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MUSE

Contract: a more grand perspective

Institutional Standards Issue: 007 OCTOBER 2012

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Table of Contents

MUSE

3 Letter from the Editor Designer’s Thought

Inside MU

4 6

Features

8 Lessons from a Box of Crackers 10 Contract: A More Grand Perspective

ABOUT US Muse is an online publication produced by students at Multnomah University. The views Expressed do not reflect the opinions of Multnomah University For more information or to submit: Multnomahmuse@gmail.com

Dr. Lawless Day of Outreach

14 Response

O p i n i o n s 16 Mixture does not Mean Relationship 18 Barriers 20 Drawings

Cover Photo and Contributor photos by Matthew Howen

ure t l u C & s t r A 22 Flowers

Editor: Makenzie Halbert

kenzie.halbert@gmail.com Designer: Matthew Howen

mattmattmatthowen@gmail.com Facuty Advisor: Cornelia Seigneur

corneliaseigneur@comcast.net

Makenzie Halbert Matthew Howen

23 24 26 28 30

Lit Snips Courage to Illuminate The Illumination Project Breakfast with Beau Break the Block

Tim Reed Photos by Larisa Warren Brittany Kramberg Makenzie Halbert Ryan Tallmon Brian Bailey Matthew Howen Jeff Sanford Sean Burdeshaw Nadine Roy Photos by Matthew Howen Beau Stumberg

CONTRIBUT0RS Brittany Kramberg Ryan Tallmon Tim Reed Beau Stumberg brian bailey (n/p) Nadine roy (N/P) Jeff Sanford (N/P) Larisa Warren (N/P) sean burdeshaw (N/P) ggggggggggggffffffffffffddddddddddddggggggggggggggggggggggggfffffhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh� bgGB

I have heard my entire life, from those older and wiser than I, to enjoy my youth while it lasts because it’s going to fly by. I’m sure we’ve all heard it. Despite the validity of this advice it’s an easy sentiment to brush off. Maybe you haven’t experienced this but at times what is often called ‘the best years of our lives,’ have seemed to drag on. Yet here I am, entering my last year of college wondering where the time went, wondering why I didn’t heed the advice of those older and wiser than I.

This seems like a wonderful thing for me to share as you all begin a new school year, no matter your situation or proximity to graduation, a call to enjoy life and take advantage of all opportunities, how nice. While, essentially, that is what I plan to tell you, I would like to explain myself. I have found that is all too easy not to respect the process of growing up, to always look forward to what’s next and to see the present as something to ‘get through’ so as to move on to bigger and better things. I am the type of person that always has a plan, a backup plan and a plan C, just in case, and I have never seen this as an issue until beginning this school year, my last year at Multnomah. I approached this year as a stepping stone, an obstacle even, a means to an end. I was spending most of my time thinking about my career, what grad schools I need to start preparing applications for and what I’m going to do once I’m out in the ‘real world.’ As I enter this year and begin to realize that the people, students, professors, mentors, and friends that surround me every day are part of a season of my life that may not, and probably will not, be there forever. God has something to teach us in every season but if we are not willing to be present in the situation in which we find ourselves, seeing it as something to ‘get through,’ we aren’t taking full advantage of the place God intentionally has us in.

Before I begin my article, I wanted to let you all in on what is going on. Muse is a magazine run by students at Multnomah. Since none of us are here forever– thankfully–no students will ever run Muse forever. Consequently it’s a magazine whose editors and writers change from year to year. The magazine is a year old; we’re just barely learning how to crawl around. This issue looks nothing like last year’s, and that is on purpose. We’re not reacting against what was. We are making it our own. I don’t think we’re starting with a blank canvas and I don’t think we’re climbing down off the shoulders of giants. I think we’re doing just what Muse is supposed to be doing. The continuity of Muse isn’t the font or the photographs or the way the title looks, it’s the students. For as long as Muse is around, it will be a platform on which students stand, dance or sing, complain or explain. Our features, our photographs all have that in common. We’re not journalists–though we may be one day–we’re students. We have homework like you. Now let me begin my article. I hope you enjoy the way we look and the way we sound, much work has gone into those two things. But more than that, I hope that Muse becomes family owned, so that you can see us all in these articles. Multnomah is the institution that has formed this community, and now Muse is the voice of that community. We have things to say. I hope this magazine is enjoyable because it’s ours, it’s something we’ve made.

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MUltnomah welcomes Dr. Lawless by Tim Reed

This year Multnomah welcomes Dr. Ell iott Lawless, P h D: a man of ins ight, integr ity, an d intell igence. Dr. Lawless is an Oregon native and earned his undergraduate and master’s at George Fox University before receiving his doctorate in clinical psychology from the same university. Following that, he spent a few years as an intern in Boston where he worked with and learned extensively about people with depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other mental ailments. In an attempt to lighten his clinical load, Dr. Lawless began instructing at Eastern Nazarene College in Massachusetts, where he learned of

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his love for teaching. These experiences helped to broaden his concept of what it means, as a Christian, to minister to the mentally ill with an eternal impact. This concept has grown to be one of his defining passions, as he strives to help college students understand how to minister more competently to the homeless and mentally ill populations. Through enhanced learning and integration of faith, Dr. Lawless helps students overcome their fears and sense of inadequacy when it comes to these facets of contemporary ministry. Acting upon this new-found passion, Dr. Lawless took a position at Hope International University in Southern California, where he served faithfully as the head of the Psychology Department for 6 years. Immediately following that time, he decided to take a full-time position as a psychology professor here at Multnomah University.

Dr. Lawless espouses a strong respect for truth and the discipline of working tirelessly to pursue it. Even though he is a man of great learning, he openly states that knowledge is not necessarily equal to change. As he explains, there must be a living truth with every fact. This living truth acts as the source and the catalyst that allows us to apply the truth and become more Christlike. Don’t let this statement fool you, though. Dr. Lawless plans on focusing intensely on the more empirical, fact-based type of psychology where you can attain solid knowledge and build a successful life and career in psychology. In his spare time, Dr. Lawless enjoys fly-fishing, mushroom-hunting, and playing the drums. He is a strong advocate of the idea that hobbies can foster a much more rounded personality, as well as promote other ways of thinking. With years of experience in both clinical and academic psychology, Dr. Lawless is sure to add significant value as he bolsters our blossoming psychology department.

Here at Multnomah, he hopes to help forge a tight-knit community for those pursuing a psychology undergraduate degree, as well as those involved in the master’s level counseling degree. He intends to found a psychology club on campus where students can come together and help discover how best to use their training. He also anticipates adding a number of new courses, including: Psychology of Religion, Social Psychology, Biological Psychology, and Theories of Personality. Some special focuses that Dr. Lawless brings to the department are: facilitating meaningful individual research projects, as well as helping to connect students with graduate schools where they can finetune their training. Overall, Dr. Lawless hopes to help bring Multnomah’s psychology program to a new level of professionalism. Being a man of strong faith, Dr. Lawless is excited to be here working at Multnomah where he can integrate his faith and his expertise to usher in a new workforce of Christian psychologists. He loves the intimate size of our school, where he can get to know and mentor students personally.

Tim Reed, Sophomore, Intercultural Studies/Mission Aviation

Photos By Matthew Howen

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Lessons from a Box of Crackers By Brittany Kramberg Photo By Matthew Howen

Walking through a grocery store, I notice the labels above the aisles written in bright colors, each one yelling urgently at the consumer. The signs seem to promise that not only will you discover what you’re looking for there, it will also be well-organized and easy to locate. Yet, as I walk through an aisle that’s supposedly for juice and canned goods, I see a random box of crackers sitting right on top of the cans of tomato juice. For a moment I stop, staring at the box. I know it’s in the wrong place. I know I should move it but I don’t really want to. I don’t want to walk all the way to the cracker aisle. For a moment I act as if the box is a leper and I give it a wide berth but I cannot avert my eyes, then I pause and just stare at it. I know it’s not going to do any tricks but I can’t help but wonder why someone would ruin the neatness of the red and white cans of tomato juice with this big, bulky box of crackers. ggggggggggggffffffffffffddddddddddddggggggggggggggggggggggggfffffhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh� bgGB

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As I continue to stare at the box, I can feel that others are looking at me, turning my head I see a mother with her two daughters. All of them are gazing over at me and I see that I’m standing in the middle of the aisle, obviously I’m blocking their path. Muttering a quiet apology I take a step back and continue to analyze the out of place box. The minute I step back, I wince. Lifting up my foot I see that I have stepped into something sticky. Wrinkling my nose in obvious disgust, I am briefly distracted from the box as I inspect my foot. It’s not gum which allows me to exhale in an obvious and rather loud sigh of relief. Hearing someone clear their throat, I look up from my shoe and meet the twinkling eyes of an older couple. Both watching me with interest. Without thinking I simply smile and point to the box of crackers, Do you know where those go? The minute the words are out of my mouth, I want to slap myself. I know where they go, the bright, yelling signs tell me exactly where they belong. I’d rather talk about the out of place crackers then the fact that I have been caught in the middle of the juice and canned food aisle staring at my foot.

I’d follow the signs. His wife says as they begin to walk past me. Again I was left alone in the aisle staring at that box. Apparently no one wanted to touch the lonely box of crackers. After this moment of looking at the box, I begin to think about why no one wanted to move the box. Am I being lazy? Or am I just apathetic? The thought of me being apathetic about this silly box, makes my nose wrinkle in apparent disgust. I remove my focus from the crackers as I hear a child crying, and the low rumble of numerous people talking. Around me people were chatting away, continuing on with their life while I was paused in front of cans of tomato juice and a box of crackers. The box of crackers had taken on a new meaning for me. They were clutter, because they were not where they belonged. The aisles in my life are only somewhat similar to the aisles in a grocery store. Like a grocery store they do get cluttered, but unlike those box of crackers which I could have easily moved, I cannot just pick up and move the jars and boxes of pride and bitterness that are in me. Instead I have to let my Papa do that, but I must be willing to deal with them, no matter how hard it seems.

The man gives me a large smile and tilts his head looking at the crackers for a moment. He doesn’t grab them either.

Brittany Kramberg, Senior, Psychology Major

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Contract:

a more grand perspective O N

M U L T N O M A H ’ S

Institutional Standards v

By Makenzie Halbert

Summer is over, school has started, and as we enter back into the Multnomah community many students are faced with an expectation to alter their lifestyle.

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Multnomah University, like many Christian institutions, expect a certain type of behavior from their students and implement standards that students are to follow. While the institutional standards at Multnomah cover numerous aspects of Christian life, the two most often challenged by students are the restriction of alcohol and tobacco use. Some students may be unaffected by the change in behavior these institutional standards, or what we often refer to as ‘contract,’ demands but for others it is a source of frustration. Why is it that these institutional standards are still in place? I have heard various arguments from students who are bothered by the fact that these standards leave no room for trust in the students. Why can’t Multnomah students, as Christians and legal adults, be allowed to enjoy, in moderation, alcohol and tobacco if they

so choose to? Why should it matter what the students engage in off campus and why can’t the students be trusted to act responsibly if they are of legal age? To many students these standards seem archaic and unreasonable. To others these standards seem both fair and necessary, either way it’s a major topic of conversation throughout the year, every year, in my experience at Multnomah. I believe a lot of the objections and ongoing conversations about contract comes from an unclear understanding of why the standards exist. Dr. Debbi Miller, PhD, a professor in the Elementary Education and MAT Program shares about the standards and why she believes them to be important. I think there are several misconceptions about the institutional standards; among those, I would say that some believe they were written in the 1950’s and haven’t changed

Why cant the students be trusted to act responsibly if they are of legal age?

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At the heart of Contract is the understanding that

we live in a community and our actions

affect those around us

Photos By Matthew Howen

since; that they are draconian and designed with ‘worst offenders’ in mind; that they emphasize the letter of the law rather than the spirit of the law; and that they apply to all students at all times.The standards have evolved over time in response to changing cultural mores in an effort to be sensitive to Multnomah’s context and constituency. At the heart of contract is the understanding that we live in a community and our actions affect those around us. Dr. Miller states, standards are written to protect both individual rights and community ethos. We as a culture have a tendency to embrace individual rights before community rights and that does not always serve us well. At times, individuals must sacrifice personal rights for the good of the community.

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Amy Simmons, a senior at Multnomah, shares about her personal stance on contract. As a legal adult and student living off campus Amy states that she sees herself as the type of student that would want to see contract revised. Amy honestly addressed the fact that though she follows contract she can’t say that she loves following it and that it isn’t at some points difficult. However her opinion remains, I chose to go to this school and I chose to be in this community and I see no reason why I can’t abide by the rules that it’s asking me to abide by. I think I learn a lot about authority by listening to those who have been here longer and know a lot more about these things than I do. Amy, like a lot of students at Multnomah, has experienced and seen a lot of healing through her time at Multnomah and she believes that healing comes from Multnomah being a safe place. Amy states that Multnomah remains a safe place because of the standards in place. At the core of this difficult issue is the reality that we live in a community, a community that we chose to enter into, and our actions affect those around us. Dr. Miller states, in reference to her personal stance on the standards, I believe that we need to be wise stewards of ourselves—physically, emotionally, intellectually, etc. I believe the Bible counsels moderation as a plumbline for behaviors, as well as a keen awareness of the impact our personal expressions of freedom have on others. Makenzie Halbert, Senior, English Major

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Photo By Matthew Howen

By Rya n Ta l l mo n

As I started thinking about what I could write for Muse concerning the Multnomah Contract, I found myself looking for the most convincing (and convicting) arguments as to why the contract should be upheld. I came up with quite a few. Then it hit me: none of my arguments held any weight. This is not because the arguments themselves were invalid, but because my use of them was manipulative. In the act of trying to defend the contract, I realized that my actual motives had been exposed. The truth is, before I can appropriately discuss the defensibility of the MU contract, specifically concerning

Multnomah students’ requirement to refrain from all alcoholic consumption, I have to first lay down my cards and confess the emotions and thoughts that I carry with me into the conversation. I have to confess first and foremost that I am uncomfortable around alcohol and that my family bears numerous scars from alcohol abuse. And I have to admit that the feelings that emerge from my thoughts are often the driving force behind my argument. Some of the first words that come to my mind when I think of Multnomah removing the ban on

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Some of the first words that come to my mind when I think

of Multnomah removing the ban on alcoho lic consumption are

alcoholic consumption are compromise, worldly, dangerous. As for my thoughts, they mostly rest on my cousin who, at forty-six years old, died last week from complications of chronic alcoholism. Consequently, my feelings become mostly anger, frustration, and, ultimately, pride. The initial words, thoughts, and feelings that come to mind, those impulsive and instinctual responses, often direct the very course of my argument and dictate the basis of my judgment.

In order to be a unified body of believers, we have to not only consider where others are coming from, but make the difficult decision to honestly assess our own motives and consider why our agenda is what it is. That requires not only honesty, but vulnerability, and willingness to admit that our judgment is always influenced by personal experiences and feelings that are not universally held or necessarily truthful. I do not mean to suggest that whether or not Multnomah should have an institutional standard toward students’ use of alcohol is irrelevant or subjective. It is neither. There is a right or wrong answer as to whether or not Multnomah should have a contract, and it is very significant. But the answer is not going to be discovered by an individual left to his own thoughts and opinions. Rather, it can (and I believe it will) be achieved by a community of believers who discuss this issue with honesty, humility, and, above all, a desire for unity.

Every Multnomah student could probably write a list like this one, and every student’s would be different. But where’s the Bible in all this? After all, we are Multnomah students, right? Staunch biblicists whose motives and judgments are rooted deeply and solely in Scripture, yes? An especially relevant passage to consider is Philippians 2:1-4. After encouraging the Philippians to strive together as one for the faith of the gospel (1: 27 NIV), Paul tells the Philippians to be like-minded, having the same love, being one in spirit and of one mind (2:2 NIV). How ought they accomplish this? By doing nothing out of . . . vain conceit and instead humbly placing others’ interests before their own (2:4 NIV).

Ryan Tallmon, Senior, English Major

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Mixture BY B. BAILEY

With Multnomah University instituting race and culture surveys, I thought it important, as one of the few minority students, to share my experience and give my perspective on this most influential and sensitive issue.

Caucasians, I am convinced that they do have real concerns and questions about race. However, what they desire is to be able to bring their questions, concerns, feelings of guilt and innocence, no matter how childish and unaware they might seem, to the conversation without being dismissed.

I want to reiterate that this is only my experience and this article does not account for every minority student at Multnomah. My experience at Multnomah has been this: being around each other doesn’t necessarily mean we are communing with each other. Being in the same classroom with scores of Caucasians doesn’t mean they (or I for that matter) are all of a sudden culturally aware and in partnership with one another. It would be foolish to think this is true. Let me qualify this by saying that this also does not mean we are enemies. It simply means there is not a mutual exchange of understanding and appreciation being shared between us. Through many conversations with

Will they be expected to give an account for every individual AfricanAmerican’s experience? Will they be blamed for the atrocious stain which slavery has left on our country? Can they be regarded innocent of unintentional racism, and bigotry? Can African-Americans take ownership of their side of this very complex and difficult issue?

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a for both of us b The other side of the coin, for AfricanAmericans seems to be this: Can they bring their experience to the table with all of its ins and outs, occasional anger, sensitivity and history without it being dismissed? Can their experience be validated without pity? Can they be honest and forthcoming without being written off as just another angry minority? Can Caucasians be open to the idea that they may not be as cultured as they think they are? Are Caucasians open to the idea that they may have some subconscious racism? Honestly, in the past, I have been less than eager to entertain such conversations with Caucasians. I have responded with an attitude that conveys a disdain for the validity of their experience without giving them a chance to voice it. In the past five years God has had to change my approach to this difficult problem.

experience race within our community as also they affect how I experience race within our community. This must be important to both of us. This approach has been paying off. Relationships with some of my Caucasian equals have become deeper in the terms of freedom, expression, care, concern, and trust. There is a sense of joy with each other in the Holy Spirit, and an absence of pity, fear, rejection, and anger. We still have healing to experience, but I believe the trajectory of our relationship has changed. I feel a greater amount of safety, and I think they do as well. I know that I could bring my experience to them and it would not be dismissed, and I can honestly say the opposite is true as well. The aim of our relationship has changed from just being in the same room together, which has been the standard approach, to walking in repentance toward the healing power of the Cross together. I can testify that the heart of mutual responsibility for one another is coming forth from this approach.

At present, I am at the point of understanding that because of Christ, I must attempt to listen with thankfulness and understanding while conversing with my Caucasian peers. I must also take the initiative in the process of redeeming race relations within my social sphere to the best of my ability. My Caucasian colleagues are my responsibility as I am theirs. I affect how they

Photos By Matthew Howen

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Brian Bailey, MBS, New Testament

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Barriers

By Matthew Howen Photo By Matthew Howen

I didn’t cry on the day: the day when everyone was supposed to cry. It was a day of team building, and believe me, there was serious team building going on, for that I was grateful. I was supposed to cry, or at least get frustrated, tired, or emotional, but I didn’t. Paul, the guru of team building, challenged us all to step out of our comfort zone that day. Believe me, I was on board with that. The only difficulty was that I could not find my comfort zone. During the activities I tried to push myself, or keep myself from pushing, or whatever, but still I never bumped into my comfort barrier.

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“I am invincible. I have no comfort barriers,”

...that’s what I said as I was going to sleep. I knew it wasn’t true, but I still hadn’t found the sneaky things. Then we all went cliff jumping. I’ve jumped off of plenty of average size cliffs feet first. Then someone said it. “Dive.” My comfort barrier fell straight on top of me but it skipped my head, my shoulders, my heart, and hit me resolutely in the stomach. All of a sudden, I now had one large comfort barrier. There was now one impossible thing in this world: to dive off this cliff. No matter that four or five others before me dove with ease, the feat had recently become impossible. It was not an option. I had found my comfort barrier and I was clinging to it. I could do everything guru Paul had us do, but to enter the water head first, I could not. Well, since all contemporary storytelling demands a resolution, I’ll give it to you. I dove. I did, and it wasn’t that bad either. I do want you to know how brave I am, but more than that, I want you to realize something. Often, we are the ones to set up our own limitations. Some of us are trapped by barriers that don’t have to be kept up. This event in my life was a healthy reminder that even those of us who are self-assured have comfort barriers, we may just have to climb up a cliff to find them. Matthew Howen, Senior, English Major

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Recently I have gotten into the enjoyable hobby of drawing. Though my drawings look like the result of a blindfolded toddler doodling, the process and the result is still very rewarding for me. My recent drawing interest has been centered on a daily goal: listen and watch the world around me, and whatever catches my attention, draw. Usually this drawing is centered on a quote from someone throughout the day. What caught my attention on one particular day was a sentence uttered from the lips of my amiable manager at work. He said, “I really only have one friend”. What attracted me to the statement, albeit taken a bit out of context, was that he said it with total contentment. There was not even a whiff of bitterness or sadness in his honest declaration. I really liked that. And so I drew it. Jeff Sanford graduated in 2012, English Major

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Flowers by Sean Burdeshaw, Senior, English Major

lit snips We all have homework, we’re all busy, we spend most of our days with our nose in a heavy theology textbook but believe me, we all can benefit from picking up a good story. You’re not a reader? You don’t know what to read? No problem, that’s what we’re here for. We want to provide you with tantalizing snippets of great stories, stories that won’t take up too much of your time and are sure to challenge you as well as entertain you. Read the preview, if it interests you and you want to know more, head down to Powell’s, put down the 4.99 for a used copy and spend this Saturday with your nose in a different kind of book. You’ll be glad you did. -Matthew and Makenzie

“Their hands were resting on the table, redspeared at the tips. He sat down and wiped his hand on the tablecloth. He didn’t take off his hat. The women had finished eating and were smoking cigarettes. They stopped talking when he sat down. He pointed to the first thing on the menu and the steward, standing over him, said, “Write it down, sonny,” and winked at one of the women; she made a noise in her nose. He wrote it down and the steward went away with it. He sat and looked in front of him, glum and intense, at the neck of the woman across from him. At intervals her hand holding the cigarette would pass the spot on her neck; it would go out of his sight and then it would pass again, going back down to the table; in a second a straight line of smoke would blow in his face. After it had blown at him three or four times, he looked at her. She had a bold game-hen expression and small eyes pointed directly on him,. “If you’ve been redeemed,” he said, “I wouldn’t want to be.” Then he turned his head to the window. He saw his pale reflection with the dark empty space outside coming through it. A boxcar roared past, chopping the empty space in two and one of the women laughed. excerpt from Flanery O’Connor’s Wise Blood

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The Courage to Illuminate By Nadine Roy

There is a power, hidden, Deep within a chosen heart. It’s wild and untamed, Yet nearly impossible to set free. It paces within cages of your being like a ravenous panther. Yearning, desperately needing the escape only you can provide. To release your bold, pleading desire Is to unlock mysterious intensity. The stamina of an unbridled soul; no one can predict its path. Deep within your person, an ember smolder’s persistently. Great wildfires in its core long to dance from your imagination. Your mighty God, Creator gifted you with such elegant conflagration. But you must chose, bravely, to embrace your heart, and endow your world

Nadine Roy, Freshman, Psychology Major

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Photos By Matthew Howen

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The Illumination Project

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Joy Eggerichs partners with father Emerson Eggerichs in his well-known ministry, Love and Respect. Joy takes the values Emerson and his wife Sarah teach to married couples and applies them to the younger generation as she addresses issues present in male/female relationships. Joy’s ministry is called Love and Respect Now and on September 7th she and her father partnered with local artists from Imago Dei, Door of Hope, and Solid Rock to put on a presentation called The Illumination Project, a live film production that will be released as a six week DVD series. Joy is passionate about educating the younger generation, adults ages 18-35, on what it looks like to have healthy male/female relationships so that we might avoid the sentiment that she hears all too often from the older couples at her parents’ seminars: I wish I knew then what I know now.

w Look how awesome the conference was here Learn more about Joy’s vision on her website Makenzie Halbert, Senior, English Major

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BreakFast Beau: h t i w with Beau:

City State Diner by Beau Stumberg

Photos By Matthew Howen

When someone says the word “diner,” many people may think of bad coffee and greasy food; a place where old men get together in the morning to sip coffee and talk politics.

Location: 128 NE 28th Ave. Hours: m-f 8am-3pm s, su 8am-4pm

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Or maybe the classic, sleek 1950’s burger joint, where our parents went to get “soda-pops” and ice cream. While both of these descriptions may be true, diners originated long before grandpa was harassing the waitress and even before girls were wearing poodle skirts. The first diners were nothing but lunch wagons, where you could find cheap-eats during the early 1900’s. Today the term diner could mean a hundred different things, but for Portland’s City State Diner it means big bay windows, leather booths and a fresh take on diner classics like Eggs Benedict and French toast.

Situated between Glisan and Burnside street the City State Diner is a friendly neighborhood eatery with a comfortable ambiance, revolving art, good coffee (Cellar Door Coffee Roaster) and delightful service. With its combination of family diner meets Southeast Portland, City State offers a great breakfast and a delicious lunch without losing style points for its genre of restaurant. On the menu there is a delightful selection of breakfast items ranging from egg scramblers to challah French toast. The eggs benedict is a must try on the menu and gets five stars for variety.

Salmon steak, crispy prosciutto, pork belly with apricot jam, or arugula and smoked tofu for the veggies out there, make up only a few of the options for the Eggs Benedict. With your choice of homemade biscuits or English muffin, these benedicts are sure to cure homework blues. Another must on the menu is the Hazelnut Challah French Toast. If you don’t know what Challah French toast is, it is a folded Jewish (especially for you Hebrew students) batter made into bread. Covered in candied hazelnuts and delicious syrup, what more would you want to appease your sweet tooth? Apart from the delicious menu and great coffee (really they have good coffee), the City State has great service, fast and polite, as well as specials that change daily. Not only do these folks serve good breakfast they also have a great lunch menu, which we sadly did not have time to explore. Definitely put this down on your next breakfast spot to check out. Its not far from MU and if you are a poor college student go to this link for happiness brought to you complimentary by one of our new favorites, City State Diner. Beau Stumberg has good taste in food, Junior, Psychology Major

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Break Block THE

3r d An nu a l Johnson Creek Art Show at Reed College 10/1- 10/12, Sun, 1–5 p.m., Mon & Wed, 6–9 p.m. Vollum lounge

This exhibition features original art inspired by the Johnson Creek Watershed, and photography. Special gallery hours, in conjunction with a Reed canyon restoration tour,

Ba n ned Books Week Rea ding Sunday, October 7th @ 7:30pm Powell’s City of Books 1005 W Burnside

Meant to highlight the benefits of free and open access to information while drawing attention to the harms of censorship, Powell’s Books and the ACLU of Oregon present an evening of readings by local authors, including: Vanessa Veselka, [Zazen] Phillip Margolin (Gone, But Not Forgotten) April Henry (The Night She Disappeared) Sarah Royal (Creative Cursing: A Mix ‘n’ Match Profanity Generator), and much more!

The Aca demy Theater 7818 Southeast Stark Street Portland, OR 97215 (503) 252-0500

Special Features: Psycho (1960) October 5-11 Jurassic Park (1993) October 12-18 (See Website for showtimes)

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An Effect i ve Bibl ica l Res ponse to Im m igr at ion October 2, 2012 @ 6:00 PM Concordia University’s Hagen Campus Center

Join us for this special panel discussion on immigration reform We present “A Biblical Response to Immigration.” Lisa Sharon Harper, the Director of Mobilizing for Sojourners, a national Christian organization committed to faith in action for social justice, will challenge listeners to consider their thinking on immigration reform in light of their personal faith.

New Wine, New Wineskins Church and State Conference Saturday, October 27 from 9 - 4pm @ Multnomah Biblical Seminary

This conference will go beyond the “Christian voter card” to consider holistic ways of bringing our faith to bear in the public sector.

Night Str ike Thursday Night at 7 p.m. for orientation, Liberation Street Church 214 West Burnside Street, Portland, OR

Come love on some of Portland’s most vulnerable people.

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MUSE Photo By Matthew Howen


Muse 007: October Edition