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Contents lifestyle with a difference volume two

Lifestyle is a bi-annual magazine from Mulpha International Bhd., published with the primary objective of keeping all Mulpha privileged guests abreast with the latest Lifestyle issues and the Group’s upcoming developments. Copies of Lifestyle can be obtained from the Mulpha International Bhd. office. For enquiries, please call (603) 7957 2233 or (603) 7955 1344 or contact Santi Octavia at santi@mulpha.com.my

CHAIRMAN Lee Seng Huang CEO Chung Tze Hien EDITOR Faridah Hanim EDITORIAL BOARD Santi Octavia Mulpha, Malaysia Koh Boon Teng Mulpha Land, Malaysia Sally Morgan Mulpha, Australia & Hayman Sue Thomson Sanctuary Cove, Australia

Mulpha Australia Limited Sally Morgan (612) 9268 5000

Leisure Farm Resort (Sales & Marketing) Tan Po Reen (Johor) Peter Lim (Singapore) (607) 556 3003 (602) 6254 8280 Mulpha Sanctuary Cove (Development) Pty. Ltd. Sue Thomson (617) 5577 6500 Hayman Great Barrier Reef Shane Green (612) 8272 7005 RESERVATIONS & GENERAL ENQUIRIES (617) 5577 6500 Hayman Great Barrier Reef InterContinental Sydney

(612) 9253 9000

Karen Evans Bimbadgen Estate, Australia

Hyatt Regency Sanctuary Cove (617) 5530 1234 Bimbadgen, Hunter Valley

(612) 4998 4600

Karen Edwards Norwest Land, Australia

Indochine Park Tower

(848) 930 4009

Peter Lewis The Hotel School Sydney, Australia Erin Millar Hyatt Regency Sanctuary Cove, Australia Fred Matti InterContinental Sydney, Australia

Cover image by P’s in a Pod Creative, Australia © September 2006. Iain McGregor, creative director. Mark Burgin, photographer.

CONTACTS Mulpha International Bhd. Faridah Hanim (603) 7957 2233

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PRINTING Label Plus Sdn. Bhd. DISTRIBUTION Mulpha’s Lifestyle magazine is a free publication showcasing the quality of life with a controlled circulation of 2,000 copies, offered to an exclusive database through selected distribution channels. • Mulpha Group of hotels -InterContinental Sydney -Hyatt Regency Sanctuary Cove -Hayman Great Barrier Reef • Residents of Leisure Farm Resort & Residences, Johor • Lifestyle brand owners • Professionals

Mulpha International Bhd. is a diversified conglomerate and a component stock of the Bursa Malaysia Composite Index since 1983 and listed on the Main Market of Bursa Malaysia Securities Berhad. Its shareholder’s fund is in excess of RM 2.7 billion. The Group’s focus is on property development and investment, infrastructure and civil construction with operations and investment in Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Hong Kong and Australia. Over the years, Mulpha has leveraged on its expertise abroad to become Malaysia’s largest real estate investor and developer in Australia, owning world-class assets that include Sanctuary Cove and Hyatt Regency Sanctuary Cove in Queensland, InterContinental Sydney, Norwest Business Park Sydney, The Hotel School Sydney, Bimbadgen Estate in New South Wales’ Hunter Valley and the world-renowned and award-winning Hayman Great Barrier Reef.

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Bold, Bald and Bad

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Sanctuary Cove Presents A Marine Feast 28 Redefining Business Amid Tighter Budgets Brand Sanctuary Cove 32 The Evolution of Style A Malaysian Idyll 37 The Classic Journey

high life

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S.E.E.D.S Eco Homes at Bayou Creek

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Welcome to Luxury That Is Exclusively Yours

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InterContinental Sydney Special E-mail Offers

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A Degree A Job A Future

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Hyatt Business Plan

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In Praise of Slow

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lif e s t y le

Bold, Bald and Bad

Bold, Bald and Bad

In the world of TV cook shows and celebrity chefs, there is always a way to compartmentalise what they do. Jamie (Oliver) is the cheerleader of fuss-free cooking, Delia (Smith) is the mother of no-nonsense, reliable fare, and Nigella (Lawson) is the kitchen goddess that makes it alright to cook, and eat everything. And then there’s Heston Blumenthal whose leftfield entrance has thrown the world of culinary experiences into a new ball game altogether.

When in the kitchen with Heston Blumenthal, it’s not at all ironic to have one hand holding a whisk and the other, a microscope.

Described as an alchemist chef and famed for his extraordinary innovative cooking style, Blumenthal is to gastronomy what Willy Wonka is to chocolate. What makes Blumenthal even more of an enigma is the fact that he was a self-taught chef who completely defied the odds. Blumenthal’s only formal introduction to the culinary world was spending summers in France in the early days, learning the art of French cuisine; and a one-week stint at Le Manoir aux Quat’ Saisons where he made friends with a young chef de partie named Marco Pierre White. Everything else after that he learnt from books. In fact, one of the books he was reading would eventually impact the way Blumenthal approached his style of cooking in the future. Author Harold McGee declared in his book On Food and Cooking “We do know for a fact that searing does not seal...”. That encouraged Blumenthal’s natural curiosity to eventually take nothing for granted. For every rule that a cookbook presented, Blumenthal

would challenge them, naturally pushing him to question and test various culinary ideas that would evolve into one of his most recognisable approaches in the kitchen: Experimenting. When in 1995 he bought a 450-year-old pub in Bray and renamed it The Fat Duck, it was to be the beginning of his many culinary exploits. Confined to work within the limitations of budget and space, Blumenthal struck out-of-the-ordinary relationships with a Bristol University physicist, Dr Peter Barham, professor Tony Blake, and a stream of scientists, academicians and experts in flavours and fragrance. This gave Blumenthal the canvas to start a style of cooking that is seen as less straightjacketed, eventually getting The Fat Duck noticed by the people who understood food discipline. Since then, The Fat Duck has now been awarded three Michelin stars.

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Bold, Bald and Bad

Eccentricity, as they say, is a mark of a genius and, in Blumenthal’s case, the label stuck. Like a modern day magician set loose in a kitchen, Blumenthal continues to blow up, reduce, foam, freeze, deconstruct and reconstruct what most of us see as every day food; creating a new realm of delicious cuisine where boundaries simply don’t exist. “Food is such a major part of our lives and is integral to our memories and experiences at all ages,” Heston says. It’s not just about cooking, it’s about using all your senses to create that perfect dining experience.”

His curiosity would propel him to overcook a custard that would be the base for his ice cream that, once pureed, looked more like a scrambled egg frozen concoction whose ultimate completion in the varying depths of taste lies in the crowing of a bit of smoked bacon. The result, of course, is the infamous smoked-bacon-and-egg ice cream the world has come to know today. Although it may be awhile before a tub of Blumenthal’s frozen dessert can be found sitting nonchalantly side by side with your favourite vanilla, chocolate and strawberry staples at your neighbourhood grocer, Blumenthal’s avant garde take on food was experienced at Sanctuary Cove recently. The culinary genius who brought us dishes such as ‘Sounds of the Sea’ – a dish that had oysters, sea urchins and an iPod in a seashell – an experiment on food and emotion – was in town to host In Conversation with Heston Blumenthal, an exclusive weekend event that offered participants an insight into the unique philosophies of one of the world’s most intriguing chefs. The Sanctuary Cove event was one of only two public events Blumenthal hosted during his visit to Australia in March. While a guest at Sanctuary Cove, Blumenthal gave participants access to get up close and personal with him, allowing fans and food enthusiasts an insight into his gastronomic mastermind. Says Executive General Manager Mulpha Sanctuary Cove Developments, Alison Quinn, “It was an honour and thrill to host Blumenthal’s visit to the Gold Coast. (He) is a trailblazer. The kitchen is his playground and he has inspired thousands through his imagination and raw enthusiasm for food and cooking. His zeal is simply infectious.”

Responding to his warm welcome and in an exclusive interview with Spirit of Regional Australia, Blumenthal described the country as “… one of the most exciting destinations for food at the moment.” He noted how there has been a “... huge surge in energy in the last five years” and how there are a wide variety of ingredients to play with. Sanctuary Cove has been planning their next major food event for a while since the success of Gordon Ramsay’s visit to the exclusive resort-style community in 2009. In conjunction with Lateral Marketing & Management, they managed to secure one of the best chefs on the planet to join them for March’s exclusive event. A special feature of the weekend was the ‘Evolution of Taste’ sessions where Blumenthal shared his unique philosophy and approach to cooking, exploring taste and flavour. Guests were also given an insight to his passion for the multi-sensory experience of eating and drinking, supported by extraordinary photographic images and clips from his renowned television shows. Another highlight of the event was the chance for guests to get-up-close-and-personal with Blumenthal as he hosted a dinner on Saturday night, where he joined his guests at their tables instead of cooking. Guests enjoyed a five-course dinner at the members only Sanctuary Cove Golf Club and went home with a Fat Duck cookbook personally signed by Blumenthal. As far as the evening goes, it was certainly one for the books for all who attended the special event.

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Sanctuary Cove Presents A Marine Feast

Sanctuary Cove Presents A Marine Feast

The best of the marine industry globally can be seen at the Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show staged each year in May. Recognised by the International Federation of Boat Show Organisers (IFBSO), the Show draws more than 400 exhibitors representing international and Australian marine products and services from around the world.

For more than two decades, the event has been staged each May at Sanctuary Cove. The $A2 billion Sanctuary Cove, located on the northern Gold Coast, is Australia’s leading and most successful master-planned community. Sanctuary Cove was acquired by current owners Mulpha Sanctuary Cove (Developments) Pty Limited in 2002. MSCD, an arm of Mulpha Australia Limited, which is a subsidiary of Malaysian listed Mulpha International Bhd, has invested

significantly in Sanctuary Cove over recent years, resulting in a major transformation designed to ensure the pre-eminent community remains at the forefront of master-planned living in Australia. In 2011, Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show celebrates its 23rd year. Show dates are Thursday, May 19 to Sunday, May 22 from 9am to 5pm daily. The annual event attracts tens of thousands of visitors from around the world, generating millions of dollars of sales and revenue into the South-East Queensland and Australian economy.

“Many executives, buyers and delegations from around Asia, Europe and the US attend the Show,” said Sanctuary Cove General Manager Events and Marketing, Sue Thomson. “We have drawn delegations from Malaysia, China, South Korea and Taiwan plus exhibitors from around the world,” she said. “Visitors can view more than 600 vessels - on water at the marina, in pavilions and hardstand exhibits through the waterfront Marine Village streets.”

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Sanctuary Cove Presents A Marine Feast

The Show in 2011 will feature a newly-configured space including one of the largest pavilion structures erected in Australia for an annual event. Some of the spectacular displays planned for 2011 include New Zealand exhibitor Diverse Projects which is showcasing Black Pearl, a 31.5m long-range super yacht. Australian company Maritimo is releasing the M60 Series II Motoryacht and the M48 at the Show. Other larger power vessels include the world launch of Formula Cruisers’ ICON 54C range and Riviera’s 53 Flybridge and 61 Series II Flybridge.

One of the great assets of the Show includes the spectacular surrounds of Sanctuary Cove’s marina and Marine Village. Visitors can stroll along kilometres of walkways to view on-water displays. The adjacent waterfront Marine Village makes for a pleasant atmosphere with cafés and restaurants lining the streets plus some interesting shops for less-nautically inspired partners. “There is a festive atmosphere at the Marine Village during the Show’s four days,” explained Ms Thomson. “Live music, roving entertainers, fashion presentations and cooking demonstrations add to the fun,” she said. There are also seminars and presentations on topics including fishing, boating and marine matters. Boat lovers tend to be divided

between power boat enthusiasts and those who prefer sailing. This year’s Show line-up again will offer something for all things nautical. Australian or regional sail launches at the Show include the new Hunter e36; the Salina 48 Evolution; and the Hanse 355 released in Australia. Waterski boats, yacht or power boat syndicates, engine companies, high-communication technology and marine fittings are also launched on the world or Asia-Pacific markets at Sanctuary Cove. “Sanctuary Cove has created a number of initiatives for the Australian market including the first Show in this country to conduct Sea Trials during the event,” said Ms Thomson. “In 2010, we introduced a Prestige Brokerage and Charter Boat Displays designed to showcase prestige brokerage boats of 50 feet and over.”

Exhibitor feedback suggests the Show is very important for both local and international marine companies’ marketing. More than 100 new products are released on the world or Australian market at the Show. “A major research study by Queensland’s Griffith University found Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show generated a direct economic impact of more than $A310 million to the Gold Coast Region,” said Ms Thomson. “It is no surprise, the Show draws visitors from more than 20 countries.”

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Marine Village street exhibits Roving entertainers add to the fun Marine Village restaurant Fashion Parades at the Show Club Marine’s celebrity chef, Bart Beek

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Sanctuary Cove Presents A Marine Feast

In 2011, Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show offers an International Business Lounge for the promotion of the Australian marine industry to international buyers. The Lounge is supported by government and marine sector entities. Average visitor numbers over five years have been more than 45,000 with a peak year in 2007 of 53,627 visitors.

fabulous location to combine marine business with pleasure. The Gold Coast supports World Heritage-listed rainforest, rich offshore gamefishing grounds, vibrant shopping precincts and kilometres of open ocean beaches. The region is also home for many large Australian marine manufacturers and service providers.

Club Marine is a sponsor for the 2011 event. Media partners include BoatPoint.com.au, Channel 7, Radio 4KQ, Trade A Boat and 92.5 Gold FM. Maritime Safety Queensland is a government partner. Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show is a member of the Australian International Marine Export Group (AIMEX) and Marine Queensland.

This year, VIP packages will be introduced online. These VIP tickets offer five-star accommodation, helicopter transfers, boat show entry and a partner pampering package per couple. Streamlined transport options make it easy to get to the Show with ferry, water taxi, helicopter transfers just some of the options.

Sanctuary Cove is located within an hour’s drive of capital city Brisbane’s domestic and international airports to the north and the Gold Coast Airport at Coolangatta to the south. Nestled in a leading tourism and boat-building region, Sanctuary Cove offers a

Some of the events during the Show include the Australian Marine Industry Breakfast on Friday, May 20. Members of the public can purchase tickets for this event which features President Monte Carlo Yachts S.p.A. Carla Demaria as guest speaker. Ms Demaria

founded Monte Carlo Yachts S.p.A. in Italy which launched its first model, the Monte Carlo Yachts 76 in Europe last September. Immediately preceding the Show, industry group Superyacht Australia will stage the Australian Superyacht and Marine Export Conference on the Gold Coast May 17 to 18.

Upcoming events include the Sanctuary Cove Winter Festival in September, the Melbourne Cup Carnival event in November and the Community Christmas Concert in December.

While the Boat Show is the largest event staged at the site, there is a year-round calendar of interesting activities and attractions at Sanctuary Cove. Earlier this year, renowned chef and owner of the 3 Michelin-starred restaurant, The Fat Duck in Bray, England, Heston Blumenthal, drew keen interest in March at Sanctuary Cove.

For details on Sanctuary Cove International Boat Show, view www.sanctuarycoveboatshow.com.au. Tickets are available online with adult one-day and multi-day options. Children 14 years and under are free. Dates in 2012 are: Thursday, May 24 to Sunday, May 27, 2012. Hours: 9am to 5pm daily. 06 07 08 09

Onwater shots at the Sanctuary Cove show Luxury views at the Show Business is done at the Show Offshore cruisers at the Show

For details on Sanctuary Cove events, view www.sanctuarycove.com.

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Brand Sanctuary Cove

Brand Sanctuary Cove Renowned TV personality and residential property expert, Andrew Winter, joins the family of Sanctuary Cove as its Brand Ambassador.

“I’ve seen a lot of residential product in my career but very few offer the lifestyle benefits and diversity of lifestyle options that are available at Sanctuary Cove,” says Winter of the AUD$2 billion master-planned community. Describing it as unique to any resort he had seen in his career, he adds, “It is a truly unique community that is in reality irreplaceable – the cost of emulating a resort with such magnificent infrastructure would make it impossible to recreate today.”

The picturesque Sanctuary Cove in northern Gold Coast, with its tranquil Coomera River amid native Australian bushland, four man-made harbours and made up of small, close-knit communities, famously put Brisbane on the map of inspiring lifestyle resort establishments. It has welcomed many discerning home buyers, and most recently, opened its doors to welcome one of Australia’s property experts, Andrew Winter. The exclusive Queensland address of Sanctuary Cove is now the family home of Andrew Winter, host and residential property expert for the ASTRA award-winning series Selling Houses Australia. Not only that, Winter has also been appointed as Brand Ambassador of this leading resort-style master-planned community, giving a face and voice to one of Queensland’s most recognisable residential developments. Winter is no stranger to the world of property and real estate. Regarded in the highest esteem among his peers as the authoritative voice in the field, it comes as no surprise that Winter would choose to find his own utopia at Australia’s premier master-planned community, Sanctuary Cove.

Since its inception in 1986, the 474-hectare development of Sanctuary Cove has been attracting those looking for a distinct resort lifestyle. It offers a residential enclave complemented by two championship golf courses – one of which is set to re-open in April 2011, 15 restaurants and harbourside cafés, fashion boutiques and specialty stores, the casual elegance of The Country Club, and the five-star Hyatt Regency Sanctuary Cove hotel. Beyond the premium lifestyle facilities, Sanctuary Cove provides the very finest in living options with quality homes, apartments, terraces and villas built and designed to offer homeowners a higher quality of life without compromising on standards of living; a fact that does not escape the property guru. Winter in fact has built his reputation around being a ‘straight talker’; cutting to the chase and actually saying what everyone else is avoiding when it comes to real estate regarding the multiple facets of renovating, buying and selling properties. His decision to settle down in Sanctuary Cove’s property despite his extensive travels around the world inspecting prestige properties and lifestyle destinations, speaks volumes of his confidence in Sanctuary Cove and its offering. Mulpha Sanctuary Cove Executive General Manager, Alison Quinn, says Winter’s endorsement of the community was hardly surprising given the unparalleled quality of the resort’s infrastructure and lifestyle options. “It’s great to have someone with Andrew’s background endorsing this community. He is certainly well credentialed to make judgements about the uniqueness of Sanctuary Cove and the fact he lives here is an endorsement that speaks for itself.”

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As Sanctuary Cove’s Brand Ambassador, Winter will be an advocate for the property as the community continues to deliver elements of the masterplan including the launch of the new Palms golf course and the delivery of a diverse new range of residential options within the resort. One of his first roles as ambassador was hosting a promotional DVD for the resort while future plans include having him host property seminars. “One of the most important elements of Sanctuary Cove is its ability to evolve through the enhancement and investment undertaken by Mulpha to keep it continually ahead of its peers,” Winter explains in accepting his appointment.

to a world-class marina, two championship golf courses, five-star dining, boutique retail stores and a 24-hour land and water security team, the value is unrivalled, he says. “I could live anywhere in the world and I chose Sanctuary Cove.”

Winter’s decision to join the community at Sanctuary Cove and be its Brand Ambassador could not have come at a more opportune time. This year, Sanctuary Cove will have one of the most significant years in its history, as it delivers the largest portfolio of new product ever released in a single year. A AUD$50 million civil works programme completes this year, and the AUD$8 million revamp of The Palms golf course will be unveiled in April concluding a AUD$20 million plus investment in Sanctuary Cove golf assets.

Since purchasing Sanctuary Cove in 2002, Mulpha has spent in excess of AUD$250 million developing the masterplan for the resort. Improvements to the community have included a new entry boulevard, a revitalised Marine Village including the creation of new tenancies, a new AUD$13 million golf clubhouse, increased landscaping and recreational open space areas, the creation of an integrated trail system for buggies, bikes and pedestrians, and increased security in residential areas. With Winter onboard as its Brand Ambassador, Sanctuary Cove looks forward to an exciting partnership to further create awareness of the resort’s exceptional products and meet today’s sophisticated homeowner’s tastes of resort living.

Winter further explains how the diversity of product now available at Sanctuary Cove caters for a wide variety of buyers. “There is stunning waterfront land, hillside land and golf course land available, plus house and land packages which start from the AUD$1million mark.” When one combines these with access

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A Malaysian Idyll

A Malaysian Idyll Far from the maddening crowd, a resort community gives residents a taste of utopia.

The palm lined entrance to Leisure Farm is only a glimpse to what residents can expect as they make their way through this illustrious gated community in Johor’s Iskandar Malaysia Economic Zone. The residential community, a project by Mulpha, combines a pleasant mix of stylish homes supported by outstanding resort facilities and amenities in a fully landscaped environment, all the while striking a perfect balance between privacy and community living.

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A Malaysian Idyll

The Leisure Farm gated community currently has seven different themed neighbourhoods, each with its own kind of charm. Most recently, Mulpha introduced the East 1 @ Bayou Creek, tranquil homes immersed in the scenic southern country with clear creeks, calm lakes, shade trees and stunning blue skies.

Developed based upon the S.E.E.D.S principle, Bayou Creek eco-homes focus on sustainability, environment, energy, design and security. Homes are created to maximise on natural lighting, with crucial areas such as living, dining and balcony having floor-to-ceiling windows. This design also allows for natural ventilation to air the homes. Low maintenance façade and interiors are also key to the home’s impeccable green design. And, without compromising on comfort or aesthetics, each plot of Bayou Creek is also fenced and planted with trees, crafting an immaculate landscape that is a delicate balance between environment and art.

Mulpha’s key strength in its projects has always been the unique techniques it deploys for heating, ventilating and air-conditioning, water, energy and structural system in many of its homes. Employing eco-sustainability in its design, Bayou Creek homes’ energy conservation also comes from ample natural lighting, cross ventilation, improved energy efficiency and rainwater harvesting. In addition, the design plan of Bayou Creek homes is mirrored to create sustainable living for families of all ages. Form meets function with generous living spaces, wide windows and entries with sliding and pivoting glass doors that blur the boundary between indoors and out, while outdoor living areas engage the landscape.

Bayou Creek home designs include a bungalow with a water terrace that gives the impression of a floating living area. Bedrooms are spacious with many having their own private balconies. Roof gardens, personal garden spaces, skylights and covered, three-vehicle carparks all provide the distinct comforts of a modern home in a resort environment. There is also a choice for a five-plus-one home design and a semi-detached home that comprises four-plus-one accommodation. Inside, modern meets contemporary as each home is equipped with brand appliances in its wet and dry kitchens, cabinetry, inverter airconditioning, high speed broadband (HSBB), three-phase wiring with separate DB panels, energy-saving light fittings, hot water and water pumps.

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S.E.E.D.S Eco Homes at Bayou Creek

Bayou Creek is resort living at its best. As with all Leisure Farm homes, Mulpha is committed to building and managing not just master-planned communities for its residents, but also in achieving sustainability through strategic planning that minimises the environmental impact and preserves Bayou Creek’s biodiversity and ecosystems in the long term. In developing Bayou Creek, Mulpha has gone to great lengths to ensure Leisure Farm’s existing mangrove forest continue to thrive while the canal waterways are preserved. With Bayou Creek, residents enjoy a lush, verdant environment that includes paths that run amid gardens and water features dotted with tropical flowers. They can relax by the lakeside with friends and family and picnic at any of Leisure Farm’s 11 lush gardens within four community parks, entertain guests at the polo and equestrian club, pass time with neighbours at the Club House, play at the 36-hole championship golf course and enjoy a stress-free, healthy living that they truly deserve amid the assurance of round-the-clock security. Leisure Farm is 20 minutes’ drive from Sultan Ismail International Airport in Senai and only 25 minutes from Johor Bahru City Centre. It is easily accessed by road and rail, and just minutes away from neighbouring Singapore, with the TUAS second link a mere stone’s throw away.

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WELCOME TO LUXURY THAT IS EXCLUSIVELY YOURS.

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InterContinental Sydney Special E-mail Offers

InterContinental Sydney Special E-mail Offers Style and history on the edge of Sydney Harbour. InterContinental Sydney is a true expression in luxury. Positioned on the edge of the world’s most stunning harbour, just moments walk from the famous Opera House, Royal Botanic Gardens, the ferries from Circular Quay and exclusive shops. Built around the restored Treasury Building of 1851, the hotel’s 509 contemporary designed guest rooms each with a picture frame view, include a collection of 28 suites that have been home to world leaders and celebrities from across the globe for more than two decades.

Welcome to a world of personal luxury at Club InterContinental. InterContinental Sydney’s exclusive lounge boasting the best panoramic views across Sydney Harbour, the Opera House and the Royal Botanic Gardens. Enjoy twilight drinks and canapés whilst relaxing within or watching the sunset from our outdoor wrap around terrace. With high speed internet access, dining options and personalised concierge services, the lounge offers a private retreat for conducting business or simply relaxing.

For your chance to discover the best of InterContinental Sydney, sign up to receive special e-mail offers from us.

Benefits of signing up: - Get e-mail-exclusive offers - Be the first to hear about new hotels - Learn about special rates and sales

For Club InterContinental guest room packages, please call or visit our website.

Do you liv e an InterContinental life?

InterContinental Sydney 117 Macquarie Street, Sydney, Australia 2000 Tel: +61 2 9253 9000  E-mail: sydney@interconsydney.com

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Hyatt Business Plan

Hyatt Business Plan Hyatt Regency Sanctuary Cove is a luxury resort on the Gold Coast and is inspired by the grandeur of a beautiful Queenslander offering an elegant and stylish timeless design. Set in beautiful surrounds, the pristine white sands of the resort’s one acre salt-water beach lagoon pool are the ideal backdrop to a resort filled with relaxation and sophistication. Hyatt Regency Sanctuary Cove hotel also features 14 meeting rooms and outdoor venues which can be easily configured to host conferences, board meetings, themed events and weddings.

With our Hyatt Business Plan promotion, business travel has never been more productive. Book the Hyatt Business Plan package and receive: • • • • •

Daily breakfast Internet access Daily refreshed water Daily newspaper One piece of laundry pressed or washed per room per day

Valid from 31 Oct 2008 - 31 Dec 2011. Hyatt Regency Sanctuary Cove Manor Circle Sanctuary Cove Resort, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia 4212 Tel: +61 7 5530 1234 Email: sanctuarycove.regency@hyatt.com

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In Praise of Slow

In one recent episode of Kimora: Life in the Fab Lane, the bubblicious brunette was on a date night with hubby but had a tough time letting go of her Blackberry. Instead of a quality evening with the spouse, the evening turned out to be just like another day at work. Suffice to say, it left hubby fuming while viewers empathising with her dilemma. Forget date nights. Heck – we even check our smartphones on our kids’ birthdays!

It seems we’re at a point in our lives where everything is about playing catch up to time. Two years ago, when Google’s news site and e-mail provider, Gmail, went reportedly ‘sluggish’ for about an hour, the business world went into a frenzy, with pundits reporting in the BBC citing the slow Google being bad for business. Have we become such an antsy society that the mere slow pace of a search engine can become a major issue?

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So it is rather timely that the cultural shift of slow movement enters our domain. Its basic argument is: Speed kills. The movement, which encompasses all manner of lifestyle – from our approach to life, work, gastronomy and leisure – backs everything from switching off the mobile to spending time with family and cherishing food with ingredients harvested in an environmentally responsible way as opposed to munching down on fast food 24/7.

The slow movement too benefits the work culture in various ways. Taking things slow does not mean passing up shoddy and sloppy jobs. On the contrary, it encourages businesses to rethink their approach to projects, relationships with clients and vendors, as well as each other. Instead of affecting productivity, the Slow Business movement focuses on the quality of work, as opposed to being in an arms race to complete a task with an indifferent attitude, always rushing to reply to e-mails and, in Kimora’s case, the constant obligation to check the Blackberry even on date nights.

Working the world on hyperdrive mode does not necessarily get you to become smarter nor benefit you in any way. Just look at a Hewlett-Packard-sponsored study of 2005 that showed workers responding quickly to the constant barrage of e-mails they received during the day had IQs that fell 10 points, more than double the IQ drop of someone smoking marijuana.

In Praise of Slow Never is there a good time to take a step back to smell the roses, coffee… and err, everything else in between.

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In Praise of Slow

Europe perhaps is the best example of how slow movement economics, with the exception of the UK, can profit both company and employees. In the mid-90s, German carmaker Volkswagon raised productivity by 20 percent simply by working an average 28.8 hours a week and sharing work with employers in an effort to avert layoffs. In Sweden’s Volvo headquarters, there is no such thing as a ‘rushed project’. Each project takes an average two years to finalise, regardless of whether it’s brilliant or simple. The results often yield impressive returns. Then there’s the French who work an average of 35 hours per week. Proponents of long vacations and work-and-play-do-mix, they, unsurprisingly, are more productive than their American or British counterparts.

Until just a decade ago, temp jobs were seen as a means to make a quick buck. The lowpay, no-future ‘McJobs’ were deemed suitable only for grads-in-between-work. But no longer. Not only has the term ‘interim managers’ entered our colloquial psyche, but part-time employees are on the rise, driven by the idea of flexible hours and greater personal freedom. In many European countries, temps are provided the same wages and benefits as salaried workers, including health care. France even offers retirement pay and a 10 percent tax rebate to help their salaries stretch further. The shift from the harried pace of the dot com boom to the slow movement has also seen US staffing firms enjoying higher profits. Robert Half International reported its third quarter profits more than doubled last year while Manpower reversed its 2009 losses of US$52.8 million with a profit of US$51.3 million in the last quarter of 2010. The demand in the interim market, it seems, is anything but temporary.

The slow effect is also spilling over to the workplace, where concerned management now offers office complexes with a landscape buffered by man-made lakes for relaxation and yoga studios to de-stress. While the Americans are only just discovering the advantages of the languid pace, the Europeans, on the other hand, are busily struggling with the question: How fast can we slow down? But, as Geir Berthelsen, founder of the World Institute of Slowness, often urges in his lectures to corporate Europe, everyone should work smarter, not faster or harder. After all, in the fable tale of the tortoise and the hare, it’s the slow that beats the fast.

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Redefining Business Amid Tighter Budgets

Redefining Business Amid Tighter Budgets Company travel budgets continue to be cautious from lessons learnt after the recent economic tsunami.

With travel budgets often the first one to be scrutinised to contain costs during a recession, travel trends at the time of economic recovery will remain cautious. Business travellers will continue to fly Economy Class, and they will do so by booking ahead to avoid higher fees. According to Egencia, the corporate travel arm of Expedia, advanced purchase fares could save companies between 22 to 50 percent on flights. Self-booking air tickets online will also be part of a company’s cost reduction and adoption measure. The era of ‘rogue business travellers’, it seems, is long gone. Sending more people on the road is a company’s way of making up for lost time during the last two years of recession. Even when technologies such as videoconferencing made it possible for businesses to carry on as usual, an analysis by Oxford Economics in the United States reported that companies risked losing almost 28 percent of current business without face-to-face contact.

The same report further states that speaking to potential customers face-to-face is 40 percent more likely to convert them to new customers. Like many companies experiencing the depths of recession, Ruth Seow’s twice-monthly travels, giving advice to companies on how to grow, ran aground. Now, she’s travelling – and back to meeting customers, saying, “My clients are happy when they see me. It gives them confidence that we have their best interests at heart and that we are here for them.” Plus, there’s nothing like an in-person meeting to create confidence in your business. The airlines and hotel industry can now let out a huge sigh of relief. After an abysmal two-year corporate travel trend, a recent survey by the National Business Travel Association (NBTA) indicated that business expenditure for travel is expected to increase by 4.4 percent in 2011. This following the 5.5 percent increase already seen in the average corporate travel budget last year. Yet even as executives are prepared to travel more, companies are ensuring that their people maintain the frugal principles learnt during the crisis of 2008-2009 that rendered corporate travel all but severely amputated. Business travellers were left on the ground or, when travel was absolutely necessary, travelled with more airlines connection to their destination than taking a direct route, while accommodation comprised of budget hotels or a downgrade from full-service to select-service hotels.

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Redefining Business Amid Tighter Budgets

NBTA showed that for every dollar spent on business travel, companies realise US$12.50 in incremental revenue.

Employees can also urge their staff to use frequent flyer miles accrued on business trips if they want to upgrade to Business Class or Premium Economy. In fact, the latter offered by many airlines have been popular with businesses as they offer a middle-of-the-road option. “It has more leg room and some perks but it’s not as costly as flying my people Business Class,” says Nathan Balagopal, who runs a door and window manufacturing company. It also pays for companies to understand industry pricing trends. Although hotel rates are expected to increase as much as 10 percent in 2011, companies can still negotiate favourable

hotel deals with their preferred hotel suppliers. Paying close attention to contracts with hotels, such as to include valuable amenities like free Wi-Fi in hotel rooms, requests for cancellation fees, and more black out dates, can help contain costs over time. Remember, hotels will continue to compete for corporate business loyalty and lock in volume, thus providing companies a little bit more room to negotiate better corporate rates. And, as with frequent flyer miles, encouraging employees to use points collected from hotel loyalty programme can also work in favour for the business traveller in the long run for room upgrades and better perks.

Employers should also ensure there remains no more ‘rogue travellers’. Travelling employees who make bookings, whether airline or hotels, outside the company’s travel programmes risk throwing the company’s best laid corporate travel programme into disarray. Without a doubt, companies are slowly but surely getting their people back on the road to build business. If they have to travel to close a deal, nothing can stop them from travelling. Even with the price of oil rising four times the rate of inflation over the last 10 years, yielding higher travel prices – and continuing to do so, making savvy management decisions is more crucial now than ever.

Businesses need to see their customers. Or their suppliers. Not everything can be done over the phone. According to a Harvard Business Review survey, many of those interviewed said that videoconferencing should complement air travel rather than used solely as a device to save company expenditure. American Express, through the recessional environment, has continuously been persuading its corporate clients to travel, saying that such travels should be viewed as an investment necessary to stimulate new business development. And, they might just have a point. Recent calculations done by the NBTA showed that for every dollar spent on business travel, companies realise US$12.50 in incremental revenue. But the upswing trend in corporate travel comes with a cost: Corporate trips are becoming more expensive now with airlines and hotels raising their prices. For the first time in two years in 2011, air and hotel suppliers will be exercising pricing power. This is expected as travel becomes more competitive with limited seats and increased occupancy levels at hotels. Inspite of this, there are several ways still in which companies can optimise strategies and cut costs without dramatically reducing the amount of travel. For example, British Airways and Singapore Airlines are among a handful of carriers that depend on corporate travellers to increase profits, charging a premium for seats with more leg room. Companies can look into these ancillary services to better balance their budget in the actual cost of a ticket. Booking tickets early with flexible change dates could also translate to better controlled spending, particularly when a penalty is often imposed when there’s a change in the travel itinerary.

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The Evolution of Style

The Evolution OF

Style

Pierre Rainero, Director of Image, Style and Heritage at Cartier, explains the maison’s distinct style that has made the brand timeless.

Cartier has a long history of heritage and creativity. How do you keep the two relevant and the brand fresh as Cartier moves forward into the 21st century? The key here is the notion of style. It’s what really drives our activity from the beginning till today. We are fortunate because the founder, especially Louis Cartier, the third generation of Cartier, had a vision for style. He thought that the notion of style could evolve. At the same time there is a paradox from every generation and creation of Cartier: You recognise a Cartier style but you also see the evolution linked to different generation. Cartier’s vision was something unique that even style could evolve with time.

How would you describe the Cartier style? Is there a specific and distinct feature to it? Cartier is totally unique in a way its creations have many different expressions. When you think of the garland style born end of 19th and early 20th century, made of platinum and diamonds, laying white on white, it’s very avant garde and modern for that time. Cartier is also distinct in its mix of colours; we have a very special eye for colour combination. For example, in the 1940s and 1950s we mixed turquoise and yellow gold. That unique combination was distinct only to us. There are many, many different expressions to Cartier but the common objective to a Cartier style is elegance.

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The Evolution of Style

Creativity and Cartier are synonymous with each other. You were the first to introduce platinum in jewellery to the world as well as introducing the wristwatch. Are these aspirations to remain the ‘first’ in what you do important to the brand? We are very happy if we happen to be the first. But we’re not preoccupied with bringing something relevant and go beyond the expected. The work of the jeweller is to look for an exquisite piece. You combine exquisite creation with precious material. That’s why Cartier can illustrate a person’s feelings and share its relevance in any material.

For a long time, Cartier was a brand linked to the aristocrats. Would you say this is true even today? How has that connection benefit Cartier in this day and age? I think Cartier interests people with the same sense of elegance and taste. I don’t think Cartier belongs to one specific class of people. I think you can find that taste for audacious pieces or beautiful pieces exist in many different groups of people. It cannot be linked to just one group or person. But the emotions that Cartier pieces evoke can be shared by many people and by many cultures. It’s not really true to say we are the suppliers of only to the aristocrats because we were also supplying to the industrialists of America and ordinary people of different origins.

Do commissioned works today continue to have the same aura, enigma and prestige that was apparent say, in the 1920s, when people reminisce about the ‘Hindu necklace’ (also known as Tutti Frutti) of Daisy Fellowes? First, because of confidentiality clause, we cannot talk about the orders from our customers. That is the trust that exists between Cartier and the client. In addition, the special orders of today will only have its value known two or three generations later. Second, special commissions are a lot about self expression. It’s not necessary linked to the evolution of our own style. Daisy Fellowes ordered the most important necklace in 1936, the Tutti Frutti necklace, but the first to commission such a style was Lady Mountbatten in 1928. It was a bracelet reconfigured to be worn as a bandeau across the forehead. That piece is presently at the V&A Museum in London. The purpose of a special commission goes beyond a person’s audacity, that is they want to express their feelings and personality. We merely provide the style.

In 1984, Cartier decided to begin the Cartier Collection, collecting pieces that reflect the artistic and stylistic creation of the brand. Why was such a ‘project’ begun and what was the objective? Everything began with a decision made in the 1970s to create an archive department. It was revolutionary at that time for a maison to keep its drawings and created pieces. We believed that the notion of style central to Cartier could only be studied and kept through the study of its history. Once everything is archived, then comes the time of the analysis. In the 1980s Hans Nadelhoffer, author of Cartier and a jewellery expert, made us realised that more than just drawings and illustrations, only the actual and antique Cartier pieces could show the evolution of style and relate the story.

In undertaking such a massive project, what is the scale and how much research and work go into it? And, in acquiring a piece for the collection, does serendipity play a hand? To that last question yes, I will say resoundingly that luck plays a hand! (Laughs). While we have our objective to include specific pieces to archive, it wasn’t for us to decide what we can get. Once a Cartier piece is sold, it leads its own life and, in many cases, we don’t know where to look for them. We were lucky to have many opportunities in the late 80s and the early 90s to be able to add to our Cartier Collection pieces that have ‘matured’ and represented the various timeline in our production. Today we have 1,400 piece, more or less composed of 1/3 jewellery, 1/3 watches and clocks, 1/3 objects. We didn’t plan it that way, it just happened.

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The Classic Journey

As Director of Image, Style and Heritage, tell us what you personally find challenging and/or interesting being involved in the Cartier Collection. For me it is a question of passion. Cartier has an incredible history, many different dimensions and creations that changed with each generation of family. Cartier is a union of cultures, influenced in various stages by the Chinese culture, the Indians, the Russians. It’s a never ending story; you always discover new anecdotes about a certain piece that someone will tell you and that enriches your own knowledge. It tells you how the brand’s been influenced by different times in the past and how to move better in the future. I find all this very interesting.

What is it about Cartier that remains enigmatic to consumers to this day? It relies in the paradox I mentioned earlier. People want Cartier’s creations to be very Cartier but at the same time they want to be surprised, so that creates the enigma. To be Cartier all the time and forever, to continue to new creations and expression. That’s why Cartier is Cartier.

The Classic Journey The Eastern & Oriental Express lets you rediscover the romance and adventure of train travel.

When one thinks of Cartier, they usually associate it with jewellery. But that is not the case, is it, for Cartier has an incredible collection such as timepieces, clocks, boxes and décor pieces? It’s good that Cartier is recognised first as a jeweller, because in every item we create – whether it’s an accessory, a clock – we create with a jeweller’s eye. It comes back to the search for elegance and beautiful proportions, I think that’s the philosophy of the jeweller whatever the object is.

Increasingly, we see luxury brands today associating themselves with lifestyle events. Cartier remains a loyal sponsor to polo and the upcoming ‘Travel With Style’ Concourse d‘Elegance in India. How does the brand benefit from such associations? And how do you ensure your selection of association maintains the brand’s prestige and credibility? We spoke about Cartier’s philosophy and how we create our pieces. The same criteria for elegance and style are the same values that we want to share with our customers. The Concourse d’Elegance in India for example is a sort of metaphor. Our interest in elegant cars reflect our values. It’s another way of communicating who we are.

The whole idea of a luxury brand also translates to exclusivity. How do you retain that aspect with lessons learnt from the economic crisis of two years ago? Exclusivity has to be meaningful and rely on really objective factors, such as the craftsmanship, the creation. It’s an extension of being faithful to yourself during exceptional times. If the style remains strong and exquisite, you will still be desirable regardless of the times.

Train travel has always been associated with romance, glamour and the pioneering spirit of adventure. It’s a journey for those who enjoy the luxuries of travel in a leisurely pace; to travel and experience the land with bold open eyes drinking in the landscape nature has to offer. When it comes to train travelling in style, the success of the revived Venice Simplon-Orient-Express in Europe has shown that for many, train travel strikes a sentimental chord, tinged with nostalgia for a by-gone age. Its old world elegance and luxury is unrivalled. And now, the same experience can be explored onboard the Eastern & Oriental Express, a luxury train journey filled with an atmosphere that harks back 70 years to a colonial age of rattan chairs on the verandah, linen suits and tea dances.

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The Classic Journey

The Eastern & Oriental Express, or E&O as it’s fondly known, provides a year-round scheduled service through a quintessential and everchanging skyline of Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand’s countryside, three of South-East Asia’s most fascinating countries, covering a journey of 2,038km.

For the first time, modern-day travellers in South-East Asia are able to see something of the region in comfort. The route and destinations have been devised to give guests the ultimate experience in travelling in a South-East Asian country, complemented by excellent cuisine and the highest service and hospitality onboard. The Eastern & Oriental Express, or E&O as it’s fondly known, provides a year-round scheduled service through a quintessential and everchanging skyline of Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand’s countryside, three of South-East Asia’s most fascinating countries, covering a journey of 2,038km. It is the only train to make the direct journey between Singapore and Bangkok without the need to change trains enroute. Stepping onboard the E&O for the first time, guests would be forgiven for thinking the carriages were remnants from a colonial era brought together to create the luxury train. While a lot of work had been put in to give that impression, many of the carriages began life as Silver Star, New Zealand’s luxury sleeper service that plied the Auckland and Wellington route in the 70s. Brought over from New Zealand to the E&O’s workshop in Singapore, each carriage was converted and modified

to meet the standards of the E&O. The same team who had worked on the Venice SimplonOrient-Express created the interiors of the Eastern & Oriental Express, including extended dining cars, windows for panoramic views, curved ceilings at the carriage interiors, and interior carriage walls decorated with veneers of wooden marquetry. Sleeper cabins boast of exquisite interiors with their unique blend of East and West, re-modelled and designed by French decorator Gerard Gallet and implemented by James Park of James Park Associates. Guests can choose between three types of cabin for their two nights and three days journey. They are the Presidential, State and Pullman, each with their ensuite shower and WC facilities complemented by Bulgari toiletries, and appointed with its own uniformed cabin steward who is on call for room service 24 hours a day. Pullman cabins are similar to those of the Venice Simplon-Orient-Express, while the State cabins are larger and have two lower beds. One carriage has two Presidential cabins providing the ultimate in comfort onboard a train; each with twin beds and a spacious dressing area, together with a smaller adjacent cabin.

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The Classic Journey

As the train pulls away from Singapore’s Keppel Road Station, guests will be immediately immersed in the E&O’s legendary service and hospitality while luxuriating in the picturesque scenery common to this part of the world. As the train enters the state of Johor on the Malaysian mainland, passengers witness a flat landscape interspersed with small villages clustered alongside the railway line amid lush vegetation of tall grasses. After Kluang, about two hours out of Singapore, passengers will get their first true taste of country scenery, filled with regimented rows of rubber trees with rolling hills in the distance, water buffaloes lazing in the fields, and green pastures of banana, oil palm and coconut plantations. By the side of the railway, ponds and streams are covered with pink and white water lilies. At sunset, as the sky turns pink, the best way to catch the scene is at the Observation Car, which passengers will soon find out to be a popular perch for many of the train’s guests over the coming days. While the landscape rushes by, you can relax with your favourite drink and wave at giggling children running happily alongside the tracks. In between journeys, there are plenty of stops and entertainment to keep everyone occupied. As the train makes a short stop in Kuala Lumpur, passengers can take a short stroll around the grand Moorish style railway station built in 1911. On the way to Taiping in the state of Perak, the railway track travels through the dramatic landscape of the narrow gorge at Bukit Berapit, which is overhung by the rock of Gunung Pondok. In Butterworth, the E&O stops for two hours, enabling passengers to take a ferry across the straits to the island of Penang that includes a tour of George Town, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and a trishaw ride to explore many of the island’s colonial buildings.

The Bar Car provides much of the entertainment onboard and is also the train’s social epicentre. Here’s where guests meet other passengers, make new friends and new dining companions for the many meals and miles ahead. The resident pianist engages passengers with his collection of favourite classics drawing in the crowd and appreciative applause. While breakfast and afternoon tea are served in the cabins, lunch and dinner are served in the restaurant cars, accompanied by distinctive chinaware, silver cutlery and fine crystalware. The elegance of the three restaurant cars, decorated with wall panels of skillfully engraved marquetry, provides an opportunity for passengers to dress up for the occasion, although formal wear is required. Guests dine on specially-crafted

menus infused with regional flavours and prepared by a team of talented chefs trained in using classic European culinary techniques. The E&O enters Thailand via Hat Yai, and instantly passengers will be aware that they have entered a very different country; with Buddhist temples replacing mosques and Thai Lanna architecture being very distinctive. In Thailand, the journey brings guests to, among others, the royal seaside town of Hua Hin and Kanchanaburi province. At the latter, guests disembark at the historic River Kwai station for a photo opportunity of the E&O making its way across the bridge before boarding a river raft for an excursion down the Kwai Yai and Kwai Noi rivers. The journey finally ends in Bangkok, called Krung Thep or City of Angels by the Thais, at 2.45pm on the third day.

When a trip from Singapore to Thailand can easily be achieved in a matter of hours these days, the leisurely pace of train travel is perfect for those wanting to rediscover the romance of train travel. The E&O not only brings back the relaxing and glamorous style of travelling during the heydays, but also introduces guests to the art of travelling in style, a voyage steep in history and unforgettable experience. In addition to the Classic 3-days/2-nights Singapore-Bangkok journey, the E&O has also introduced a series of new three- and six-night rail voyages through Thailand, Malaysia, Laos and Singapore which commenced in January 2011. The programme contains many elements brand new to E&O, including an overnight stay in the fabled hills of Cameron Highlands and dugong trekking in the island of Koh Kradan.

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lifestyle by Mulpha Vol 2, 2011