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<<amplifier>> #0000

On Work

by multitude

04.2014


3

Amplifier #0000 - On Work


In revolutionary times, those who accord themselves, with an extraordinary arrogance, the facile credit for having enflamed anarchy in their contemporaries fail to recognise that what appears to be a sad triumph is in fact due to a spontaneous disposition, determined by the social situation as a whole. (Auguste Comte - Philosophie Positive, Leรงon 48)


INDE X 7

// foreward introduction to Amplifier #0000

9

// summary six facts to keep in mind

10

// outburst where it all begins

12

// survey just asking a few questions

14

// contracts vs. architects infographic

15

// the misuse of the internship contract

new rules are necessary

16

// the reasons for chosing a job

19

// a proposal for the demise of open architectural competitions paying to work seems contradictory

20

// what architect stands for in 201x the rise of the new creative craftman

21

// network aggregation and risk of segregation

23

// lunch break intermezzo

27

// a manifesto stand out by a group of fed up

28

// do you have any other comments? everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice should be heard at least once


FOREWARD This first issue of Amplifier collects the heroic efforts of young architects to ignite a revolution during their spare hours. The author of the attempt is 18Oktoberdam, a temporary collective of young architects who met in December 2011 in an attic apartment somewhere in the West of Rotterdam. Most of them were working for low salaries, despite, they claimed, their talent and dedication. They were determined to change things. 18Oktoberdam organized an online survey to gather information on working conditions in the field of Architecture. The result (170+ entries) is a showcase of individuals who have struggled to find a way in a mutating market. Their stories come as a wake-up call to all workers in the field. The hierarchical organization of the traditional office is economically unsustainable when faced with reality. The urgency for renewal is undeniable and the social situation as a whole seems to be ready for a change. During the last decades, architects have grown accustomed to a predetermined career path. The media tends to describe the profession of Architecture as a tale of lonesome egos. Working architects have failed to think of themselves as a group. Young graduates are stuck between the need to work and the desire for independence. Aware of the drama, Amplifier is willing to investigate the cause and suggest, between its lines, a possible way out. This issue #0000 is where this search begins.

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7


SUMMARY

1.

Hiring graduated students (often registered as architects) with internship contracts, for periods of 6 months or more, is illegal, yet widely perpetrated.

2.

Not offering a regular contract, even after a period of 6 or 12 months of internship, is a common practice.

3.

Underpayment is the direct consequence of bad man agement, the crisis of the building sector and architectsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; own predisposition to martyrdom.

4.

Overtime is admired, promoted and usually not paid.

5.

There is no union, institution or organization protecting the rights of the creative class workers.

6.

Architecture competitions are most likely to result in a huge investment of time and ideas , and do not necessarily translate into opportunities for young architects.

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OUTBURS T The reality of the employment situation in the architectural world is well known, especially here in The Netherlands: Offices produce work, thanks to interns or temporary workers. The interns work for 40 hours/week when there are no special deadlines, and, in most cases, they are asked to do the same work that normal architects do. The only practical difference between their positions is their respective salaries. It is self-evident that living in a city, while earning an income barely sufficient to pay the rent, is extremely difficult. This type of contract was once an opportunity, and there were two reasons why: A. Internships provided the possibility of a first working experience for young architects; B. Internships gave young architects the chance to obtain some useful preliminary skills, which would enable them to start working as a professional within that company shortly afterwards. Nowadays, on the other hand, internships have been extended to everyone. The internship title has almost completely lost its original meaning, because: A. Experienced workers are also being hired as interns; B. After the internship period ends, it is unlikely that the employee will be offered any professional contract. Very few people sign regular contracts. Those contracts that are offered are frequently insecure in their terms; offers of six months to one year, or project based offers, are common. It is possible to say that companies prefer this kind of contract because they do not have any risk: taxes are very low, and uncertainties exist only for the precarious workers. To face facts, the use of an intern is seen as temporary. It creates an affordable workforce for immediate production. In other words, it creates an economic advantage, especially in a time of economic crisis.


The intern has to learn quickly, because if they do not, he or she will soon be replaced by another intern. During the internship, the trainee, instead of going through a learning process, is forced to prove his production skills as part of a tested system. And this is why it would be preferable that interns could be defined (and paid) as regular employees: interns are in fact demanded to observe the same rules, responsibilities and tasks as the architects. Moreover, the difference between contracts does not guarantee workers job security, because every worker can be fired on short notice, or their contract may not be extended. The wide range of contracts does not reflect the different working responsibilities inside the office. The hierarchical administration of the office is generally much more differentiated than a design team. According to administrative categories, the employees are divided into the categories of interns, part time workers, freelancers, juniors, mid-level and senior architects. However, within design teams, one or two individuals responsible for the project play the most important role, while the other team members produce the work, resulting in the final product. If we let this continue, it will be almost impossible for anyone who is not independently wealthy to obtain a proper job which compensates them fairly for their efforts, even for those who already have working experience or exceptional skills. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gather and plan further action.

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4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

1 1

3 3

3 1

2 2

2 5

1 2

Rotterdam Rotterdam

1

3

1

1

2

3 Royal Haskoning

Rotterdam

1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1

3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

2 3 1 1 3 2 1 2 2 2 3 3 1 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 4 2 1 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 4 2

3 2 Benthem Crouwel Architekten 1 1 3 import.export Architecture 3 mvrdv 3 Hvdn/studiOninedots 2 broekbakema 3 3

San Diego rotterdam Amsterdam Rotterdam Amsterdam Amsterdam antwerp rotterdam Amsterdam rotterdam Den haag Den haag

3

Rotterdam

3 3

2 3

1 1

2 1

3 2

Den Haag Delft

3 3

1 2

2 1

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Rotterdam rotterdam

2

1

2

3

Delft

1

2

1

1 1 1 1

5 Diplom, comparable to Master degree Dear _____ 2

1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1

3

2

1

2 2

1

1 1

1

Protterdda Rotterdam

Rotterdam

rotterdam Rotterdam Rotterdam

Rotterdam Rotterdam Rotterdam

Eindhoven

Eindhoven rotterdam

Amsterdam

2 2 3 1 3

2 1 1 3 1

1 2 1 1 1

3 1 3 3 2

3 2 DZH 3 deerns raadgevende ingenieurs 3 3

3 3

2 3

2 1

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3 Group A 3 UN Studio

Rotterdam amsterdam

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 Bachelor of Built engineering 3 3

2 2 3 2 3 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

1 2 4 4 2 4 2 1 2 2 2 3 4 2

2 Atelier Kempe Thill 3

Rotterdam Rotterdam rotterdam Rotterdam Rotterdam amsterdam Rotterdam

3 5 MSc Urbanism, MSc Architecture 2 3 3 3

2 2 3 2 1 2

2 1 1 1 2 1

2 3 2 2 4 1

3 3

3 1

1 1

1 2

If you want you can also contact us to get more involved. 3 3 1 3 3 KCAP There will be a lot to do, in the coming months!

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1

18oktoberdam is a group of people working in the field of Archi3 3 1 2 2 KCAP tecture who want to talk about it. 2 3 1 4 TReC ‐ The Responsive City We3 think that our profession is, at this moment, 2 1 4 misinterpreted. 3 2 1 4 Offices abuse the system of internships, underpayment is accepted 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 3 3 as 3normal and working with a proper contract has become a rare 3 2 2 3 KCAP Architects&Planners luxury. We would like to collect actual data about the conditions of 3our work, so we can make everyone aware of1it. It is2 StudioMarcoVermeulen very impor2 2 3 2 Inter.National.Design tant as11 it can44 also send a strong 3 to raise awareness among people, 3 3 1 2 message to those in charge of legislations. 3 2 1 4 Morgen Architectuur 2 2 1 4 If you agree with us, and want to help, please click on2the follow3 1 2 1 ing3 link and answer a few questions.2 It will1 take2about3 3 minutes. 3 2 1 4 Feel 3 free to leave out any questions3you do 2 not feel comfortable 3 1 1 2 FABRIC answering due to privacy issues. 23 3 2 5 1 link

1 1 2

SURVE Y

Thanks for taking part, and good luck.

2

Rotterdam maastricht Tilburg

Rotterdam

3 Guller Guller Architecture Urbanism 2 3 2 3 Arc2 2 Technocon

Amsterdam rotterdam Almere Aalter, Belg

3 Architectenbureau Brinkman BV

Delft

3 Tudelft 3 3 Atelier Kempe Thill 3 VenhoevenCS architecture+urbanism 2 Claus en Kaan Architecten

Delft Berlin Rotterdam Amsterdam Delft Rotterdam

2 3

rotterdam Brussels


m m

4 3

m

5 both learning opportunity and clear future career opportunity within the office

m m m m

m

m

m

5 5

5 Social oriented architecture 3 1 4 5 I need money,I need to do architecture and I enjoy working with the group 2 3 5 i like them since my second year of architecture study... 2 3

QUES TIONS

3 3 3 1 4 3 3

A

What is your nationality?

A1

Do you have a work permit?

80 60

50 50

2

40

60

2

1900

20 6 6 15 80 10 16 20 20 5

40 40 40 32 32 40 32 40 32 40

45 50 45 37 30 60 38 70 32 40

2 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1

500 1600 350 800 2400 1100 1600 1400 1680 1400

5

0

32

32

2

10

10

40

50

2

2300

25 100

4 20

40 40

40 50

2 2

1350 700

50

10

40 40

50 40

1 1

1730 325

40

50

2

1300

50 2

20 50

32 24

35 36

2 2

1250 800

3 2

50 30

60 40

60 70

2 2

1000 1000

10

10

38

38 55

2 2

1800 2000

5 5 1

75 80 0

40 40 30

60 60 30

2 2 1

400 1000 2000

2

0

12

12

132

1400

6

20

32

40

2

175

0

40

2

B1

What is the highest level of your Architectural education?

B2

30 20 in How many years of working experience do you have 10 10 the field of Architecture?

B3

Are you currently working?

m

5 ALL of them 3

C

What type of contract do you have?

m m

2 1

D5

86 8 38 What is the duration of your contract? (Freelance only)

m m m

3 1 5 FUN

E1

What is the name of the office?

n

5 My own office

E3

What is the location of the office?

n

3

F1

Why are you working there?

m t

3

1 3

500 500

6 45 65 7 3 90 7 70 15 45

3 3

m

2 2

1000

am m

4

90 80

E2

Please state the approximate number of empolyees 8 50 in the office

38 40

45

2

650

F2

35 20 What is approximately the percentage of interns in 30 5 this office?

40 40

50 45

2 2

500 1700

F4

80 10 How many hours do you work per week according to 30 10 your contract?

F5

How many hours do you ACTUALLY work on average 15 20 per week? 10 15

F6

Do you receive compensation for overwork?

m

5 learning/experience/management level/travelling

40

45

1

2600

m m

5 recommendation from friends working there, they needed new people at that time 1

40 40

40 50

1 2

1300 1800

m m

5 1 5 1 1 3 5 3 4 1 3 5

m m m m

m

gium

m m

m

120

6

3 40 120 3 7 50 120 10 4 7

0 20 40 50 0 5 6 30 0 0

40 40 6 40 40 30 40 40 40 40 20 40

50 55 6 50 80 30 45 50 50 45 24 40

2 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2

850 1250 400 400 1800 1600 1100 450 1700 1550 400 1650

3

2

0

32

36

2

1300

3 3 3 3 3

10 12 25 1 30

0 2 15 0 10

36 8 32 40 40

42 20 35 40 42

1 1 1 2 2

1600 500 1400 1600 600

25 12

5 0

40 38

45 45

2 1

650 2050

thanks to a friend/to participate in competitions in my country we're 3 freelancers temporarily gathering for an assignment

To save money for half a year in order to go abroad

G

What is your average monthly (netto) income?

H

Do you have any other comment?

Learning, change, better opportunities, no underpayed employees

5 only job offer 3

Amplifier #0000 - On Work


CONTRAC TS V S ARCHITEC TS

66%

INTERNSHIP / NO CONTRACT years of work experience in the field of architecture

<1 year 1<3 years >3 years

4% 31%

19% 27% 9%

9%

41%

<1 year 1<3 years >3 years

PERMANENT CONTRACT years of work experience in the field of architecture

10%

CONTRACT TYPES for Architects owning a master of higher degree no contract (black work) 30%

internship agreement

60%

temporary contract permanent contract freelance


THE MISUSE OF THE INTERNSHIP CONTRAC T Looking at the output of the survey, and in particular, the average wage and work hours, the results appear to be in line with the law. However, by carefully reading the statistics, a more alarming phenomenon can be recognized: 31% of interviewees belong to the group of graduated architects (holding a master or higher degree) working under an internship agreement or subjected to under-the-table agreements involving no contract. By focusing on the particulars of this 31%, one discovers that the great majority (86%) of architects have completed at least one or more years of work experience in the field of architecture. This represents the most controversial finding of the survey, since it underlines a growing trend, which is the weakening of the power of labor. Within the realm of architectural practices (from one-man companies up to multinationals) there exists a need to re-define contractual conditions and methods/modalities of practice in order to re-establish the dignity of the workers. In a moment of economic, political and cultural crisis it is unlikely to secure workers by adopting traditional means. Assuming it is impossible for the labor market to provide stability, being flexible remains the way to go for most of the companies. However, what should a worker do? Is it possible for a worker to achieve a (/n economic) balance by means of flexibility?! How can a person provide for his/her future when having to jump from one temporary contract to another , quite possibly incurring long periods of unemployment?

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THE REA SONS One of the questions of the survey is: why are you working there (in that office)? Seemingly a naive question, it instead addresses one of the most impalpable, unwritten disputes on practicing Architecture: The hidden agenda. It concerns one’s plan for the future. It is, in a way, the: “what do you want to be as a grown up?” kind of question. A young architect, freshly out of university, is faced with the choice of thousands of offices to apply to. The scale is global, and so is the ambition. Participants were offered 5 possible answers to the question: - reputation of the office 17 - clear future career opportunity 9 - learning opportunity 55 - no other choice 11 - other (specify) 23 55 respondents indicated learning opportunities as the reason behind their choice. Together with the second biggest group1, reputation of the office, they form a vast majority. The average income of those who applied and work at an office for learning opportunities is the lowest, as they signed, willingly or not, an internship agreement for a temporary contract. The results of this response imply the statement: I am willing to sacrifice my income, if at least I can do an interesting job. Or if that job will look extremely prestigious on my CV. And for all we can assume an undeclared motivation: After graduation, I wasn’t ready to work in a permanent job. The very few that, instead, responded with future career opportunities, based their choice on a stable and reliable working environment, and they form the group whose income is, by far, the highest.

1: Those who answered other, often specified the reason were both reputation and learning opportunities, or a rather contradictory all of the above.


(It should be noted that the highest income recorded in this survey is just above the legal minimum). I wonder, does a higher income necessarily mean less interesting projects? How is a career different from a learning opportunity and how is it that this difference doubles the income? There is an idealistic mindset, part of the education and embedded in the way of thinking typical of this field, that pushes all those young architects to self-immolation for the sake of a greater abstract good. Is the assumption I am working at a well-known office, so one day I will be a good Architect still valid today? Considering all factors involved, probably not.

21 22 3 8 1

Internship Temporary contract Permanent contract Freelance No contract

average income:

17

17

9

55

11

23

1.106 €

1.622 €

988 €

1.031 €

1.190 €

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Amplifier #0000 - On Work


He is, actually, sleeping


A PROP OS AL FOR THE DEMISE OF OPEN ARCHITEC TURAL COMPE TITIONS The competition is mostly seen as a free and egalitarian way of expressing diverse ideas. However, what often happens is that open architectural competitions place stress upon the fragile economies of small architectural firms. What is even worse is that such competitions favor the exploitation of interns because, if the entry is unsuccessful, no reimbursement is given to the participants. When a small practice wants to enter a competition, it will have to use interns to reduce the costs of the production needed for the submission, triggering a situation of exploitation when interns are forced to work up to 80 or 90 hours per week. In general, an open competition should not require too much time and effort from its participants, nor should it impose intricate restrictions. Some open competitions have become lottery-like events, receiving thousands of entries. In addition, many competitions impose rules which deprive the architects of any intellectual copyright on their own submission. This is the ultimate contradiction, especially when the architect has to pay a fee to participate. Too many negative aspects are overshadowing open competitions despite the excitement and good will of many architects.

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WH AT ARCHITEC T S TANDS FOR IN 201 X In the European Continent the role of the architect has deteriorated during the last decade; from taking a seat at the political â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;tableâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of Europe, architects have dropped (in the best cases) to the position of make-up artists for developers. The large commissions given by governments have ended, demarcating the end of architectsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; involvement as public intellectual figures. Nowadays, architects have become either extremely global or extremely local. This means that one can work from Amsterdam designing a building in Brazil or South Korea, or one can operate in Antwerp only following local projects. Moreover, the new generation has become interested in interdisciplinary collaborations and small assignments (temporary installations, small exhibitions, interiors, teaching), as a strategy to reach economic independence. There is a new professional trend that can be identified; aside from conventional practice, young architects are starting to design, realize and sell diverse products, thus invading the field of small-scale product design. This direct approach to design, production and sale allows them to maximize profit, especially when this involves small, relatively affordable products. This process can happen without intermediaries and renders the architect both entrepreneur/producer and trader: the new creative craftsman.


NE T WORK Collective: 1. Spontaneous association of persons united for political or trade union. 2. In a party or a trade union, a group of persons with liaisons outside of the party, who deal with a specific topic or issue. Platform: 1. Fundamental program at the basis of a common action or negotiation carried out by a group. These two words have become the new cliché terms used by architects. Collectives or platforms are popping up on a daily basis to participate in competitions, small projects or publicly commissioned research studies. During the ‘60s and ‘70s, this definition was relevant among students and workers aiming at political discussion; today, these terms have been revived by architects in order to define their more or less formal association and work relationship. This trend seems to trivialize the meaning of the word “collective.” In fact, it illustrates that architectural firms might be an outdated setting for architecture. Another phenomenon of architectural practice, which is also experienced by other professionals, is the physical aggregation of their offices within the same compound (or building, block, or neighborhood). It favours knowledge-sharing, and stimulates collaborations and solidarity; but it also does not eliminate the risk of self- segregation. Because real interdisciplinarity is lacking, the chance to interweave work relationships with professionals of other fields could be missed.

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LUNCH BREA K They were astonished. How could they miss it? There it was, right in front of them. A smoked Norwegian salmon filet, the finest quality, prominently positioned in the fridge. That day, they were alone in the office, because the other intern was on a forced holiday to recover from food poisoning contracted earlier that week. “Come on! I’ll make croutons” Said Franco, rubbing his palms, caressing the idea of an act of insubordination. If they were to eat that salmon as they were obviously not intended to, it would unleash a direct attack upon everything the office ever represented. It would question the established structure of a one-course lunch and be a claim for better digestion. You could call it a revolutionary act of cooking. Their usual lunch break was based only on cold sandwiches, regardless of the occasion. Whether it was workers’ or mothers’ day, their menu was poor in vitamins and proteins. Colorful sauces on slices of ageless bread. It was reminiscent of the time, during Easter, when the whole office was having lunch. The team was composed of two interns, Mirco and Franco; a Belgian intern, Selma; one regular employee, Koen; and the Boss. It was at this occasion that Mirco spoke, for the first time, of the possibility of a better lunch. It was Easter, after all! And they shouldn’t be eating suspicious tuna sauce. Why should they be resigned to sliced young cheese, when they could aim for a better, seasoned Parmigiano, at the very least? “We could quite reasonably cook steak, every now and then or risotto”, he said in a hyper-caloric delirium caused by an excess of peanut butter. “It could improve our protein intake.” “No steak during apprenticeship. It’s the rule,” said Koen, disturbed by the idea of foreign cuisine. Selma interrupted: “Could someone pass me the garlic butter?” Amplifier #0000 - On Work

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At that point Franco, who normally went through the lunch ritual in religious silence, put down his onion sandwich. Franco was the guy who could create delicious dishes on a budget less than the one reserved for foam-cutting wire. He could be a gourmet with rocket salad alone. When they would relax in the office garden on their break, Franco would tell stories of roasted chickens with a side of baked potatoes. He would tell tales of salads with walnuts and honey. He was a dreamer of the stove, a Garibaldi of the appetizers.They listened to him, dreaming of an extra-virgin olive oil experience, arguing with each other about which part of the chicken they’d like to begin with. They would fantasize of mustard a la ancienne and carrots a la julienne. Usually, when Franco was sitting at the same table as the Boss, he wouldn’t speak. Not that day! Not that Easter. That day Franco gathered all the indignation of his not-so-small intestine and stated: “With no salt, salad is tasteless.” The image used was striking, the provocation subtle, the speech garnished by his address. The Boss manifested a firm mandibular activity. He listened to the nutritional critics carefully, but didn’t abandon his lemon escalope. After he had swallowed, he talked: “You guys don’t know the market! Prices are changing and natural products are not for everyone. We have to get used to new standards. We shall base our lunch on what is necessary, like onions, mayonnaise and oatmeal.” The Boss continued: “I have been in this business for years now, I know all the crops and I know my favourites. I bargain the price, compare the offers, follow the trends. It is because I take the risk of having a kitchen that I deserve a complete meal. You guys have a long way to go.” “Of course I started with warm meal at the public kitchen, in the past. Everyone was there, it was the place to be. It made us who we are today: entrepreneurs. We work at dinners, brunches,


wine tasting events and, often, stinky cheese picking groups. It’s the hard part!” Koen was smiling, looking at his phone. He then added: “Didn’t you hear the Apple guy? So, stay hungry.” “I wouldn’t mind an apple,” concluded Selma. “He might have meant foolish, but not hungry.” Mirco was brooding while clearing the table. Mirco prepared himself a filter coffee, took a sip of it and realized he wanted espresso. And espresso it should be. It was his caffeinic right. But then deadlines came in. More tuna cans had to be opened, and mayonnaise had to be squeezed. And they tried original combinations. They were losing weight, but they didn’t mind. Their goal was to have a new meal on the table, every day. Now their contract was about to expire and there was no sign of a new, better menu. The quality of the coffee didn’t change either. That very day the Boss left the office wearing sunglasses, Koen was on a paid vacation and Selma in bed with gastritis. They opened the fridge and there it was, the salmon. The smell of butter croutons filled the office.

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A MANIFES TO We believe in the post office era, in collaboration and communication at a large scale and across a multidisciplinary field of professions. We believe talented architects need a new space to interact, work and communicate their ideas. Architects today find themselves in a terra incognita. The fetishes and hypes of recent years, having left their over-sized, overpackaged relics throughout cities and living rooms, seem to ring hollow in the current socioeconomic climate of transformations, uncertainties, and austerities. post--office sees the ruins of the current crisis as a playground. We find ourselves surrounded by loose ends, fantastic potentials that only need to be realigned in order to be unleashed. There is an emerging generation of architects, designers, and citizens that has the potential to form a rich ecology of meaningful production and critical reflection. In the new terra incognita, post--office aims to provide a collaborative platform for new projects across all possible creative disciplines. post--office is a hybrid entity: simultaneously a public platform for cultural interaction and collaboration and a working space, providing materials, services and tools to professionals and students. By exploring collaborative models of working we aim to generate initiatives that are as refreshing as they are economically sustainable. All post--office projects are like beads on a string, each with its own structure, team, vision, budget, and planning. Those interested can propose a project and run it themselves, generating their own income along the way. We will act as a platform, providing a space and linking actors with each other. The core of post--office will remain intentionally small, flexible and fast, responding to new ideas and possibilities as they arise.

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DO YOU H AVE ANY OTHER COMMENTS? -income-

“I really hope that Graduate students get treated with respect and with fair pay and hours. This is not healthy and not sustainable for our generation.” -500€“no” -1600€“Before having the year contract that I have now, I did 3 postgraduate internships. In total 1 and half year of internships (in 3 different offices in The Netherlands) with average income 700 euros.” -1350€“great work! keep it up!” -1300€“It is a great initiative! I was thinking with a friend of mine to do something similar. My working condition are not that bad, but I know about people working for example at OMA 80hours/week (!!!) on 40hours contract. Overhours unpaid. Can not call such offices different than Architecture Sweatshops.” -1250€“Create your own job!” -400€“Because of the poor working conditions I’m currently also working in a bar to compensate for insecurity I have.” -1000€“internship sucks” -500€-


“great survey, curios to see the result” -1800€“I only made a design for my parents who want to built a new house” -1600€“arbeit mach frei!” -1500€“I do not care becoming rich as long as I manage to draw beauty!” -450€“In general, another world is possible” -450€“free your hands, free your mind” -700€“yes, in the office they say that there are not work, but, how is possible? I’m WORKING like an architect...” -600€“I’m happy to have a real job but, it is a not fair contract is only for three months and before I sign it, my boss warned me that working hours will be twice the signed.” -1100€“The intensive use of interns contracts is degrading. The interns are considered as raw material, graduated architects are hired as interns without any possibility of progressing in the company. -1750€-

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Amplifier #0000 - On Work


Amplifier #0000 is edited by: <multitude> to get in touch, criticize or donate: editor.amplifier@gmail.com someone@multitude.eu www.multitude.eu


Amplifier #0000 - On Work