to the table, and the turn of the 21st century saw early plug-in electric hybrids, audacious V10 gas guzzlers, nuclear and gas turbine powered cars and others arrive. By 2012, BMW stunned the world with its shape-shifting, fabric-covered GINA, while Mercedes-Benz introduced the concept of road scanning to create perfectly smooth motoring. Regardless of radical ideas, today's concepts cars often hold the key to futuring motoring advancement, and their unveiling is a highly anticipated event at motor shows. 132


Car Year

BMW i8 Concept 2011

Now in production, the BMW i8 was introduced as a concept car in 2011. It was originally unveiled as the BMW Concept Vision Efficient Dynamics and is a plug-in hybrid sports car.

Car Year Engine Power

Audi E-Tron 2010 42 kWh Lithium-ion Battery 201 hp (150 kw)

Audi's electric concept cars belong to the company's e-tron family. Two electric motors drive the car's rear wheels, which can accelerate the vehicle to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 5.9 seconds.

Car Year Engine

Honda/Acura NSX Concept 2013 V6 Hybrid Electric

The Honda/Acura NSX concept car takes the original Honda NSX production car to new levels with sleek styling, carbon fibre elements and a minimalistic cockpit. 'Sleek' was the catchcry when the car was unveiled in 2013.

Car Year Engine

Chevrolet Miray 2011 1.5 L / Hybrid Electric

Car Year Engine Power

Peugeot SR1 2010 1.6 L Petrol /Hybrid Electric 215 hp (160 kW)

Now in production, the BMW i8 was introduced as a concept car in 2011. It was originally unveiled as the BMW Concept Vision Efficient Dynamics and is a plug-in hybrid sports car.

The hybrid convertible Peugeot SR1 is powered by Peugeot's HYbrid4 technology, which was incorporated in to the 2011 Peugeot 3008.

Car Year Engine

Mazda Ryuga 2007 2.5 L E85 Flex Fuel

Mazda and Ford teamed up to create the Ryuga concept car in 2007, and it was unveiled alongside Mazda's Nagare. Designed as an example of future styling, the name Ryuga means 'gracious flow' in Japanese.

Car Year Engine

Nissan ESFLOW 2011 2011 Dual Rear Electric Motors

The Nissan ESFLOW Electric is a pure electric concept car capable of reaching 100 km/h (62 mph) in five seconds. A single charge equips the car for 240 kilometres.


Car Year Engine Power

Hyundai Atos 1997 - 2007 1.1 L / 4-cyl 58 hp (43 kW)

A four-door city car, the Hyundai Atos was also marketed as the Hyundai Amica and Atos, and the Santro Xing. In 1999, a redesign saw the Atos become the Atos Prime.

Hyundai The Hyundai Motor Company arrived in South Korea in 1967, 20 years after the establishment of the Hyundai Engineering and Construction Company. The first motor car released was the Cortina, which was produced in 1968 in cooperation with Ford. The first true Hyundai car was manufactured in 1975 as the Hyundai Pony, and it became Korea's first home grown automobile. Exports to South America, several European countries and Canada ensued over the following decade, and by the time the Excel was released, the USA began importing the Hyundai. Technological advancement became the company's focus from that point, and the release of the Sonata and the Alpha saw the company reach excellent sales figures in a short time period. By the early 20th century, Hyundai was a world leading brand with R&D centres in South Korea, Japan, India, Germany and the USA. The company owns part of Kia Motors and has manufacturing plants around the world.

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Car Year Engine Power

Hyundai iX-onic 2009 1.6 L / 4-cyl 167 hp (124 kW)

Hyundai's concept turbocharged 4 x 4 SUV was unveiled in Geneva in 2009. The vehicle's external styling was a continuation on the theme introduced with the 2006 Concept Genus.

Car Year Engine Power

Hyundai Genesis 2008 - 2016 2.0 L / 4-cyl - 2008 Coupé 212 hp (158 kW) - 2008 Coupé

The luxury Hyundai Genesis was first unveiled in 2007 at the New York International Auto Show. It was marketed outisde of Europe as a premium sports sedan/saloon.

Car Year Engine Power

Hyundai HND-9 Concept 2014 3.3 L / V6 365 hp (272 kW)

Based on the Hyundai Genesis, the HND-9 Concept was unveiled in 2014 to reveal bold styling and a fluidity that seemes virtually impossible at first. It sports scissor doors and carbon fibre accents, neither of which are intended for production.

Car Year Engine Power

Hyundai Veloster 2011 - Present 1.6 L / 4-cyl 138 hp (103 kW)

Since 2011, the Hyundai Veloster has been in its first generation. The coupé was designed to replace the discontinued Hyundai Tiburon, which was last produced in 2008.

Car Year Engine Power

Hyundai Scoupe (S-Coupé) 1988 - 1995 1.5 L / 4-cyl 82 hp (61 kW)

Known as both the Scoupe (pronounced scoop) and the SCoupé, Hyundai's sporty coupé was the company's first sports car.


Car Year Engine Power

Volvo PV 544 1958 - 1966 1.6 L / 4-cyl 66 hp (49 kW)

The Volvo PV (Personal Vehicle) Series began in 1947. The PV 544 arrived in 1958 and quickly gained a reputation as a strong, reliable family car.

Volvo Volvo began life as a Swedish ball bearing manufacturer in 1915, with its name emanating from the Latin term 'I roll'. The ball bearing business never got off the ground, but Volvo turned to car production and released its first car in 1927 - the Volvo Ă–V 4. A number of vehicles followed before World War II, but it wasn't until 1947 that the small Volvo PV444 entered production and allowed entry into the US market. Sales in the US began in 1955 in California and then slowly spread across the continent to reach Canada in 1963. In the latter country, Volvo opened an assembly plant in Nova Scotia before setting up a further plant in Belgium. The 1970s saw the arrival of Volvo's 'boxy' 200 series, which took the world by storm and set the company on the path to international success. With safety at the forefront of technology and marketing, it wasn't long before Volvo became a family car of choice around the world a mindset that continues to this day.

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Car Year Engine Power

Volvo 1800 ES 1972 - 1973 2.0 L / 4-cyl 122 hp (91 kW)

The Volvo 1800 ES was a variant of the P1800. It was designed purely as a station wagon (estate) and had a frameless fibreglass tail gate.

Car Year Engine Power

Volvo P1800 1961 - 1973 1.8 L / 4-cyl 96 hp (72 kW)

The Volvo P1800 shot to prominence on television as the vehicle of choice for Simon Templar in the Roger Moore series - The Saint.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Volvo 262 C 1977 - 1981 2.7 L / V6 - 1978 Model 148 hp (110 kW) - 1978 Model

The Volvo 262 C was the company's first luxury coupĂŠ. The model was based on the 200 Series and was built in Italy by Bertone.

Volvo Duett 1953-1969 1.8 L / 4-cyl 85 hp (63 kW)

The design of the Volvo Duett was based on the Volvo PV. The model was a popular one, serving as both a commercial and personal vehicle.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Volvo S60 (Second Generation) 2010 - Present 1.6 L / 4-cyl - 2010 T3 Model 148 hp (110 kW) - 2010 T3 Model

Volvo S40 1995 - 2012 1.9 L / 4-cyl - 2000 Year Model 120.5 (90 kW) - 2000 Year Model

The compact S40 was produced in two generations. Before it was released, the model was to have been called the S4/F4, but the S4 designation had already been reserved by Audi.

The Volvo S60's second generation included a raised saloon version named the V60 Cross Country. There are currently three diesel engines and four petrol engines in the series.

Car Year Engine Power

Volvo 200 Series 1974 - 1993 2.0 L / 4-cyl - 240 DL 99 hp (74 kW) - 240 DL

In 1974, the Volvo 240 and 260 series were released and immediately became popular. The initial 240 series came in six models, and the 260 had two models.


Car Year Engine Power

Saab 92 1949 - 1956 0.8 L / 2-cyl 25 hp (18.6 kW)

The 92 was Saab's first production vehicle, and it was released with an aerodynamic, futuristic look constructed from a single sheet of metal. All models were Deluxe.

Saab Saab was established in Sweden in 1937 as an aircraft manufacturer supplying to the Swedish Air Force. By the end of World War II, the company began looking elsewhere for its future profitability and settled on the design and manufacture of automobiles. The first project began in 1945 and culminated in the release of the Saab 92 in 1940 (the Saab 91 was a light training aircraft). Sales through the 1950s were modest, and the 92 was superseded by the Saab 93 in 1955, with the new model moving from two the tree cylinders and an estate version arriving within four years (Saab 95). Saab's famous Sonnett, the Saab 94, was the company's first performance car also released during the 1950s. The Saab 96 arrived in 1960 and became the company's first successful export model, but it was the innovative Saab 99 of 1968 that put the company on the international map. A year later, Saab merged with Scania-Vabis AB and an epanded vehicle range under the new umbrella emerged in the 1970s, the highlight of which was the release of the the iconic Saab 900 in 1978. Today, the Saab name continues as a leader in both automobile and aircraft design and production. 138


Car Year Engine Power

Saab Sonett III 1971 - 1974 1.7 L / V4 - 1971 Model 75 hp (56 kW) - 1971 Model

The Sonett III was also known as the Saab 97. It was designed to appeal to the US market and was basically a re-design of the earlier Sonett V4.

Car Year Engine Power

Saab 90 1984 - 1987 2.0 L / 4-cyl - 1985 Model 99 hp (74 kW) - 1985 Model

The compact executive Saab 90 was a continuation of Saab's 99 model. Its engine had hardened valve seats in readiness for unleaded fuel.

Car Year Engine Power

Saab 900 SE 1994 - 1998 2.0 L/ 4-cyl -1994 Turbo Model 185 hp (138 kW) - 1994 Turbo Model

The Saab 900 SE was a straight-four or V6 variant of the second generation Saab 900 NG release. Other NG variants were the Saab 900i, the Saab 900 S and the Saab 900 Talladega.

Car Year Engine Power

Saab 900 (First Generation) 1978 - 1993 2.0 L / 4-cyl - 1979 GL Model 99 hp (74 kW) - 1979 GL Model

Saab's compact luxury 900 model was produced over two generations lasting 20 years. The first generation was known as the 'classic generation' and was released with sedan and hatchback models. A cabriolet was added in 1986.

Car Year Engine Power

Car Year Engine Power

Saab 95 1959 - 1978 1.5 L - 4-cyl - 1976 Model 65 hp (48 kW) - 1976 Model

The seven-seater two-door Saab 95 was initially powered by an 841 cc, three-cylinder engine. In 1967, the 95 came equipped with a V4 Ford engine.

Saab 9-5 1997 - 2010 2.0 L / 4-cyl - 1999 2.0t Model 148 hp (110 kW) - 1999 2.0t Model

The Saab 9-5 was initially designated the Saab 95. In Sweden, the USA, Scotland, England and Poland, the model is used as a police patrol car.


Car Year Engine Power

Koenigsegg One:1 2014 5.1 L / V8 1,341 hp (1,000 kW)

Koenigsegg named the One:1 as a reflection of the car's power to weight ratio. The One:1 reaches 100 km/h (62 mph) in 2.8 seconds.

Koenigsegg In 1994, Christian von Koenigsegg established his own company with the aim of producing the world's greatest supercars. The first street-legal Koenigsegg was produced in 2002, but it was in 2006 that the name came to prominence with the release of the Koenigsegg CCX, equipped with an engine designed solely in-house. Forbes magazine selected the Koenigsegg CCX as one of history's most beautiful cars, and in 2010, the Koenigsegg Agera also won the Hypercar of the Year Award with the BBC's Top Gear program. Not content to rest on its laurels, the company worked on developing green technology that includes plug-in electric, reciprocating and camless engines. Koenigsegg works in an aircraft hangar in the Ă„ngelholm airport, and prospective purchasers are flown in by private jet. In addition to the CCX and Agera models, Koenigsegg has also produced such models as the Regera, CC and CCR.

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Car Year Engine Power

Koenigsegg Agera R 2011 - 2016 5.0 L / V8 1,140 hp (850 kW)

With a top speed of 439 km/h (273 mph), the Koenigsegg Agera R broke six production car land speed records. The rear tail-wing was of an advanced spring-loaded design.

Car Year Engine Power

Koenigsegg Agera S 2014 5.0 L/ V8 1,016 hp (758 kW)

The Agera S was specifically designed to accommodate the absence of available E85 biofuel in certain regions.

Car Year Engine Power

Koenigsegg CCX-R 2008 - 2010 4.7 L / V8 1,004 hp (749 kW)

The Koenigsegg CCX-R was a version of the CCX model. The acronym stood for 'Competition CoupĂŠ X', with the 'X' denoting Roman numerals for the 10th anniversary of the Koenisgegg CC's release.

Car Year Engine Power

Koenigsegg Regera 2016 - Present 5.1 L / V8 1,100 hp (820 kW)

The Koenigsegg Regera is a plug-in hybrid performance sports car. As of 2016, it was the world's fastest production car, and a total of 40 units out of a final 80 had already been sold.

Car Year Engine Power

Koenigsegg CCR 2004 4.7 L / V8 795 hp (593 kW)

The Koenigsegg CCS was similar-looking to the CC8S but had an upgraded body that included an altered headlight arrangement, a revised tail and additional front-end down force.


Car Year Engine Power

Ford Model T 1908 - 1927 2.9 L / 4-cyl 20 hp (14.9 kW)

Also known as the 'Tin Lizzie', the Ford Model T is considered to have been the world's first affordable car. Only days after its release, over 15,000 orders for the model had been placed.

Ford Seven years after building his first 'quadricycle' automobile at home, Henry Ford established the Ford Motor Company and produced the Ford Model A in 1903, with alphabetical models produced over the ensuing five years. In 1908, the Ford Model T arrived, along with the world's first moving 'assembly line'. Innovative working conditions ensued to maximise production and reduce the sale price of Fords. Ford bought out the Lincoln Motor Company in 1922, while The Model A was re-released to a new design and the Model T was retired in 1927. In 1939, Ford established the Mercury Division to introduce the mid-priced car (between low priced Fords and high end Lincolns). By the 1950s, the Lincoln Continental had been released and the Edsel brand arrived, followed in the next decade by the Galaxie, the compact Falcon and the first of the iconic Ford Mustang and Ford GT 40 models. From that point and into the 21st century, Ford has maintained market dominance with the release of a plethora of models and a design mindset that continues to mirror Henry Ford's original aims. 142


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Ford Customline (Second Generation) 1955 - 1956 4.5 L / V8 162 hp (121 kW)

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The Ford Customline first arrived in 1952 and was produced in two successive generations. It received a number of significant updates and was also produced in Australia from 1952 to 1959.

Edsel Corsair 1958 - 1959 5.4 L / V8 225 hp (168 kW)

The Edsel was the penultimate model in the Edsel line and sat between the lower priced Pacer and the top line Corsair.

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Ford Thunderbird 1955-1957 4.8 L / V8 193 hp (144 kW)

The sporty Ford Thunderbird was a two-seat roadster created to fill a market niche. Its success was phenomenal and the line continued through eleven generations.

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Ford Country Squire 1955 - 1991 3.6 L / 6-cyl 120 hp (89 kW)

The Country Squire was first designed with the Crestline and Custom Deluxe in mind. It also shared Galaxie and Fairlaine trim and was consolidated into a new model. Eventually, the Country Squire became part of the LTD line.

Ford Model ATudor 1928 3.3 L / 4-cyl 40 hp (30 kW)

The two-door Model A Tudor Sedan was released in 1928 and was beautifully styled for its time. It was equipped with a front-mounted engine and a three-speed manual transmission.

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Ford Super De Luxe 1947 3.9 L / V8 100 hp (75 kW)

The loosely named Super De Luxe model was a continuation of the 1941 Ford that received annual upgrades. In 1947, only slight alterations to the locaton of lights and exterior mouldings occurred.


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Studebaker President (First Generation) 1926 - 1942 5.1 L / 8-cyl 100 hp (75 kW)

The Studebaker President replaced the Studebaker Big Six in 1936. An evolution of styling saw the President emerge over the next decade-and-ahalf into one of the world's most luxurious automobiles.

Studebaker The Studebaker family were blacksmiths and foundry workers from Indiana, making their first fortune through manufacturing wheelbarrows during the California Gold Rush. Carriage and wagon making then followed, and by 1902, Studebaker Electric produced its first battery powered vehicle. Two years later, a Garford gasoline engine was added for some models, and by 1910, the Studebaker Corporation was established. Abandoning electric power, Studebaker 's pre-World War I efforts were were halted to supply Great Britain with wagons, ambulances and saddlery. Following the war, the Big Six, Special Six and Light Six were released, followed by the Commander, President and Director models among others. In the early 1950s, production resumed to see the arrival of a few models before the iconic Hawk series began in 1956. Seven Hawk models were released between then and 1962, but the company's fortunes began to fall. The Lark, Avanti and Wagonaire models were the last three Studebaker models released, and production ceased in 1966. 144


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Avanti II 1965 - 1982 5.7 L / V8 - 1965 Model 300 hp (224 kW) - 1965 Model

When Studebaker closed its South Bend factory in 1963, local Studebaker dealers Altman and Newman purchased the Avanti name along with production rights, tooling and plant space. The Avanti II was released in 1965.

Studebaker President (First Generation) 1926 - 1942 5.1 L / 8-cyl 100 hp (75 kW)

The Studebaker President was the company's ultra luxurious model between 1926 and 1942. The name was discontinued at that point, but was revived in 1955.

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Studebaker Sky Hawk 1956 - 1957 4.7 L / V8 210 hp (157 kW)

The Sky Hawk was one of the two models that continued along with the Silver Hawk. It had a base price ticket of US$2,477 prior to options, and was discontinued in 1957.

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Studebaker Silver Hawk 1957 - 1959 3.0 L / 6-cyl 101 hp (75 kW)

Studebaker released its Hawk Series in 1956 with the Sky Hawk, Golden Hawk, Power Hawk and Flight Hawk featuring. The Silver Hawk arrived in 1957 and replaced the lower placed Flight Hawk and Power Hawk.

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Studebaker Commander 1955 3.8 L / V8 120 hp (89 kW)

Studebaker President (Fourth Generation) 1955 - 1958 4.2 L / V8 175 hp (130 kW)

When Studebaker reintroduced the President name in 1955, it applied the name to all of its top trimmed models. The Studebaker Speedster was one of those models.

In the 1955, the Studebaker President name reappeared for the premium model name. The Commander name was given to the mid range model.

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Studebaker Champion (Fourth Generation) 1953 - 1956 3.0 L / 6-cyl 101 hp (75 kW)

The fourth generation Studebaker Champion was the recipient of a complete redesign in 1953. The two-door coupĂŠ was named the 'Starlight', and the hardtop coupĂŠ became the 'Starliner.


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Lincoln Continental Mark III 1958 - 1960 7.5 L / V8 365 hp (272 kW)

The AM radio was joined by FM broadcasting during the Mark III's life span. The model also saw the introduction of the 'Auto Lube' feature that had the car lubricate itself from a reservoir.

Lincoln The Lincoln Motor Company was established by Henry Leland in 1917 and has been a Ford subsidiary since 1922. The purchase of Lincoln gave Ford its luxury brand. By 1932, Lincolns were produced with V-12 engines, and the development of the 1936 Lincoln Zephyr led to the brand's most iconic model in 1940 - the Lincoln Continental. The luxury car appealed to American buyers, as it was both big and styled in the European fashion. Lincoln and Mercury were merged by Ford later in the decade, and the Continental was discontinued by 1949. In 1956, the Continental brand re-emerged as an independent marque with upgraded styling and a price tag similar to a Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud. In 1959, the Continental Town Car was released, and the 1960s saw the Continental released in a number of formats. The large Lincolns of the 1970s arrived first, and were followed by smaller models (after the 1973 oil crisis) while the Town Car continued in production. The Lincoln Continental was eventually retired in 2002, and the Lincoln Town Car lasted a further nine years before being retired in 2011. 146


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Lincoln Mark VIII LSC 1993 - 1998 4.6 L / V8 290 hp (216 kW)

The Mark VIII LSC was the first American built car to feature high-intensity discharge headlights. The model also featured a third rear brakelight.

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Continental Mark II 1956 - 1957 6.0 L / V8 Max 300 hp (224 kW)

Ford developed the Continental Mark II after initially discontinuing the Lincoln name in the post-World War II years. The name was quickly re-established.

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Lincoln H Series 1946 - 1948 4.8 L / V12 Max 150 hp (111 kW)

Lincoln Premiere (Second Generation) 1958 - 1960 7.0 L / V8

The Lincoln Premiere's second generation arrived in time for an economic recession in the USA, and it was unsusccessful as a result. It did not see a successive generation.

The full-size Lincoln H Series looked a lot like the Continental model that would eventually see the H consigned to history and the Continental become a household name for decades.

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Lincoln Premiere (First Generation) 1956 - 1957 6.0 L/ V8

The Lincoln Premier was over 5.6 metres (18 feet) long and weighed over two tons (1,976 kg). It was a stylish model inside and out, with futuristic overtones.


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Mercury Montclair (First Generation) 1955 - 1960 5.1 L / V8 258 hp (192 kW)

The Mercury Montclair was first introduced in 1955 as a premium model. It is believed that the Montclair name was derived from an affluent New Jersey suburb.

Mercury Mercury was a division of the Ford Motor Company, created by Edsel Ford in 1938. The Mercury Eight was the company's first release, and many of its components were from Fords or Lincolns - including the Flathead V8 engine. Following World War II, Lincoln and Mercury were combined, but each retained their model names. The Mercury Eight was re-released and remained in production well into the 1950s before the arrival of the Mercury Monterey and the Mercury Custom. The 'station wagon' (estate car) came into being as the Voyager, Colony Park and Commuter models by the end of the decade, and debuting in 1959 was the Mercury Park Lane. Following the heavy Super Marauder V8, the company moved into smaller 6-cylinder cars and released the Mercury Comet in 1960. The Meteor followed the Comet and was joined by the Cougar and Montego, while the Marauder continued as a competitor to Buick and Oldsmobile's heavyweights. The late 1970s saw Cougar sales reach all-time highs, and the last two Mercury vehicles made before the end of the brand in 2011 were the Grand Marquis and the Mariner SUV. 148


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Mercury Marauder (Third Generation) 2003 - 2004 4.6 L / V8 302 hp (225 kW)

The Marauder model returned to the Mercury line-up after a 33 year absence. It was marketed as a fullsize 'muscle' sedan.

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Mercury Monterey (First Generation) 1952 - 1954 4.2 L / 8-cyl & V8 161 hp (120 kW) - V8

The original Monterey was released in 1950 as part of the Mercury Eight series. In 1952, it was a stand alone model designed as a high-end coupĂŠ.

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Mercury Turnpike Cruiser 1957 - 1958 6.0 L to 7.0 L / V8 290 hp (220 kW) - 6.0 Litre Model

In 1957, the Turnpike Cruiser arrived to sit in Mercury's top spot. In its first year, it was available in two and four-top hardtop styles, with a convertible arriving in 1957. It served as the 1957 Indianapolis 500 pace car.

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Mercury Park Lane (Second Generation) 1964 - 1968 7.0 L / V8 340 hp (254kW)

After a four-year hiatus, the Mercury Park Lane returned to the Mercury line up. The model sat in the highest price bracket above the Mercury Montclair.

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Mercury Cougar (First Generation) 1967 - 1970 5.8 L / V8 290 hp (216 kW)

The Cougar was Mercury's first pony car, and the name quickly became synonymous with performance. Its design was deliberately European as a means of separting it from Ford's Mustang.


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Buick Super Riviera (Fourth Generation) 1954 - 1956 5.3 L / V8 Min 164 hp (122 kW)

The Buick Super was an extremely popular line, and the 1955 model was identified through its four 'VentiPorts' on each fender.

Buick Established in 1899 by David Dunbar Buick, the Buick Auto-Vim and Power Company specialised in stationary and marine engines. By 1908, the company was turning out nearly 9,000 automobiles annually as the Buick Motor Company, which had changed ownership twice to become the property of William C. Durant. Buick rapidly became the USA's biggest car manufacturer, and Durant formed the General Motors Corporation, which soon also owned Cadillac, Oakland, Oldsmobile and Chevrolet alongside Buick. By 1911, Buick led the charge with the closed-body car, and when the Great Depression struck in 1929, the Buick Master Six was the company's flagship. By the 1950s, the Buick V8 engine was released, and Buick enjoyed its best sales figures by the middle of the decade. The Le Sabre, Electra and Invicta arrived in 1959, setting the standard for the remainder of the century. The early 2000s saw Buick move into crossover SUVs, with a return to the the sedans and convertibles of the company's earlier years in the 2010s. Today, Buick maintains its strong market presence in the USA. 150


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Buick Special (Third Generation) 1948 - 1958 5.3 L / V8 - 1957 Model 250 hp (186 kW) - 1957 Model

The origins of the Buick Special can be traced back to the early Buick Model 10. It was a low-priced, midsize car.

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Buick Century (First Generation) 1936 - 1942 5.2 L / 8-cyl 141 hp (105 kW)

The first true generation of the Buick Century began in 1936 when it was released as a full-size car. It was essentially an upgraded and renamed Series 60.

Buick Le Sabre (Third Generation) 1965 - 1970 5.6 L / V8 - 1966 Model 220 hp (164 kW) - 1966 Model

The Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II was known as one of the 'Big Healeys', which included all 3000 models and the 6 cylinder Austin-Healey.

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Buick Skylark (Third Generation) 1964 - 1967 3.7 L / V6 155 hp (116 kW)

Originally designated the Roadmaster Skylark and later the Buick Special Skylark, the name came into its own as a separate model in 1964.

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Buick Roadmaster (Fourth Generation) 1942 - 1948 5.2 L / 8-cyl 141 hp (105 kW)

Under the auspices of Harley Earl, the Buick Roadmaster grew to significant proportions in its fourth generation. Wartime restrictions meant that a lot of chrome was shed from the previous generation.

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Buick Riviera (Third Generation) 1971 - 1973 7.5 L / V8 250 hp (186 kW)

Buick's third generation Riviera sported an unusual Corvette-inspired boat-tail end. From 1971, the model was stylish externally, but sales did not take off.

Buick Envision 2016 - Present 2.0 L / 4-cyl Turbocharged 252 hp (188 kW)

The luxury crossover SUV Buick Envision was first unveiled in China in 2014. Chinese built, the Envision is sold in the USA, Canada, Mexico and China.


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Cadillac de Ville (Third Generation) 1965 - 1970 7.7 L / V8 375 hp (280 kW)

In 1965, the Cadillac de Ville sat between the Calais and Eldorado. It was redesigned for its third generation, and by 1970 had a new 13-blade grille and reduced tailfins.

Cadillac The Cadillac Automobile Company began life in 1902 and released the Tonneau and Runabout models in the same year. Each sported a 10 hp single-cylinder engine and were virtually identical to Ford's Model A. The Cadillac Motor Company was then created following a merger with Leland & Faulconer Manufacturing in 1905, and General Motors purchased Cadillac in 1909. By 1912, the company was already incorporating electrical ignition and lighting into the vehicles. After 1918, Cadillac cars were equipped with V12 and V16 engines and were renowned for their custom built bodies and luxurious interiors. The Great Depression took its toll on the luxury car market, but Cadillac survived by entering the mid-price market and introducing fully automatic transmission by 1941. In the post-World War II years, distinctive styling saw the emergence of heavy chrome work and tail-fins before the trend faded. By 1967, the Eldorado was released to experience stunning sales figures, and within the decade, the cars were downsized as a reflection of concern over oil supply. Entering the SUV market in the late 1990s, Cadillac's star has continued to rise and shows no sign of abating. 152


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Cadillac Fleetwood (First Generation) 1985 - 1992 4.9 L / V8 200 hp (149 kW)

The luxury Cadillac Fleetwood derived its name from the 1920s car body stylist responsible for designing early luxury and limousine models for Cadillac.

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Cadillac Series 62 (Third Generation) 1948 - 1953 5.8 L / V8 160 hp (119 kW)

The third generation of the Cadillac Series 62 shared its chassis with the earlier Series 61, but the similarity stopped there. The Series 62 was richly appointed inside and had tail fins and more chrome.

Cadillac Eldorado (Second Generation) 1954 - 1956 5.4 L & 6.0L/ V8 325 hp (242 kW) - 6.0 L

The second generation Cadillac Eldorado saw the reduction of earlier models' 'chunky metal', and a sleekness crept into the line over its three year life. Defined by trim rather than metal, the model was a lower price.

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Cadillac Eldorado (Third Generation) 1957 - 1960 6.4 L / V8 345 hp (257 kW)

The third generation Cadillac Eldorado was distinctive and stylish. Available in hardtop and convertible models, the car's rear fenders were often called 'chipmunk cheeks'.

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Cadillac Eldorado (Seventh Generation) 1971 - 1978 8.2 L / V8 190 hp (142 kW)

The Cadillac Eldorado was heavily redesigned for its seventh generation. It was longer in the wheelbase than its predecessor and received an 'opera' window in place of a rear quarter window.


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Chevrolet AB National Roadster 1928 2.7 L / 4-cyl 35 hp (26.1 kW)

The AB National replaced the AA Capitol and sported a longer wheelbase than its predecessor. It was produced in a number of models and styles and was equipped with fourwheel braking.

Chevrolet Louis Chevrolet and William C. Durant co-founded Chevrolet in 1911, and the company's first prototype was unveiled during the following year and went into production in1913. In 1914, the H-Series was introduced alongside the L Series, and Chevrolet became part of General Motors within three years. With six manufacturing facilities in the USA and one in Canada, Chevrolet's greatest competitor was Ford. In 1929, the Chevrolet 'Stovebolt' engine outdid its rival's and was able to produce America's cheapest car (the Standard Six) as a result. By the 1950s and 1960s, the name of Chevrolet was a huge one in the European and American car market, and the emergence of the futuristic Corvette in 1953 excited millions of would-be racers. The Corvair arrived later in the decade, and further significant models filled the rest of the 20th century. The 21st century marked a return to the European market with a re-badged GM Daewoo, and Chevrolet emerged from the GFC to win Car of the Year in North America and Europe in 2012.

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Chevrolet Impala SS (Third Generation) 1961 - 1964 7.0 L / V8 385 hp (287 kW)

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By the end of the Chevrolet Impala SS's lifetime, the model was more rounded in styling. The design paved the way for the following generation, which set a one-million sales record in its first year.

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Chevrolet Camaro (First Generation) 1966 - 1969 6.5 L / V8 360 hp (261 kW)

In the last year of the second generation Camaro's production, the car received a more aggressive face, which included a new grille and a sportier 'creased' look.

Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray 1963 - 1967 5.4 L / V8 250 hp (186 kW)

The second generation of Chevrolet Corvette (C2) was known as the Sting Ray. Its origins lay in the racing Sting Ray and the Q-Corvette.

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Chevrolet Master Deluxe 1933 - 1942 3.5 L / 6-cyl 85 hp (63 kW)

The Chevrolet Master Deluxe was one of two models in the Master line. It replaced the Chevrolet Eagle and sat in the top price bracket with the Mercury and Standard below it.

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Chevrolet Camaro (Fifth Generation) 2009 - 2015 3.6 L / V6 312 hp (233 kW)

Chevrolet's classic pony car continued through many generations. In 2009, the most distinctive styling since the model's introduction arrived. It was the first Camaro since the fourth generation ended in 2002.

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Chevrolet Bel Air (Second Generation) 1954 - 1957 3.9 L / 6-cyl 123 hp (92 kW)

By the end of 1955, the Chevrolet Bel Air was easily identified by the Bel Air name emblazoned in gold script on the car. The front grille was inspired by Ferrari, and chrome featured heavily.


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Pontiac Firebird Trans Am (Second Generation) 1970 - 1981 5.0 L / V8 155 hp (115 hp)

The second generation of Pontiac Firebird included a base model, along with the Esprit, Formula and Trans Am models. The black and gold Trans Am Special Edition was released between 1977 and 1981.

Pontiac In 1926, GM created the Pontiac brand and produced its first car in the same year. Powered by a Chevrolet engine, the car was available in a number of body styles and was an instant hit with the American public. The Pontiac Chief arrived in 1927, and by the end of the 1930s, the Pontiac Torpedo was the top selling model for the company. In the post-World War II years, Pontiac was the staid and sensible car in the market, but in the late 1940s, new Pontiacs arrived with new styling and a brand new model - the Chieftan range. Replacing the pre-war Torpedo, the line continued into the mid 1950s and ended with the Star Chief. From 1955, a new V8 engine arrived in place of the standard Pontiac 6-cylinder, and Pontiac's reputation grew with the top selling Bonneville and a new Catalina line. Pontiac grew in parallel with other GM models throughout the 1960s and 1970s, and the Firebird competed with Ford's Mustang. By the 1980s, the Firebird Trans Am was the wedge-shaped mechanical hero of the Knight Rider Series, and Pontiac entered the new century with the muscly Pontiac GTO. 156


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Pontiac Solstice GPX 2007 - 2009 2.0 L / 4-cyl 260 hp (193 kW)

The Pontiac Solstice GPX was released in 2007, having first debuted in Los Angeles in 2006. The straight-four turbocharged 'Ecotec' engine was new for Pontiac.

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Pontiac Parisienne (Third Generation) 1965 - 1970 4.6 L to 7.4 L / V8 390 hp (291 kW) - 7.4 L

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In the Parisienne line, the front grille changed more often than the engine size through successive generations. By 1967, the model had a collapsible steering wheel and other new safety features.

Pontiac G8 2008 - 2009 3.6 L / V6 261 hp (195 kW)

The Pontiac G8 was only built in Australia and was known in the Middle East and South Africa as the Chevrolet Lumina, in Brazil as the Chevrolet Omega and in Australia as the Holden Commodore VE.

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Pontiac Chieftain (First Generation) 1949 - 1954 3.9 L / 6-cyl & 4.4 L / 8-cyl 90 hp (67 kW) to 106 hp (79 kW)

The Pontica Chieftain replaced the Pontiac Torpedo in 1949. It was smaller and lower priced than its predecessor, and was available in sedan, sedan coupé, business coupé and deluxe convertible coupé variants.

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Pontiac Grand Prix (Fourth Generation) 1977 - 1987 3.8 L / V6 - Standard 150 hp (110 kW) - 5.0 L V8 Model

Pontiac's fourth Grand Prix generation began with a restyling and downsizing of the model, which had been in production since 1962.

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Pontiac Bonneville (Second Generation) 1959 - 1960 6.4 L / V8 300 hp (224 kW)

The Pontiac Bonneville line added a hard-top sedan and a station wagon (Safari) to its line in 1959. The second generation also heralded the arrival of the split grille.

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Pontiac Grand Safari (First Generation) 1971 - 1976 4.9 L / V8 135 hp (101 kW)

The largest Pontiacs built were part of the Pontiac Grand Safari line, which ran from 1971 to 1978. The Grand Safari used a multi leaf spring suspension instead of the traditional coil system.


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Oldsmobile 88 (Second Generation) 1954 - 1956 5.3 L / V8 170 hp (125 kW) Approx.

The Oldsmobile 88 second generation came in several body variants, including the Holiday hardtop coupĂŠ and a station wagon.

Oldsmobile The Olds Motor Vehicle Co. was established in 1897 and immediately began manufacturing gasoline-fuelled automobiles. The company's first mass-produced car was the Oldsmobile Curved Dash, and the term 'Old's Mobiles' soon became 'Oldsmobile'. In 1910, the Limited Touring model was released, and by 1929, the company's GM ownership saw Oldsmobile benefit from the GM platform and produce the Viking. In the 1930s, Oldsmobile introduced their 'Automatic Safety Transmission', which evolved into the Hydramatic transmission of the 1940s. From 1941 until 1996, Oldsmobile adopted a two-digit designation for each of its models. In 1949,the V8 'Rocket' engine arrived, accompanied by styling designs in the 1950s that included jet-style tail lights and led to heavily chromed models in the late 1950s. The 1960s saw iconic models such as the Cutlass, the Starfire, the Vista Cruiser and the Delta 88 emerge (among others), and sales soared through the next two decades. A mid-nineties surge was not enough for GM to maintain the Oldsmobile brand, and by 2004, the very last Oldsmobile left the production line and ended a carmaking era. 158


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Oldsmobile 98 (Sixth Generation) 1959 - 1960 6.5 L / V8 315 hp (235 kW)

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The Austin-Healey 3000 Mark II was known as one of the 'Big Healeys', which included all 3000 models and the 6 cylinder Austin-Healey.

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Oldsmobile Super 88 (Fifth Generation) 1961 - 1964 5.4 L & 6.4 L / V8 330 hp (250 kW) - 6.4 L

The fifth generation of the Oldsmobile Super 88 was also its last. It was released alongside the Dynamic 88, the 88 Fiesta and the Jetstar 88.

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Oldsmobile 98 (First Generation) 1941 4.2 L / 8-cyl Max 110 hp (81 kW)

Oldsmobile Starfire 1953 - 1979 Oldsmobile 'Rocket' V8 170 hp (127 kW) to 200 hp (150 kW)

The first Oldsmobile Starfire was released in 1953 as a five-seat convertible with a fibreglass body.

Over 15 generations, Oldsmobile was the full-size car of choice for millions of Americans. The ensuing generation was built during and after World War II.

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Oldsmobile Cutlass (Second Generation) 1968 - 1972 4.1 L to 5.4 L / 6-cyl & V8 240 hp (176 kw) - 1971 V8

The second generation of Cutlass was redesigned to sport a new front end that remained reminiscent of the the big Oldsmobile noses of old.

Oldsmobile Fiesta 1953 & 1957 - 1960 5.0 L / V8 170 hp (127 kW)

The Oldsmobile Fiesta was a large car designed to appeal to middle Americans. Standard Fiestas were equipped with leather interiors, 'Hydramatic' transmission, power steering and other features.

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Oldsmobile Cutlass (Fifth Generation - 442) 1978 - 1980 3.8 L / V6 - Base Model 170 hp (126 kW) - 1980 Model

A downsized Cutlass arrived in 1978 as a muscle car. Also known as the Oldsmobile Supreme, the Cutlass 442 received continual changes to its front grille over its short lifetime.


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Packard Six (1700) 1939 3.6 L to 4.0 L / 6-cyl 128 hp (95 kW) - 3.6 L

During the Great Depression, Packard introduced a smaller sixcylinder model to the One-Twenty line. Priced at only US$1,000, sales rocketed and the luxury carmaker survived thanks to a non-luxury line.

Packard Between 1899 and 1903, Packard produced hundreds of 'horseless carriages' as the New York and Ohio Automobile Company before the name changed to the Packard Motor Car Company. Moving to Detroit, the company replaced its single-cylinder engines and grew to produce 12-cylinder cars by the early 1920s. High priced Packards were extremely popular and renowned for their quality craftsmanship. The company fought the Great Depression by designing cheaper cars, and the brand was still considered luxurious regardless of its lower priced range. In the 1940s, Packard released updated pre-war models and suffered a 'styling crisis' when many low priced vehicles bore striking similarities to high-end Packards. As the brand suffered a downturn in popularity, Packard developed several concept cars that included innovative technology, but the writing was on the wall for the Packard brand. In 1962, the Packard name disappeared, but its legacy continued in lovingly restored models that remain highly valued today.

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Packard One-Twenty 1937 4.6 L / 8-cyl 120 hp (89 kW)

During the Packard One-Twenty's first generation, the name was was changed in 1938 to 'Packard Eight'. 1937 was also the year during which Packard introduced its first six cylinder car in a decade.

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Packard Twelve 1937 - 1941 7.7 L / V12 175 hp (130 kW)

Packard Eight 1930 - 1935 5.2 L / 8-cyl 90 hp (67 kw)

The Packard Eight was released with a choice of three models, those being the Standard Eight, De Luxe Eight and Custom Eight.

The multi-cylindered Packard Twelve was a V-configured take on earlier models that used two straight-six engines to power a single automobile. It was the luxury muscle car of its day and extremely popular.

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Packard Four Hundred 1955 - 1956 6.1 L / V8 290 hp (213 kW)

The Packard Four Hundred name was an attempt at re-using an earlier Patrician 400 name. The Four Hundred series was identifiable through its banded three-colour duco along the car's sides.

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Packard Patrician 1951 - 1956 5.3 L / 8-cyl 212 hp (158 kW) - 1954 Model

The Packard Patrician was Packard's top range car, and it was available with a variety of trims, including scalloped chrome ports along the side rear.


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Shelby AC Cobra 427 (Mark III) 1965 - 1967 7.0 L / V8 425 hp (317 kW)

The Shelby AC Cobra 427 was powered by the largest of the Shelby/Ford engines, which was known as the 'side-oiler 427'. The car had a top speed of 164 mph (262 km/h).

Shelby Carroll Shelby established Shelby American in 1962 as a parts manufacturer and modifier of high performance cars. From the workshops of Shelby American came significant models such as the Shelby GT350, GLHS and GT500 (Mustang) and the AC Cobra (AC Ace). Motor racing wins for Shelby-modified vehicles came thick and fast throughout the 1960s, and Shelby American teamed up with Shelby Daytona to win an FIA World Championship title. Shelby produced 562 Shelby Mustangs in 1965 alone, and that number rose significantly into the late 1970s. The 1980s heralded the arrival of the Shelby Lancer-800, the CSX-750, the Dakota-1500 and other models that made up a total production of nearly 20,000 cars over four short years. Today, the Shelby name remains synonymous with the very best in performance racing, and some of its past models continue to inspire generations of performance car and motor racing fans around the world.

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Shelby 'Cobra' GT500 1969 - 1970 5.8 L / V8 290 hp (216 kW)

All Shelby 'Cobra' Mustangs in the 1960 to 1970 line were actually manufactured in 1969, with the FBI supervising ID plate changes for unsold 1960 models to be altered to read 1970.

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Shelby Daytona CoupĂŠ 1964 - 1965 4.7 L & 7.0 L / V8

Only six Shelby Daytona CoupĂŠs were built. The model was a racing car specially designed to provide serious competition for the Ferrari 250 GTO.

Ford Shelby GT350R 2015 5.2 L / V8 526 hp (392 kW)

The muscle-bound and streamlined Ford Shelby 350 GTR is also known as the Ford Mustang GT 350. It was released in a limited production run and had an optional back seat.

Car Year Engine Power Car Year Engine Power

Both the Shelby Mustang GT 350 and the GT 500 were designed with very little Shelby involvement. In the middle of 1969, Carroll Shelby decided to terminate his relationship with Ford.

Shelby AC Cobra 1962 - Present 4.3 L, 4.7 L & 7.0 L / V8 425 hp (317 kW) - 7.0 L

The first Shelby Cobras (Mk I) sported a 4.4 litre engine,while a further 51 were powered by a 4.7 litre Ford engine. Shelby designed the Mark III in a joint cooperative effort with Ford Detroit.

Car Year Engine Power

Shelby Mustang GT500 1967 7.0 L / V8 425 hp (317 kW) - Approx

1967 was the first year that Shelby built the GT500 Mustang. It was modelled on the 1967 Ford Mustang Fastback.

Shelby GT 350 1969 - 1970 5.8 L / V8 290 hp (216 kW)

Car Year Engine Power

Shelby Mustang GT 350 1968 4.7 L / V8 306 hp (228 kW)

The Shelby Mustang GT 350 came with an AM/FM Radio and air conditioning. The dashboard was crammed with new gauges, which included a tachometer.


Car Year Engine Power

Chrysler Windsor 1961 6.3L / V8 305 hp (227 kW)

The 1961 Chrysler Windsor was the last car in the model line. It was equipped with a padded dashboard for driver and passenger safety.

Chrysler The Chrysler Corporation was established in 1925 by Walter Chrysler. The Chrysler 70 sported a highly advanced engine and features not available in most automobiles. One of the features quickly adopted by the entire car industry was the safety rim, which stopped flat tyres from flying off when the car was in motion. By the 1930s, Chrysler had its own parts division (MoPar). The company further used wind tunnel technology to streamline its early cars, and by the 1950s, it was the leader in innovation in the industry. The addition of a transistor car radio was a Chrysler innovation, as was electronic fuel injection in late 1950s models. The 1960 Valiant was another innovative release, with an alternator, direct current electrics and futuristic styling. Chrysler moved into the European market during the 1960s, acquiring a majority share in the Rootes Group, Spain's Barreiros and France's Simca. By the 1970s, Chrysler was leading the charge in the muscle car market and turned to compact cars later in the decade. Lee Iacocca arrived in the late 1970s to turn the company around, before Chrysler partnered with Daimler to become Daimler-Chrysler in 1998. Today, Chrysler is owned by Fiat and is officially known as FCA US LLC. 164

The big book of cars  
The big book of cars  
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