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Methods II: Homesteading Survey Cb18: Canarsie, New York

Sabrina Dorsainvil Joel Stein Aubrey Murdock Drew Tucker Jonathan Lapalme


Reflections: Survey design, conduction and analysis, as well as the larger construction of a research methodology, provides an initial and useful understanding of a particular place. Working through the logic of the questions, and the particular research approach, does reveal some highly problematic gaps. The thing to keep in mind, at least in my experience, is that it is a certain type of knowledge that is being collected. Doesn’t make it necessarily wrong or bad, just risky, conditional and maybe an inappropriate tool for the question posed. An important element, although tangential to the quantitative analysis, are the stories of place that comes bubbling up, uncontrolled, spilling from the simple prompt of the questions. Joel

What was most useful for me was how this experience really helped me formulate a better set of methodological practices, as far as the creation and utilization of surveys. Drew

Perhaps it was the cold, or something about the population of Canarsie, but interviewing ten people each ended up being more difficult than expected. Many people encountered were either too busy, simply not interested, or they were suspicious of the consent form to be signed - they just didn’t want a sign any paper, no matter what it said. For all these reasons, we had to come up with different strategies, such as walking with the people to wherever they were going, in order to get them to answer our questions. From one question to the next, many contradictions arose in the position of some people, which makes us wonder if they truly understood all the questions they answered to. We could also perceive this lack of comprehension by various micro facial expressions, but unfortunately, since we didn’t want to influence their answer, we rarely explained the issue in greater details. Furthermore, while many people gave us very rich details about their position on some topics, the format of the survey forced us to ignore it, which was quite frustrating at times. Jonathan

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Reflections: Pierre Bourdieu’s asserts that what main stream statisticians refer to as ‘popular opinion’ is in fact a gross over-simplification of the complex web of human emotion and opinion, narrowly focused to serve a political function. This made itself abundantly clear in our own experience collecting surveys. The most glaring example I can think of was the lack of participation by the most frustrated and disenfranchised individuals. The very people that might be most effected by homesteading legislation were too fed up with the housing system in general to discuss the issue. Additionally, the limitation of the survey to English-speaking participants was another glaring example of the exclusivity of the quantitative survey. The process of analysis was a helpful example of how data can be synthesized for specific purposes. In general this was an instructive experience that reminds me never to take popular opinion at face value.

Aubrey

The survey process allowed me to think about the initial creation of a survey. It was difficult for me to give someone a survey with a topic that I was detached from. It was also hard to not engage in conversation with survey recipients. In reality that may repeatedly happen however from my past experiences this process was more beneficial in aggregating information when those conversations could occur. This may have been because my focus was more qualitative than quantitative but looking at the bigger picture learning the usefulness of either is informative. The experience of using this survey was quite interesting as it provided me with insight about how I would want to approach people. We tried several different methods to engage passersby. Being personable was helpful but also contested the idea of removing yourself from the survey. As for analysis, the experience itself was useful in visualizing interesting trends, contradictions and patterns. Sabrina

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis Homesteading:

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis Vacant & Abandoned Properties

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Data Analysis

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Cross Tabulation

Number of people who would support Urban Homesteading legislaĆ&#x;on

Among those who own, rent or lease, whether or not they would supporturban homesteading legislaĆ&#x;on. 25 20 15 10 5 0 Own

Rent

Do you rent, own or lease your home? Yes

Yes Own Rent Lease

Lease

No

No 82% 91% 100%

18% 9% 0

100% 100% 100%

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Cross Tabulation NO

YES Owners > 30%

100%

Owners < 30%

0%

66%

33%

Renters > 30%

95%

5%

Renters < 30%

75%

25%%

Lease > 30%

100%

0%

If you are an owner, renter, or leaser, and pay less or more than 30% of your monthly income on housing, how loikely are you to support urban homesteading legislation?

Lease < 30%

Yes Owners > 30% Owners < 30% Renters > 30% Renters< 30% Lease > 30% Lease < 30%

No 5 4 19 3 1 0

0 2 1 1 0 0

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


Cross Tabulation

Number of response to whether vacant properƟes ar noƟced

Depending on income bracket, do you noƟce vacant properƟes in your neighborhood? 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Income Level Yes

Yes No Income 1-4,999 5,00010,00020,00030,0004000050,00060,00070,00080,00090,000100,000-

No 1

Null Null

1 Null Null

3 0 2 8 1 1 Null

2 3 5 1 4 1 Null

1 Null Null

No

1 Nll Null

Sabrina Dorsainvil, Joel Stein, Aubrey Murdock, Drew Tucker, Jonathan Lapalme


CB18 Canarsie Survey