Page 1

Issue 1

03/03/2011

M U N D P

P R E - C O N F E R E R E N C E

W E L C O M E

D

ear Delegates  –  a  very  warm  welcome  to  the  10th  annual  session  of  MUNDP!  I  know  that  you  are  all  looking  forward  to  the  next  few  days which will be filled with ideas,  discussions  and,  hopefully,  much  food for thought.      As  you  are  aware,  MUNDP  simu‐ lates  the  United  Nations  Develop‐ ment  Programme  –the  only  UNDP  style conference! – and changes its  region  focus  each  year.  Last  year,  our focus was the Arab States. The  committees  were  composed  of  representatives  of  all  Arab  States  as  well  as  simulations  of 

A L L

T

T O

A L L

D E L E G A T E S

prominent Civil  Society  Organiza‐ tions  and  UN  bodies.  This  year,  our  focus  will  be  "Asia  and  the  Pacific"  and  the  participants  will  strive to solve the developmental  challenges  faced  by  the  UNDP  in  that region.     The  Development  Committees  will discuss the prospective topics  of  democratic  governance,  envi‐ ronment,  health  and  women’s  rights  while  the  Special  Commit‐ tees  will  debate  about  climate  change,  atomic  energy,  human  rights  and  economical  and  social  advancement.  Meanwhile,  the  Specialized Agencies will be giving 

A B O U T

he National  Committee  consists  of  all  the  members  from  the  develop‐ ment  committees.  During  sessions  of  the  MUNDP  conference,  delegates  will  debate on nationally assigned development  issues.   The  National  Committee  is  constructed  for  the  delegates  to  have  a  clear  opinion  on  their  country’s  policies  and  have  debating  time  on  the  main  developmental  issues.  It  goes  without  saying  that  delegates  are  required to come prepared to the sessions.  They  are  assumed  to  have  carried  out  the  necessary  research  in  order  to  have  ade‐ quate knowledge on their designated topics  so that constructive debates may take place  and  realistic  solutions  may  be  offered.  

N E W S L E T T E R

testimonials to  committees,  with  the aim of assisting them in their  debate.     Outside  of  the  conference,  we  will  have  a  dinner  in  Divan  Res‐ taurant  as  well  as  a  party  at  the  school.  We  also  have  amazing  sightseeing  plans  for  today  and  the last day.   We  hope  that  you  will  actively  participate  in  the  debates  and  that  you  will    go  home  with  a  great  many  thoughts  to  be  proc‐ essed.  Most  of  all,  however,  we  hope  that  you  will  have  a  won‐ derful time! 

N A T I O N A L

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHTS

Delegate registration at  Pyramid 

Cocktail at  Pyramid at  17.00   

Opening Ceremony at AD  HALL at  18.30 

C O M M I T T E E S

Delegates are required to prepare policy state‐ ments about their countries’ topic.  The  National  Committee  sessions  will  include  both lobbying and open debate time within the  delegates of the same national delegation. The  session times will be executed as  regular com‐ mittee  sessions  and  both  the  delegates  and  chairs  are  required  to  attend  these  sessions.  The  format  of  the  sessions  will  be  identical  to  the Development Committee sessions and they  will be supervised by the MUNDP’11 Directors. 

as the  action  plans  of  the  Development  Committees;  containing  short,  medium,  and long‐term solutions for the topic under  discussion. The contributions made by each  delegate during the debate should contrib‐ ute  to  the  formation  of  the  action  plan.  National  Committee  sessions  will  proceed  as  Development  Committees  where  the  topics  debated  are  amended  in  order  to  create  the  most  comprehensive  action  plan. For further information on topics and  delegations you may either visit our confer‐ The  National  Committee  session  will  be  con‐ ence  website  or  contact  Başak  Kocamış,  cluded  by  writing  an  action  plan.  This  national  Director  of  National  Committees  and  Spe‐ action plan will be formed in the same manner  cialized Agencies. 


P a g e

2

ISTANBUL

T

he one place on earth  where you can be in the  middle of two  continents, feel the harmony of  this many cultures, touch the  remains of  the ancient  civilizations, watch its famous  skyline shaped by the historical  towers, mosques, churches and  skyscrapers and witness the  contrast of traditional vs modern  life in Istanbul.  Throughout history, it has been  named Lygos, Byzantium,  Augusta Antonia,  Constantinopolis,  Konstantiniyye, Islambol and  finally Istanbul as we now know  it. It was  the capital of three  different empires so we can say  that it has been “the people’s  choice” of all time. Why? Well,  you can find anything in Istanbul  including delicious food, dizzying  nightlife, ever‐expanding 

schedule of international  events, museums, concerts,  chic fashion shows and art  exhibitions, amazing shopping  centers and a lot more. The  city is also becoming one of  the most important financial  centers of the world. A recent  study by the Washington‐ based Brookings Institution,  has shown that Istanbul had  beaten Beijing and Shanghai  to claim the title of 2010's  Most Dynamic City. It was the  European Capital of culture in  2010 and will become the   European Capital of Sport in  2012. The city has a rich  history that dates back about  three hundred thousand  years, a dynamic present and  the potential of a great future.     Although it’s a large city with  a population of 15 million, 

S I G H T S E E I N G

S

ultan Ahmet Center  (The Walled City) is the  oldest part of Istanbul.  It’s not surprising that “The  Old City of Istanbul” is the  first place tourists would want  to visit since most of the im‐ portant religious, administra‐ tive and civil monuments and  buildings of different empire’s  are located there including  Hagia Sophia, Tokapı Palace,  Blue Mosque, Hippodrome,  Hagia Irene, Basilica Cistern,  etc.   Hagia Sophia had served as a  church known as the "Magna  Ecclesia" built by the Byzan‐ tine Empire for 916 years, a  mosque when the minarets  were added by the Ottoman  empires Sultan Beyazid II and  Sultan Selim II for 481 years  and a museum since 1943 to  the present day.  

Built between 532 and 537,  Hagia Sophia was the largest  cathedral in the world for  nearly a thousand years.  Known for its dome and mosa‐ ics, it is considered as the peak  of Byzantine architecture. In  1453, when Constantinople  was conquered by the Otto‐ mans, Sultan Mehmed II or‐ dered the building to be con‐ verted into a mosque. Many  of the mosaics were plastered  over and while any orthodox  features were removed, Is‐ lamic features as mihrab,  minarets were added. The  four minarets were added by  the famous Ottoman architect  Sinan.   The Sultan Ahmed Mosque,  built between 1609 and1616,  is known as the Blue Mosque  because of the blue  

Istanbul is still growing and  growing. At the end of the  Second World War, only a  million people lived here.  Since then, the population of  the city has increased its  population by this amount  every 10 years. With all these  facts, it’s hard to argue with  someone claiming that  Istanbul is becoming a country  of its own.     There are lots of things to do  and places to go in Istanbul;  relaxing in a hamam, going for  a drink in  Beyoglu, joining the  crowd on Istiklal Caddesi,  Nisantasi, visiting Grand  Bazaar and Spice Bazaar, Tiled  Mansion, Princes’ Islands,  Galata Tower, walking along  the Golden Horn or the  Bosphorus, and so on.

“The one place   on earth   where you   can be in   the middle   of two   continents” 

L O C A T I O N S tiles adorning the walls of its  interior. It has become a  popular tourist attraction  while it’s still being used as a  mosque.   The word “hippodrome”  comes from the Greek  “hippos” meaning “horse” and  “dromos” meaning path.  Horse racing and chariot rac‐ ing events were used to be  held at the Hippodrome and it  was considered to be the cen‐ ter of the Roman and Byzan‐ tine Constantinople.   Topkapi Palace, the official  residence of the Ottoman  Sultans and the administrative  center of the empire was built  between 1460‐1478 by Fatih  Sultan Mehmet, the conqueror  of Constantinople.  

The palace has been turned  into a museum in 1924 and it  houses some of the best ex‐ amples of the Ottoman minia‐ tures, treasure, jewelry, weap‐ ons, shields, etc.. It’s definitely  one of the most impressive  monuments that make you  feel like you’re a part of the  living history as you explore it.   The interesting thing about  Istanbul is that it’s impossible  to finish exploring it. You can  never get bored in this city  with its variety of tastes, col‐ ors, images, cultures, spices  and energy accumulated  through the ages. So, I find it  hard to argue with what  Alphonse De Lamartine had  said:  “If one had but a single  glance to give the world, one  should gaze on Istanbul.” 


P a g e

W H A T ’ S

 

T

he Asia‐ Pacific region, with over  45 countries of vast differences,  is perhaps the most complex  region of the world where life is filled  by hardship and struggle. The headlines  of newspaper indicate that the main  issues in the region are related to nu‐ clear power, currency wars, humanitar‐ ian struggles and natural disasters.  

In the Region there are a total of 133  operating reactors, and a further 25  under construction. There is still a big  question in the region about the exis‐ tence and usage of nuclear arms and  power.  India, North Korea, Pakistan  being non‐signatories of the Nuclear  Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) the Asia  Pacific region is a hot spot for the Nu‐ clear Power Fight.   The region is also in the crossfire of  currencies. China is under constant  attack from the rest of the world re‐

U N I Q U E

A

T O

ctions papers  are  unique  to  MUNDP.  Delegates  will  produce  actions  paper,  not  resolutions.  Action  plans  resemble  to  resolutions  since  both  of  them  suggest  solutions  for  a  particular  issue.  An  action plan starts with an “Explanatory”  part..  This  introduction  part  gives  an  explanation  and  clarification  of  the  issue,  in  a  general  sense,  and  background  information  on  it. 

H O T

I N

A S I A

garding its currency values. Addition‐ ally, Thailand is now introducing a tax  on foreign holdings of bonds which is  anticipated to have a serious impact on  the foreign investments in this country.  The trend is foreseen to spread to other  countries in the region. Considering the  two of the BRIC countries are in the  region, this economical struggle may  result in further economic instability.  Even though there have been attempts  to come to an agreement in order to  balance the currency devaluations, a  favorable solutions has not yet been  reached and the battle goes on.  The Asia Pacific region also experiences  one natural disaster after another. The  most recent one is the 6.3 magnitude  earthquake which took place in New  Zealand last ten days ago. Australia has  also been faced with a series of disas‐ ters ranging from floods in Queensland  to a severe drought in Southern Austra‐ lia. Climate change seems to be felt  here with great strength. In Indonesia  the harvests are totally irregular be‐ cause of the climate shift caused by  floods and most believe that an ex‐ tremely fatal flood will reoccur in five  years.  Climate change related problems  are doubled up with water contamina‐ tion problems in many areas within the  region.  Each day in Hong Kong, about  one million tons of sewage and indus‐ trial effluent pour untreated into the  sea. As we can see from examples ex‐

M U N D P

-

3

perienced in India and Bangladesh,  water contamination and wrong usage  of water will cause many more disputes  as the years pass by. Climate change  and water pollution coupled with natu‐ ral disasters lead to severe problems in  the area of human health. It is esti‐ mated by that Australian Medical Foun‐ dation that by 2100 malaria, dengue  and cholera in will be tripled in the  region.  The humanitarian issues of the region  are extensive. Thai officials are now  investigating a case where babies ob‐ tained from raped Vietnamese women  are sold on the international market.  Pirates are ruling the Indian Ocean with  currently 30 ships are being held along  with more than 700 hostages. Almost  all of the figures generated in the re‐ gion are shocking. The literacy rate in  Afghanistan is %28. One in four of the  world’s estimated 300 000 child soldiers  are currently serving in the East Asia  and Pacific region. The region hosts  close to 900 million of the world's poor  who are forced to survive on less than  $1 a day.  The desolate issues of the region are  countless. It will be a very interesting  week where we will discuss and ob‐ serve what possible solutions may be  found for the Asia‐Pacific Region. 

A C T I O N

Therefore, could  be  considered  as    the  pre‐ambulatory  clauses  of  a  regular  resolution.  The  second  part  of  an  action  paper  is  the  “Solutions”  part.  In  this  section,  delegates suggest viable and productive  solutions  to  the  issue.  There  are  short  term,  mid‐term  and  long  term  solutions,  once  again,  without  clauses.  Delegates  write  the  solutions  down  in  paragraphform  with  brief  explanations 

P A P E R S

or in a list format to be read out one by  one.  The  more  informative  and  clear  the solutions are, the better the action  paper is considered to be.     Chairs are encouraged to divide topics  accordingly, and use lobbying sessions  efficiently to address specific issues.   


P a g e

S P E C I A L I Z E D

S

pecialized agencies are independ‐ ent intergovernmental organiza‐ tions that address a specific issue,  need or function. All member states of  the UN have promised to cooperate  with these organizations, either as a  government or as a group of govern‐ ments, to find solutions for social and  economical issues including those re‐ lated to standards of living, economic  and social progress, health, human  rights, culture and education. Special‐ ized agencies provide a more specified  look into international issues.  Today there are more than 15 special‐ ized agencies established under the UN  including International Labor Organiza‐ tion, World Health Organization and  International Monetary Fund. The UN  also works with Non‐Governmental  Organizations and Civil Society Organi‐ zations and they are included in special‐ ized agencies. 

A G E N C I E S

There are 5 specialized agencies to be  simulated in MUNDP 2011, which are  Oxfam International, Greenpeace,  Grameen Bank, International Federation  of Red Cross and Red Crescent and the  Office of the Special Adviser on Gender  Issues. These organizations are chosen  because they are known to be actively  involved in particular issues of Asia &  Pacific Region, which is this year’s  MUNDP focus.  Oxfam International  Oxfam is an international group of  NGOs from three continents working  worldwide to find long lasting solutions  for poverty and injustice. They work on  a large variety of issues including agri‐ culture, gender justice and climate  change.  Greenpeace  Greenpeace is an international NGO  working with the UN to solve environ‐ mental issues like climate change, de‐

M U N

struction of forests and pollution.  Grameen Bank  Grameen Bank is an organization that  makes small loans to those in need  without requiring collateral.   International Federation of Red Cross  and Red Crescent  The Federation is the world’s largest  humanitarian organization and provides  to people from all races, beliefs and  nationalities in issues related with  health and disasters. The Federation,  together with National Societies and the  International Committee of the Red  Cross, make up the International Red  Cross and Red Crescent Movement  Office of the Special Adviser on Gender  Issues  OSAGI is the division of the UN is dedi‐ cated to gender equality and the em‐ powerment of women. 

C R O S S W O R D

1) [ ______   to a Resolution] a suggestion for a change  to be made  to a resolution, by adding deleting or altering words.   2) The right to be the only person speaking.  3) A set of ideas , with  the background explaining why they are important, asking the United Nations to do something.  4) An official note from a delegation, written on notepad.  5)Voting to say that you neither accept, nor reject the motion or resolution.   6)The person  in charge of the debate who makes sure that rules are followed correctly.  7)The ideas for debating and finally voting.    8)Everyone attending  the debate, except chair.  9)To accept.                    10) Point of Personal _________.        11) [To come to _________.] To be quiet, to listen the Chair or the Speaker.   12) [Policy __________] What your goverment thinks about  a problem as its main idea.  13) [________ the floor] To be given  the right of speak.  14) [Point of _________] A question from a member of the house who has been Recognized by the Chair.  15)  The Chairs will set  the time for debating, dividing into 'Time for' and 'Time ________' 

1

2

12 15 3

6 7

10

11

4 13 5 14 8 9

4

MUNDP Pre Conference Newsletter  

The Newsletter.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you