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5 CULTURE & ENTERTAINMENT FRIDAY, 8 MARCH, 2013

A tale of two nations

MW

Members of theatre group Rashtra Bhasha Parivar enact a scene from Toba Tek Singh, which is a stage adaptation of a short story by the same name by renowned Urdu writer Saaadat Hasan Manto at the National Centre for Performing Arts in south Mumbai on 26 February 2013. Sumedh Sawant / Mumbai Weekly

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ashtra Bhasha Parivar, a theatre group from Nagpur in Maharashtra, took the audience back to the days of the Partition of India with their play Toba Tek Singh at the National Centre for Performing Arts in Mumbai on 26 February. The play was performed as a part of Zest!, which according to the NCPA website is a platform for ampus and youth theatre. Toba

Tek Singh is one of the most famous short stories of renowned Urdu writer Saadat Hasan Manto, which revolves around Bishan Singh, who is an inmate at a Lahore asylum and hails from Toba Tek Singh, which is a district in the Punjab province of present day Pakistan. When the governments of India and Pakistan decide to exchange some Hindu, Sikh and Mus-

lim prisoners two to three years after the Partition, Bishan Singh is put on the list and sent off to India under police escort. When he realizes, however, that his hometown Toba Tek Singh has become a part of Pakistan after the Partition, he refuses to leave and lies down between the barbed wire dividing the two countries. The members of Rashtra Bhasha Parivar adapted this story

for the stage and put up a remarkable show, employing body language, costumes and effective lighting to convey the chaos and confusion that was prevalent amongst the people when the country was divided. The one act play was performed in Hindi, and is reputed to have won several multi-language and one act play competitions throughout India.

A tribute to a maestro

Members of Rashtra Bhasha Parivar perform a stage adaptation of Toba Tek Singh at the NCPA in south Mumbai on 26 February 2013. Sumedh Sawant / Mumbai Weekly

Suburban festival adds fun to the weekend

Indian Classical Music singer Shubha Mudgal performs on the occasion of the 85th birthday of celebrated sitar player Ustad Abdul Halim Jaffer Khan in suburban Mumbai on 23 February 2013. Prashant Nair / Mumbai Weekly

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n the occasion of legendary sitar player Ustad Abdul Halim Jaffer Khan’s 85th birthday, vocalist Shubha Mudgal and renowned santoor player Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharmaperformed at Rang Sharda auditori-

um in suburban Mumbai on 23 February 2013. Born in 1927 in Madhya Pradesh, Halim Jaffer Khan honed his skills under the tutelage of his father Ustad Jaffer Khan, of the Indore Gharana. Padma Bhushan Ustad

Abdul Halim Jaffer Khan is best remembered for introducing new ragas like Madhyami, Chakradhun and Khosravani and familiarizing Hindustani music aficionados with carnatic ragas such as Latangi, Kirwani,

Chalanti, Sarasangi, etc. His contribution to popular films included musical compositions for Mughal-E-Aza (1960), Jhanak Jhanak Payal Baje (1955) andKohinoor (1960) among others.

A man dressed as the renowned comedian and actor Charlie Chaplin, looks into a mirror at the Wassup Andheri Festival in suburban Mumbai on 2 March 2013. Ashish Vaishnav / Mumbai Weekly

Mumbai Weekly  

An online newspaper run by the photojournalism students of Udaan School of Photography

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