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Great Mammal Hall

93 South American mammals

81 New England Forests

69

A Catalogue for the Exhibition at Indo-Asian the Harvard Birds & Mammals

Africa Gallery

Museum

of

Natural

History

October 12, 2013

Fishes Molluscs

41

Anthropods

29

Evolution Theatre

Glass Flowers


2 2


3


Great Mammal Hall

93 South American mammals

Indo-Asian Birds & Mammals

81 New England Forests

69

Africa Gallery

Fishes Molluscs

41 Vertebrate Paleontology

2

4

49

Fossil Mammals

Anthropods

29

Evolution Theatre

Glass Flowers

Evolution

Museum Shop


s

19

Kassel Jaeger

23 29 41 49 69 81 93

Victor Costales & Julia Rometti Joey Holder Andreas Ervik Carrick Bell Sergio Racanati GSD Projections Maria Molteni

Minerals

Climate Change

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We

asked ourselves the question: how to institute the conceptual performance of “Multinaturalism” at the Harvard Museum of Natural History? Our first remark regarding the concept of multinaturalism was the following: if the ideology attached to a certain naturalism is the counterpart of a multiculturalism (where cultural singularities, along the “great unifier”, the concept of Nature, are considered to be dissonant expressions of beliefs and beliefs only), one has to consider how to connect two spheres which are, as set out by post-structuralist anthropology, actually always connected in the order of practice, in what Philippe Descola termed “symbolic ecologies”1. Indeed, the theoretical program promoted by Descola and his colleague, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro (and in another measure, by Bruno Latour), gives us through anthropology (mainly through Amerindian sources) a way to direct our thought towards a space where the division between Nature and Culture is non-pertinent. Multinaturalism would designate the plurality of interactional complexes, of ecologies, that, throughout 2 For more on this question, see Olivier Surel, “On The Very Idea of a Multinaturalism” (forthcoming). 6 1


modernity, were conceptually rendered under the heading of an obscuring division, where Nature, up to contemporary “physicalism” in philosophy, remains a field of (formal) continuity, and Culture, a field of unruly, dissonant expressions. But it would have been a risk to espouse the ethnographic gaze too narrowly, in a superposition of ethnographic material on the naturalist taxonomy. Indeed, it is not simply a matter of contextualizing artifacts in the museum, in an “animating” gesture as has been masterfully deployed in the practice of a Mark Dion for example. Beyond that, what we take the characterization of multinaturalism by Viveiros to invite us to do is to suspend, or put into crisis the atomism of the cultural artifact, or in other words, the anatomo-physiological “gaze” characteristic of a certain type of museography, if we follow Viveiros in his uptake of what he calls “perspectivism”, again: “If animals see different things in the same way as us, it is because their bodies are different from ours. I don’t think about physiological differences... but about affects, about powers or capacities 7


singularizing every species of body: what it eats, how it moves or communicates, its habitat, if it is gregarious or solitary... Corporal morphology is a powerful albeit often misleading mark of those differences of affection. Thus, for example, a human figure can hide a jaguar affection.2” Lines which, beyond the appeal to “ethograms”, put us back in the sphere of a Spinozian conceptuality, where the question of what a body is made of becomes secondary in a theory of affects (that of the third part of the Ethics) where the capital question is that of what a body can do (note that beyond those familiar slogans, Spinoza’s philosophy is also a mild critique of “specific knowledge” inasmuch as it impacts the definition of human essence in a general anthropological discourse, essence equated by Spinoza with the the conatus or beings’ constitutional desire, striving for existence3). But one can’t spatialize a concept such as multinaturalism from the sole basis of a Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Métaphysiques Cannibales, 2 Paris, PUF, 2010, p.  39 (our translation). 2

See Alexandre Matheron, “L'anthropologie spinoziste  ?”, in Etudes sur Spinoza et les philosophies de l'âge 8 classique, Paris, ENS Editions, 2011, p.  15. 3


jump from specific to affective knowledge, even if such a move is for us an important one on the theoretical plane. More cogently, in a recent piece about Paris’ Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle, entitled “The Pantheon of Animals4”, J.E.H. Smith recognized a bit sourly a phenomenon of which Damian Hirst’s art is exemplary: what we are witnessing is the slow transformation of the taxonomical displays of museums of natural history into entertainment zones where the sensationalist assemblage of taxidermied animals slowly eclipses the “keen sight” of the (now unfashionable) aesthetic and systematic sensibility of naturalists5. On another level, Stephanie Rutherford describes this transformation as the sideeffect of an institutional shift to the importance of universities over museums, but also a turn from morphology to the study 4

http://www.jehsmith.com/1/2013/09/

The anatomo-physiological gaze being in part characterizable (as Cynthia Klestinec described it in an article on anatomical inquiry at the end of the sixteenth century in Padua) as a complex reinforcement of social identity through the exercise of aesthetic judgment (see her “Practical Experience in Anatomy”, in Charles T. Wolfe, Ofer Gal (eds.), The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge. Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science, Dordrecht, Springer, 2010, pp.  33-57). 9 5


of evolutionary processes and eventually genetic sequencing. In other words, a focus on the invisible mechanisms that dictate how things look the way they do as opposed to “being satisfied with what is visible”. The artifacts, scientific bounty of the age of exploration, are thus employed as tools for education, an endeavor increasingly transformed by decreasing attention spans into “edu-tainment”. More clearly put, we are, as Smith states it, witnessing the replacement of a certain genre of European art by another. And the aforementioned “Hirstian” motif, in its reviving an old symbolic investment in the animal characteristic of social relations of domination6, might well be the “middle-brow” counterpart of such popular art. Take for example Douglas Gordon’s video installation Play Dead; Real Time at Gagosian’s in 2003, where a giant Indian elephant is instructed to mimic its own death repeatedly (doing that, Gordon also toys around the transgression point set Smith quotes the case of Louis the XVth's “Rhinocéros de Versailles”, who was killed by rioters in Sep2 tember 1793, shortly before being transported to the Museum and anatomized by Louis Daubenton, then head of the newly founded post-Revolutionary institution. 10 6


by André Bazin as regards the plasticity of time elicited by cinematographic technique). Hirstian gestures which are moderated in strange and beautiful pieces like those of Allora and Calzadilla: one thinks here of their Raptor’s Rapture video installation in Kassel’s Weinberg Bunker7, during the 13th edition of Documenta where the wanderer could also witness a localized overcoming of a certain “Hirstianism” in Pierre Huyghe’s Untilled (where the site of installation and that of the ecosystem were undistinguished). And back in the space of the museum, a more “actionist” mood prevailed in Russian performance group Voïna’s fake orgy in the “Metabolism and Energy of Organisms” section in Moscow’s Biological Museum, to protest against the election of Dmitry Medvedev in 2008. Their performance, entitled “Fuck for the heir Puppy Bear!”, recalls the lines of Marx’s critique of Hegel’s confusion between legislative power and heredity: “In this system, nature immediately creates kings, peers, etc. just as it creates eyes 7 Which involved a 35,000 years old flute carved in the bone of a griffon vulture, oldest known music instrument, played in presence of a vulture of the same species. 11


and noses... This is, of course, why we find in the aristocracy such pride in blood and descent, in short, in the life history of their bodies. It is this zoological point of view which has its corresponding science in heraldry. The secret of aristocracy is zoology.8” It is along the same lines that Donna Haraway, in her “Teddy Bear Patriarchy9” piece, portrayed the African Hall of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Her analysis is laden with minute descriptions of the libidinal economy of the Western upper-class hunting practitioner that was its main designer, taxidermist Carl Akeley. She thus, and rightly for one who has seen the Hall, characterizes its museography as something that is more akin to an implicit history of race, sex and class in North America than to a natural history of Africa (to ponder how exact Haraway’s analysis is, one can see for oneself how every animal group there has Karl Marx, Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right, trans. Joseph O'Malley, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, p.  106. 8

2 Donna

Haraway, “Teddy Bear Patriarchy. Taxidermy in the Garden of Eden, New York City, 1908-1936”, in Social Text, 11, Winter 1984-85, pp.  20-64. 12 9


indeed been staged according to the model of the nuclear family). But as she further notes in a moment of micro-sociology of the 1990s’ gaze, the natural historical museography is likely to be ignored by “street-wise kids” who are here to see sensationalist magnifications of natural environments in what she refers to under the generic name of “Nature Max Films”. At any rate, giving their rights to other modes of abstraction of nature doesn’t necessarily imply the embracement of a “savvy” populism: one thinks here of botanist May Theilgaard Watts who, against traditional conservationism, made a point of restituting the singular beauty of the landscapes she traversed from the windows of the highway cars and continental planes she happened to sit in10. Taking all that into account, where should we locate ourselves, as guided by the concept of multinaturalism? A first trick would be to introduce variations in what our productive imagination puts See in particular her essays in “motorized” botany entitled “Reading the Headlines Only” and “Looking Down on Improved Property (or an Airplane View on Man and Land)” in Reading the Landscape of America, Rochester, Nature Study Guild Publishers, 1999. 13 10


into gravitation around our concept of Nature, through the exhibition of the artwork. Nature, you could say, encompasses everything (your left arm, the lithium in your computer’s battery, the last time you yelled from surprise...) and thus, nothing in the order of distinctions. But to render this fact manifest, one has to realize that such a Gestalt shift can’t possibly go in a flash from the material history of nature as deployed in a museum such as Harvard’s, to our own idiosyncratically pop-technoscientific take on all this. Here one has to bear in mind that it is not only about giving room to multinaturalism, but also to a history, one that is registering the discrete aspects of our progression through those mutations from Nature to a kind of a “post-natural” condition. For the sake of exerting intuition, let’s take the path of analogy: the Braudelian practice of history, with its attention to slow and obscure factors, was in part about deflating what was then named an “event-centered” history, preoccupied only with remarkable events and the individuals who partook in them. Now it would be a 2 case of harsh amphibology (that is, of a rather perilous use of a concept out 14


of its domain) to say that “multinatural histories” as we’ll conceive them do away with the interest in members of “dominant taxa”! At any rate, one would have to equal the perspicuous social critique11 of Honoré de Balzac featuring just this motif, in the Guide-Ane à l’usage des animaux qui veulent parvenir aux honneurs, where Balzac went on conflating the acclaim for men of science with the marvel at their systematized menageries through the voice of a donkey. But a more interesting point is made by prominent philosophers of biology like Peter Godfrey-Smith12, who stresses the fact that explanatory adaptationism (in which he includes among others the most ideologically driven of its promoters like Dawkins or Dennett), for which the problem of “apparent design” in nature is a remarkable property that should find its conceptual clarification, is devoted to the “special events” of biology. In a way, such a brand of philosophy does Which also gave J.E.H. Smith's recent paper its title.

11

Peter Godfrey-Smith, “Three Kinds of Adaptationism”, in S.H. Orzack and E. Sober (eds), Adaptationism and Optimality, Cambridge University Press, 2001, p.  338.

12


bear a certain attentional kinship with the corpus we inherited under the name “natural history” (the former attending to the fact of adaptedness, the latter sticking to diversity, both considered as puzzling biological facts)13. One begins to wonder how to conduct an alternative natural history in the arts in general, considering the state of a philosophy of biology in which researchers working on biological individuals sustain, for example, that colonies of bacteria are sometimes more important for a mammal’s survival than a leg14. The way is of course partly paved by the likes of Jean Painlevé, who left his preparatory classes of special mathematics in Paris, to work as an animal caretaker at the Jardin des Plantes, to then become a biologist turned indie cinema 13 Note that if we talk here about “inheritance”, it is to differentiate the natural history of museums from another (notably Wittgensteinian) and laxer sense of “natural history”, expression by which is meant doing use-oriented or experimentally enlightened conceptual analysis (as opposed to what contemporary selfbaptized “Experimental Philosophers” call “armchair philosophy”).

2 See

for example Thomas Pradeu, The Limits of the Self. Immunology and Biological Identity, trans. Elizabeth Vitanza, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2012. 16

14


insider15. Familiarizing himself with cinematographical techniques, he started tweaking the speed handles of cameras and coupling them with microscopes to put together scientific short-films that where soon to be deployed in different versions, among which the popular series one can today see under the title Science is Fiction16 – and this at a time when, as he confesses, any tweak in the instrumentation was, even at this peripheral level, considered by the scientific community of the Académie as a moral failure. Inasmuch as it, out of pure enjoyment, reveals this conflation of epistemic standards and moral judgement, Painlevé’s work was “multinatural” avant la lettre. And something of that affectivity survived today in an even more tweaked way, in motifs even more invaded by cultural industry in the works on display on the occasion of the “Multinatural Histories” event at the Harvard Museum of Natural History.

15 It is interesting to note that Carl Akeley was the inventor of a camera model designed for “wildlife” situations that would decades after serve for documentary film-making.

See also Andy Masaki Bellows, Marina McDougall, Brigitte Berg (eds), Science is Fiction. The Films of Jean Painlevé, Cambridge, MIT Press, 2001. 17 16


In all honesty, “Natural History” in the space of a museum can today only stand as the shortcut to designate what is in fact the educational display of a “taxonomization” of (mainly) non-human entities notwithstanding their interactional embeddedness (sections of the Arthropods room at Harvard being an exception, a modest expression of what Descola called motivated or pragmatic taxonomy against classical hierarchical taxonomy17). It seems to us that the very concept of “multinaturalism”, with its polemical face-value, and considering the risk of making a strict application of what it implies in the visual arts, could be considered, like a lot of elements of poststructuralist theory, as a symptom. Such a concept reveals that the old imaginary attached in the West to Nature is about to slowly mutate. And the “Multinatural Histories” curatorial intervention could be considered as set of breaches made in the Museum of Natural History to make this fact more manifest in the order of our productive imagination. 2 Philippe Descola, “La catégorisation des objets naturels”, seminar at the Collège de France (2012). 18

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Kassel Jaeger Kassel Jaeger (b. 1981) is a French-Swiss composer and theorist. He’s a member of the Groupe de Recherches Musicales in Paris, France. His works are released by Editions Mego, Senufo Editions and Unfathomless.


Campo del Cielo (Harvard version), Onyx (octophonic diffusion of electromagnetic meteorite and onyx resonances).

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Minerals


Kassel Jaeger’s contribution to Multinatural Histories consists in two 8-channel drone tracks, composed through the modular captation of electromagnetic iron meteorite and onyx resonances (as well as pebbles, granite, and marble). The first piece is a modified version of a piece originally commissioned by a planetarium. The second one has been specially crafted for the show. Far from reconducting a vaguely animistic stance towards the minerals, such an installation aims at instantiating a diversion of attention from their taxonomic organization. Thus, it substitutes it with a highly machinic mode of relation to those elements, the apprehension of which is almost always mediated by sight or touch. Along the alleys, the dark ambient affect of the pieces invades space, as if the room’s closing times coincided with the rocks’ very own “sonic relapse”.

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Julia Rometti & Victor Costales The artistic duo of Julia Rometti (b. 1975) and Victor Costales (b. 1974) has been active since 2007. Adopting the role of self-taught archaeologists and eccentric tourists in wanderlust, Rometti & Costales engage in wide-ranging research activities that takes them into archives, libraries, and used bookstores to venture through broad fields of knowledge, from literature through history, and certain areas of scientific thought.


Brief History of Portable Botanomancy (slideshow projection, black and white ink print).

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Climate Change


Julia Rometti and Victor Costales’s piece consists of an aleatory display of 116 images extracted from Soviet-era popular science magazine KVANT, projected onto the surface of a poster of the Monstera deliciosa plant. While performing a satire of the fantasy of a “geometry of natural forms�, Brief History puts on the same level two stigmata of productivism: the pop-science imagery of the Soviet-era, and the representation of a plant that has for decades been the common denoter of exoticism in the bureaucratic spaces of the West, as well as the vegetal equivalent of the the laboratory rat. This productivist imagery is placed within the Climate Change room, adjacent the grand narratives of ecological sustainability and Climate Change.

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Joey Holder Joey Holder (b. 1979) received her BA in painting from Kingston University and graduated with an MFA from Goldsmiths in 2010. Recent shows include “Plants vs Zombies” at Boezelaer/Nispen, Amsterdam, “Cocktail” at Nottingham Contemporary and “Mutagen” at ASC Gallery, London. In 2009 her work was featured in Impossible Exchange at Frieze Projects, and in the same year she was shortlisted for the Red Mansion Art Prize.


Scotoplane; Janthina Janthina; Dorid (digital videos). Sushishhihuiiishii (black and white A4 prints under black light)

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Anthropods


Joey Holder’s installation comprises of three digital display pads, mounted on a fake wood log bench, as well as a wall of twelve prints. The three videos revolve around an intensification of the popular science and miniaturized elements one could randomly find along an image search on the Internet, colliding in minute digital environments where abstracted representations of forms of life seem to finally have found a space to cohabit. On the wall, twelve cheap black and white prints of objects found “in the field” that is the Internet neighbor the aged Arthropods specimens preserved in formaldehyde. The preserved, aged specimens contrast with the disposable, cheap black and white prints of the objects found “in the field” that is the domain of the Internet. Holder’s use of online imagery can therefore be seen as a sort of postinternet naturalism. At the same time, her deliberate use of food imagery and reinterpretation of these forms calls into question the general Western aversion to anthropods, particularly insects. 33


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Andreas Ervik Andreas Ervik (b. 1987) is a Norwegian artist based in Oslo, currently studying for a Masters degree in Aesthetics at the University of Oslo. Solo exhibitions include Learning to Love my Life as a Non-Player Character (2012) at Wizard Gallery, Oslo (Norway) and Intimate Knowledge (2013) at The Toolshed, Frome (UK). He has participated in group shows in London, Glasgow, Leeds and New York, and his work has been featured in a range of publications including the book Visual Rebellion (2012), released by Gestalten Verlag.


Coral Reef Toilet Brush; Whale Nigiri with Dolphin Tattoo; Jellyfish in Fiji Water (blog postcards in fish net)

2 Molluscs


Andreas Ervik’s work in Multinatural Histories takes the form of three works produced for The Jogging. They are reproduced here as mass-market post-cards, in reference to the fleeting nature of cultural production in the post-digital age. At first glance it is obvious that the thematic content of these chosen works reference the maritime and aquatic themes of the molluscs hall. However, they also refer to the digitally produced form itself. Images of the sanctity of nature are juxtaposed against the banal in Coral Reef Toilet Brush. In Jellyfish in Fiji Water, the branding strategy of Artisian bottled water as a sort of commercialized natural purity is contrasted by a mass of stinging red Box Jellyfish, which seems to be stuffed inside the bottle. This critique of the circulation of images of nature is taken to extremes in Ervik’s Whale Nigiri with Dolphin Tatoo. Here, a primary circulated image via Google of whale meat - an illicit product in most countries, though not Ervik’s Norway - is shown emblazoned with a dolphin temporary tattoo. 45


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Carrick Bell Carrick Bell (b. 1981, Anchorage, Alaska) is a Berlin-based video artist. He received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2008, has recently exhibited at Charim Gallery (Vienna), LW56 (Vienna), .hbc (Berlin), Brooklyn Pavillion of the Shanghai Biennale, and BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music).


Furniture for A New Community, 2012 (video installation)

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Vertebrate Paleontology


Furniture for A New Community is installed for Multinatural Histories as 8 channels selected by the artist, mounted on empty plastic storage bins. In a broad sense, Carrick Bell’s time-based video work with live feeds and extended loops does a similar task of interrogating a normative anthropocentric sense of linear time as does the very notion of paleontology and deep time. In Furniture for A New Community specifically, Bell’s use of the British Petroleum Live Feed from the Deep Water Horizon oil spill registers the movements of petroleum in the deep seas. The petroleum, whose origin is the decomposed organic matter such as the flesh of the Kronosauraus, subject to heat and pressure over the course of millennia.However, the methods of Furniture for A New Community underscore the forensic techniques of the archeological project necessary for producing a Paleoontology, the transmision of information across vast time scales. Bell writes, “The BP live-feed videos are the simultaneous success and disaster of a crippled techno-

utopian project; not that of oil exploration, but that of the use of visual technologies to overcome distance in and through visual display. For every camera that functions smoothly (BP’s near-HD feed that was originally withheld from the government), there is a camera that is incapable of even communicating its inability to record.”

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Sergio Racanati Sergio Racanati (b. 1982, Bisceglie, Italy), lives and works in Milan and Berlin. His latest project “Resistance: a State of Mind” was presented at the Mediterranea 16 Biennale in Ancona, Italy. Recent projects include residencies at “Performance Sapce” in August 2012, in London where he continued and investigate the dynamics of public space; DEFAULT curated by Ramdom, Lecce, Italy in September 2011, the 7th Berlin Biennale June 2012 within the program “Pre-Occupied”. In July, he received the performance section award at the NY biennial.


Where is my Land? (performance, site-specific installation)

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New England Forest Room


Sergio Racanati’s practice revolves around performance, site and space. For Multinatural Histories, Racanati’s work Where is My Land?, the result of a prior research residency in the summer of 2013, consists of three actions: a site specific installation titled Hypothesis Archive in New England, a performance titled Where is my land?, and a performance titled Drop-out. Drop-out occured at a scrap metal recycling facility in Somerville, while the performance portion of Where is my Land? as well as the installation Hypothesis Archive in New England are situated in the Museum’s “New England Forest Room”. The New England Forest room is significant within the museum, as more than any others it attempts to represent a holistic ecological system with its ambient forest sound track, exposed taxidermied specimens, and indigenous flora. One thing it is missing of course are the people, as well as what they leave behind as traces of their presence. The room in its normal state could therefore be considered as perpetuating a myth of “pristine wilderness”. We now

understand these zones to be in fact produced through processes of enclosure and dispossession in prior eras of capital accumulation and territorial expansion. In the 21st century these areas are increasingly “branded”, commodified and consumed through imagery and ecotourism. Racanati contests the colonial foundations of this ideology, inserting his Harawayan body-double into the mock-up of the New England Forest ecosystem, displaying found objects from the streets of Boston, and turning it into a curiosity cabinet of trashed artifacts.

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GSD Projections GSD Projections is represented by Alexander Jacobson, Rae Pozdro, Gabriel Tomasulo, and James Yamada from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. The group is bound by a desire to conduct experiments upon faculties of sense and perception using ephemera in the physical environment. With its participation in “Multinatural Histories,” GSD Projections would like to ask what contexts are absent from the Great Mammal Hall’s eclectic presentation of Mammalia through specimens of taxidermy.


Where is here? (video installation)

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Great Mammal Hall


Where is here? is an installation which asks what contexts are absent from the Harvard Museum of Natural History Great Mammal Hall’s eclectic presentation of Mammalia. The installation separates the museum’s specimens from its visitors with a 60-yard long semi-opaque screen that wraps around the museum’s diaoramas. Some specimens were visible behind the screen, others evident only in their shadows cast onto the fabric. Video of specimens staring back at the viewer was rearprojected onto the screen, as well as video collage of pop-cultural references to mammals. Audio of the specimens and their habitats was played from behind the screen. This technique of intensely layering shadow, projection, audio and direct view introduces ambiguity into the reading of what is or is not normally in the Great Mammal Hall.

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Maria Molteni Maria Molteni is a Bostonbased multimedia and performing artist, beekeeper, and educator. Though she migrated from Nashville to New England to study painting in 2002, she often works with fiber or textiles to build participatory soft sculpture. Molteni has attended residencies at Mildred’s Lane, PS1 MoMA Project Space, the Bumpkin Island Art Encampment, and SübSamsøn. She founded the New Craft Artists in Action in 2010 and has collaborated with Danza Organica, Occupy Boston, the Institute for Infinitely Small Things, and the Office of Culture and Design, Manila.


Fielding (performance, mixed media).

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Great Mammal Hall


In Fielding, Boston-based artist Maria Molteni has commissioned local glass blower Aron Leaman to create custom glass objects that act as “speakers” projecting the insects’ stridulation as she disassembles a secondhand fur coat. Dressed in a metallic sequin blouse, Molteni processes and organizes the fragments by color into large glass jars. Maria’s performance takes place in the Great Mammal hall, a space whose thematic categorization is unique within the Museum. While other rooms adhere to a geographic or taxonomic schema, bodies within the Great Mammal Hall are those that have registered a minimal affect within the beholding subject. In Fielding, Maria seems almost to have outsourced the performance to the crickets. Methodically reducing the faux-flesh of the coat into small pieces classified by color, Molteni seems to be working through her response to the phantom of vitality lingering taxidermied animals. In a satire of the attempt to make sense of the remains of a mammal’s body, Molteni patiently reconstitutes its

variations in some kind of folk-spectronomy.

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An Independently Curated Event by Marcus Owens and Olivier Surel

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Sponsored by gsd_nonhuman Funded in part by Solomon Grant from the Harvard Office for the Arts The Mahindra Humanities Center Seminar on France World The Laboratoire Sophiapol

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Special Thanks to:

Tom Scanlon & the Harvard Museum of Natural History Christina Antiporda Alan Waxman Lara Mehling Rachel Dao Vincent Normand Courtnay Cain Saunders Rachel Schneider Synthesis Journal Mauro Mattei Gino Battista Galerie Jousse Entreprise New England Audio Rental Harvard GSD Student Forum Harvard GSD Advanced Studies Program

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Multinatural Histories