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Dogs

The Big Book of


M U R R A Y

B O O K S

Exclusive Books, Gifts and Stationery

First published in 2017 by Murray Books www.murrayboooks.com Copyright Š 2017 Murray Books ISBN 978-0-9943730-1-4

All rights reserved. This publication or any part thereof may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright holder. Compiled by Lorri Lynn and Peter Murray Images: Shutterstock

The author and publisher have made every effort to ensure the information contained in this book was correct at the time of going to press and accept no responsibility for any loss, injury or inconvenience sustained by any person or organisation using this book. Some images may have been used from the Public Domain.


CONTENTS 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 38 48 56 62 74 88 106 124 132 146

History of the Dog Dogs and Human Culture Dogs on Active Service Assistance Dogs Dogs on the Land Sporting & Hunting Dogs Top 10 Dog Breeds German Shepherd Golden Retriever Belgian Malinois Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Australian Shepherd Labrador Retriever American Staffordshire Terrier French Bulldog Yorkshire Terrier English Setter Dogs by Continent - England Dogs by Continent - Scotland & Wales Dogs by Continent - Germany & The Alps Dogs by Continent - Mediterranean Europe Dogs by Continent - Western Europe Dogs by Continent - Eastern Europe & Scandinavia Dogs by Continent - North America Dogs by Continent - The Frozen North & Russia Dogs by Continent - Asia Dogs by Continent - Australia & South America


Dogs

The Big Book of

INTRODUCTION The History of the dog

Alongside the history of man, the history of the dog as man’s companion has been written. When humans walked across the Bering Land Bridge between Siberia and North America, it is believed that they were accompanied

by dogs, and the earliest evidence of this places the dog alongside man at least 9,000 years ago. When the Native American Apache and Navajo people migrated en masse 1,400 years ago, they used dogs as sled and pack animals

long before the horse arrived on the continent. The value of dogs to early man was immense, and in history,

canines have been used as hunters, pack animals, protection, in policing and in military roles. Today, the role of

the dog remains one of service in many areas, but most dogs in the Developed World are either companion

animals or assistance dogs for humans.

It is estimated that there are 900 million dogs in the world today, and only 20 to 25 percent are companion or service/working animals. The rest live in the Developing World where life is hard for man, and where dogs are

generally feral as a result. Of the dog breeds present in the world today, the majority are breeds that have been

selectively developed over the past few centuries, and they number in their hundreds. The proliferation of breeds has led to the ability of humans to bond with dog ‘types’ best suited to certain living conditions and relationship

needs. Additionally, many crossbred dogs without a definable ancestry live happily with human companions, and a vast majority of those have been rescued through animal shelters dedicated to saving abandoned, lost or

unwanted dogs. Over the centuries, the dog’s relationship with humans has grown to become one of mutual

dependence, companionship, and in many cases - love. 4


Dogs and Human Culture

Historically, dogs have been depicted as objects of adoration in ancient religion, subjects of art and literature,

and during the past century, as the subject matter of movies and television shows. In religion, the Ancient Egyptians were fond of worshipping animals, and their god of the underworld was the jackal-like Anubis. The Aztec religion had Xolotl, the god of death, while Chinese astrology honours the dog among other animals.

Many Christian feast days are dedicated to dogs, and France's Saint Guinefort was actually a dog and not human

at all. To Hindus, the dog holds a significant place as the guardian of the doors to heaven and hell, while the

Tihar Festival in India is dedicated to the dog. The Ancient Greeks also associated the dog with the spiritual

world, and the three-headed Cerberus guarded their underworld.

Culturally, the dog has featured in artwork since Neolithic cave painting was practised. As man's relationship

with the dog became more companionable, representations appeared in the artworks of the Middle Ages, the

Renaissance and beyond. Dogs have been portrayed as loyal guardians, lap dogs and status symbols of the aristocracy in art history. By the 18th century, dog portraits became more fashionable than classic hunting scenes, while Victorian Era artists portrayed the dog in natural settings. By the time moving pictures arrived to entertain

the masses, the dog had been portrayed in all forms of art, including photography. When dogs first appeared on

screen, they were generally seen wandering through the dusty streets of American Westerns, but it wasn't long

before the dog took its own starring role with the likes of Old Yeller and others. Soon, television brought the

dog into living rooms around the world, and the popularity of shows centred around dogs continues to grow - as

does man's commitment to enjoying life alongside nature's greatest companion animal.

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Dogs on Active Service

In the Developed World, most dogs are companion animals, but there are a few areas in which dogs are able to

work alongside man for the betterment of society and community. Military working dogs have roles not dissimilar to the military dog in history, although they are generally not used in the front line today. Once the domain of the German Shepherd, military roles are now being filled by smaller dogs for detection work requiring a keen

sense of smell. Employed in a number of tasks, one of the most crucial roles of the military working dog is that of detecting explosives. In civilian law enforcement, the dog is an essential member of police forces around the

world. From tracking suspects to detecting drugs and explosives, the police dog is often seen at airports or in

operations that involve tracking, search and rescue, or as mascots in public relations exercises. Outside of traditional policing or military duties, dogs have been used around the world for their keen sense of smell and

their ability to follow quarry. Rescue dogs have saved countless lives in seeking out lost or trapped people, from

those who have wandered away from a wilderness trail to people trapped in buildings following a collapse.

Dogs are also widely used to engage children in a range of activities and programs that are public relations based.

The value of such dogs lies in creating a bridge between adults and children, and allowing communication that

might have been otherwise difficult. There are currently many reading programs that use dogs as ambassadors.

Dogs are also important in the medical world, and their ability to detect health anomalies in humans is exemplary. Using the olfactory cortex, a dog can detect one part in one trillion, and diseases such as cancer and diabetes are

now being detected earlier as a result.

8


Assistance Dogs

Possibly the most important role a dog can play is as an Assistance Dog, and in the past few decades, that role

has diversified well beyond assisting only the vision impaired. Mobility dogs are trained to assist people with

mobility difficulties, and their roles include guiding the vision impaired, acting as a companion and helper for people in wheelchairs and serving as a ‘walker’ for people struggling with gait and balance. Autism service dogs

assist people living with autism by performing tasks that allow their human handlers to live comfortable daily lives, and many programs are continuing to open around the world as the benefits become clear. Medical response

dogs are trained to assist humans suffering from conditions that might result in seizures or episodes requiring a

response. In many cases, dogs are able to alert their handlers before an episode begins. Aside from epilepsy and

other seizure related conditions, a dog can even detect changes in blood sugar and bring medication or a telephone

to their handlers.

Psychiatric illness is another area of medicine in which assistance dogs are of great benefit. People suffering

from a range of illnesses that include post-traumatic stress disorder and schizophrenia have had their lives

transformed by the arrival of a specially trained assistance dog. Children too have benefited greatly from the

arrival of a dog in their lives following a particularly traumatic event, and many courts in the USA now use dogs

to act as companions for children affected by criminal activities. Today, dogs are becoming more and more important as their ability to act as guides, companions, nurses, protectors and therapists continues to garner

global attention and respect. In the future, there will be many more assistance roles for dogs as their intelligence

and sensory abilities come to light, and as they do, humankind will benefit greatly from a relationship that has

been growing over the past 9,000 years.

10


Dogs on the Land

Dogs have been involved in pastoral work since man first moved away from a hunter-gatherer life and began

farming. Working dogs remain an integral part of the farming landscape in most countries around the world, and their existence is often a crucial element of a stock farming concern. The dogs are trained to respond to a series

of hand movements, whistles or verbal commands in herding activities that generally involve sheep or cattle. In

European countries, German Shepherds, Belgian Shepherds and Briards have worked with sheep for centuries,

and their ability to guide large flocks while acting in packs as a barrier is legendary. English Shepherds and Welsh Sheepdogs tend to work as independent sheep herders, while the lighter Australian Kelpies and Koolies

often jump onto the backs of sheep as part of their herding activities. Other breeds such as the New Zealand

Huntaway depend upon their loud barks to muster sheep.

Cattle mustering also depends upon dogs for herding, and many notable breeds make successful cattle dogs. The

Australian Cattle Dog is one such breed, and although small, it has the ability to move quickly as a ‘heeler’,

constantly pushing the cattle forward from behind. Other breeds are natural ‘headers’ with cattle, working at the

front end and staring the animal down as means of keeping it facing in the right direction. When headers and

heelers work together, livestock is successfully herded in the desired direction. Many working dogs are also

family pets, and it not unusual for them to join the family after a day’s work and spend time relaxing and playing

in or around the family home. Their natural intelligence means that they can be easily trained as safe companions

for children and adults alike, and their loyalty is legendary.

12


Sporting & Hunting Dogs

As predators and carnivores, it is natural for a dog to want to hunt, just as it was natural for man to include dogs

in hunting activities over the past centuries. Today, hunting dogs are no longer simply unleashed in baying packs

to hunt down foxes and other game. In most cases, they are used to track game for a human hunter and then

retrieve the game once it has been shot. That game can range from rabbits and hares through to wild boar and

deer, and as the prey changes, so does the breed of hunting dog suited to the task. Hunting dogs fall into several

categories, which include hounds, gundogs, terriers and dachshunds among others. Sight hounds often sight prey

from a distance and work rapidly and alone, while scent hounds work in packs to follow their quarry. The best

gundogs are generally retrievers, spaniels, setter or pointers, which are known for their ability to spot and retrieve small game for shooters while remaining unruffled by the percussion of a weapon. Waterdogs also make good

gundogs when waterfowl are the prey. Terriers and dachshunds are used when hunting for animals that live in

burrows.

Dogs also take part in sporting and entertainment activities, with the most renowned of those being sled dog

racing. The annual Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race takes place in Alaska annually and involves teams of 21 dogs

racing from Settler’s Bay to Nome over a two week period. Greyhound and whippet racing is also another popular

sport involving dogs, and an entire gambling industry has been built around it. Dog trials are contested around

the world today, and events include traditional herding competitions, intricate obstacle courses and tasks that

require intelligence, obedience and physical fitness. Showing dogs is also considered a sport, with the annual

Crufts event in London considered the largest, most popular and prestigious dog conformation showing event in

the world.

14


T O P 10 D O G B R E E D S

German Shepherd The German Shepherd originated in the late 19th century in Karlsruhe, Germany. The breed came into existence as a result of interbreeding Bavarian farm dogs and local herding dogs, all having different types of coat. It was

originally called the German Shepherd Dog, which was then shortened to German Shepherd. The breed arrived

in the rest of Europe and the United Kingdom over the ensuing years, and it reached North America in the 1910s. During World War I, its name was changed in Allied countries to 'Alsation' in the wake of anti-German sentiment.

The coat of the German Shepherd can be short or long, but it will almost always be all black or black with tan.

The breed is a valuable working dog suitable to a number of pursuits. It is a successful police dog, military dog

and a guard dog, and its ability to work in detection is highly valued. Additionally, the German Shepherd is a

popular breed in dog sports, including tracking, ability, obedience and ring sport. The overriding feature of the German Shepherd's character is one of protectiveness, and it has been known to sacrifice itself in a pack situation

for the greater good. German Shepherds make successful protectors of humans, other dogs and sheep, and their

original herding instincts come to the fore in the latter. While the breed can seem aggressive, it is not naturally

so, but it will step in to defend others. As a companion animal for humans, it is one of the most loyal, faithful

and loving of all dog breeds, and its aura of serenity and calmness has a steadying influence on a household.

16


Golden Retriever In the Scottish Highlands in the mid 19th century, the Golden Retriever gradually came into being as the result of a long breeding program that included curly coated Spaniels, Labrador Retrievers, Red Setters and unknown

hounds. By 1908, the Golden Retriever was a registered as the ‘Golden Flatcoat’ in England, and its current name came about in the 1920s.

The medium-sized large dog is one of the most popular breeds in the world today, and it comes in a variety of

coat colours that fall within the parameters of ‘golden’, but which can range from pale yellow through to a rich

burnt orange/red colour. The Golden Retriever is a gentle, intelligent and well-mannered breed suitable as a

companion animal for all ages of human. Packed with enough energy to keep a small family moving for a while,

the breed is extremely loving and companionable, and its retrieving skills are legendary. Happy as a gun dog or

a family pet, anything thrown will immediately be fetched, with an expectation for the game to continue until

the human is no longer capable of throwing. It is not unusual for a Golden Retriever to return from a foray into the woods with an object bigger than it is, and as long as something (or part of something) fits into the dog’s

mouth, it is considered available. The intelligent and loving Golden Retriever will welcome all comers, including

other breeds of dog, humans and cats, and it is particularly good with children.

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Belgian Malinois The Belgian Malinois is also known as the 'Malinois', and was so named after the city in which it was first bred.

As one of a number of shepherd dogs in Western Europe, the Malinois is prized for its contribution to society as

a working dog, and many are seen today detecting explosives and narcotics, as well as seeking out victims of

human trafficking. The Malinois is so good at its job that the US Secret Service favours the breed, and many

Malinois are also in service in India, Israel, Hong Kong, Australia and Canada.

The Malinois is intelligent, friendly and protective, as well as being active and alert. The energy level of the Malinois outstrips most other breeds, and a dog's puppyhood generally last for three or four years before it 'settles'. Often considered to be 'neurotic' by humans unfamiliar with the breed, the Malinois will only develop

such a state of mind if it is bored or under stimulated by its human companions. As the member of an active,

busy household, the dog will thrive and strive to be as important as everybody else in the house. Although it is

a puppy for a long time, the Malinois is nevertheless relatively simple to train, and providing the training is

consistent, new tasks will be welcomed with as much delight as a strenuous daily walk.

20


Cavalier King Charles Spaniel The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel came into being as a result of breeding King Charles Spaniels with Pugs,

and then further developing the breed in the USA in the 1920s. The result was a small dog that had an upturned

face, a flattish nose, slightly protruding eyes and luxuriant ears. The colouring of the new breed was also very

desirable, and included tri-colour, red-and-white, black-and-tan, and a rich ruby red. The ‘Cavalier’ prefix was

attached to the breed name in the 1940s as a means of differentiating it from its King Charles Spaniel ancestors.

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is one of the most affectionate and happy of dogs, and it loves activity and a

chance to please its humans companions. With a tail that seems to permanently wag, it makes a wonderful and

intelligent companion animal, and it seems happy in the company of most other dogs. The natural hunting instincts of the original King Charles Spaniel continues on in the Cavalier, and a desire to chase remains in the breed. Accompanied by excellent eyesight and a remarkable sense of smell, the dog is more than happy to head

off in pursuit of small prey. Affection, obedience, a love of activity and a desire to please are the hallmarks of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, and those attributes makes it a wonderful family pet capable of walking for

long distances or equally happy to settle on a lap for some ‘together time’.

22


Australian Shepherd The Australian Shepherd is not an Australian breed, but geneticists believe that the dog's bloodstock arrived on

the West Coast of the USA from Spain via Australia. First noted as a breed used to herd sheep in the Rocky

Mountains, ranchers in Colorado began a breeding program that was immediately successful and saw the

breed begin to spread throughout North America. Where the 'Australian' part of their name originated remains a mystery, but in the 19th century, the breed was also referred to as the Pastor Dog, Spanish Shepherd, Bob-

Tail, California Shepherd and others.

Today, the Australian Shepherd is found throughout the American West as a highly valued stock herder, but its

popularity goes well beyond that. Movies and television shows feature the intelligent, easily trained breeds,

and rodeos feature Australian Shepherds due to their performing skills. The highly energetic Australian

Shepherd is a canine dynamo and loves to be on the move. Its intelligence makes it an ideal breed to be trained

and obedient, and it also loves to play. As a companion animal, the Australian Shepherd is one of the most

loyal and loving breeds imaginable, but it requires a lot of attention and activity to be happy. With lots of room

to play and several daily hours of exercise, a dog will seemingly run itself out and simply attach itself

permanently to its human companion. Devotion, loyalty, energy and intelligence are the hallmarks of a breed

that is both loved and admired the world over.

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Labrador Retriever The Labrador Retriever was originally known as the ‘St. John’s Dog’ and was native to Newfoundland. Its

original role was that of a fish retriever for fishermen. The breed arrived in England in the early 19th century and was then crossed with hunting dogs to further develop its retrieving skills. Soon, the ‘Lab’ became one of the most popular hunting dogs in the UK, Europe and America as a result of its intelligence and the ease with which it could be trained. A smooth coated dog, the Labrador comes in colours that range from black through to

chocolate or a buttery yellow.

The breed is known for its affectionate, loving personality, as well as its good natured patience. Combined with

a genuine desire to please humans, the Labrador is the preferred breed in the training and development of

assistance dogs and service dogs. It also tops the list as a family pet or a hunting dog. A Labrador adores playtime, and it also loves water. If the opportunity arises, it will enter the water and have a good swim with or without

human company. As a family pet, the Labrador bonds quickly and easily with all members of a household, and it is particularly gentle and patient with children and the elderly. As an assistance dog, the Labrador is trained to

assist those with vision, hearing and mobility limitations, as well as psychological disorders. In service, the

Labrador can be a search and rescue dog, a police dog or a military dog in a number of roles.

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American Staffordshire Terrier

The American Staffordshire Terrier is known by a number of names, including the 'Amstaff' and the 'Staffordshire'. More commonly, the breed is known as the 'Pit Bull'. Initially, the breed began in the West Midlands of England and shares bloodstock with the English Bulldog. Cross breeding between Bulldogs, Fox Terriers, White Terriers and Black-and-Tan Terriers saw the beginnings of the American Staffordshire Terrier

begin to appear in North America by the 1870s.

The temperament of the American Staffordshire Terrier is one of friendliness to its companion humans, but also

of great loyalty and protectiveness. Strong for its size, it is both muscular and agile, and can be quite graceful in

its movements. The average male American Staffordshire Terrier stands between 46 cm and 48 cm tall, while

the female is generally three centimetres shorter. Much has been said about the breed's propensity to attack

humans, and many countries in Europe have banned the American Staffordshire Terrier as a result of this.

Obversely, many humans families live with American Staffordshire Terriers quite safely, having trained their dog to be sociable, well mannered and a loving companion. Above all else, the 'Staffy' loves human company

and is happiest when part of a family and kept busy by its companion humans. Upon occasions, a dog's loyalty

to its family can be somewhat overwhelming to outsiders.

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French Bulldog The origins of the French Bulldog are actually English. In the mid 19th century, Nottingham’s lace makers bred

a miniature English Bulldog and named it the ‘Toy Bulldog’. When lace making artisans left England for France

as a result of the Industrial Revolution, they took their miniature bulldogs with them, where both their lace

making skills and their dogs were appreciated. The name ‘French Bulldog’ soon came into popular use, and despite English dog breeder protestations, the name remained.

The sturdy French Bulldog is a compact breed with a square head and a rounded forehead. Its upper lip hangs

well below its lower lip, and its bat-like ears are quite pronounced. It comes in a variety of colours and markings, and its skin is loose around the head and shoulders. The French Bulldog is a playful, intelligent and extremely

affectionate dog. It rarely becomes loud or yappy in its attempts to interact with humans or other dogs, preferring

to resort to funny antics instead. Sociable, friendly and scrupulously clean, the French Bulldog will work hard

to avoid stepping in any amount of water. The breed cannot swim, but it is a more than capable rodent hunter

that will relentlessly stalk and capture its prey. Not all French Bulldogs drool and slobber, but many do, although the results are far less than other breeds notorious for it. If raised with young children, a French Bulldog will be

a considerate companion, but it prefers the company of adults.

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Yorkshire Terrier The plucky Yorkshire Terrier first came into existence as a specific breed in Northern England in the 19th century.

It was developed by the working classes of the region as a means of vermin control in mine shafts and textile

mills, which suffered from huge rat infestations. Originally a larger breed than the Yorkshire Terrier of today, it is believed that the bloodstock for the breed came from Scottish mill workers and miners who brought Dandie

Dinmonts, Skye Terriers, Paisley Terriers and Manchester Terriers with them to the area. Recognised as a specific breed in the 1880s, the ‘Yorkie’ was also used to hunt burrowing animals.

As a puppy, the toy-sized Yorkshire Terrier is either brown, black or tan. Eventually, the coat becomes steel blue

over the body and tail, and the remainder of the dog is tan. The character of the Yorkshire Terrier is one of

extreme bravery, loyalty and intelligence. It makes an ideal companion animal, but it tends to forget its diminutive

size when confronted with danger. Much like its human Yorkshire counterparts, it will take on all comers and

refuse to yield even when faced with certain defeat. A Yorkshire Terrier has no qualms in telling its human

companions what it thinks, and it needs a firm set of rules to ensure that it does not develop into a ‘yappy’ dog.

Regardless, the sweet natured Yorkie responds well to routine and human company, and it is a favourite breed

for the elderly as a result.

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English Setter The English Setter is part of a larger family that includes the Irish, Irish Red, White and Black-and-Tan Gordon

Setter. By nature, the breed is extremely active and strong minded, and it has a delightfully naughty side that comes to the fore when the dog is bored. Popular as a gun dog, the English Setter has both athleticism and stamina, and it is happiest when working methodically to seek out prey for a human hunting companion. The breed developed into today's English Setter during the mid 19th century, and it remains a favourite gundog.

The well-mannered English Setter loves people, and it makes a wonderful family pet. In the home, the dog

requires a lot of exercise and attention to keep it from being bored, and a daily two-hour walk is commonplace.

When exercised enough, the dog is completely content to curl up inside the home and make the most of soft

furniture and bedding. Good natured to the core, the English Setter is also child-friendly and loves nothing better

than a good romp with energetic older children or to round up the smallest members of the household. When in

training, the English Setter requires a lot of patient reinforcement, as it is easily distracted and thus difficult to train at first. Once a dog has settled into a household, it will quickly become an active, loving member of a human

family.

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The Shih Tzu makes an ideal companion and loves a household with clear rules. They crave human companionship and respond well to patient and consistent training, with lots of playtime in between.


BREED Greyhound COUNTRY England SIZE 68cm to 76cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

Dogs by Continent

England

BREED Yorkshire Terrier COUNTRY England SIZE 15cm to 18cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Old English Sheepdog COUNTRY England SIZE 51cm to 61cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

38

BREED Airedale Terrier COUNTRY England SIZE 56cm to 61cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Beagle COUNTRY England SIZE 33cm to 41cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years


BREED English Cocker Spaniel COUNTRY England SIZE 36cm to 43cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Bedlington Terrier COUNTRY England SIZE 38cm to 43cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 17 to 20 Years

BREED Bulldog COUNTRY England SIZE 30cm to 40cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Approx 8 Years

BREED Curly Coated Retriever COUNTRY England SIZE Large LIFE EXPECTANCY 8 to 12 Years BREED Staffordshire Bull Terrier COUNTRY England SIZE 33cm to 41cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years


BREED Flat Coated Retriever COUNTRY England SIZE 63cm to 69cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Approx 10 Years

Dogs by Continent

England

BREED English Setter COUNTRY England SIZE 58cm to 69cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Cavalier King Charles Spaniel COUNTRY England SIZE 30cm to 33cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 9 to 14 Years BREED Smooth Fox Terrier COUNTRY England SIZE 33cm to 41cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

40


BREED Wire Fox Terrier COUNTRY England SIZE 33cm to 41cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

BREED Jack Russell Terrier COUNTRY England SIZE 20cm to 38cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

BREED English Springer Spaniel COUNTRY England SIZE 46cm to 56cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years

BREED Bullmastiff COUNTRY England SIZE 61cm to 69cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 8 to 10 Years


42


The Collie is a highly intelligent dog with an exceptional sense of direction. From puppyhood, they tend to try and herd their human companions until they learn otherwise, and their loyalty to humans is legendary.


44


The Tibetan Mastiff originated in the cold climates along the ancient Silk Route, and its main role was to protect herds of sheep from predatory bears, leopards and wolves.


46


Both American and English Cocker Spaniels are friendly and sweet natured, as well as being notorious for an almost permanently wagging tail. Exercise is a must with Cocker Spaniels, and many make excellent gundogs as a result of their love of the outdoors.


Dogs by Continent

Scotland & Wales

BREED West Highland White Terrier COUNTRY Scotland SIZE 23cm to 30cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

BREED Golden Retriever COUNTRY Scotland SIZE 51cm to 61cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Dandie Dinmont Terrier COUNTRY Scotland SIZE 20cm to 28cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Shetland Sheepdog COUNTRY Scotland SIZE 33cm to 41cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to15 Years

BREED Welsh Cardigan Corgi COUNTRY Wales SIZE 25cm to 33cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

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BREED Bearded Collie COUNTRY Scotland SIZE 51cm to 56cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 14 to 15 Years

BREED Border Collie COUNTRY Scotland SIZE 46cm to 56cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Welsh Pembroke Corgi COUNTRY Wales SIZE 25cm to 30cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Scotch Collie COUNTRY Scotland SIZE 48cm to 61cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Scottish Deerhound COUNTRY Scotland SIZE 71cm to 81cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 9 to 10 Years

BREED Gordon Setter COUNTRY Scotland SIZE 58cm to 69cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Skye Terrier COUNTRY Scotland SIZE Approx 25cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years


50


The Keeshond was once bred as a watch dog to protect canal barges in the Netherlands. Its loud and distinctive bark was the perfect alarm, although the breed is not aggressive at all.


52


The Old English Sheepdog is one of the most adaptable, gentle and loving breeds of large dog. Protective and intelligent, their bark is a distinctive one and sounds much like a cracked bell.


54


The Australian Shepherd is a courageous, loving breed that makes an ideal companion animal. They are intelligent and easy to train, and are happy at work or play. Their natural herding instincts make them ideally suited as working farm dogs.


BREED Dachshund COUNTRY Germany SIZE 20cm to 27cm (Standard) LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

Dogs by Continent

Germany & The Alps

BREED Standard Schnauzer COUNTRY Germany SIZE 43cm to 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

BREED Eurasier COUNTRY Germany SIZE 48cm to 16cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 11 to 13 Years

BREED Boxer COUNTRY Germany SIZE 53cm to 63cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 11 to 14 Years

BREED German Shepherd Dog COUNTRY Germany SIZE 55cm to 65cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Approx 13 Years

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BREED Westphalian Dachsbracke COUNTRY Germany SIZE 20cm to 27cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED German Wirehaired Pointer COUNTRY Germany SIZE 56cm to 67cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years BREED German Spitz COUNTRY Germany SIZE 23cm to 28cm (Small) LIFE EXPECTANCY 14 to 15 Years

BREED Weimaraner COUNTRY Germany SIZE 56cm to 69cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 14 Years

BREED Doberman Pinscher COUNTRY Germany SIZE 61cm to 71cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 13 Years

BREED German Pinscher COUNTRY Germany SIZE 41cm to 48cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years


BREED Rottweiler COUNTRY Germany SIZE 56cm to 69cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Appenzeller Sennenhund COUNTRY Switzerland SIZE 46cm to 58cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 13 Years

Dogs by Continent

Germany & The Alps

BREED St. Bernard COUNTRY Switzerland SIZE 61cm to 70cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 8 to 10 Years

BREED Bernese Mountain Dog COUNTRY Switzerland SIZE 58cm to 71cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 6 to 8 Years

58 58


BREED Great Dane COUNTRY Germany SIZE 71cm to 86cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 9 to 12 Years

BREED Entlebucher Mountain Dog COUNTRY Switzerland SIZE 48cm to 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 11 to 15 Years

BREED Pomeranian COUNTRY Germany SIZE 18cm to 30cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Up to 15 Years

BREED Greater Swiss Mountain Dog COUNTRY Switzerland SIZE 60cm to 72cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 11 Years

BREED German Shorthaired Pointer COUNTRY Germany SIZE 53cm to 64cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years


60


Like humans, dogs come in many nationalities, shapes and sizes, and they adapt well to their human companions as well as their environment. Playtime is just as important as quiet bonding time.


BREED Catalan Sheepdog COUNTRY Spain SIZE 45cm to 55cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12to 14 Years

BREED Lagotto Romagnolo COUNTRY Italy SIZE 36cm to 49cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 16 Years

Dogs by Continent

Mediterranean Europe BREED Neapolitan Mastiff COUNTRY Italy SIZE 60cm to 75cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Under 10 Years

BREED Bichon Frisé COUNTRY Spain SIZE 23cm to 30cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

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BREED Maltese Dog COUNTRY Italy SIZE 20cm to 25cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years


BREED Italian Greyhound COUNTRY Italy SIZE 30cm to 38cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Ratonero Bodeguero Andaluz COUNTRY Spain SIZE 35cm to 43cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Unknown

BREED Galgo Español COUNTRY Spain SIZE 60cm to 70cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Approx 12 Years

BREED Cane Corso COUNTRY Italy SIZE 60cm to 68cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 11 Years

BREED Maremma Sheepdog COUNTRY Italy SIZE 60cm to 73cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 11 to 13 Years


Dogs by Continent

Mediterranean Europe BREED Perro de Presa Mallorquin COUNTRY Spain SIZE 52cm to 58cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Ibizan Hound COUNTRY Spain SIZE 56cm to 74cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

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BREED Portuguese Podengo COUNTRY Portugal SIZE 55cm to 70cm (Large) LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years


BREED Portuguese Water Dog COUNTRY Portugal SIZE 43cm to 57cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 14 Years

BREED Spanish Water Dog COUNTRY Spain SIZE 40cm to 50cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 14 Years

BREED Spanish Mastiff COUNTRY Spain SIZE 72cm to 88cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 11 Years


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Spaniels, Springers and many similar breeds have a natural love of the outdoors, and they make excellent companions when hunting, camping or just enjoying an energetic walk.


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The Border Collie comes in many varieties of coat, ear and eye configurations. Eye colour varies between brown and blue, and ears can be fully erect or dropped.


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Playful and curious, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels maintain their puppyish nature into adulthood. They adore human contact and make excellent lap dogs.


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The Maltese is a socially active breed, and is happiest in a small home with an enclosed garden. Once they bond with humans, they spend as much time as possible in their presence.


BREED Drentse Patrijshond COUNTRY Netherlands SIZE 55cm to 63cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Unknown BREED Barbet COUNTRY France SIZE 52cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 13 to 15 Years

Dogs by Continent

Western Europe

BREED Schapendoes COUNTRY Netherlands SIZE 40cm to 50cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Approx 14 Years

BREED Stabyhoun COUNTRY Netherlands SIZE 49cm to 53cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 13 to 14 Years

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BREED Wirehaired Pointing Griffon COUNTRY Netherlands SIZE 50cm to 60cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Basset Fauve de Bretagne COUNTRY France SIZE 30cm to 38cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 11 to 14 Years

BREED Dutch Shepherd Dog COUNTRY Netherlands SIZE 55cm to 62cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Kooikerhondje COUNTRY Netherlands SIZE 36cm to 41cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years

BREED Dutch Smoushond COUNTRY Netherlands SIZE 35cm to 42 cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years


Dogs by Continent

Western Europe

BREED Belgian Shepherd (Tervuren) COUNTRY Belgium SIZE 56cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 13 to 14 Years

BREED Belgian Shepherd Dog (Groenendael) COUNTRY Belgium SIZE 56cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 13 to 14 Years BREED Belgian Shepherd Dog (Malinois) COUNTRY Belgium SIZE 56cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 13 to 14 Years

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BREED Bloodhound COUNTRY Belgium SIZE 58cm to 69cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years


BREED Braque d'Auvergne COUNTRY France SIZE 52cm to 65cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Unknown

BREED Belgian Shepherd Dog (Laekenois) COUNTRY Belgium SIZE 56cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 13 to 14 Years

BREED Keeshond COUNTRY Netherlands SIZE 41cm to 48cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Bouvier des Ardennes COUNTRY Belgium SIZE 51cm to 63cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Unknown

BREED Beauceron COUNTRY France SIZE 61cm to 70cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Griffon Bruxellois COUNTRY Belgium SIZE 18cm to 20cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 15 Years

BREED Bouvier des Flandres COUNTRY Belgium SIZE 56cm to 71cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Basset Hound COUNTRY France SIZE 28cm to 38cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years


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The Spitz is one of nature's most playful companions, and its intelligence and alertness means it is always ready spring into action. Agile and tough, the Spitz is a popular dog with families and singles alike.


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The English or British Bulldog is a stalwart breed that enjoys worldwide popularity as a favourite purebreed. With distinctive 'pushed-in' noses and wrinkled faces, they are also one of the world's most recognisable breeds.


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The hard working Jack Russell Terrier was originally bred for fox hunting. Filled with boundless energy and an inquiring mind, they also excel at agility trials and flyball.


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Many breeds of dog age quickly, while others seem to possess energy that promises to continue indefinitely. Older dogs require differing levels of care as they near the extent of their longevity.


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Border Collies love doing anything that is athletic, acrobatic or energetic. Known as one of the world's most intelligent domestic breed of dog, their success as livestock herders is legendary.


BREED Tornjak COUNTRY Bosnia & Herzegovina SIZE 60cm to 70cm

Dogs by Continent

BREED Puli COUNTRY Hungary SIZE 36cm to 46cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 12 Years

Eastern Europe & Scandinavia BREED Pumi COUNTRY Hungary SIZE 33cm to 48cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 13 Years

BREED Polish Lowland Sheepdog COUNTRY Poland SIZE 41cm to 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Mudi COUNTRY Hungary SIZE 38cm to 47cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 13 to 14 Years

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BREED Czechoslovak Wolfdog COUNTRY Czech Republic SIZE 60cm to 65cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 16 Years

BREED Vizsla COUNTRY Hungary SIZE 51cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Cesky Terrier COUNTRY Czech Republic SIZE 25cm to 32cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Dalmatian COUNTRY Croatia SIZE 50cm to 60cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Polish Tatra Sheepdog COUNTRY Poland SIZE 60cm to 70cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Kuvasz COUNTRY Hungary SIZE 66cm to 76cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years


Dogs by Continent

Eastern Europe & Scandinavia BREED Danish Swedish Farmdog COUNTRY Denmark SIZE 32cm to 37cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 15 Years

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BREED Finnish Spitz COUNTRY Finland SIZE 38cm to 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Lapponian Herder COUNTRY Finland SIZE 43cm to 54cm

BREED Norwegian Lundehund COUNTRY Norway SIZE 31cm to 39cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Approx 12 Years

BREED Estonian Hound COUNTRY Estonia SIZE 42cm to 52cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years


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The life of a happy dog is always full of excitement. Owners encourage plenty of outdoor exercise to keep the dog in good health.


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When puppies are born, they have a keen sense of smell but are unable to open their eyes. Within two to four weeks, they can wag their tails, bite, bark and growl. Dogs love to play and in summer, enjoy jumping into water to fetch a ball or stick.


The Akita Inu is one of two varieties of Akita, the other being the Akita Ken. Originating in Japan, the breed has a coat similar to the Japanese Spitz and the Siberian Husky.

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The Doberman breed is the result of crossbreeding Pinschers, Rottweilers, Pointers, Shepherds, Great Danes and Greyhounds. The powerful, deep chested breed is known for its athleticism.


Dog trials are a popular sport, and well attended by many enthusiasts. Events include obedience, tracking, endurance, herding and obstacle courses. In some trials, dancing with dogs is included.

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Dogs are at their happiest when interacting with other dogs or humans. The simple act of running along a beach after a ball is a pastime of sheer joy and unfettered freedom.


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Fun loving Dalmations provide many moments of laughter for their human companions. Happiest with other canine friends around, the breed makes a wonderful family pet.


BREED Rat Terrier COUNTRY USA SIZE 20cm to 35cm (Mid Size) LIFE EXPECTANCY 15 to 18 Years

BREED Mountain Cur COUNTRY USA SIZE 46cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 16 Years

Dogs by Continent

North America BREED Shiloh Shepherd Dog COUNTRY USA SIZE 71cm to 76cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years

BREED Miniature Australian Shepherd COUNTRY USA SIZE 26cm to 36cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 13 Years

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BREED Silken Windhound COUNTRY USA SIZE 46cm to 60cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 14 to 18 Years


BREED Plott Hound COUNTRY USA SIZE 51cm to 63cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years

BREED White Shepherd COUNTRY USA SIZE 55cm to 65cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Approx 12 Years

BREED Olde English Bulldogge COUNTRY USA SIZE 43cm to 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 11 Years

BREED Treeing Walker Coonhound COUNTRY USA SIZE 51cm to 69cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 13 Years

BREED Redbone Coonhound COUNTRY USA SIZE 53cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 11 to12 Years


BREED American Cocker Spaniel COUNTRY USA SIZE 36cm to 38cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED American Staffordshire Terrier COUNTRY USA SIZE 41cm to 48cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 9 to 15 Years

Dogs by Continent

North America

BREED American Pit Bull Terrier COUNTRY USA SIZE 35cm to 60cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Approx 12 Years

BREED American Hairless Terrier COUNTRY USA SIZE 20cm to 40cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 14 to 16 Years

BREED Boston Terrier COUNTRY USA SIZE 38cm to 43cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

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BREED Black and Tan Coonhound COUNTRY USA SIZE 58cm to 68cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED American Akita COUNTRY USA SIZE 61cm to 71cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 15 Years


BREED Australian Shepherd COUNTRY USA SIZE 46cm to 58cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12to 15 Years

BREED Black Mouth Cur COUNTRY USA SIZE 41cm to 46cm

BREED Chesapeake Bay Retriever COUNTRY USA SIZE 53cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED American Bulldog COUNTRY USA SIZE 52cm to 70cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 16 to 17 Years

BREED Catahoula Cur COUNTRY USA SIZE 51cm to 58cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 14 Years BREED Carolina Dog COUNTRY USA SIZE 45cm to 61cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years


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The Chihuahua is one of the bravest dogs for its size, and it loves adventure and play. The diminutive breed is highly intelligent and enjoys attention from adult humans.


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French Bulldogs are sweet natured, affectionate and often comical, and they are a popular breed as a result of their temperament. They love to keep clean, but hate water, which makes bathtime an interesting exercise.


Working dogs include heelers and cattle dogs, and many are cross bred for attributes that include intelligence, obedience and their natural herding instincts.

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The Shih Tzu is a small dog, but it is nevertheless a solid breed and can be quite heavy for its size. When outdoors, Shih Tzus are energetic and a source of joy to watch as they frolic around.


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Maltese dogs are cheerful and spirited, and quite devoted companions to both canine playmates and humans. Happy indoors and out, they make ideal companions for all ages.


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Dogs love being outdoors, and many more love the hustle and bustle of towns and cities. Born to be sociable, many breeds can adapt quickly to new environments.


The brave and energetic Yorkshire terrier has the heart of a dog several times its size. It is also proud and territorial, and will stand its ground when challenged.

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Dogs by Continent

BREED Labrador Retriever COUNTRY Canada SIZE 53cm to 61cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

The Frozen North & Russia

BREED Alaskan Malamute COUNTRY USA SIZE 56cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 16 Years

BREED Landseer COUNTRY Canada SIZE 67cm to 80cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 8 to 9 Years

BREED Greenland Dog COUNTRY Greenland SIZE 56cm to 64cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 13 Years

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BREED Newfoundland COUNTRY C anada SIZE 63cm to 74cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 9 to 15 Years


BREED Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever COUNTRY Canada SIZE 43cm to 53cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years

BREED West Siberian Laika COUNTRY Russia SIZE 53cm to 61cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 14 Years

BREED Black Russian Terrier COUNTRY Russia SIZE 64cm to 74cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 14 Years

BREED Icelandic Sheepdog COUNTRY Iceland SIZE 31cm to 41cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years


Dogs by Continent

The Frozen North & Russia

BREED Siberian Husky COUNTRY Russia SIZE 51cm to 60cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to15 Years

BREED Russian Toy COUNTRY Russia SIZE 20cm to 26cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 11 Years

BREED Samoyed COUNTRY Russia SIZE 48cm to 60cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

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BREED Central Asian Shepherd Dog COUNTRY Russia SIZE 60cm to 78cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years


BREED Borzoi COUNTRY Russia SIZE 66cm to 71cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Russo-European Laika COUNTRY Russia SIZE 52cm to 60cm

BREED Russian Spaniel COUNTRY Russia SIZE 38cm to 45cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years

BREED East-European Shepherd COUNTRY Russia SIZE 61cm to 76cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years


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Like Labradors, Golden Retrievers can age quickly when they reach a certain point. Regardless of health complications, they remain a loyal, patient and a thoroughly loving companion animal.


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Having a dog in the household can be rewarding, challenging and amusing, and many human lives have been transformed by the presence of a canine housemate.


BREED Shar-Pei COUNTRY China SIZE 46cm to 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 8 to 10 Years

BREED Shih Tzu COUNTRY China SIZE Up to 28cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

BREED Chinese Crested Dog COUNTRY China SIZE Approx 30cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

Dogs by Continent

Asia

BREED Pug COUNTRY China SIZE 25cm to 36cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Lhasa Apso COUNTRY Tibet SIZE 25cm to 28cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

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BREED Eurasier COUNTRY China SIZE 48cm to 60cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 11 to 13 Years BREED Pekingese COUNTRY China SIZE 30cm to 45cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 15 Years

BREED Chow Chow COUNTRY China SIZE 46cm to 56cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 13 to 15 Years

BREED Japanese Chin COUNTRY Japan SIZE 18cm to 28cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Less than 10 Years


BREED Shikoku COUNTRY Japan SIZE 43cm to 55cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

Dogs by Continent

Asia

BREED Thai Ridgeback COUNTRY Thailand SIZE 51cm to 60cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 13 Years

BREED Akita Inu COUNTRY Japan SIZE 61cm to 66cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 11 to 15 Years

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BREED Tosa COUNTRY Japan SIZE 62cm to 82cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years


BREED Taigan COUNTRY Kyrgyzstan SIZE 60cm to 65cm

BREED Tibetan Spaniel COUNTRY Taiwan SIZE Approx 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Tibetan Terrier COUNTRY Taiwan SIZE 36cm to 43cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years BREED Shiba Inu COUNTRY Japan SIZE 33cm to 41cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

BREED Afghan Hound COUNTRY Afghanistan SIZE 67cm to 73cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Yeras


An inquisitive but adoring look from a dog has the propensity to melt the heart and raise a smile in most humans. The love that a dog feels for its human companions is wonderfully unconditional.

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The Great Dane shares its ancestry with boarhounds that lived in Ancient Greece. A long period of interbreeding among Suliot Dogs, Molossian Hounds and wolf hounds resulted in today's Great Dane.


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The Labrador is an ambassador for gentle friendliness, excellent manners and high intelligence. Often trained as assistance dogs, their stable temperament makes them the ideal companion.


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The Cavdoodle is the result of breeding between Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Toy or Miniature Poodles. The breeding program was a deliberate one designed to reduce the risk of genetic diseases in purebred dogs.


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Quiet, independent and athletic, the Borzoi is known for its selective obedience and a love of exercising over large areas. Like most sight hounds, the Borzoi loves nothing better than a long run in the outdoors.


BREED Fila Brasileiro COUNTRY Brazil SIZE 65cm to 75cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 9 to 11 Years

BREED Blue Heeler COUNTRY Australia SIZE 43cm to 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

Dogs by Continent

Australia & South America BREED Chihuahua COUNTRY Mexico SIZE 15cm to 23cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

BREED Australian Kelpie COUNTRY Australia SIZE 43cm to 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 14 Years

BREED Australian Cattle Dog COUNTRY Australia SIZE 43cm to 51cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years

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BREED Australian Silky Terrier COUNTRY Australia SIZE 23cm to 26cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 15 Years


BREED Havanese COUNTRY Cuba SIZE 20cm to 28cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 14 to 15 Years

BREED Brazilian Terrier COUNTRY Brazil SIZE 36cm to 41cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 12 to 14 Years

BREED Australian Terrier COUNTRY Australia SIZE 23cm to 28cm LIFE EXPECTANCY Over 15 Years

BREED Mexican Hairless Dog COUNTRY Mexico SIZE 38cm to 51cm (Miniature) LIFE EXPECTANCY 15 to 20 Years

BREED Dodo Argentino COUNTRY Argentina SIZE 61cm to 69cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 10 to 12 Years

BREED Peruvian Inca Orchid COUNTRY Peru SIZE 50cm to 65cm LIFE EXPECTANCY 11 to 12 Years


Many dogs become accustomed to the comings and goings of the human members of their household. It isn't unusual for dogs to anticipate the homecoming of humans and then post themselves in wait.

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Grooming dogs is not merely a matter of dunking them in warm water and adding soap. Many breeds have sensitive skins and specific grooming needs in order to be healthy and happy.


In the history of man's relationship with dogs, Neolithic campfires, Medieval taverns and modern day dining rooms have all provided an opportunity for treats or scraps.

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Many households have more than one dog, and often more than one breed of dog. While a few select breeds tend to prefer the company of 'their own kind', most dogs are not so particular and make friends easily.


At odds with its wolf-like appearance, the Samoyed is a very gentle dog, and it adapts well to anybody it encounters. Loyal, playful and strong minded, it makes an excellent family pet but is equally at home with just one human.

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The Italian Greyhound has only come to prominence around the world over the last decade. Its popularity as a companion animal continues to grow with its renown as an affectionate and loving dog.

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The Whippet is an English sighthound descended from the Greyhound. Like Greyhounds, Whippets participate in sporting pursuits, but they also make excellent family pets.


The Papillon is intelligent and friendly, and its delicate looks belie a toughness that responds well to a good outdoor romp. Papillons respond well to affection, and they love to be cuddled by humans.

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