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Friday, November 18, 2011

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MARSHALL UNIVERSITY’S STUDENT NEWSPAPER

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Occupy Huntington marches in solidarity with national movement BY CORY RINER THE PARTHENON

Protesters gathered in front of Huntington City Hall Thursday evening to march in solidarity with the Occupy Movement to mark its two month anniversary. The national Occupy movement began Sept. 17, and Occupy groups around the nation are marching in unity. Protesters organized in front of City Hall and marched to the Occupy site in front of Chase Bank, located on Fifth Avenue. “Today is the two month mark, the 60-day mark, for Occupy Wall Street in New York, and with the recent eviction from Zuccotti Park, that’s why I’m out here.,” said Barry Dillon, 28, organizer and member of Occupy Huntington. “This march was called for on an international level in solidarity with that, along with presenting our grievances that we have locally. But largely, this is in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street.” The march also represents an increase in the activity of Occupy Huntington, and the effort to have their voices heard. “The goal is just to let everybody know there’s a lot of people that support us out here,” said John “Chicago” Hough, 45, member of Occupy Huntington. “To the real 99 percent, the people honking their horns, we’re just trying to show that we’re out here and we’ll stay out here as long as it takes to sit out here and tell people that we are tired of the corporate greed.” Police have cleared many

CORY RINER | THE PARTHENON

Members of the Occupy Huntington movement march in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street. Members of the occupation have camped out in front of Chase Bank located on Fifth Avenue in Huntington since Oct. 7. Occupy sites and arrested protesters across the nation last week. Occupy Huntington is staying put. The Occupy Huntington movement has maintained a camp in front of Chase Bank since Oct. 7.

The protesters have avoided much of the problems faced by other Occupy groups by maintaining a peaceful camp. The protesters said they have not had any problems with the Huntington Police Department,

and they seem to have a greater interest in keeping them safe than getting them to move their camp. The Occupy movement began with frustration in the way working class people were being treated by those

in power. “All of the sudden, when 100,000 people stand up, they realize that we’ve all been feeling this way for the last 5 or 10 years. We’ve all been feeling pinched. Nothing is getting easier anymore,”

The Occupy protesters are attempting to voice their concerns over the injustices they feel are unfairly pushed onto the working class,” said Michael McAteer, 36, volunteer See OCCUPY I Page 5

Career Services prepares seniors for graduation, job search BY JOHN GIBB

THE PARTHENON With graduation quickly approaching, seniors could find it easier to land a job with the help of Marshall University Career Services. Career Services assist students with professional development, career direction and job searching both during and after postsecondary education. In addition, Career Services helps students with resume building and reviewing, prepares students for mock interviewing, provides job search strategies and hosts on-campus career fairs and recruiting events. Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services, said preparing for graduation is “major-specific.” For

example, a student in the College of Education needs to gather credential files, test scores and complete the Praxis – all in order to acquire a license to teach. Students who plan to further their education at graduate school, however, need to complete grad school applications, collect letters of recommendation and prepare personal statements. Mirek Bialk, senior career adviser, said planning early is the key for success. “Some seniors began planning for graduation during their freshman year, other seniors, however, begin planning a few weeks before graduation,” Bialk said. By planning early, Bialk said students are able to perfect their resumes, gain valuable career experience

and prepare for interviews with potential employers. Bialk said with the current state of the economy, the job market is quite challenging. “What’s happening in the economy right now is unprecedented,” Bialk said. “Jobs are becoming extremely competitive, and none of us assisting the students grew up in a situation like that.” Debby Stoler, assistant director for development and outreach at Career Services, said she is telling students to prepare for six to nine months of job searching activities, especially if they have not yet started. Stoler said an excellent resume allows students to stand apart from other job applicants. “A resume is a professional

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239163 SCHOONERS PARTHENON FRONT PAGE 6 x 2.0 3 /3 /3

GOOD VS. BAD

RESUMES

GOOD resumes... BAD resumes... > are career focused.

> are generic.

> are specific

> generalize information.

> highlight relevant professional experience. > list your highest level of education first, spells out the school name and is honest. > list skills tailored to the job to which you apply. > include professional contact information.

> follow us... ONLINE

> INSIDE NEWS..................... 2,5 SPORTS..................... 3 OPINION................... 4 LIFE!........................ 6

document,” Stoler said. “It must look great and be focused toward the position a student is applying for, rather than a generic resume.” Stoler said the first little bit of information on a resume must stand out to an employer. In addition, the way in which the resume is conveyed and formatted is also important to the employer. Hogsett said relevant skills and career experience are items of concern for employers, making them take a second look. “If employers have 75 resumes sitting on a desk, they are not going to spend five minutes looking at every single resume,” Hogsett said. Bialk said relevant See RESUME I Page 5

> give irrelevant details. > include high school in addition to college. > do not highlight your most relevant talents. > include unprofessional e-mail addresses. > look messy and don’t feature good layout and design.

le quotab it’s

VOL. 115 NO. 59

Alcohol may be man’s worst enemy, but the bible says love your enemy.

page designed and

FRANK SINATRA

KRISTIN STEELE

edited by steele47@ marshall.edu


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Friday, November 18, 2011

“To those engaged in peaceful protest, I am sorry that you were pepper-sprayed.” >MIKE MCGINN SEATTLE MAYOR

marshallparthenon.com

Huntington Christmas parade scheduled for Dec. 1 BY AMANDA FASTUCA THE PARTHENON

An annual downtown parade is bringing the community together Dec. 1 to celebrate the holidays. Huntington’s well-known Christmas parade is presented by the Moses Auto Mall of Huntington and organized by the Downtown Live Committee of the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce. Renee Maass, downtown live coordinator of the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce, said it’s tradition for the parade to begin at the same place each year. “The parade will begin on Fourth Avenue and 13th Street, and it will proceed

down to Eighth Street,” Maass said. “They will then take a right at Eighth Street and go down Third Avenue — ending at Pullman Square.” The lineup for the units begins at 6 p.m. with the parade beginning at 7 p.m. The parade will consist of approximately 90 units, including local businesses and organizations that are encouraged to dress and decorate floats accordingly. Among the organizations will be churches, boy scouts, girl scouts, fraternities, sororities, dance teams and troops. “Every year, we have a theme for the parade,” Maass said. “This year is the 12 Days of Christmas so a lot of people are decorating their floats around that

theme. However, floats are not necessarily required. Participants may ride in a vehicle or even walk if they choose to do so. All we ask is that individuals please make some attempt to decorate it for Christmas if they are in a vehicle. And if you are walking, wear some seasonally appropriate attire. The main thing is that we want people to come out and participate in it and have fun.” Every year, the parade is led by a chosen Grand Marshal who has made an impact on the community in some way. This year’s Grand Marshal is Ronald McDonald. “Ronald McDonald was chosen to lead the parade this year because of the McDonald’s Corporation’s

strong commitment to children’s charities and especially to our local Ronald McDonald House at the Cabell Huntington Hospital,” Maass said. “The work that the Ronald McDonald House does is so important to health care and the Tri-State area.” Other characters who will be involved in the parade include Santa Claus as well as his crew of elves and reindeer. Maass said the Moses AutoMall of Huntington has allowed the Downtown Live Committee to provide transportation costs for the five high school bands that will be performing in the parade, as well as cash prizes for the band contest and float contest.

The high school bands are Cabell Midland High School, Ironton High School, Huntington High School, Green High School and Spring Valley High School. There will also be performances to entertain participants and those watching the parade that will occur prior to the parade. “At Pullman Square before the parade, The River Magic Chorus will be singing Christmas carols,” Maass said. “The True Impact Dance and Performing Arts will also be putting on a show at Pullman about 30 minutes prior to the parade. And lastly, the Thundertones, male barbershop chorus, will be singing up and down Fourth Avenue before the parade begins.”

Maass said she is taking applications to participate in the parade until Nov. 22. Those who are interested can email her at renee@huntingtonchamber.org. “If anyone wants to get involved, it’s not too late,” Maass said. “This is a community parade, and it’s meant to be enjoyed. We encourage students to come out and watch the parade if they are not already participating in it. It really is a great way to kick off the holiday season. It’s a source of community pride and also an opportunity to show faith downtown and show what downtown has to offer to people.” Amanda Fastuca can be contacted at fastuca@marshall.edu.

College of Health Professions will New exhibit to open at Huntington Museum of Art offer new health sciences degree BY BRITTINI BROOKS THE PARTHENON

A new exhibit will open Saturday at the Huntington Museum of Art. The exhibit entitled “Lenny Lyons Bruno: Coal Camp Series 2000-2010” features paintings and sculptures from artist Lenny Lyons Bruno. “This collection tells a story,” Bruno said. “This exhibit is about growing up in West Virginia in a coal mine.” The artwork in this exhibit reflects Bruno’s and her mother’s memories in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Bruno’s artwork shows how hard it was growing up

in coal mining family. “There was always a possibility of a disaster everyday,” Bruno said. “You never knew what was going to happen.” Bruno grew up in Beckley, W. Va., near the Cranberry coalmines. Bruno said she is a selftaught artist and started painting in 1987. Some of the paintings in this exhibit highlight memories from a journal Bruno’s mother left behind. People can find Bruno’s paintings interpreted with a wide range of materials including quilts, photographs and ledgers. Her sculptures are made from everyday objects. See EXHIBIT I Page 5

BY MEAGAN EARLS THE PARTHENON

The College of Health Professions is preparing a 120-credit hour bachelor of art’s degree in health sciences. “One of the goals of the program is to offer students an option, particularly when they start getting into their junior year and they still haven’t settled on a program,” said Charles Hossler, associate dean of the COHP. “This would be another option of getting a degree.” Hossler said the degree gives students the foundation to move on to graduate-level programs

within the health fields. “A degree in health sciences will allow a student to get all the coursework they need in order to move on to graduate-level work in almost any health field, and the degree also works very well for pre-med students,” Hossler said. “I think the health sciences degree provides another viable option for Marshall students interested in health-related careers because it gives them an area of study that is flexible and broad,” said Frances Hensley, senior associate vice president for academic affairs and dean of undergraduate studies. The majority of classes

within the health sciences curriculum are already offered at the university. “It’s a unique program in that, except for three courses, it’s almost made up entirely of courses that already exist at the university,” Hossler said. Hossler said students who receive a bachelor’s degree in health sciences could potentially have jobs as lab assistants, pharmacy technicians, records clerks or insurance coders. “So far, we have had good reactions from the students,” Hossler said. “We have some students waiting to be admitted to the program, and we are projecting the program

to grow to almost 200 students in a four-year period.” The health science degree is waiting approval from the Faculty Senate, Board of Governors and the university president. Hossler said pending approval, the degree should be released for the spring 2012 semester. “We are here to help students get through their college career, and I think that is the most important part so I am really hoping this degree will help students be successful,” Hossler said. Meagan Earls can be contacted at earls4@marshall.edu.

Seattle mayor apologizes after police pepper-spray peaceful protesters BY MIKE LINBLOM AND LYNN THOMPSON THE SEATTLE TIMES (MCT)

SEATTLE – Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn said he’s sorry police pepper-sprayed peaceful Occupy Seattle demonstrators, after a photo of 84-year-old demonstrator Dorli Rainey’s dripping face went viral. But the apology didn’t satisfy protesters who say the police response has been “excessive.” “To those engaged in

peaceful protest, I am sorry that you were peppersprayed,” McGinn said in a statement Wednesday. The mayor said he has spoken with Rainey. The confrontations began Tuesday afternoon after demonstrators blocked downtown intersections, delaying commuters. As far back as Oct. 8, police have followed a policy of keeping streets clear, by arrest if necessary. McGinn said he and Police Chief John Diaz are

reviewing two pepper-spray incidents from Tuesday and developing procedures to ensure “appropriate commanders” are on hand at future protests. Diaz couldn’t be reached Wednesday, and police spokesman Sgt. Sean Whitcomb declined to comment, saying, “We’ll defer to the mayor.” Sgt. Rich O’Neill, head of the police union, did not return calls for comment. Police said they used pepper spray to disperse a crowd in Belltown, while arresting

a 17-year-old girl who swung a stick at officers. Protesters regrouped on Fifth Avenue at Pine Street. “Pepper spray was deployed only against subjects who were either refusing a lawful order to disperse or engaging in assaultive behavior toward officers,” said the department’s online statement. In an interview Wednesday night, McGinn said the city is “walking a fine line between protecting public safety without allowing the actions of the police themselves

to become a flash point for others.” He said he understood that some protesters in the crowd Tuesday, as well as during previous clashes with police, used the cover of the crowd to provoke violence. “We’re well aware that there are individuals who have been extraordinarily provocative to police over the last six weeks. That was my point in apologizing to peaceful protesters.” But he added it was important he and the police

command “critically review what’s gone on in order to do the best job we can. We need to have the appropriate police presence, and they need to have the support they need.” Occupy Seattle activists issued a statement Wednesday night saying McGinn’s apology did not go far enough. The statement described the group’s actions as “nonviolent civil disobedience” and was critical of police See PROTEST I Page 5

page designed and edited by FIRST LAST | email@marshall.edu

welcomes applications for spring 2012 editors

Available positions:

Executive Editor Managing Editor News Editor Life! Editor Sports Editor Photo Editor Digital Editor Copy Editor Assignment Editor Photographer or Columnist Application deadline is Friday, Nov. 18 at 4 p.m.

Applications are available in The Parthenon newsroom, Communications Building 109. For more information, contact Sandy York at 304-696-2273 or sandy.york@marshall.edu.

The Parthenon is an Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer and welcomes diversity.

WMUL-FM 88.1 is seeking applications for spring 2012 Positions include: • News director • Sports director • Music director • Production director • Promotions director • Continuity director

• Online director • Traffic director • Training coordinator • Programming coordinator • Automation coordinator

Deadline to apply is Nov. 18. Interviews Nov. 28 - Dec. 2.

For job descriptions and applications contact Leannda Carey at 304-696-2295 or carey33@marshall.edu. Applications can be obtained in the WMUL-FM staff room - Second Floor, Communications Building. WMUL is an Equal Opportunity Student Activity.


C M Y K 50 INCH Friday, November 18, 2011

FOOTBALL STANDINGS EAST DIVISION Southern Miss East Carolina Marshall UCF UAB Memphis

C-USA Overall W L W 5 2 9 3 3 4 4 3 5 2 4 4 2 5 3 2 6 2

L 2 6 6 6 8 9

WEST DIVISION Houston Tulsa SMU UTEP Rice Tulane

C-USA Overall W L W 6 0 10 6 0 7 4 2 6 2 4 5 2 4 3 1 6 2

L 0 3 4 5 7 9

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marshallparthenon.com

Late comeback keeps bowl hopes alive

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MARCUS CONSTANTINO | THE PARTHENON

Marshall kick returner Andre Booker looks for space during a return against Louisville. Booker returned two kicks for 81 yards and five punts for 34 yards against Memphis Thursday night. The Herd won the contest after scoring two late touchdowns. Freshman quarterback Rakeem Cato completed 13 of 23 passes for 150 yards and a touchdown. Running back Tron Martinez rushed for 87 yards and a touchdown. Travon Van scored the game-winning touchdown when he scampered into the end zone for a 19-yard score.

JUCO transfer adds depth to women’s basketball BY SHAINA CARTER THE PARTHENON

MARCUS CONSTANTINO | THE PARTHENON

Sophomore Jasmine Shaw makes her way to the basket during the Herd’s 65-49 loss to Miami on Tuesday. Shaw had a team-high 16 points in Marshall’s season opener against Kent State.

Marshall golf lands top prospect THE PARTHENON Marshall University’s men’s golf program has announced the signing of high school senior Logan Lagodich this past weekend, penning him down in agreement to compete for the Thundering Herd next fall season. Currently a senior at Canton Central Catholic High School in Canton,

Ohio, Lagodich is a First Team All-Ohio and First Team All-Northeast Ohio member, an honor he has received in 2010 and 2011. His Central Catholic squad earned runner-up honors at the 2011 Ohio High School State Tournament, of which Lagodich himself was an individual runner-up as well as the Sectional Champion in 2011. Lagodich’s scoring

average is 74.4, a consistent performance that the Herd will be looking for more of in the seasons to come. Lagodich has supported and participated with the American Junior Golf Association, and has found success in AJGA events, placing third at the Columbus Junior Open and 13th at the Stonehenge Junior Open. Lagodich will be a new face on a Marshall squad that

page designed and edited by JAKE SNYDER | snyder100@marshall.edu

will have a number of returners. With Bosten Miller and Carson Schambach as the only two seniors on the roster – Coach Feaganes will have plenty of experience on his side, something he feels Lagodich will be able to use to his advantage. “Logan is an outstanding prospect,” Head Coach Joe Feaganes said. “He should have an immediate impact on our golf team.”

Jasmine Shaw transferred to Marshall this season to make her debut with the Herd. She transferred from Chipola Junior College where in 2011 she was All-American and first team All-Panhandle Conference. During her first year with the program, she was named Florida Panhandle Conference freshman of the year after averaging 15.5 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.5 assists, 1.7 steals and shooting 42.6 percent behind the arc. “I’m still trying to adjust and get used to the new system,” Shaw said. Before coming to Marshall Shaw hurt her knee and had to go through operations, but that did not stop her from playing the game. “She hurt her knee in junior college and only played one year of college basketball before transferring here where she has three years left,” Head Coach Royce Chadwick said. Shaw has adjusted well to the team, which has shown in the recent games. “She’s a very good defensive basketball player,” Chadwick said. “She can pass a ball, she sees the floor well, she can shoot the three, a greta mid-range game and she can take it all the way to the rim.” In the team’s two exhibition games, she scored a total of 13 points helping her team to two victories. In the teams first regular season game against Kent State,

she totaled 16 points along side Shynisha Johnson, making them the teams highest scorers. “It was the first game and the game just came to me,” Shaw said. She gives most the credit to her team for helping her get the open opportunities to make a basket. “My teammates got me some good looks and I took the opportunities,” Shaw said. Shaw hopes if they work hard enough, she can help lead the team to a championship this year. “I hope I can help the team win a championship because I know it’s been a while since they’ve won,” Shaw said. They plan on improving every game they play. “ We want to improve every game we play and every time you go out you want to learn something new about yourself,” Chadwick said. After their loss against Miami of Ohio, the Herd said they hope to take what they did wrong and use it to defeat Ohio in their next game. “You want to become a more cohesive unit, develop your chemistry as you go through November and December, and once conference begins that’s when it counts,” Chadwick said. The team continues their season away at 2 p.m. Saturday against Ohio University. Shaina Carter can be contacted at carter216@ marshall.edu.

239076 SUNTIME TANNING TBD 2 x 2.0


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Friday, November 18, 2011 marshallparthenon.com

Opinion

ABOUT US

The Parthenon, Marshall University’s student newspaper, is published by students Mondays through Fridays during the regular semesters, and weekly Thursdays during the summer. The editorial staff is responsible for news and editorial content.

STAFF KRISTIN STEELE

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

steele47@marshall.edu

ERIN MILLER

MARCUS CONSTANTINO

miller652@marshall.edu

constantino2@marshall.edu

MANAGING EDITOR

PHOTO EDITOR

KATIE QUINONEZ

BRANDON ANICICH

quinonez@marshall.edu

anicich@marshall.edu

NEWS EDITOR

JAKE SNYDER

SPORTS EDITOR

snyder100@marshall.edu

CRYSTAL MYERS LIFE! EDITOR

myers132@marshall.edu

DIGITAL EDITOR

ASHLEY GROHOSKI COPY EDITOR

grohoski1@marshall.edu

ARIAN JALALI

COPY EDITOR

jalali@marshall.edu

CONTACT US 109 Communications Bldg. Marshall University One John Marshall Drive Huntington, West Virginia 25755 parthenon@marshall.edu

THE FIRST AMENDMENT

The Constitution of the United States of America

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people to peaceably assemble; and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

“An idea isn’t worth much until a man is found who has the energy and ability to make it work.”

?

>WILLIAM

FEATHER, AMERICAN PUBLISHER

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Visit us at marshallparthenon.com, click on the OPINION link in the navigation bar to write a letter to the editor, and let your voice be heard.

EDITORIAL

NCAA sends mixed message

BY MINNESOTA DAILY EDITORIAL BOARD

MINNESOTA DAILY, U. MINNESOTA VIA UWIRE

Less than two weeks ago, the NCAA approved a package that gives universities the option to give a $2,000 stipend to student-athletes with full scholarships. The money would pay for what the NCAA calls the “full cost of attendance,” outside of tuition, room and board, books and fees for college athletes. Even though NCAA President Mark Emmert says that university leaders are “adamant” about not allowing students to be paid to play, the new reform certainly sends mixed signals. It is no secret that universities make money from athletic programs and draw in prospective students as well. The question is whether the University of Minnesota’s focus is on these student-athletes and their education or on reaping benefits from collusion with professional leagues.

Among the approved package was an increase in the academic eligibility requirements for studentathletes. Formerly, a C grade average was required of incoming freshman and junior transfers. Now it is a C+ grade. This not only shows a lack of emphasis placed on academic performance for athletes, it mixes the NCAA’s message — does the NCAA want student athletes to be students or athletes, amateurs or professionals? Sweetening the package for prospective students to choose athletics over an academic focus in their education — in programs where few will enter professional leagues — is questionable promotion by the NCAA. Young men and women must seriously question the values and motives of the NCAA when they make declarations such as these. Are they helping young individuals succeed in forming part of our society or are they exploiting a class of revenue generators for universities?

EDITORIAL CARTOON

COLUMN

Twitter is poised to become new top dog BY CAROLINA NACHAZEL

ARIZONA DAILY WILDCAT, U. ARIZONA VIA UWIRE The AOL Instant Messenger was the direct form of communication back in the days of dialup Internet. It was the only way to talk to our friends and elementary crushes without being heard on the house phone. As we matured and went on to middle school and high school, social networking evolved with us. The handheld, mirror shot was born and the world of Myspace was the only place to be seen. If you didn’t have the right pictures, the best quotes, the coolest celebrity’s photo under the “role models” section, you were a loser. Myspace was a gateway drug into the world of social media. Toward the end of high school, when we became wiser and “too mature” for Myspace, the Facebook era began. It is not news that Facebook has taken over the world. With over 800 million users today, Facebook has become a tool for both social and professional networking. Despite that, Facebook is past its prime. Twitter, although it has been around since 2006, will soon be the tool to use. The CEO of Twitter, Dick Costolo, reported in September that more than 100 million users are now active on Twitter. Still 75 percent less than Facebook, Twitter will soon become the new Facebook and Facebook will become the new Myspace. According to Mashable Social Media, there are 230 million tweets a day, 8,900 per second. Unlike Facebook, Twitter gives people direct access to celebrities.

While not everyone is obsessed with following a certain famous person’s every move, millions of people are. The top five followed people (Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Kim Kardashian, and Barack Obama) tweet daily on their whereabouts and appearances. This gives more than 11 million fans desperately desired communication in 140 characters or less. If you own the iPhone, a Twitter account is coming your way shortly. The 200 million plus people who own iPhones, according to CNN, will be forced to share via Twitter if they have a habit of commonly posting photos, videos, and links. The iOS 5 software, released early October, includes Twitter integration. After taking a picture, listening to a song, or using any of the iPhone features, a Twitter button is ready to be tapped for instant upload. Facebook, available for download on any iPhone, will not be able to survive the fierce competition Twitter is bringing. With Apple endorsing it, there is no doubt that Twitter’s popularity will dramatically increase. We have been through a lot with Facebook, but sadly its time has ended. Soon liking comments and stalking profiles will be a thing of the past. Becoming obsessed with Twitter will not be as dangerous as Facebook. Although there are still ways to waste hours, scrolling through the site. Twitter is a more condensed, savvy way to social network. If you aren’t quite ready to say goodbye to Facebook, treat it like a Band-Aid. Deactivate it quickly then post your first tweet.

COLUMN

The mess we’re in and how the FED got us here BY LOGAN DEPOVER

THE DAILY IOWAN, U. IOWA VIA UWIRE The financial collapse of late-2008 has left many in the United States scratching their heads. How did something like this happen? What are the origins of this mess? What exactly can we do to fix it? The U.S. government and the Federal Reserve appeared to have the answers, claiming it was a failure of the market that caused the crisis. Sweeping into action, they bailed out the banks, piled on the regulations, and began pumping new money into the market in order to jump-start the dying economy. However, when utilizing the lens of the Austrian business cycle theory as developed by Ludwig von Mises, it is easy see that the collapse was not a failure of the market: It was a failure of monetary policy. A recession occurs when large sectors of the economy see drastically falling prices more or less at the same time. The Fed has the ability to raise and lower interest-rates, which it does by decreasing or increasing the money supply, respectively. By doing so, the Fed sends signals to investors about the ratio between consumption and savings within the economy. By raising interest-rates, the Fed tells investors that consumers are interested in purchasing goods in the present, thus

sending the signal to invest in consumer goods. By lowering interest-rates, the Fed is saying that consumers are more interested in investing in the future; thus signaling that saving is up and to go ahead and invest in higherorder goods, things like houses. This is risky, however, because the Fed can change interest-rates in ways that come into conflict with the economy’s actual consumption to savings ratio. Trying to calculate what market interest-rates really are is frankly impossible due to the complexity of the marketplace. This is where problems begin to arise. Austrian business cycle theory explains that if the Fed artificially lowers interestrates below that of the actual market level, new money pours into the banks and is then used to make loans. Investors see all of the new money as increased savings on the part of the consumer, signaling them to invest in higher order goods. The investments are made and the money begins to trickle down to the consumer. When consumers receive all this new money, they go out and spend it at the actual consumptionto-savings ratio that is higher than the one the Fed signaled. Thus, the investments made in higher-order goods are unprofitable due to a lack of demand, making huge portions of the economy go under all at once. We now

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have a recession. This same process is the cause of the recent recession and the reason more expansionary monetary policy will not be a cure. In response to the bursting of the dotcom bubble in the early 2000s, the Federal Reserve, under the direction of Chairman Alan Greenspan, slashed interest-rates to as low as 1 percent between June 2003 to June 2004 . This put into motion the malinvestment that led to the housing bubble that burst in 2007. Investors believed that the time was right to invest in higher-order goods, in this case, housing. However, when it came time to pay for all of the new housing, there just wasn’t enough real consumer demand and prices began to fall drastically. The rest of the economy soon followed with the stock market crash in 2008. The crash in stocks was due to the fact that stocks are units of title to masses of capital or higher-order goods and the artificially low interest-rates fooled investors into thinking there would be adequate demand for such goods. In response to the crisis, the Federal Reserve has called for two rounds of monetary expansion, labeled QE I and QE II, and has kept interest rates near 0 percent in an attempt to jump-start the economy. With real, U6, unemployment figures stagnate around 16 percent and few signs of economic improvement in the

near future, this is clearly not working. If the Federal Reserve and the U.S. government really want to end the recession and begin the recovery process, they must allow for the necessary liquidation of malinvestment and debt to occur. This was once the policy of the U.S. government toward recessions, and it worked. From 1920 to 1921, for example, the country was hit with recession. The government, with Warren G. Harding as president, stood aside, cut spending, and slashed taxes while the Federal Reserve did nothing as far as monetary stimulation was concerned. Recovery was painful, but quick, as the market recovered and found growth again in only one year. Unfortunately, shortly after this, the Federal Reserve began tinkering with the monetary base in 1923, setting up the bubble of the Roaring 20s that would later burst into the Great Depression. Instead of following its predecessor, however, the Hoover administration encouraged and adopted inflationary monetary policies very similar to those currently in practice by the Bernanke Fed and the Obama White House. This must be changed, as these policies will only re-inflate the bubble, drag out the pain of recession, and set up the economy and the American people for even bigger trouble down the road.


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Twitter poised to become top dog BY CAROLINA NACHAZEL

ARIZONA DAILY WILDCAT, U. ARIZONA VIA UWIRE The AOL Instant Messenger was the direct form of communication back in the days of dial-up Internet. It was the only way to talk to our friends and elementary crushes without being heard on the house phone. As we matured and went on to middle school and high school, social networking evolved with us. The handheld, mirror shot was born and the world of Myspace was the only place

BY NIKKI DOTSON THE PARTHENON

John Friedl, professor at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, gave the final lecture of the year for the Amicus Curiae lecture series, Thursday, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center. Friedl’s lecture, titled “Through the Looking Glass: The Constitution Means What Five Justices Choose It to Mean,” focused on the idea that the framers of the constitution’s initial intent cannot be known by the Supreme Court today. Friedl began by quoting a passage from Lewis Carroll’s book, “Through the Looking

RESUME

Continued from Page 1

experience is the key to attaining a job in the field a student wants to get into. Stoler said if students have no career experience when graduating, they should consider doing an internship that could possibly lead to a full-time position. Some places only accept interns while the student is enrolled in school. Other places, however, accept students as full-time interns following graduation. Career Services offers a service titled JobTrax. JobTrax allows students to upload resumes to the system to be reviewed by Career Services staff. JobTrax also links students to a professional network, lists upcoming events and workshops, as well as any available jobs and internship opportunities. Hogsett said, on average, 10 to 15 resumes are uploaded to JobTrax daily. Career Services has, on average, five walk-in appointments each day. However, this changes depending on the time of the year, especially around graduation when greater surges of students seek the help of Career Services. In addition to a resume, students must also prepare for an interview. “Students only have one shot at applying for a job — one shot at an interview,” Bialk said. “Students must possess the total package because a good interview does not override a bad resume and vice versa – students must be proactive and competitive in searching for that job.” Stoler said professional dress and etiquette also is

MCDONALD

Continued from Page 6 McDonald’s at Thursday night’s performance. Huckaby was born in

to be seen. If you didn’t have the right pictures, the best quotes, the coolest celebrity’s photo under the “role models” section, you were a loser. Myspace was a gateway drug into the world of social media. Toward the end of high school, when we became wiser and “too mature” for Myspace, the Facebook era began. It is not news that Facebook has taken over the world. With over 800 million users today, Facebook has become a tool for both social and professional networking.

Despite that, Facebook is past its prime. Twitter, although it has been around since 2006, will soon be the tool to use. The CEO of Twitter, Dick Costolo, reported in September that more than 100 million users are now active on Twitter. Still 75 percent less than Facebook, Twitter will soon become the new Facebook and Facebook will become the new Myspace. According to Mashable Social Media, there are 230 million tweets a day, 8,900 per second. Unlike Facebook, Twitter gives people direct access to

celebrities. While not everyone is obsessed with following a certain famous person’s every move, millions of people are. The top five followed people (Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, Katy Perry, Kim Kardashian, and Barack Obama) tweet daily on their whereabouts and appearances. This gives more than 11 million fans desperately desired communication in 140 characters or less. If you own the iPhone, a Twitter account is coming your way shortly. The 200 million plus people who own iPhones, according

to CNN, will be forced to share via Twitter if they have a habit of commonly posting photos, videos, and links. The iOS 5 software, released early October, includes Twitter integration. After taking a picture, listening to a song, or using any of the iPhone features, a Twitter button is ready to be tapped for instant upload. Facebook, available for download on any iPhone, will not be able to survive the fierce competition Twitter is bringing. With Apple endorsing it, there is no doubt that Twitter’s popularity will dramatically increase.

We have been through a lot with Facebook, but sadly its time has ended. Soon liking comments and stalking profiles will be a thing of the past. Becoming obsessed with Twitter will not be as dangerous as Facebook. Although there are still ways to waste hours, scrolling through the site. Twitter is a more condensed, savvy way to social network. If you aren’t quite ready to say goodbye to Facebook, treat it like a Band-Aid. Deactivate it quickly then post your first tweet.

Glass.” “When I use a word it means what I chose it to mean, neither more nor less,” Friedl quoted. “The question is whether you can make words mean so many different things. The question is, which is to be mastered.” This quote was used to demonstrate how the words in the constitution were written with intent that cannot be known hundreds of years later. “I believe that constitution of the United States means what five justices of The United States Supreme Court choose it to mean. Neither more nor less,” Friedl said. “I believe this is true no matter what the political make up of

the court may be. It is as true of conservatives as it is of liberals. I do not believe this is a bad thing, or that it is anything different from what the framers envisioned.” Friedl reinforced his idea of judicial activism by drawing the audience’s attention to three amendments: the second, ninth and fourteenth. The second amendment to the constitution states that “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.” Friedl argued that in cases of bearing arms that the right to keep weapons has been made from a political and time era standpoint, not by

the original intent of the framers, because the framers tie weapon ownership to the need for a militia, and today we do not. “I agree with the rulings made, I just do not believe that the rulings should be titled as original intent,” Friedl said. “The original intent cannot be determined. However, logically the intent seems to be different than the rulings that have been claimed to showcase original intent.” Friedl approached cases from the ninth and fourteenth amendment with a similar standpoint, that the rulings are made by the justices in Supreme Court at the time, and have a political influence. Topics such as segregation,

civil rights and same-sex marriage were used as examples of modern political issues that have been ruled upon due to modern principles, and by the justices in office. “It’s a pretty good system, it works,” Friedl said. “In fact, I’ll go out on whim and say it is not only a great system, but it’s the best one anywhere on the planet, and it in a very reasonable percent of the cases, does work.” Kayla Marcum, junior broadcast journalism major, agrees with Friedl’s theories that the original intent cannot be used as a reason behind ruling in most cases. “I think like anything, it has to evolve with time. I think that the framers wrote

the constitution out, and didn’t have any idea what would come in the future,” Marcum said. “I think that they set it to adapt with change.” The Amicus Curiae lecture series is sponsored by the West Virginia Humanities Council, and will continue in spring, 2012. “One of the hallmarks of its [the lecture series] mission is to provide an open and honest discussion of matters related to the constitution and its interpretation,” David Pittenger, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts said. Nikki Dotson can be contacted at dotson76@ marshall.edu.

important. “If you are networking or meeting anyone, it is extremely important that a student be clean, neat and professionally dressed,” Stoler said. Stoler said confidence is crucial. She said students need to be assertive in their interviews and giving their “30-second elevator speech,” a speech in which students essentially sell themselves, skills and abilities. Hogsett said students who utilize Career Services have a better chance at career opportunities and being more competitive in today’s job market. “Students don’t know how much better they could be with the services we provide,” Hogsett said. “Students have a much better chance of having a polished package to present to employer, which, in return, increases students’ chances so much more.” Hogsett said any student, especially seniors, could schedule an appointment with Career Services in order to review their resume. Hogsett said meeting one-on-one leads to better quality in regard to resumes and allows the student and adviser to specifically focus on the individual student’s needs. “We are here to provide the professional development students may need,” Hogsett said. “Seniors need to realize we are here and are willing to assist them in finding that job.” Career Services is located between Harless Dining Hall and the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on Fifth Avenue. John Gibb can be contacted at gibb@marshall. edu.

Louisiana and raised in West Virginia. Huckaby is the namesake son of the legendary former NCAA basketball coach, Richard David “Rick” Huckabay, who led Marshall University

OCCUPY

Continued from Page 1 for the media team for Occupy Huntington. Occupy Huntington said they not only put a local representation of the national movement forward but also stand for local issues. Students have also become frustrated and have become a larger part of Occupy Huntington. “We as students take on massive amounts of debt to gain degrees that do not promise us well paying jobs,” said Ethan Young, 21, Marshall student and member of Occupy Huntington. “The vast majority of people that go to Marshall are from Appalachia and coal mining areas where mountaintop removal and fracking and other dangerous and bad environmental practices actually endanger our health and the health of our families.” Included in their demands are, “the full funding for city employee pensions, the right for city workers to collectively bargain, the halting of firing of all city workers and for politicians to quit supporting and funding mountaintop removal

EXHIBIT

Continued from Page 5 “My sculptures are made to look like they jump off the paintings and come to life,” Bruno said. The West Virginia Division of Culture and History, West Virginia Commission on the Arts and the Isabelle Gwynn and Robert Daine Exhibition Endowment sponsor Bruno’s “Coal Camp Series” exhibit. The public can meet the artist on Dec. 4 at the museums’s Holiday Open House from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

to four titles in the Southern Conference from 1983-89. His sound has been described as “a flawless bridge between the soulful Memphis R&B and country music.”

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and fracking, Young said. The protesters believe it’s important to maintain a local site to support the national movement. “I think what the thing Occupy Huntington is doing well is it’s giving the Occupy movement at large a local face,” McAteer said. “It localizes the fact that even if Huntington isn’t Wall Street and it isn’t New York and we don’t have that many people here. The fact that we have a presence at all shows that it matters, the movement matters, the issues we’re talking about matter, people’s lives are being affected.” Occupy Huntington said it is in for the long haul. “The actual physical occupation, the fate of that has not been decided, but we all as individuals through networking and things like that, we’ve committed ourselves to organizing politically in Huntington and the Tri-state area and, it will continue whether there are tents in front of Chase Bank or not,” Young said. The protesters said they plan to organize more events like the march, but do not have details at this time. Cory Riner can be contacted at riner8@marshall. edu.

Admission to the Holiday Open House is free. The exhibit ends Feb. 19. The museum is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and Sunday noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free on Tuesdays and $5 per person or $18 for a family of four or more on other days. The museum is located in Huntington at 2033 McCoy Rd. Brittini Brooks can be contacted at brooks73@ marshall.edu.

His single, “Ain’t Enough Blacktop,” was the country winner of the 2008 Billboard Word Song Contest. Caitlin Conley can be contacted at conley104@ live.marshall.edu.

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Q. Are winter puns cold fashioned? A. Not at all. But they’re snow joke. | marshallparthenon.com

Friday, November 18, 2011 |

Michael Mcdonald serenades Huntington BY CAITLIN CONLEY THE PARTHENON

Five-time Grammy Award winner Michael McDonald performed at Huntington’s historical Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center Thursday night. McDonald’s performance is part of the Marshall Artist Series’ 75th anniversary MARCUS CONSTATINO | THE PARTHENON

Michael McDonald performs Thursday at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. McDonald has previously performed with Steely Dan and The Doobie Brothers.

‘Office’ star Krasinski shares jokes, anecdotes

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line-up. David Wilcox, senior finance major from Teays Valley, W.Va., attended the show. “The Doobie Brothers are actually my favorite band,” said Wilcox.” And I saw the Doobie Brothers when they came to campus last year without Michael McDonald. Now that he’s here, I’ll just finish off the set I guess. Especially since it’s free.” McDonald has been thrilling listeners for over four decades. His work has been referred to as being “both timeless and ever-evolving.” He gained fame playing

with the American rock band, Steely Dan, popular for such songs as “Reelin’ In the Years,” “Haitian Divorce,” “Bad Sneakers” and “Doctor Wu.” After spending time playing with Steely Dan, McDonald became a part of the American rock band, the Doobie Brothers, becoming a staple of their signature sound. The Doobie Brothers are famous for such hits as “Takin’ It To the Streets,” “It Keeps You Runnin’,”Little Darling (I Need You),” and “What a Fool Believes.” McDonald’s distinct vocal style also made him one of

the world’s most sought-after session singers. Over the years, he has guest stared on records by many artists, including Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, Kenny Logins, Bonnie Raitt, the rock band Toto and Elton John. Jessica Machmer, from Teays Valley, W.Va., was joined by her mother for the show. She said that she and her mother attend all the artist series events and that she used to listen to McDonald back in the eighties. West Virginia’s own Rick Huckaby opened for See MCDONALD I Page 5

‘The Last Night of Ballyhoo’

BY KAT THORNTON

filmed scene together. “I think I just rehydrated last week from that,” he said. Krasinski said he did not A crowd of star-crazed plan to go into acting as an fans filled an auditorium undergraduate. He entered at Brown U. last night to Brown as an English concensee 2001 Brown alum John trator after spending the first Krasinski crack jokes and semester of freshman year in tell personal stories in an Costa Rica teaching English. informal hour-long ques- The best thing about Brown tion-and-answer session. was “everyone doing whatever “This is insane,” Krasin- the hell they wanted — in a ski, who plays Jim Halpert on good way,” he said. “The Office” and has starred Krasinski recalled the first in several films, said upon en- play he acted in at Brown, in tering the packed auditorium. which he played a “6-foot-3 “I’m having an existential transvestite.” meltdown.” “I wore high heels,” Students gathered outside Krasinki said. “So that as early as 3 p.m. to get seat- was another phenomenal ing at the event, which started moment.” four hours later. Some students asked “It was so worth it,” said more personal questions, Deesha Misra, sophomore at like how Krasinski met his the Rhode Island School of wife, actress Emily Blunt, Design. who was sitting in the front The crowd was brimming row. with anticipation before the Krasinski said the pair met event began. at a resTwo false taurant, entrances through provoked apa mutual you have to be plause and courageous enough friend. cheering “There’s to give it a shot.” before Kramore to sinski made > JOHN KRASINKI it, yes, but his entrance, you’re cracking jokes as he appeared. not going to get it,” he added. “I took way too many Several students asked classes in here,” he said, look- about how Krasinski being around Salomon. “And a came a successful actor. He couple naps.” responded that though he After a few opening re- was working in New York as marks, Krasinski opened the a waiter when he decided to event to questions from the pursue acting, he had a lot of audience. Students lined up fun just living in the city and to ask about the actor’s deci- being with friends. sion to attend Brown, which “I think that’s pretty dorms he stayed in, his fa- much the world’s job — to vorite classes (“Management dissuade you from acting,” of Industrial and Nonprofit Krasinski said. “Don’t lisOrganizations” and an intro- ten to anybody. ductory biology course) and “You have to be courahis time on The Office. geous enough to give it a “I think we all have a little shot — and keep giving it bit of our characters,” he a shot.” said, referring to the show’s When the event ended, cast. Krasinski said Steve the majority of the crowd Carell is “pretty shy” but is rushed the stage to get aualso one of the funniest peo- tographs and pictures with ple he knows. He said the two the actor, who complied actors had an emotional time with several requests but getting through their last quickly left the stage. BROWN DAILY HERALD, BROWN U. VIA UWIRE

MARCUS CONSTANTINO | THE PARTHENON

Ethan Treutle from Stephens City, Va. performs the role of a character named Adolf in “The Last Night of Ballyhoo.” Treutle has previously been seen in Marshall’s productions of “Our Country’s Good,” “Saturday, Sunday, Monday” and “The Good Doctor.”

Marshall theatre students travel back in time for their lastest producton BY CAITLIN CONLEY THE PARTHENON

The stage at Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center has been taken back through time to arrive in 1930s Atlanta. “Gone With the Wind” has just premiered, the Southern Jewish Holiday Festival, Ballyhoo, is just about to begin and one family is going to learn more about love as well as their own heritage. The Marshall University Department of Theatre premiered its latest production, Alfred Uhry’s “The Last Night of Ballyhoo,” Wednesday for students and Thursday for the general public. “The Last Night of Ballyhoo” won the 1998 Tony Award for best play. Uhry is also popular for

his other works, “Driving Miss Daisy” and “Parade.” The Thursday performance opened with a pre-show discussion from guest speaker, Rabbi Jean E. Eglinton of Huntington’s B’nai Sholom Congregation, located on 10th Street and 10th Avenue. Eglinton worked with “The Last Night of Ballyhoo” cast to help them better understand their roles por traying characters of Jewish faith. Nicole Per rone, assistant professor of acting, voice and movement and musical theater, directed “The Last Night of Ballyhoo.” “The subject matter deals with a Jewish family in the south in the 1930,” Per rone said. “I am

neither Jewish, nor from the south, nor was alive in the 1930s. So, quite a bit of research was required for me to fully understand the different levels of this story.” Per rone and the cast were invited to Shabbat services at the temple of B’Nai Sholom Congregation whilst in preparation for the play. “That additional kind of research has been invaluable to me,” Per rone said. Shelby Brewster, senior theater performance and history major from Colorado Springs, Co., played Reba in the show. “As an actor, I think the element of the show I like the most is working with a small cast,” Brewster said. “We really have an amazing

ensemble feeling in this piece, that you don’t get working with a huge cast.” There will be two more performances of “The Last Night of Ballyhoo” at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. There will be another special event before the final showing on Saturday. The community organization, the Musical Arts Guild, will be performing songs of the 1930s. The pre-show event will begin at 7 p.m. “I think students should see this piece because it will open their eyes to something they may not experience every day,” Brewster said. Also, it’s an interesting show with intriguing characters, and overall a good time to be had by all.” Caitlin Conley can be contacted at conley104@ live.marshall.edu.

WMUL - FM 88.1 sponsors T-shirt design contest BY ALIANNA TELLES

THE PARTHENON

Students wanting to share their creativity with the campus now have the opportunity to do so in a unique way. WMUL, the Marshall Universities student run radio station, is hosting a t-shirt design contest. The designer that wins the

contest will receive several prizes including the design on the t-shirt, a t-shirt and the WMUL “Swag Pack.” “The idea behind the contest was to generate student involvement, but it is also open to the general public, and promoting the station in a way different from what we normally do,” Adam Rogers, sports director WMUL said.

There are several entry requirements in order to enter into a design into the contest. The submissions must have the frequency, slogan and call letters (88.1, WMUL, and “The Cutting Edge”). Those who want to enter in the contest have two ways to enter: By posting the design on the WMUL Facebook page, or by placing a hard copy of the design in the box

outside of the station, labeled “Contest Entry.” “I think this is the perfect way for people to find out who we are and what we do,” Rogers said, “By them simply looking us up and looking at our website, they might decide to come back later to listen to our music, our news and sports coverage.” During winter break, five

page designed and edited by CRYSTAL MYERS | myers132@marshall.edu

semi-finalists will be chosen. The five semi-finalist’s submissions will be posted on WMUL’s Facebook wall and voted on by the number of ‘likes’ each submission gets. The semi-finalist with the most number of ‘likes’ by Janu. 31, will be announced the winner and then be notified via Facebook. “The t-shirts are going to

be used as a promotional item for WMUL-FM,” Rogers said. “I don’t believe that enough people on Marshall’s campus and in the Huntington community know of who WMUL-FM is and what we do.” All entries must be submitted by 4 p.m. Dec. 4. Alianna Telles can be contacted at telles@marshall.edu.


The Parthenon | Nov. 18, 2011