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DADBOD TO 8-PACK! THE EVERYMAN FITNESS PLAN

p78

11

NOVEMBER 2016

NOV 2016 £3.99

CAN YOU BE FAT AND FIT? MH TAKES THE WEIGHT OFF YOUR MIND P25

19-DAY ARMS! Bigger Biceps Double Your Strength Faster Gains

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WAYS TO UPGRADE YOUR BODY TODAY

6-MINUTE PROTEIN FEASTS! THE FOOLPROOF £50 FACELIFTp134

9 77135 771356 743132

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LEAN MUSCLE SHORTCUTS

MELT AWAY

FAT!

While You’re Sleeping

TURN WORK STRESS INTO LONGER LIFE

WHO DARES WIN? MH Takes On The SAS INV E STI G ATI

ON

JUSTIN THEROUX, 45, ACTOR, WRITER, HUSBAND TO JEN & COUSIN TO LOUIS


MUSCLE

FITNESS

P26 IS SUGAR ALWAYS BAD?

P31 GROW WITH THE FLOW

P38 TAKE THE CROSSFIT CHALLENGE

Feeling bitter about skipping dessert? Our nutritionist has some sweet health insights

This upgraded animal-flow staple will beast your body for a shredded torso

To complete our toughest test yet, you need a barbell, a pull-up bar – and nerves of steel

P42 INTERNAL AFFAIRS

P56 THE JUSTIN THEROUX WORKOUT

P46 PLOT YOUR PATH TO A PB

Mirror muscle can mask inner weaknesses. This workout cuts fat from the inside out

Find out how the Hollywood nonconformist and alt-movie star built his best body at 45

MH trials the GPS watches that keep your fitness on track – even when you go off it

P155 BREAKING THE HABIT

P128 PILLARS OF STRENGTH TRAINING

P74 DO THE LEG WORK

Whether it’s Marlboros or Maltesers, follow our guide to outwit your addictions for good

The kit you need to raise your weightlifting game from part-time hobby to total pro

This 60-second protocol will slash time from your Sunday sportive (or Monday commute)

WEIGHTLOSS

STYLE

NUTRITION

P32 BURN FAT IN YOUR SLEEP

P138 RIP UP THE RULEBOOK

P40 TACO THE GLORY

Use your eight hours wisely to give your fat-torching hormones a wake-up call

Torn denim is no longer the preserve of grungy teens. This is how to style it just so

MH upsets the food truck to turn Tex-Mex stodge into a lean, clean treat. De nada

P71 DON’T SWEAT THE SMALL STUFF

P140 CIRCUIT TRAINERS

P49 THE TRUTH ABOUT GLUTEN

Perfectionism could be weighing you down – literally. Lighten up to let go of your baggage

As high-end designs step onto the high street, we pick the best kicks for every budget

Considering making the cut? Here’s the scientific view on going against the grain

P162 LIFT SOME METAL

P142 STREET WATCH

P119 BOAR DOWN ON DOMS

With your fork, we mean. This lesser-known mineral is the key to resculpting your body

Find a ticker that ticks all the boxes for under £100. Our horology expert shows you how

Bounce back faster from your next workout with a quick, energising pulled-pork bun

18 MEN’S HEALTH

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(MODEL COVER) MODEL: CHRIS ROBERTS AT STEVEN VAN DER LAMMIE | GROOMING: SUSANA MOTA | STYLING: ABENA OFEI | SWEATPANTS POLO RALPH LAUREN AT MATCHESFASHION.COM

11/16 BULLETPROOF YOUR BODY & MIND

HEALTH


IN THIS ISSUE THE LATEST INTEL TO HELP YOU HIT YOUR TARGETS

ON THE COVER P52 FAST PROTEIN FEASTS Use our chef’s twist on the cheese toastie to melt fat and pile on heaps of muscle

P123 DOUBLE YOUR STRENGTH Seven small training tweaks that deliver giant leaps in your muscle-building progress

P124 LEAN SHORTCUTS P85 BIG ARMS IN 19 DAYS If age or indolence have floored your gains, this plan will get things off the ground

P86 TURN AROUND STRESS MH trials the new desktop tech designed to rewire your nine-to-five anxiety

P92 WHO DARES WIN? Can the SAS keep pace with the changing nature of war? Meet the world’s elite fighters

Burn 800 calories on your lunchbreak with the new science of interval training

THEROUX COVER PHOTOGRAPHY PATRIK GIARDINO

P134 THE £50 FACELIFT

MODEL COVER PHOTOGRAPHY DAVID VENNI

Industry insiders talk you through the products that work – no needles necessary


THE EXPERT PANEL KEEP YOUR FITNESS GOALS ON COURSE THIS MONTH WITH NEW EXPERTISE THAT TH VENTURES OFF THE BEATEN TRACK TRAACK

PICK UP THE TEMPO

WELLNESS AT WORK

RED OR DEAD?

ROB SMYTH

STEVE ILEY

HELEN BOND

Steady-state cardio is doing little for your fat loss goals. Torch calories hard and fast with F45 trainer Smyth’s HIIT class p124

Bupa medical director Iley guides you through the wellness-enhancing desk-tech that can bust boardroom stress p86

Consultant dietitian Bond has serious beef with those condemning red meat. Here she explains its myriad benefits p37

REST ASSURED

TRIPLE SWEAT

MAN OF ACTION

JEROME SIEGEL

WAYNE EDWARDS

MATTHEW OLLERTON

Insomniacs, put your sleep problems to bed with psychiatry professor Siegel’s doze and don’ts for a good night’s rest p98

Row, cycle and run from your risks of heart failure with a visceral fat-busting workout from 3Tribes’ head trainer Edwards p42

Special forces veteran Ollerton puts MH’s SAS credentials to the ultimate test at military training facility Break Point p92

EDITOR

TOBY WISEMAN DEPUTY EDITOR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

PHOTO DIRECTOR

DAVID MORTON

DECLAN FAHY

RACHAEL CLARK

STYLE DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION EDITOR

DIGITAL DIRECTOR

ERIC DOWN

SCARLETT WRENCH

ED VANSTONE

FEATURES EDITOR

ART DIRECTOR

ASSOCIATE EDITOR (STYLE)

TOM WARD

TOM PLUMSTEAD

MATT HAMBLY

COMMISSIONING EDITOR (PRINT & DIGITAL)

SENIOR DESIGNER

TED LANE

JESSICA WEBB

STYLE ASSISTANT

PICTURE EDITOR

SUBEDITOR

RICCARDO CHIUDIONI

FRANKIE HILL

AARON TOUMAZOU

JUNIOR FITNESS EDITOR

DIGITAL EDITOR

ASSISTANT DIGITAL EDITOR

JACK HART

ROBERT HICKS

MATT EVANS

GROUP PUBLISHING DIRECTOR SALES DIRECTOR BRAND DIRECTOR SENIOR FASHION EXECUTIVE ACCOUNT MANAGER ACCOUNT MANAGER GROUP CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS DIRECTOR CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS DIRECTOR SENIOR PARTNERSHIPS EXECUTIVE CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS ART DIRECTOR CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS ART EDITOR SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER PROJECT MANAGER PRODUCTION MANAGER HEAD OF MARKETING MARKETING AND EVENTS EXECUTIVE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT MANAGER OFFICE MANAGER AND EVENTS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS PR MANAGER CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER MARKETING AND CIRCULATION DIRECTOR MANAGING DIRECTOR, BRANDS

ALUN WILLIAMS GEORGINA PARROTT TOM LAKE TOM SPRATT NATASHA BAILEY MELANIE MCKINLAY ANDREA SULLIVAN MORGAN HARRISON-DOYLE JASON MILTON-BARKER BEN BRILEY AOIFE KAVANAGH VICTORIA STEPHEN KATHRYN TAIT ROGER BILSLAND JANE SHACKLETON MEG STEPHENSON MARK PEACOCK MEGAN BLACKBURN LISA QUINN BEN BOLTON DARREN GOLDSBY REID HOLLAND MICHAEL ROWLEY

THIS ISSUE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY… 14 PERSONAL TRAINERS

2 WINE PROFESSIONALS

12 STYLE AUTHORITIES

1 TOP RESTAURANT CRITIC

6 UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS

1 GASTROENTEROLOGIST

4 RESEARCH SCIENTISTS

1 RUNNING PRO

4 NUTRITIONISTS

1 DIETITIAN

3 SPECIAL FORCES VETERANS

AND 1 MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT

TOTAL

76 EXPERTS

20 MEN’S HEALTH

CEO, HEARST MAGAZINES UK

ANNA JONES HEARST-RODALE JOINT BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT AND CEO, HEARST MAGAZINES INTERNATIONAL

ANNA JONES CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, HEARST MAGAZINES UK

CLAIRE BLUNT SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, RODALE INTERNATIONAL

ROBERT NOVICK MEN’S HEALTH IS PUBLISHED IN THE UK BY HEARST RODALE LIMITED, A JOINT VENTURE BY HEARST MAGAZINES UK, A WHOLLY OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF THE HEARST CORPORATION, AND RODALE INTERNATIONAL, A DIVISION OF RODALE INC. MEN’S HEALTH IS A TRADEMARK OF, AND IS USED UNDER LICENCE FROM, RODALE INC. HEARST RODALE LTD, 33 BROADWICK STREET, LONDON W1F 0DQ. TEL: 020 7312 3800. FAX: 020 7339 4444. RODALE’S MEN’S HEALTH (ISSN 1356-7438). COPYRIGHT © 2015. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MEN’S HEALTH IS PRINTED AND BOUND BY WYNDEHAM HERON, THE BENTALL COMPLEX, COLCHESTER ROAD, HEYBRIDGE, MALDON, ESSEX CM9 4NW. DISTRIBUTION BY COMAG. PUBLISHED 11 TIMES A YEAR. CONDITIONS APPLY. FOR ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES, PLEASE CALL OUR ENQUIRY LINE ON 0844 848 1601, INTERNATIONAL +44 (0)1858 438794. BACK ISSUES, CUSTOMER ENQUIRIES, CHANGE OF ADDRESS AND ORDERS TO: MEN’S HEALTH, HEARST MAGAZINES UK, TOWER HOUSE, SOVEREIGN PARK, LATHKILL STREET, MARKET HARBOROUGH, LEICS LE16 9EF (0844 848 5203; MONDAY TO FRIDAY, 8AM-9.30PM AND  SATURDAY, 8AM-4PM. CREDIT CARD HOTLINE: 0844 848 1601). MEN’S HEALTH, ISSN 1356-7438, IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, 11 TIMES PER YEAR BY HEARST RODALE LIMITED. C/O DISTRIBUTION GRID. AT 900 CASTLE RD SECAUCUS, NJ 07094, USA. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT SECAUCUS, NJ. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO MEN’S HEALTH C/O EXPRESS MAG, PO BOX 2769, PLATTSBURGH, NY 12901-0239

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2 MEDICAL DIRECTORS

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24 TOP TABLE CHEFS


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EDITOR’S LETTER WEATHER THE CHANGING SEASON – AND COME OUT FIGHTING

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Meet the UK wrestlers facing off against Mexico’s finest in the flamboyant ‘lucha libre’ tournament

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What do you look like? MH charts the shifting shape of man to find a training plan for every physique

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98

With insomnia on the up, there’s big money in finding a fix. But could the ‘cures’ be a false economy?

From deadline anxiety to desk-bound inertia, we test the gadgets designed to short-circuit your modern workplace woes

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52

Toasties are so hot right now. With a few upgrades, this food-truck trend can melt excess weight, too

F BUILD A BODY TO STAND THE TEST OF TIME (P56)

MENSHHEALTH.CO.UK CO K

or many, autumn is the most alluring of seasons. Crisp skies and cool climes; rusty crimson foliage dying on the branch; bonfires, overripe fruit, long shadows, golden sunlight… I get it, I get all of it, I really do. But there comes a time in life when autumn marks another kind of change – and this one is rather less evocative of a Keats poem. It’s when we start getting fat again. Summer keeps us lean. There’s the vanity aspect, of course – with just the fine cotton of a T-shirt between your naked self and the world, there’s more incentive to keep yourself trim. But it’s also about how the bright mornings and warm evenings make training more pleasurable; how the glut of vitamin D energises the body and nourishes the muscles. When autumn comes, that natural vitality starts to seep away. As more clothes are dug from the back of the wardrobe, so the conspiracy to mask returning

Our edit of the smartest high-street buys will keep you on point and in pocket

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bulges takes sway. Cosy pubs become more inviting than stark gyms; kale salads are upstaged by toad in the hole. Already, after a long summer of running and sprinting, I’m conscious of autumn cloaking me in its swollen grasp and getting me fitted for a new fatsuit. Fortunately, if any of these sensations are familiar, then this is the issue for you. From the lunchtime workout that burns 800 calories (I find it helps to think of it as a Sunday roast, enjoyed then annulled) to the secrets behind Justin Theroux’s impeccable lean muscle profile at the spruce age of 45, we’ve got the moves you need. We also have countless recipes, wearable tech reviews and science bulletins, all dedicated to taking back control of your life, plus a feature on the new body shapes and how you can dictate your own. So enjoy your autumn; take in those sunsets, by all means. Just don’t let it beat you.

TOBY WISEMAN BSME EDITOR OF THE YEAR MEN’S HEALTH 23


AS H R A NUMBEER ON HARD-TO-SHIFT BLUBBER RUN WAIST SIZE NEEDN’T DETERMINE WHAT YOU CAN KEEP IN THE TANK

THE BIG QUESTION

Q

NO MATTER HOW FAST I GET I CAN’T SHAKE MY PAUNCH. CAN YOU BE FIT AND FAT? JACOB, NOTTINGHAM

Aerodynamics aside, that gut isn’t necessarily slowing you down. While too much abdominal fat can indeed be a marker of excess blubber around your organs – or even of metabolic syndrome – it’s entirely possible for it to be harmless. In fact, you can be at once obese and yet still metabolically healthier than your doctor. Things like internal inflammation and cardio fettle count for far more than the belt notch you use. Your gut girth is just a sign. But it can be an unsightly one. Work

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out whether you’re fit-fat or just fat-fat by investing in a body composition monitor, like those sold by Tanita or Withings. This will tell you if you’re carrying more subcutaneous (benign) or visceral (risky) fat. You can check your waist-to-hip ratio at home, too: if your gut protrudes relative to your hip measurement, a scan might be wise. Meanwhile, eat butter. A new French study found that the aminos within it help reverse age-related weight gain and add muscle mass. We’re calling it a tasty fix for middle-aged spread.

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ASK MH GRAINS OF WISDOM FOR HEALTHY LIVING AM I NORMAL? I GET HEADACHES EVERY TIME I LIFT. SHOULD I BE WORRIED?

MATTHEW, LIVERPOOL Sharp spasms in your gut, chest or head are always worth heeding, but that doesn’t mean you should worry over every gym headache. As you load your muscles, blood vessels in your brain swell to carry oxygen. If the pressure is too great, you get an exertion headache, says strength coach Mike Donavanik. You can drink more water to relieve the pressure (blood plasma is mainly H2O, so dehydration makes blood run thick) and breathe in with each rep – pushing against a closed airway makes your blood work harder to carry limited oxygen. We also carry tension in our necks and the fascia around our skulls, which leads to tension headaches when lifting. Combat this by massaging your traps (running from shoulder to neck) and moving your head in circles, stretching side to side, up and down. Now hit the gym, no pressure.

DOES IT WORK?

Q

MY TRAINING BUDDY LIKES TO NECK CONCENTRATED COFFEE BEFORE OUR BIKE RIDES. IS IT JUST A HIPSTER FAD OR WORTH A SHOT? DIMITRI, LONDON Believe it or not, there are performance benefits that make concentrated coffee worth stealing from the coffee shop poseurs. Because it’s concentrated, it boasts more caffeine per ml than the average cup (which might be why your pal is pipping you to the post during your Sunday sportive). Plus, it’s sold in shot bottles that are easy to take on bike rides. But perhaps the best thing for weekend athletes is its lower acidity levels. “The slow extraction process means you get less acid in your cup, so it’s kinder on your stomach,” says First Sukpaiboon, barista-proprietor at Her Haggerston. Aficionados claim it’s smoother than other coffees, too. Three shot bottles (each makes two cups) will cost you £14.

26 MEN’S HEALTH

Q

CAN SUGAR EVER BE HEALTHY? CHRISTOPHER, BATH

It’s long been the condiment non grata at your PT’s dinner parties, but guess what? The alternatives suck too. Things get cloudy when companies swap out sucrose and sell something ostensibly healthier in its stead. Acids in diet sodas can actually be worse for you than the sugar in their full-on counterparts, says nutritionist Drew Price. Then there’s the effect on your brain. According to bods at Harvard University, artificial sweeteners can

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overstimulate taste receptors. This means that, just like the sliding scale of a drug’s moreishness, you end up needing a bigger sweet hit in future. So yes, controlling sugar intake is important, but a bag of Tangfastics every so often won’t harm you – especially post-gym when your hungry muscles put extra glucose to good work. Timed correctly, it’s fine to dabble in the second-best white powder on the planet. (The first is salt, obviously.)

LUNG DISEASE RUNS IN MY FAMILY. CAN I BREATHE EASY?

THOMAS, BELFAST As maladies go, lung disease is one better avoided than treated. We’re going to go ahead and presume that if you smoke, you’re at least cutting down. So, swerve pollution. Get fresh air. And open a damn window if your other half is a fiend for scented candles (some are as bad as bus fumes). Now implement our supplement plan to soup up your lung power.

i/ TURMERIC POWDER Nature’s statin is the sworn enemy of inflammation in your body. Turmeric supplements are shown to reduce the risk of lung diseases from asthma to cancer to fibrosis to coughs.

ii/ COENZYME Q10 Not only has this wonder drug been proven beneficial to general lung health, it also helps keep them functioning better when you’re already unwell. Researchers say the effects are particularly pronounced when doing exercise.

iii/ FENUGREEK CAPSULES This spice helps clear the bronchial passages and is doubly effective when coupled with fennel. Perhaps a turmeric and fenugreek based curry loaded with fennel is on the menu?

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WORDS: ALEX HARRIS | PHOTOGRAPHY: JOBE LAWRENSON | HER-HAGGERSTON.COM

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DON’T MAKE THE SWITCH TO CHEMICAL SWEETENERS YET


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01

GROW WITH THE FLOW

WORDS: JACK HART | PHOTOGRAPHY: PHIL HAYNES | MODEL: CHRISTOPHER WHITLOW AT APM | STYLING: ABENA OFEI | GROOMING: SUSANA MOTA | SHORTS NIKE AT MRPORTER.COM | TRAINERS ASICS.COM

Boot out boredom with the WEIGHTED FRONT KICKTHROUGH to shred your abs and train your brain in a single session gnore the chumps shuffling back k to the bench at the mention of animal flow; it’s not all crawling on your hands and knees while channelling your inner wolf. In fact, done right, it’s a shortcut to washboard abs, increased mobility and a beast of a mental boost, too. This weighted version of the regular kickthrough is a complex movement in the technical sense of the word, meaning it requires the coordination of multiple muscle groups and joints. When n performing it, you need to focus on stabilising your planted arm while hefting a dumbbell in the other, kicking your core into overdrive. However, it’s this complexity that transfers gains to body and brain. “This exercise works wonders forr your grey matter,” says PT Kemo Marriott, founder of Mayfair studio o Holistic Motions. “Learning new movement patterns stimulates increased production of a protein that contributes to brain growth and development.” Which means not only will it prove the catalyst for fulfilling your abs aspirations, there’s an intelligence kicker to boot. Now that’s truly training smart.

01 BRACE E FOR

THE BEST EXERCISE YO YOU’RE NOT O DOING O G

KICKSTART GROWTH

TAKE-O OFF Crouch w with yyour hands on the ground, holding dumbbells. bb ll Your heells should be raised, dirrectly l bbelow l your glutees, and your knees hovvering g aabove thee floor. f

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02 EXPLODE OUT Raise your left foot and tense your abs in preparation – you’re about to do a lot of things simultaneously. Jump your right foot to where your right hand is, lifting your right hand as you do.

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KICK K THROU U UGH IIn a ffluid m movement, kick your left leg through the gap g between your y right foot and left f hand,, extending g your leg as far as yyou can. Still solid?? This next bit is fairlyy tricky.

04 FOLD O D BACK Hold thhe extended p positio on for a beat b f reversing the before m move in the same order. Then T repeat to the othher side. Abs already l dy aching? You can consider that p proof itt’s working.

WHAT YOU’LL GAIN...

BEASTMODE ABS

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HEIGHTENED COORDINATION

BREAKDANCER MOVES

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03 DOZE AND DON’TS

SHEAR FAT IN YOUR SLEEP Give your weightloss plan a wake-up call by sending your

WEIGHTLOSS NEWSFEED 11/16

natural testosterone resources sky-high in your slumber. Losing while you’re snoozing? It’s the dream scenario

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any trainers would claim that, when it comes to weightloss, there’s no substitute for sweating it out under a barbell or spending your evenings prepping chicken breasts in Tupperware. But actually, giving your belly-shrinking ambitions an edge is so easy you can do it with your eyes shut. Testosterone suffers from a dubious reputation, thanks to its association with top-heavy gym monsters armed with hypodermics. But this essential hormone – produced naturally in your sleep – not only has the potential to help you gain muscle mass, it can also target fat around your gut, providing a raft of health benefits beyond new abs. Research published in the Journal of Andrology found that catching superior Zs results in a T-boost that’s exponential – and that upping your kip from four hours to eight increases your levels of the fat-stripping hormone by more than 50%. But simply being horizontal for the night doesn’t cut it. Studies have linked sleep efficiency – the quality and length of your deep sleep – to even higher testosterone. Think of it as the nocturnal fat-burning zone. Follow the steps below to enter this hallowed state as soon as your head hits the pillow. So go sleep it off.

IGNORE WOOLY BRO SCIENCE. DECENT REST IS THE WAY TO BURN FAT

HAVE A GOOD NIGHT Deploy sound sleep science before you hit the hay to get yourself in the zone

18:00

20:00

21:00

22:15

22:30

WARM UP

GO OFF GRID

DROP OUT

PUT A SOCK ON IT

ROLL OVER

Worried a post-work session will leave you wired? A study* found working out aids rest by boosting body heat, much like a warm bath.

Try a next-level digital detox and turn off the wifi: electromagnetic frequencies in your bedroom have been shown to affect sleep.

Supplementing sleep hormone melatonin knocks you out faster. Liquid drops are the most easily absorbed (£7 evitamins.com).

Having warm feet enlarges blood vessels, lowering your core body temperature and helping you to doze off more rapidly.

Right-side snoozer? US doctors found sleeping on your left reduces the risk of sleep-disturbing acid reflux. Now, lights out.

32 MEN’S HEALTH

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WORDS: TED LANE | PHOTOGRAPHY: PETER CROWTHER | *SOURCES: APPALACHIAN STATE UNIVERISTY, SAUDI MEDICAL JOURNAL, UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, NATURE, PHILADELPHIA GRADUATE HOS PITAL

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02 MAKE SLEEP COUNT


THE BEST GYMS IN THE WORLD

SCALE UP YOUR FITNESS Rock your body at Sheffield’s Awesome Walls, one of the country’s highest-calibre climbing centres, and see your training go up a level

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45° The most extreme angle of one of the centre’s two bouldering walls. There are also 30-degree, 15-degree and vertical sections, in case the demands of the former prove too acute. WORDS: JAMIE MILLAR | PHOTOGRAPHY: TOM WATKINS

limbing is on the rise, for a chalky handful of reasons. “People want an alternative to the monotony of the gym,” says Phil Borodajkewycz, duty manager at the Sheffield branch of the excellently named Awesome Walls. “It works all the major muscle groups, can provide a good cardio workout and is fantastic for mental health.” After all, nothing takes your mind off your problems like concentrating on the more immediate concern of not falling off. If you’re down on your training routine, or anything else, then things are looking up. So good is the Steel City outpost that it was the first climbing gym in the UK to be awarded National Performance Centre status by the British Mountaineering Council. Team GB members and other pros will regularly swing by, but the majority of the hangers-on are recreational climbers. “We attract a huge mix of people,” says Borodajkewycz. “Male and female, toddlers to pensioners, no matter their ability.” Climbing recently qualified for the 2020 Olympics. If you haven’t, don’t worry, as you’ll be instructed in all of the safety aspects such as how to put on a harness, tie knots and control the rope before you’re let loose – metaphorically speaking, of course. Equipment can be hired on site, where you’ll also find a cafe serving homemade brownies, Yorkshire Tea and baps. This is Sheffield, after all.

104 The number of ‘lines’ at Awesome Walls, which equates to more than 312 potential routes for you to scale – and zero risk of getting bored, as they’re redrawn on a regular basis.

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04 NORTHERN HEIGHTS

23M The height of the competition wall, the biggest at the centre, which comes complete with a 12m overhang. As the website says, “not for the faint of heart – or weak-armed.”

£19 The price of an initial ‘taster’ session, essential for learning the, well, ropes. Then it’s just £8 a session, with even more cost-effective weekly and monthly passes. Tie yourself in.

9.5 The centre’s current record in seconds for the 14.5m speed wall, which also overhangs at five degrees. The standing world record for the same distance is 5.6 seconds.

GYM AWESOME WALLS

LOCATION SHEFFIELD, UK

WEBSITE AWESOMEWALLS.CO.UK

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05 MEAT: YOUR MAKER

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THE DEVIL’S ADVOCATE

YOU NEED TO EAT MORE RED MEAT Steak night isn’t killing us after all. In fact, red meat tears through fat and keeps hormones ones in balance – you just need to choose tthe rigght stuff ose

WORDS: MARK BAILEY | PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC

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id you know the number o of vegans g in Britain ha as risen by y 360% over the past p decade? In that time, red meat has been relegated to the realm of ‘man food’, favoured by those hunting muscle, not gathering health. But chew over the misinformed hashtags for a minute and you’ll realise this food’s nutritional worth is far from being in the red. Let’s start by skewering some myths. Red meat provides quality protein, curbing hunger and supporting muscle growth. It also contains conjugated linoleic acid, which takes a bite out of your belly fat 1 . But many people have ditched red meat for poultry and fish, fearing beef’s saturated fat. Again, this is a mistake. Sat fat is essential to everything from brain health to energy. It’s why NHS guidelines allow for up to 30g per day. A zero-tolerance approach is unsupported. Besides, not only is red meat far from a death sentence for your cholesterol 2 , modern farming methods have actually slashed the levels of fat in most red meat. In fact, there’s more fat in a chicken breast with its skin on than a lean slab of sirloin. But what about the Daily Mail health police bemoaning the Big C risks? The idea that meat causes cancer is also misleading. We need to differentiate between red meat eaten in its natural form – such as a good steak – and processed meat, like cheap sausage and ham. People often mince the two together but when the World Health

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“Sat fat is an essential nutrient... A zerotolerance approach is unsupported”

DEALS WITH THE DEVIL 1

TRIMMING FAT

Red meat’s conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) helps you cut fat while maintaining muscle, the University of Wisconsin says.

2

HEARTY DINNER

Lean beef helps to keep heartharming LDL cholesterol in balance, reports the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

SATAN’S LITTLE HELPER Consultant dietitian Helen Bond (helenbond.co.uk) is a spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association

Organisation declared that red meat raises your risk of colorectal cancer, it was processed fare they were talking about. What we do know is that, if you dodge red meat and don’t adequately substitute the nutrients, you risk issues spanning from low energy to poor sexual health. Red meat, for example, is a key source of fatigue-fighting iron 3 . It also contains magnesium and zinc, which support testosterone production, and its selenium strengthens the immune system. Plus a good steak is a rare source of vit D, as well as B12, which fuels your workouts by facilitating energy release. (Exhausted after reading that list? You might be iron deficient.) Red meat isn’t just beef, either, but also pork, lamb, veal, goat – any meat that’s red at room temperature. Each has its own benefits so it’s worth mixing it up: lamb is high in niacin – a mood-balancer – while pork is rich in heart-supporting thiamin. Of course, this doesn’t mean you can tear through more red meat than a tyrannosaurus rex. Overconsumption contributes to health problems in the same way as any other food group. Stick to the 500g per week advised by the NHS, trim visible fat and grill when possible. And this is one part of your weekly shop where it’s worth spending extra: grass-fed beef is higher in nutrients. Follow those rules and you can enjoy steak night without spending your life on red alert. Béarnaise optional.

3 GIVE IN TO PLEASURES OF THE FLESH, WITHOUT CONDEMNATION

MEAT HEAD

A study in European Journal of Epidemiology linked higher red meat intake to enhanced neurological development.

MEN’S HEALTH 37


A

06 LIFT IN THE MOMENT

PUSH OUT FAT AND PThis full-body test is our toughestSto date.E

RUN THE GAUNTLET CROSSFIT AMRAP

S THE BAR 01 \ SET

02 \ HANG G TIGHT G T

First up, thrusters. h Withh the bar in a front-rack position, lower l into a d deep squat before f pressing b k up, using the h back o e tu to drive d e the momentum bar overhead. Your rep p is complete pl when h your y arms l k d out, ears in are locked ffront off biceps. Give us 10.

Straight g from the thrusters, jump j up to a pull-up bbar and knockk out 10. Forget kipping; k stickk to strict h core reps withh a tight f and clean form. Iff you can’t manage g them in a row, use your y time wisely ly d ttake ke a 10-second 0 seco d and f carrying g on. pause before

US 033 \ FINAL PUSH When you’ve y finished 10 reps of both – correction, iff you finish – it’s straight g b backk to the h beginning b g fo for another ot e round ou d oof 10 0 th thrusters. uste s With th 12 minutes utes tto work, k keep k the h pace ssteady d or riskk wasting g tthe final f five f collapsed p in a heap on the gym floor floor.

> THE Tally up your total before checking it against Wallace’s rankings T SCOREBOARD O O 2 rounds ou ds

3-5 rounds rou ds

5-10 rounds ou ds

BEGINNER G

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCED C D

ELITE

M k pull-ups Make ll easier i b by engaging your strong upper-back muscles first. It’ll support your arms when they start pulling down on the bar.

Find Fi d another th gear nextt ti time by mixing sprint sessions into your training. It could increase your anaerobic capacity by up to 30%*.

I Increasing i th the cardio di you do at max speed raises your lactic threshold, lending your muscles the stamina they need to break past 10 rounds.

Very V wellll done. d Now try with a weighted vest (argos.co.uk/ menshealth), or bump up the barbell weight. CrossFit always has another level.

38 MEN’S HEALTH

1 rounds 10+ ou ds

THE TASKMASTER Jordan Wallace, CrossFit coach “AMRAP – as many rounds as possible – is a CrossFit staple. With a set end point, you can push yourself to that ‘dark place’ at high intensity levels, knowing it’s only for a short time.”

Pleased with your PB? Shout about it: #MHgauntlet

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

*NORWAY’S NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH | WORDS: JACK HART | ILLUSTRATIONS: ALCONIC | PHOTOGRAPHY: PHIL HAYNES | MODEL: CHRISTOPHER WHITLOW AT APM | STYLING: ABENA OFEI | GROOMING: SUSANA MOTA| | TRACK PANTS NIKE AT MRPORTER.COM, PEGASUS 33 TRAINERS NIKE.COM

Complete as many rounds as possible in 12 minutes – and keep that sweat towel handy y


T H S N O B ’ S G U I D E T O... THE HE AL

From reheated burritos to not-sobuenos nachos, your relationship with Mexican cuisine needs work. MHH upsets the food truck to inject zing ng into your menu. Viva la revolución ón!!

HOT OFF THE PRESS

POWER FLOURS The food truck phenomenon shows no sign of abating, with many new restaurants using food markets as a springboard to more permanent digs. Bao, Pizza Pilgrims and Pitt Cue all started life on the road before turning revered restaurants in their own right. But while burrito stalls abound, until recently Mexican fare has never quite made the step up. “What most people call t tacos –h hard d shells h ll fill filled d with h beef mince nce – are a Tex-Mex Tex Mex

abomination th hat ha ass unfairly led to o the e idea ide th ha att Mexican food od is low-q quality ity ty y,,”” says Jamess Hart, founder of London on’s new gourmet g taqueria ia El Pastor. “In fac fa a t, tacos a are soft and have fresh,, zingy gy fillings. g They’re y not suppo pposed to be greasy.” g y Using g all all-star ingredients g such as avocados, dos, chillies and cured fish, Hart’s missio ssion is to unwrap the health cred of Mexican food. And with tacos, it all starts with a good dough.

i) YELLOW CORN

ii) BLUE CORN

iii) WHOLEMEAL

iv) i TOSTADA TOS A

Clean eaters and bread abstainers, rejoice – cornmeal is gluten-free. And if you’re looking to support muscle recovery, corn also carries about half your iron RDA, which can be supplemented by adding blitzed spinach to your mix.

While the cool colour might divide diners, you can’t argue with the fact blue corn contains 20% more protein and has a lower glycaemic index than white, drip-feeding your muscles with power during the day. It also has a sweeter, nuttier taste to help tone down spicy salsas.

If the idea of white carbs (or blue, for that matter) still sends shivers down your health-conscious spine, we’ve got you covered. These pack more dietary fibre for improved digestion and slump-beating B vitamins – perfect for lunch al desko.

Bake ke your tortilla rtillass at 180°C and C for 20min 20 you’ve got anotheer Mexican classic, thhe tostada. Brigham Young Uni says cruunchh makes you more aware of how mucch you’re eating, so you end up consuming less. Though delicious toppings could throw a sombrero in the works, of course.

40 MEN’S HEALTH

GGUT GU UUTTTE TTER EERR CCRREED EDI DDIIT

Put down the Old El Paso! Now, in a bowl, combine a pinch of salt with 115g Maseca cornmeal (£3.90 mexgrocer.co.uk). Add 180ml hot water, knead for 2min, cover the dough with clingfilm and leave for 20min. While you wait, line your tortilla press (£16 mexgrocer.co.uk) with clingfilm so you can remove your tortillas tear-free. Once the dough has rested, place an iron griddle (£36 robertdyas.co.uk) on a high heat, and form your dough into ping-pong-size balls for tortillas 10cm in diameter – big enough for four mouthfuls, small enough to stop you overfilling. Next, place the ball in the centre of the press and close. Remove, flip and repeat. Go from press to piping-hot griddle and cook your tortillas for 2min 15sec, flipping every 45sec until they puff up slightly. Once cooked, place in the fold of a tea towel to stop going p them g g cold. Muy y bien.

MEN ME NSSHHEEAALLTTHH.C .CO CCOO.U O.UK O. UK


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0088

TTAAACO CO THHEE CO GLOORRY GL

TEA SSEERV RVVIC I E IC

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WRAP S TA R S Whether you plan on tucking in for a solo feast, or have booked up a mariachi band for a real fiesta, an authentic taste is essential – and matching your salsa to your protein is the mark of a taco connoisseur. “Salsas are split into two camps,” Hart explains. “Firstly fresh, made from tomatillos with lots of acidity, added to coriander, garlic, lime and jalapeño” – pair this with chicken or white fish for a lighter taste. For richer flavours and a higher fat content you need a smoky, more indulgent salsa: “Cooked tomatoes, roasted garlic, onion and chipotle.” Now, adopt a Mexicando attitude (sorry) and try these delicious recipes from d Ell Pastor. Ta acos Hart and d gh D da. done right. De nada.

i) MONKFISH & SALSA VERDE SERVES 2 • Coriander seeds, 1tsp • Peppercorns, 10 • A lime, zested and juiced • Fresh coriander, handful • Monkfish tail, 250g • Blue ue corn co tortillas, 6 FORR THE SALSA: SA: • Tomatillos, T ll 100g • White Wh onion,, ¼ • Poblano bl peppers, 40g • A garlic clove, skin onn • Jalapeños, 2

METHOD Grill the salsa ingredients for 10min; blend, add salt to taste and set aside. Toast the coriander seeds and peppercorns, grind using a pestle and mortar, and mix with 1½tbsp vegetable oil and the lime juice and zest. Add the fish, cover and leave to marinate for 2hr. Cook the fish in i a griddle g iddle p pan on medium heat forr 5min p side, until til it eeasily comes aw per way from bone. ke into the toortilla f o the t e bo e Flake t a spoon overr salsa. One tequuila and iila... ..

ii) SPINACH, SQUASH & QUESO FRESCO SERVES 2 • Squash, 250g • Paprika, 1tsp • Spinach, 100g • Wholemeal tortillas, 6 • Queso fresco, 150g

METHOD Cut the squash into bitesize chunks, toss in a little vegetable oil with a pinch of salt and the paprika, and roast at 180°C until soft and golden. Steam the spinach then squeeze out any excess water. Arrange the spinach and squash on the tortillas then h crumble bl the h queso fresco f o r the top. ov ove p Two tequila… q …

GUT GGU UT UTTTE TER EERR CCRRED EEDI DIT

WORDS: TED LANE | PHOTOGRAPHY: LOUISA PARRY | FOOD STYLING: TAMARA VOS

S SPECIAL BREEEW Too early for tequila? tequ Traditional Mexican tea, or agua, provides thirst-quenching a thir h lth boost that also healt e nguishes chipotleextin d ced emergencies induc

ICED & SPICED HIBISCUS TEA SERVES 2 • Hibisscus flowers, 2tbsp • Cinn i namon, 1tsp • Clovves, 1tsp • Card damom, 1tsp • Agav g ve syrup, 1tsp METHOOD M L e the shot glasses, salt Leave d lim l me to one side. Add and hibisc h cus (which improves i nity), cinnamon immun ( (meta bolism boost), cloves ( inflammatory) and (anti-i cardamom (digestion aid) to pot with 500ml boiling a teap w water. . Steep for 3min then strain and set aside to cool ol. When ready to drink, add h ag gave syrup. Slamminn’.. the

iii) CRISPY SPY CHI CH I CKK EN & SALSA S S VERDE SERVES 2 • Salsa ingredients, above • Skin-on chicken thigh, 250g • A chipotle chilli • A cascabel chilli • A garlic clove • Coriander seeds, 1tsp • Cumin seeds, 1tsp • Agave syrup, 1tsp • A lime, juiced • Fresh coriander, 50g • Yellow corn tortillas, 6

METHOD METHO Make thee salsa verde,, as abovee. Add the chicken to a pan an of water w with h boil, boil some salt and sugar. Bring to the then cool and leave for 2hr. Fry the dried chillies, garlic and spices, then grind with a pestle and mortar. Add the syrup, lime juice and most of the fresh coriander and spoon over the drained chicken. Leave for an hour, then griddle for 20min. Slice and lay on top of the tortillas with the salsa and remaining coriander. Three tequila...

iv) TUNA & CHIPOTLE MAYO TOSTADAA SSERVES 2 • A chipotle chillii • Mayonnaise, 1tbsp • A lime, juiced j • A leek, very finely sliced i d • Mirin, 1tbsp • Light soy sauce, 1tbsp • Raw tuna fillet, 250g • Tostadas, 6 • An avocado, sliced

O METHOD h chipotle h l in warm water Soakk the for 10min. Drain and p pat dry. y Blitz it h mayonnaise and d add dd llime into the juice to taste. Fryy th the sliced leek in a small amount of coconut oilil until til brown and crisp. Remove from the pan and drain on kitchen roll. Mix the mirin and soy sauce. Slice the tuna into strips, dip into the mirin/soy mix then arrange on the tostadas. Top with a little mayo, avocado slices and the crispy leek. And finally… floor.

MEN’S HEALTH 41


10 LEAVE FAT FOR DEAD

MAKE GOOD HEALTH AN INSIDE JOB Mirror muscles can mask inner weaknesses. Change up your workouts and put dangerous fat on the run

C

ardiophobic bros beware: your bulging biceps may paint a picture of health, but the route to longevity is one best trod in running shoes. Endurance training is now proven to be the most effective cure for excess visceral fat – the internal kind that swaddles organs and obscures abdominals. A recent study by Obesity Reviews found that, while

LEAN UP AT LUNCH Trim visceral fat from your workouts with a plan from Wayne Edwards, head trainer at 3Tribes two to six months of endurance training has little effect on your weight – good news for those who fear cardio’s catabolic effect on their gains – it reduces internal fat by as much as 6%. This slashes your risk of heart failure, no matter how many kilos you’re carrying. If your waist-to-hip ratio is above one (a key marker of high intra-abdominal fat), chest’n’guns simply won’t cut it. To tackle the issue at heart you need to push hard enough to put your body in the fat-burning zone. This lunchbreak-friendly triathlon workout is your go-to.

ROWER Row as fast as you can to complete 2000m. Fit guys should aim for eight minutes, but 10 is a good target. Make sure you’re breaking a sweat.

WATT BIKE Crank it out on the bike at 60rpm for a standing climb. Every three minutes, switch to a seated sprint at 120rpm. Go for 15 minutes.

TREADMILL Sprints are proven to shift more abdominal fat than a steady-state trudge. Do four minutes at 8km/h and one at 14km/h for 15 minutes.

H HEALTH NEWSFEED N 11/16 111/

WORDS: SCARLETT WRENCH | PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC | 3TRIBES.CO.UK | ILLUSTRATIONS: ALCONIC

A

09 THE STRENGH WITHIN

STEP UP YOUR CARDIO TO STAND THE TEST OF TIME

42 MEN’S HEALTH

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11 DRINKING GAINS

FIRST ORDERS

VERSUS WINE VS BEER

Pass the bar exam at happy hour with our glass-half-full guide to selecting the best beverage for your wellbeing. g This round’s on us

BEER

WINE VVSS

3.2

2.8

The h number of un ni nits per pint. You’’r ’re looking at clos l se to 220kcal, or a slice ssll of pizza

The number of units in a large glass. At about 190kcal, that’s eequall to a bag of crisps ps ENDORSEMENT “Red wine could give athletes a boost by increasing free testosterone”

“Milk is for babies. When you grow up you have to drink beer”

Kingston University

Arnold Schwarzenegger

TIPPING POINTS

?! Balances BP

Ups bone density Helps gym recovery Enhances banter

Eases joint pain HEALTH HERO

ELLAGIC ACID

XANTHOHUMOL

Extracted from pinot noir grapes, this antioxidant slows the growth of fat cells. Berries and walnuts are (less fun) sources The point at which blood-alcohol peaks after a glass of wine, the University of Texas says, measured from the last sip. Time humorous anecdotes accordingly Adding wine to meat reduces the toxic chemicals released during the breakdown of fat. Sauce-up your next casserole

A flavonoid found in hops, it could offer protection against Alzheimer’s disease. The required dosage is unclear, however... HAPPY HOUR

54 minutes

62 minutes

PAIRING NOTES

Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Beer enters the bloodstream slightly slower. Note, subjects were asked to savour their beverage over 20 minutes. Necking it will have variable effects Marinating meat in lager before flamegrilling cuts the formation of carcinogenic PAHs by 37%, or by 68% for dark beer Universidade do Porto, Portugal

THE MH VERDICT: WINE WINS! Wine’s profusion of heart-healthy antioxidants sets a high bar – but the right beer falls a close second. While a glass of red is still the top order, a hoppy IPA beats a sweet white. In moderation, there’s no need to bottle out when minding your health: a vin-vin situation. 44 MEN’S HEALTH

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

*AS PART OF YOUR WEEK’S 14 UNITS, THAT IS | WORDS: SCARLETT WRENCH | PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC

Aids heart health*


MH LAB GPS WATCHES

MH

WINNER

NAVIGATE YOUR WAY TO A NEW PB Good fitness adventurees require a proper wrist assessment, and GPS watches let you track your training and plot H a path to a new PB. MH explores your options

S

orry old-schoolers, the days of lacing up tired trainers and running through the wild until you drop are gone. Today, unless your kit is feeding back every iota of available info, you’re losing valuable ground on your parkrun rivals. That means investing in a proper support team – preferably one you can carry on your wrist. But what sets a GPS watch apart from your ten-a-penny tracker? Well, using satellites, they chart exactly how far and fast you’re running, biking, or swimming, wherever you are in the world. That’s a lot of tech for one wrist, and precisely the type of statistical boon that can elevate your cardio endeavours to new heights. We chased down Ben Hobson, Runner’s World digital editor, and asked him to map out the GPS watches capable of keeping pace with your aspirations. Time to recalibrate your endurance.

46 MEN’S HEALTH

DURABLE STAMINA

9/10

Polar V800 £339 Value Tech Style UX Apps

ON THE MAP

8/10

Suunto Ambit3 Peak £270 Value Tech Style UX Apps

•••••••• •••••••• •••••••• ••••••• ••••••••••

DON’T LOSE FACE If you’re looking for a long-term workout partner, this watch will spot you. With a weather trend indicator and sunrise/sunset timer, you can outwit the elements and squeeze extra training time from every day. EXPERT VERDICT Worth the outlay if only to access the app, Movescount, which provides heat maps revealing the tracks favoured by communities all over the globe. You can even create original routes and upload them to your watch to blaze your own trail.

•••••••• •••••••••• ••••••••• ••••••••• •••••••••

QUIDS PRO GO Fitness nerds, look no further. Not only can Polar predict the time needed to recover before your next session, an orthostatic test shows how your heart rate responds to stress so you can tailor workouts accordingly. EXPERT VERDICT You’d be forgiven for being a little precious with this level of tech, but wrapping it in cotton wool might mess with the GPS signal. Covered with Gorilla Glass and water resistant to 30m, it’s hardwearing enough to keep pace. And at this price, it certainly should do.

IT’S GREAT OUTDOORS GPS watches are wasted on those shackled to a treadmill. But the benefits of outdoor cardio extend well beyond being able to use your new toy

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK


TRIPLE THREAT

8/10

ADDITIONAL WORDS: TED LANE | PHOTOGRAPHY: CHARLIE SURBEY

Garmin 735XT £360 Value Tech Style UX Apps

TRI IT OUT Take your triathlon career up a notch with a coach’s insight from your wrist. Feeding back with an analysis of your ground contact time, stride length, even lactate threshold, this model lets you make elite adjustments on the fly. EXPERT VERDICT Triathlon functions measure performance for running (indoor/outdoor), cycling (indoor/outdoor) and swimming (pool/open water). And technophobes needn’t worry about high-tech complicating matters – it’s all achieved at the touch of one button.

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

13 PARK YOUR EFFORTS

A

7.5/10

Soleus Pulse £170

••••••• ••••••••• •••••••• •••••••• •••••••

HOBBY INTO HABIT Open-air training is more rewarding than a HIIT class, which increases the likelihood of making your training plan stick, claims Environmental Science & Technology.

GREAT UNKNOWN

12 A MAP ON THE WRIST

Value Tech Style UX Apps

••••••••• ••••••• •••••• •••••••• •••••••

YOUR NEXT STEP As well as standard

training features, its GPS allows you to record workouts with a new level of accuracy. Just as there are athletes whose success is founded on doing the basics well, the same is true of Soleus. EXPERT VERDICT Much like when wearing a GPS watch, it’s worth going off the beaten track and investigating the lesser-known. This entry-level watch provides all you need to maximise your long-distance workouts without exhausting your bank account.

PRICE IS RIGHT With the average gym membership well over £300 per year, park runs and adventures in further fields offer fitness-boosting opportunities that won’t break the bank.

PICK UP THE PACE Not only does hitting the hills increase leg strength, but it improves running economy too, reports Karolinska Institute. It’ll shave minutes from your PB when you’re back on the flat.

FINELY TUNED

8.5/10

TomTom Spark £190 Value Tech Style UX Apps

•••••••• ••••••• •••••••••• ••••••••• ••••••••

BRIGHT SPARK The Spark’s ability to store music makes it gym-friendly, while TomTom’s MySports app lets you easily review your progress. With changeable strap colours, a lot of boxes are being ticked for a reasonable price point. EXPERT VERDICT Music is a proven performance enhancer and can be an invaluable distraction from the monotony of long runs. Training with 500 songs – not to mention getting a free set of wireless headphones – can make all the difference to your motivation.

MEN’S HEALTH 47


14 FEEDER’S DIGEST

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN…

04

IIt’sEAT GLUTEN? a nutritional bête noire outlawed

NUTRITION OMISSION

by athletes and the #eatclean zealots alike. But is it all bad? MH breaks down dietetic enemy number one

Going gluten-free in the hope you’ll feel energised? “In some cases, giving up gluten can increase tiredness,” says Akbar. “Foods containing gluten provide a range of other nutrients, from iron to folic acid to fibre. Remove these from your diet, and you’re creating nutrient deficiencies that can lead to fatigue.” Instead of simply switching to wheat substitutes, focus on eating more fruit and veg. Don’t make the cut.

04

01

HARD TO STOMACH Like Big Sam Allardyce, gluten’s image problem is partly down to its size. “Gluten is a large protein with a low surface area,” says Dr Ayesha Akbar of the British Society of Gastroenterology. “As proteins pass through the digestive system, a greater surface area helps enzymes break them down.” Help your body out by chewing 15 times per mouthful.

01

05 02

02

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WORDS: DANIEL MASOLIVER | ILLUSTRATION: PETER GRUNDY

RIGHTFUL VILIFICATION “In the less than 1% of people who suffer from coeliac disease, the body launches an autoimmune response to gluten, attacking the villi (tiny projections in your small intestines) and resulting in the malabsorption of nutrients.” That’s an extreme case, but 5-8% of us can still experience some sensitivity, where your villi are intact, but diarrhoea and bloating regularly rear their heads.

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

A

03

GUT FEELING We’re all inclined to think with our stomachs, but the relationship between brain and gut may be more intimate than you realise. “There are more serotonin-producing cells and nerve fibres in the gut than anywhere else in the body,” says Akbar. “In a recent study

of individuals with gluten sensitivity, those given a placebo saw an improvement in mood compared to those given gluten capsules.” Sensitive souls on a free-from diet do have something to smile about.

BLOATED STATE Gwyneth Paltrow and an army of paleo fans would have you believe the gluten in your bread is to blame for bloating. Reality is a little more complicated. “It’s not uncommon for people to experience bloating after eating wheat-based foods,” says Akbar. “But how much of that water retention is down to the gluten, and how much is because of short-chain carbs is very hard to say.” Use your loaf: cutting off your crusts isn’t worth losing the fibre.

MEN’S HEALTH 49


PUMP UP YOUR HEALTH $TOCK In our new franchise, ch hiis h issee, e, we we chart cch haarrrtt of re rrecent eeccceent ent the rise and fall of research. This mo month month, on o ntth nt h h,, it iit’s tt’s ’s the best investments ments me m ent en nttss for your heart

02 GOLD FISH A diet high in fruit and veg, fish and unrefined foods staves off heart attacks and may also help reverse effects of erectile dysfunction. European Society of Cardiology

03 GRAB A LIFT Sports scientists found that lifting weights promotes more uniformly sized red blood cells – an indicator of low heart disease risk. Uni of Mississippi

04 GO GREEN Just one kiwi fruit a week raises ‘good’ HDL cholesterol concentration in your blood, reducing heart attack-inducing blood clots. Sweet. Nutrition Journal

05 BREATH OF AIR A weekly yoga class lowered heart rate and blood pressure in people with abnormal heart rhythm. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

50 MEN’S HEALTH

05

FIT$E IND£X HEART HEALTH

03

02

06

07

01

01 FINE TUNES Listening to classical music on your morning commute cuts stress and blood pressure. Even if it’s a loop of the GoT theme song. Deutsches Arzteblatt International

04

12

11 08

06 COUPLE THERAPY Putting off that proposal? Tie the knot and you’ll have a 14% higher chance of surviving a heart attack than your single friends. Uni of East Anglia

10

09 13

07 EGG ’EM ON Cracking the myth that yolks are bad for you, researchers found eggs did not affect the levels of ‘bad’ LDL cholesterol in athletes’ blood. San Diego State Uni

FOLLOWING YOUR HEART’S DESIRES WILL PAY DIVIDENDS

08 TEAM PLAYER Watching your team struggle against the drop needn’t end in heartache. Scientists found stroke risk is not notably higher on match days. European Academy of Neurology

09 RAY BAN A new study puts the sunshine vitamin back in the shade: both too low and too high levels of vit D were found to raise the risk of cardiorelated mortality. Uni of Copenhagen

16

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10 SALT WOUNDS We already know that a lack of salt can hinder muscle growth; but it turns out that a deficiency may increase your risk of heart disease, too. McMaster University

11 OIL TRICKS Using veg oils rich in linoleic acid instead of butter may lower cholesterol – but it can also make heart disease more likely. He who dairies wins. British Medical Journal

15 QUIT SMOKING

15

12 OVERLOAD Gym bros, take note. High-calorie shakes reduce levels of ANP, which lowers blood pressure and gets rid of excess sodium. American College of Cardiology

14 EXHAUSTION 13 EVERY CLOUD There’s never been a better time to switch. E-cigarette vapour causes little or no stress response in artery cells, unlike conventional smoke. University of Bristol

The more traffic noise you’re exposed to, the greater your heart attack risk. As if you needed another cause of sleepless nights. Deutsches Arzteblatt International

Sorry, city-dwellers: air pollutants speed the build-up of arterial plaque, increasing your odds of heart troubles later in life. Reroute the commute. Uni of Washington

16 TWO BAD A non-mover – and largely preventable in its more common type 2 form – diabetes leads to a 50% higher risk of dying from a heart attack. University of Leeds

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

WORDS: LOUEE DESSENT-JACKSON | ILLUSTRATIONS: INFOMEN

A

15 THE TICKER LIST


BULK UP, SLIM DOWN CHEESE TOASTIE

GREASE THE WHEELS FOR FASTER FITNESS With a few easy upgrades, the humble cheese toastie can become the hottest way to take a healthy bite out of your body goals g 5C4ARBS

MAKE GRATER GAINS BEEF UP WITH A BUBBLING SLICE OF MUSCLE FUEL

• Wholegrain mustard, 50g • Horseradish sauce, 50g • Lemon juice • Sourdough bread, 4 slices • Cornichons, 100g • Pickled onions, 2, separated into petals

g 52FAT

UP

INGREDIENTS

LK

Cheese toasties may be a piping hot trend thanks to new comfort food eateries such as London’s Melt Room, but a few tweaks can transform them into mouthwatering muscle meals. This salt beef and mozzarella filling delivers a 77g protein hit to your muscles, while the lactic acid bacteria in sourdough bread reduces blood sugar spikes and limits excess fat storage. Plus the addition of cornichons and pickled onions lend a dose of blood pressure-stabilising potassium and bone-building vitamin K for a health-kick crunch. Napkins at the ready.

BU

7R7OgTEIN P

2 9C9ALORIES

BULK-UP EXTRAS • Salt beef, 400g, shredded • Mayonnaise, 100g • Mozzarella, 8 slices

> METHOD SERVES 2

1/ MIX IT UP

2/ GRILLL TIME

Bind the salt beef with the mustard, mayo and horseradish in a bowl. Lick the spoon, then season with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice.

Lightly toast your sliced sourdough in the grill. Top with the beef mix and two slices of mozzarella on each before grilling until the cheese begins to melt.

3/ IN A PICKLE

4/ NICE SLICE

French cafes serve their sandwiches with a side of pickled treats, so while it’s bubbling, chop the cornichons and plate up with the pickled onions.

k sandwiches, d i h Now layer into two chunky being careful not to make a beef and mozzarella mess. Cut each sandwich in half so they’re easier to shoehorn in.

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CHEESE BROAD

FAT GAIN IS TOAST

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MELT AWAY INCHES GRILL YOUR LOVE HANDLES WITH A MED CLUB THE TOAST MAKER Name: Steven Ellis Job: Chef Ellis’s skill at fusing French cooking with English and Mediterranean flavours will raise your cheese toasties to new layers of flavour.

INGREDIENTS • Olive oil, 1tbsp • Garlic, 3 cloves, crushed • Chives, 6 sprigs, finely sliced • Rye bread, 4 thin slices For the salsa verde: • Shallot, ½, diced • Anchovy fillets, 4 • Parsley, 30g • Basil, 30g • Capers, 1tsp • Olive oil, 1tsp • Red wine vinegar, 1tsp

3C2ARgBS

S

P

DOW

3R5OTgEIN

LI M

21FAgT

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4A6LO3RIES

SLIM-DOWN EXTRAS • Cherry tomatoes, 8, chopped • A yellow pepper • A courgette, chopped • Halloumi, 150g, sliced into 6

Halloumi is a smart Cypriot cheese that stays fairly solid when heated, so its succulent slices maintain a meaty texture that will keep your stomach satisfied for hours. With one serving containing 20g of hunger-busting protein and a whopping 80% of your bonestrengthening calcium RDA, it’s a mightier alternative to traditional cheddar. Serving it on rye triples the satiating fibre compared to white bread, keeping cravings at bay, while filling up on Mediterranean veg has been shown to trigger double the weightloss results of a bland low-fat diet. With a dollop of thick salsa verde you’ll bag enough healthy fats to fuel workouts and further melt any dough from your middle.

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WORDS: MARK BAILEY | PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC | FOOD STYLIST: TAMARA VOS | ILLUSTRATIONS: ALCONIC

> METHOD SERVES 2

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1/ CHOP TO IT

2/ FEEL THE BURN

Set the oven to 180°C then cut up the vegetables into bite-size chunks. Mix them together with a dash of olive oil and crushed garlic cloves.

Place the vegetables on a baking tray, season to taste, then cook for 15min. Allow to cool before removing the cloves and mixing in the chives.

3/ CARE TO SALSA?

4/ PAN HUNGER

Blitz all salsa verde ingredients – bar the olive oil and vinegar – in a food processor. Add the oil and vinegar then pulse for a spreadable consistency.

Toast the rye bread in a hot, dry pan then remove and add the halloumi. Smear the salsa over the bread, then add the cheese and veg and dig in.

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EXECUTIVE DECISIONS

WORKS OF WISDOM

A

MIND NEWSFEED 11/16

A TAXING JOB IS OFTEN THE BEST MEDICINE FOR A MUDDLED MIND

CLIMB THE COGNITIVE LADDER Chasing a bigger pay slip

WORDS: MATT EVANS | PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC *UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

could be selling your brain short. Challenge yourself to keep you mind alive

H

old onto your wallets: wages in Britain have fallen by an average of 10% since the financial crisis, worse than anywhere in Europe bar Greece. So far, so scary. But just because your job isn’t filling your bank account doesn’t mean your career is bankrupt of worth. In fact, when it comes to your next career move, a change in

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priorities could help make a smart deposit in your health pension. A new study in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine discovered a challenging workplace improves cognitive powers as you age, meaning mental stimulation wins out over salary in the long-term. Sadly, the reverse is also true – a better-paid office drone filling in spreadsheets will find his faculties declining far faster, increasing your likelihood of developing dementia. The western world likes to equate wealth with health. But it’s mental stimulation, not money in the bank, that will guarantee an upturn in later fortunes. So next time you update your CV, consider the jobs (right) designed to boost bank balance and brain. These are the thinking man’s career choices.

STIMULUS PACKAGE The top job criteria for a healthy brain, matched to your new role*

MENTORING Stay savvy by sharing your knowledge. Teachers rarely lose their edge.

PRECISION WORKING Tinker with an engineering career for cognitive gains through motor skills.

NEGOTIATING Stimulate debate with a legal career to get creative juices flowing.

CO-ORDINATING Overseeing people in a management role gets your brain spinning plates.

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STAR POWER IS BUILT BEHIND THE SCENES


COVE R M O D E L M U SC LE JUSTIN THEROUX

The Slow Burner WITH THE PHYSIQUE OF A MAN HALF HIS AGE, A STRATOSPHERICALLY HIGH-PROFILE WIFE, AND A CAREER LITTERED WITH QUIET PERFORMANCES IN LAUDED MOVIES, JUSTIN THEROUX COULD JUST BE THE COOLEST MAN IN HOLLYWOOD. THAT IS, OF COURSE, IF HE LIVED THERE WORDS BY COLIN CRUMMY - PHOTOGRAPHY BY PATRIK GIARDINO


Justin Theroux is a man who knows his wardrobe. His style says downtown New York biker: leather boots, skinny jeans, vintage T-shirt. Sleeveless tee if the temperature heads above 30, leather jacket if it doesn’t. There are absolute no-nos, even as the mercury rises in a Manhattan summer. “The one thing that is unchangeable is I refuse to wear shorts,” he states with the confidence of a man who is never off best-dressed men lists. “I just don’t think it’s a good look on anybody.” Wait, there’s more. “It’s the same with flip-flops. I don’t think anyone should wear those things unless they’re in rehab, in hospital or on a beach. I just prefer jeans and boots.” The grungy New York thing is a tricky one to pull off without looking like you’re free-wheeling into a mid-life crisis. On 45-year-old Theroux it simply looks cool. Sometimes he’ll ride one of his four motorcycles, but lately he’s opted for a bicycle to get around town, presumably giving NYC’s couriers a dressing down on their presentation. Even the addition of a beard fell effortlessly under the ‘he wore it well’ category on walls of shame. The facial hair has, however, not been the most welcome. “It’s driving me crazy,” he laughs, “because I actually love shaving. There’s something that feels good about shaving.” The beard, you may have gathered, is not Theroux’s by choice. He’s grown it for the third and final series of The Leftovers, the HBO show that’s pushed him into the spotlight for reasons more integral than his ability to wear clothes well or the fact that he just so happens to be married to Jennifer Aniston. But like most other

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things in Justin Theroux’s world, he is taking the beard in his stride. Adapting, even. “To be honest, there is actually a beard balm I’m enjoying,” he laughs, popping into his bathroom to retrieve it. “It’s lavender. It smells nice.” Theroux, you also may have gathered, is a gift to interviewers. He is engaged and enthusiastic, no matter the topic. Big or small, he loves or hates it. He can chew the fat over his love of grooming (“I’m into it,” he says, “kind of unapologetically, because it makes me feel better”), his love of dogs (he adopts them and uses social media to guilt trip others to do the same, which works a treat) and his great, great love of his adopted hometown New York City. When Men’s Health catches up with him, he’s enjoying a day off from filming The Leftovers, which has relocated to Australia for series three. He is in relaxed form away from what he calls the “grief fest” of the daily schedule. That’s because The Leftovers is heavy-duty stuff; an existential crisis in boxset form. It begins with 2% of the world’s population disappearing without explanation and then asks what happens next. The answers include: people go crazy, join cults, smoke a lot and sleep walk to calamitous effect. The local sheriff

“SCHOOLL WASS TOUG TOUGH, H, BUT BU UT LET’S LE LET LETT’S ’SS BE CLEAR CLEAR, R, IT WASN’TT SYRIAN IAN REFUG REFUGEE FUGEE EE TOUGH” UGH”

ALTERNATIVE ASCENT If Theroux’s route to stardom has been long and varied, his CV reveals an actor of impeccable taste 2000 American Psycho His ’80s yuppie character Timothy Bryce was one of Patrick Bateman’s business card jousters. 2001 Mulholland Drive Theroux played director Adam Kesher in David Lynch’s lauded noirthriller masterpiece. 2003 Six Feet Under After cameos in Sex And The City, a recurring role in Six Feet Under brought the actor to UK screens.


THEROUX HAS MADE FEW CONCESSIONS ON HIS CLIMB TO THE TOP


Kevin Garvey – played by Theroux – tries to keep order and not lose his mind. It’s not a spoiler to say that he succeeds in neither.

TAKING THE LEAD The show was developed from the Tom Perrotta novel by Lost creator Damon Lindelof. It shares with that series a fixation with the unexplained; its themes are the big questions of life and death. It can be baroque and studied, like a series of high-minded Instagram images. If that sounds like a lot to stomach for a Tuesday night in front of the tellybox, Theroux understands. Series one, he admits, tested viewers to “breaking point”. But over two seasons and a change of location, characters and themes, The Leftovers has found its groove and a dedicated audience, willing to grapple with the brain ache. “The show is disquieting,” says Theroux. “The people who love the show are embracing that because there are existential questions in it that we ask all the time. Questions about things like where do we go when we die, why are we here, what is the point of life? All that stuff.” The show has belatedly catapulted Theroux into leading man status after 20 years in the business. Shave the beard and Theroux is action man personified, thanks to his Italian heritage and a dedication to the weights room. Those sleeveless tees don’t fill themselves. But Theroux’s starring role isn’t the stuff of classic heroes. Sheriff Garvey is all outer strength and inner bewilderment. His body may say ‘ready for action’. His eyes say ‘what the fuck just happened?’ Genetics might have something to do with his success. His mother, Phyllis, was a journalist with The Washington Post. His uncle is the novelist Paul Theroux, his cousins are writers and TV presenters Louis and Marcel Theroux and his father, Eugene, is a lawyer. Yet despite the bookish background, Theroux did not thrive in school. He didn’t like teachers or authority and was diagnosed with dyslexia and ADHD. “It was tough, but let’s be clear, it wasn’t Syrian refugee tough,” he qualifies. His teenage

“I ONLY LY EVER FIND MYSEL MYSELF ELFF UNHAPPYY IF I MISTRUST MISTRUS USTT MY GUT””

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COVE R M O D E L M U SC LE JUSTIN THEROUX

THEROUX’S RISING PROFILE HASN’T ALTERED HIS TIGHT GRIP ON REALITY

years were met with a severe case of wanderlust. “I knew I wanted to leave my neighbourhood for somewhere exciting,” he says. “I wanted to be alone, not in a melancholy way, but to experience everything.” Having graduated from Bennington College in Vermont with a double major in visual art and drama, he headed for New York.

NEW YORK STATE OF MIND

HAIR: CHRIS MCMILLAN FOR LIVING PROOF AT SOLO ARTISTS | GROOMING: LISA-RAQUEL C/O ANNA CASAGRANDE AT SEE MANAGEMENT | STYLING: RYAN HASTINGS AND ANALI MRAOVITCH

When Theroux landed in Manhattan, he “threw a bunch of stuff at the wall” to see what worked. He painted murals for legendary clubs like Palladium and The Limelight, proving that even when Justin Theroux just threw stuff at a wall, it was a pretty cool wall. He did theatre, then advanced to TV and film. He got an apartment in Greenwich Village and indulged his fixer-upper side, refurbishing salvaged furniture. He decorated his flat in a singular fashion. A New York Times interiors feature from 2003 catalogued his love for collecting curios. A treasure trove for those who like their comedy black, home décor at Chez Theroux included macabre medical instruments to a sweets bowl filled with human teeth. His cousin Louis once gifted him a book on syphilis, which sounds like the documentarian being weird until Theroux clarifies that it was to go with all the other objects the actor has on the STD. “He was just giving me a companion piece,” he smiles. “But most of the things I own are not repulsive. It’s not that I have two-headed babies in glass jars and formaldehyde. That’s not what my house looks like at all.” While Theroux lived his real-life New York dream in his twenties, a slightly more sanitised version of Manhattan living captured the television-watching public’s imagination. Friends was shot on an LA soundstage but put forward a fantasy vision of Big Apple life. It turned its six leads into megastars and one of their number, Jennifer Aniston – because of her persona, her hair and her private life – into one of the most scrutinised celebrities on the planet. After meeting on the set of Tropic Thunder in 2007, they dated and – after many, many reams of tabloid speculation – married in a private ceremony at their home in Bel Air in 2015. Justin Theroux is not one to complain. Like the man says, his woes are not that of the war torn. But the level of spotlight his

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SHIRTS KELLY COLE RECYCLED VINTAGE, BRACELET DEAN HARRIS AT BARNEYS, JEANS THEROUX’S OWN BLK DNM, OTHER ACCESSORIES THEROUX’S OWN


COVE R M O D E L M U SC LE JUSTIN THEROUX

CONSTANTLY ON THE GO, THEROUX’S FITNESS GOALS HAVE RARELY DERAILED

ALTERNATIVE ASCENT Theroux continues to hit new heights 2008 Tropic Thunder This role led to Theroux meeting his future wife. Oh, and he was a writer and exec producer… 2014 The Leftovers HBO’s slow-burning cult favourite has made him a superstar without sacrificing credibility. 2016 The Girl On The Train In cinemas this month, Theroux stars opposite Emily Blunt in ‘the new Gone Girl’.

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wife, their marriage and he himself deals with is intense. “To some extent, there’s no use us bitching about the tedium of the paparazzi,” he says, even though every time he leaves his apartment he’s got a dozen on his doorstep. The couple tend to ignore the tabloids, but this year Aniston chose to respond in an op-ed piece to tabloid reports that she was pregnant, a story gleaned from pap shots of her stomach while on holiday. The reality was she’d just had lunch. For his part, Theroux is both open and honourable when talk turns to his uber famous wife. “I was very proud of what she wrote,” he says. “It was a rare insight into how disgusting all that is. At some point it becomes bullying. It sucks when people aim cameras at your stomach on some bizarre womb watch. But more to the point, it’s equally damaging to the national conversation.” There is a strong moral backbone to Theroux, something he credits with living in New York. He says having the luxury of doing the latter part of his growing up there made him open to all kinds of experiences and people. David Lynch, the enigmatic director who cast him in Mulholland Drive back in 2001, has described him as a ‘modern man’. But Theroux turns this on its head. “I just find non-modern men very boring. Just because they seem rigid, stuck in the old tropes of what it means to be a professional, a boyfriend, a father. Those kinds of things.” Undoubtedly, Theroux has been a very modern man in the cool way he’s handled his wife’s fame.

THE INSIDE TRACK In addition to New York, the couple own a place in LA, the latter also home to their chickens. He recently completed another project close to home in upstate New York, The Girl On The Train. It’s the only time in our conversation he turns cagey. But with due cause; he doesn’t want to give away any of its many twists. Based on the bestselling book, it is likely to emulate the success of Gone Girl and thrust Theroux further into cinema’s major league. Between bi-coastal living, filming commitments (he’s off to Berlin next for another project he’s tight lipped about) and the global locations for The Leftovers, Theroux has to manage his fitness regime

accordingly. When in LA, he hits the weights rack hard. He doesn’t lift absurd amounts, but heavy weights at low reps. He sets a goal, reaches it and works out a maintenance programme when he’s filming. “You have to come in to filming in the best shape you can because as the hours and weeks grind on you, you find yourself not having the luxury of going to the gym and doing the big workouts you like to do,” he says. “I always try to look into where I’m going to be so I can find a little spot to work out,” says Theroux. “The beauty of workouts now is that you really just need some rubber bands and a kettlebell and you can set up anywhere.” Sometimes, though, he doesn’t even leave the apartment to get with the workout programme. “I’ve just got this Peloton bike, which I fucking adore,” he enthuses. “You can drop in on actual spin classes in New York on this monitor. I thought it would gather dust but I tried a class and 15 minutes in I was gushing with sweat.” Theroux doesn’t sweat the small stuff. In his thirties, when he was working on the screenplay for Iron Man 2, he had no time for the gym. He packed on weight and developed back pain. He’s turned that around but the motivation is more about feeling than looking good. At 45, he’s conscious of losing muscle mass faster and he sees exercise as an investment in living a long, healthy life. “Fitness is a brain food. It makes my brain function better. It improves my mood,” he says. “There are times I don’t enjoy working out, but I never regret visiting a gym. It’s about keeping the spring tight, you know?” Regrets would seem to be few and far between for Justin Theroux. He may star in a show about the mysteries of life but he’s a man who’s cracked the code to living a happy one. It is perhaps why he conducts himself in such an easy manner. It turns out his happiness is instinctive. “I only ever find myself unhappy if I mistrust my gut,” he says. “If I make a career decision that I think will advance me in some way, it usually ends badly with me being unhappy in a location I don’t like. If I’ve learned anything it’s to do what I want based on my taste. Usually I enjoy myself. It’s simple advice, do what makes you happy. But I’ve been very successful, at least on a happiness level.” The Girl On The Train is in UK cinemas 5 October. The Leftovers returns in 2017

TURN OVER FOR THEROUX’S FEELGOOD FITNESS PLAN MEN’S HEALTH 63


COVE R M O D E L M U SC LE JUSTIN THEROUX

STEP UP YOUR WORKOUTS FOR A PHYSIQUE THAT’LL FILL OUT THE BIG SCREEN

The Workouts WORKOUT PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC AT HEARST STUDIOS

SCULPT LEAN LEADING-MAN MUSCLE WITH THEROUX’S FITNESS REGIME

THE FOUNDATIONS OF FAT-BURNING

Barbell moves and compound exercises are the building blocks of Theroux’s physique. This workout from his PT, Jason Walsh of Rise Nation, kicks off with a big

1/ THRUSTER

2/ FARMER’S WALK

3/ FRONT SQUAT

4/ L-SIT PULL-UP

3 SETS OF 10 REPS From a front rack position, bar on your shoulders, drop into a squat (A). Press back up explosively and use the momentum to drive the bar overhead, maintaining a straight back (B). Lower the bar and repeat.

3 SETS OF 30SEC Grab a heavy dumbbell or kettlebell in each hand, tucking in your pelvis to avoid your back stooping with the weight (A). Walk forward over a set distance (B), not pausing at the end before yyou turn to walk back.

3 SETS OF 8 REPS Legs feeling heavy? Push through to complete 8 reps with a full range of motion: with a barbell across your chest, squat down to 90 degrees (A). Tense your core to stay upright as you drive back upp to the top p (B).

3 SETS OF 8-10 REPS Your legs may get a breather, but this move is tough on your core. Lift your legs until your body is bent at a right angle (A), then drive your elbows down as you pull your chest to the bar (B). Lower with control.

lift, engaging all major muscles while pushing your body into prime fat-burning territory. The moves that follow capitalise on this boost to get you lean, quickly.

A

B B

B

A

A

A

CUT OUT AND KEEP

B

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COVE R M O D E L M U SC LE JUSTIN THEROUX

FUNCTIONAL STRENGTH

Walsh fits as much pull work into Theroux’s workouts as possible. His reasoning is that most people neglect the posterior chain – ie

1/ SLED PULL

2/ TRX REVERSE FLY

3/ TRX ONE-ARM PULL

4A/ TRAP BAR DEADLIFT

3 SETS OF 45SEC “Justin hates these,” says Walsh. But they’re not here for sadism: sled pulls p prep p p yyour muscles for heavy llifts. Attach the sled with a belt, then sprint for p f a short distancce.

4 SETS OF 10-15 REPS Standing in front of a TRX, take a handle in each hand and lean back slowly until your arms are straight (A). Squeeze your shoulderblades to draw back up to the top (B).

4 SETS OF 10-15 REPS Holding both handles in one hand, lean back as shown (A). Steady yourself by tensing your core and glutes, then pull your body up (B). Keep your elbow at your side.

5 SETS OF 8 REPS Stand inside the trap bar, grasping the handles with knees bent (A). Pull back your shoulderblades to brace your upper body as you press with your legs too standing di (B) (B).

muscles running down your back, glutes and hamstrings – which has the biggest potential for strength and extra fat-burning. SUPERSET 01

B A A A B

B

A

B

SUPERSET 01

SUPERSET SUP T 02

4B/ WEIGHTED PULL-UP

5A/ LANDMINE OVERHEAD OVERH PRESS

5 SETS OF 8 REPS Attach a belt with a manageable weight – Theroux lifts 20kg. From a dead hang (A), pull your chest to the bar (B) then slowly lower. Go back to the deadlifts for another set.

CAREFUL PLANNING AND TIME-MANAGEMENT GIVE THEROUX HIGH DEFINITION

4 SETS OF 20 REPS Stand with one end of a barbell in your left hand, the other end fixed in a corner, knees bent (A). Press to full extension (B), then lower and side. repeat on the other side B

B

A

A

SUPERSET 02

5B/ LANDMINE BENT-OVER ROW

6/ BICEPS CURL

4 SETS OF 8 REPS Turn to face away from the base, holding the bar at your side (A) (A). Hinge forwaard and row into your stomach ((B)) before changing g g sides. Return to thhe h landminnne ppresses.

4 SETS OF 21 REPS Round off the session with a classic bodybuilding routine. Curl a pair of dumbells up to halfway for 7 reps, then lower from top to halfway for 7, and finally complete 7 full reps. B

B

CUT OUT AND KEEP

A

A

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TIME WORDS BY DAVID MORTON / PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOBE LAWRENSON

MAXIMI AXIMISING AXIM M I S IING N G LI LIFE’SS GREA GREATE GREATEST AT E ST LLUXURY LUU Y

01

WEEK TO CUT LOOSE AND WATCH YOUR WAISTLINE SHRINK

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PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY | BALLOON COURTESY OF BUBBLEGUM BALLOONS/NOTONTHEHIGHSTREET.COM

f you’re the sort of employee who regularly spends his evenings bathed in the glow of an Anglepoise, triple-checking reports and tweaking emails for the morning, it’s no use blaming late-night ‘al desko’ dining for your weight gain. In fact, a recent study has found that perfectionism in the workplace will do more than simply disincline workmates to invite you out for drinks. It’ll make you fat. In an article published in the Journal of Health Psychology, study subjects with high perfectionism scores had an increased propensity to obesity in the short term. Worse still, career obsessive compulsives

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showed a 51% higher risk of early death than their laid-back colleagues. And that’s a very good case for closing down those spreadsheets. “Perfectionism is definitely a virtue to be extolled within reason,” says Dr Prem Fry, research professor at Trinity Western University. “But beyond a certain threshold, it can backfire and become an impediment.” So, while getting things right when it matters will help you scale the ladder, letting the minutiae of the nine-tofive slide from time to time will make you a leaner, healthier man for, oh you know, the rest of your life. We’ll let you decide how that one should pan out.

CUT YOURSELF SOME SLACK: PERFECTIONISM COULD BE WEIGHING YOU DOWN

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DAYS TO LOOK MORE DESIRABLE WITHOUT O LIFTINGG A FINGER GR

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f all the things we have apparently exceeded ultimate capacity p y for in recent years, #peakbeard was one of the first backlashes to trend. Yet while the beard boom has shown signs of abatement, it is byy no means dead yyet. And those men who have ppersisted with their facial topiary can justifiably bristle with pride to learn that the beard has now been pproven to enhance its wearer’s desirabilityy to women. Researchers at the Universityy of New South Wales in Australia asked s ed women o e to rate te the t faces of variously groomed men. Those with heavy beards scored highest g for perceived parentingg ability, health, suitabilityy as a partner p and in general appeared more alluringg g than clean-shaven counterparts. p The reason,, researchers said,, is that the beard suggests a healthy gg dose of testosterone. Pogonophobes need not fret, g however, since you y don’t need to look like you’ve lived in the y woods for six months to reapp the rewards. Heavyy stubble was deemed dee ed to be most ost attractive tt ct e of grades studied, so merely cuttingg g the razor out of your mirror routine for a few days is enough g to see some decent ggrowth where it reallyy makes a difference. After all, it’s unlikely we’re ggoingg to hit #peakhandsome any time soon.

72 MEN’S HEALTH

LOVE IS IN THE (FACIAL) HAIR. LET IT GROW FOR MAXIMUM APPEAL

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A DAILY CARROT HABIT NEGATES THE NEED TO ASK YOU DOC WHAT’S UP

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HOURS TO HALVEE YOUR CANCER RISK ISK WITH CARROT JUUICEE

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hile we’d be inclined to man forgive the type of m who gives #eatcleann juice j zealots a generous berth b at the salad bar, those with an eye on the escalating rates oof prostate cancer would do well to challenge their bias against the merits of so-called ‘rabbit food’. Epidemiologists at China’ss University of Zhejiang carried out a meta-analysis of 10 studiess into the cancer-fighting efficacy of at men carrots. Their sums show that e who crunch their way througgh at least one carrot a day can haalvee their risk of prostate cancer. Frequency of consumption was key, with even three times a week pulling together an 18% decline in your chances of the disease. But it was the cumulative effect of a daily dose which yielded most reward, slicing odds by 51%. A daily 10g portion (that’s about one-fifth) was enough to see the benefits, but consuming it in juiced form (try it with apple and ginger) will spare your colleagues the sound of virtuous munching. Now, embrace the root to longer life.

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SECONDS TO SPIKE YOUR ENDURANCE AND FINISH FASTER

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t’s fair to say it has been a mightily decent summer for British cycling. From the Champs-Elysées to the Rio velodrome, our athletes have become the dominant force on two wheels. And if you’ve followed in their slipstream, some new science will give you an added boost in your weekend sportive. Research at the Catholic University of Brasilia found that performing heavy leg-resistance moves before a time trial improved cyclists’ speed and stamina. The results, published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, credit the effect with

a phenomenon called ‘postactivation potentiation’, which is when intensive exertion activates the target muscle and allows it to work at a higher level directly afterwards. It’s the same process by which weightlifters can do more reps after a short warm-up with a slightly heavier weight. The resulting boost in VO2 max and reduced lactic acid led to 6% faster times over 20km. Two sets of 10-15 bodyweight squats with a 20-second rest is surely the easiest way to stay ahead of the peloton as the finish wheels into view – whether that’s the peak of a category-two climb or the office door on your commute.

BIKE COURTESY OF SOHO BIKES

WARM UP WITH STRENGTH MOVES TO BECOME A TIME-TRIAL HEAVYWEIGHT

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TIME

T BIRD KNOWS THIS HOW TOO KNOCK HO O THE SSTUFFING OUT OF YOU

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MINUTESS TOO FLICK F YOUR YO LEAN-MUSCLE S SWITCH S AT LUNCHH

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f tthee eever-earlier e e e arrival of Christmas sarnies in your local coffee shopp is an annual source off ire, try swallowingg your grievance. g That’s because a key ingredient in the g snowflake-wrapped snack is a ggift to anyone who wants to gain more muscle and lose body fat this winter. Turkey is the richest common source of tryptophan, a precursor of serotonin and melatonin, normally associated with a good night’s sleep. But results published in the journal Amino Acids show a strong link between tryptophan and your body’s synthesis of protein. In the MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

study, rats were ggiven a daily dose of oral tryptophan, equivalent to about yp p q 2gg for humans. Not only did the lucky rodents show improved muscle mass,, p crucially they also lost weight g when compared to the control ggroup. Thee researchers believe ese c e s be e e tthatt tryptophan induces yyour small intestine yp p to absorb more amino acids from the rest of your food, meaning that a mouthful of turkey can switch your body into lean-muscle mode. Whether you choose to take that mouthful with stuffing, cranberry sauce and two slices of wholemeal is, of course, up to you. But we certainly will.

MEN’S HEALTH 75


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Does My Body Look

GU TE GUTTER TE CCREDI RE T

Big / Ski M NSSHEAL ME A TH..CCOO.UUK


The age of ectomorphs and endomorphs is over. In 2016, a man’s physique follows the more modern trends of Skinny Fat, Gym Bro and Dad Bod. You might recognise yourself as one. You may have aspects of all three. Either way, you’re not doing your health or physique any favours. To transform you inside and out, we’ve compiled a guide to the three shapes, with fitness prescriptions to cure yourself of their symptoms. This is your body of evidence WORDS BY JAMIE MILLAR ILLUSTRATIONS BY OLIVER BURSTON

nny / Fat G T CCREDI GUTTER RE T

In This? M NSHEEALTH MEN THH.CO. COO. O UKK

MEN N’S HE H ALLTH 7799


01 The Skinny Fat Man GUTTE GUTTER GUT TTER ER CCRRED EDI DDIT

That most deceptive of body types, the beanpole-fatty boasts a naturally slender frame, but like an iceberg, most of his bulk is hidden. It’s this visceral fat around the midriff that makes him critically unfit, with worrying long-term health implications. It’s time to stop hiding and redress the balance See: Danny Dyer

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The New Body Shapes

A HEALTHY-LOOKING FRAME CAN BELIE SERIOUS HEALTH RISKS

COMPOUND CARVING While compound lifts reawaken both metabolism and muscle, there’s more fun to be had in ditching the barbell for unstable random-object work. These moves from Walker incorporate the most underused gym kit – so that’s less time queuing at the rack and more time working. Forget long-distance cardio, too: cutting down rest between sets is a far superior way of torching fat. Call it the Everyman Strongman Plan.

1/ FARMER’S WALK

VISCERAL PANIC

GUTTER GUT GUTTER T CCRREDI TE EAMERICAN ED DIT *SOURCES: JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH, INJURY EPIDEMIOLOGY JOURNAL, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE USA, BUCK INSTITUTE

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ften found hiding in plain sight, the Skinny Fat man is unlikely to ’fess up to the appellation – mainly because he’s unaware of it. Sure, he looks OK in a T-shirt, but underneath he’s a not-so-hot mess, with visceral fat suffocating his internal organs, drastically increasing his risk of type 2 diabetes. In short, his long-term prospects are slimmer than his arms – and he has fat chance of reaching a ripe old age. “As well as poor training habits, stress and overeating can cause your body to stockpile fat,” says PT Tim Walker of Evolution of Man Training (eomfitness. com). “As a result, it’s likely that your testosterone levels have plummeted in inverse proportion to oestrogen, leading you to pack on lard in ‘female’ places.” Think triceps (bingo wings), chest (man boobs) and hips (they don’t lie). So, while you may feel in fine fettle, if you’re carrying a little extra heft, ask yourself: are you burning the candle at both ends by getting to work early then staying up late? Does ‘training’ actually mean the occasional jaunt round the park? If the answer to either is yes, it’s time to act. “The immediate reaction when we gain weight is to hit the cardio hard, but steady-state runs actually raise the stress hormone cortisol, cannibalising what muscle you do have,” says Walker. Cue severe iron deficiency, leading to lethargy, heart palpitations and headaches – none of which will put you in an optimum training mindset. “The key issue at the heart of the Skinny Fat physique is an imbalance between lean muscle and fat,” he says. “The solution is to reverse this ratio in favour of muscle by shocking your system into action.” Joining the gym might be a good start.

20%

The fatbegetting increase in blood glucose caused by an overabundance of the stress hormone cortisol*

21

The number of days of HIIT it takes to reduce visceral fat by 18%

YOUR BODY SHOP

3 SETS OF 30SEC WITH 10SEC RESTS Holding two heavy things – dumbbells, hay bales – walk forwards, taking short, quick steps while keeping your posture upright, shoulders back (A & B). Keep going A until your grip gives out.

B

2/ ONE-ARM KETTLEBELL SWING

B

3 SETS OF 20 REPS WITH 10SEC RESTS Feet shoulder-width apart and knees soft, take a 12kg kettlebell in one hand then swing it through your legs (A). Engage your core, hips A and shoulders to drive it up to chin height (B). Do 10 reps per side to complete one set.

3/ MEDICINE BALL LUNGGE WITH OVERHEAD PRESS 3 SETS OF 20 REPS WITH 10SEC RESTS Grab a medicine ball (A) and step forward with your righht foot, lowering your left kneee to the ground. Both legs should form right angles. Simultaneously push the bball overhead (B) and hold for three seconds. Drive back up p and repeat 10 times per leg.

A

B

DRINK THIS

BUY THIS

A study in Obesity journal found a direct correlation between zero-calorie fizzy drinks and visceral fat around your waist. Soda water with a slice of lemon is a sugar-free alternative to hit that refreshing sweet spot – don’t be fooled by ‘Diet’ badges.

A pair of dumbbells. If you’re new to lifting, these are an ideal tool for teaching stability and form, with adjustable weight options preventing you from lifting too heavy too soon. Men’s Health Dial Dumbbell £99.99 argos.co.uk/menshealth

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The New Body Shapes

TOP-HEAVY TRAINING CAN LEAD TO PAINFUL POSTURAL DISPARITIES

MUSCLE-BOUND MOBILITY Bringing in the neglected postural muscles and glutes will promote far greater mobility than simply alternating chest and arms ad infinitum. However, bad habits are the hardest to break and in the gym, our man has a reputation as someone who lifts and leaves. The solution is to continue behind closed doors with Wong’s 20-minute evening stretch ven do it in front of Geordie Shore. Shoore. session. You can even

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his guy is at his best when approached face-on, thanks to his habit of constantly training from the front in the following order: chest, shoulders, abs. But a sideways glance tells a different story: his shoulders slump forward over his too-tight pecs, his behind protrudes and his lower back curves because of taut hip flexors. He may hold the gym’s deadlift record, but he’d struggle to raise his hands above his head or complete a 5K without collapsing – all of which can lead to flexibility issues in later life. Dalton Wong of Twenty Two Training (twentytwotraining.com) started out in mobility and rehab on Harley Street, and has seen his fair share of poor postures. “Many men who ‘train’ have that rounded kyphotic posture, leading to shoulder, neck and back pain,” he says. “They have a ‘no pain, no gain’ mentality, so they work through it. Inside, they’re in terrible shape: stiff, sore and shovelling protein into their stomach, which is distended because they can’t digest it all.” Not the kind of bulking you had in mind, bro. When it comes to rectifying the situation, regeneration is the name of the game. For the most part, those MMA fighters the Gym Bro wants to emulate go hard, go home and get massages. Wong suggests releasing your hip flexors with a foam roller and your pecs with a therapy ball. Not only will this improve your range of motion, it will also flush toxins from your muscles, saving you painful DOMs while boosting your bench press PB in the long run. You should also rejig your regime to emphasise your posterior chain: “For every one chest exercise, do three back,” says Wong. Having good posture will never be a negative.

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15

The number of minutes, three times a week, you should spend working on back stretches to maintain good posture

150% The rise in hospitalisations from weight training since 2003

YOUR BODY SHOP

2/ SINGLE-LEG SQUAT 3 SETS OF 10 REPS Start with your right leg raised off the ground (A). With your arms outstretched in front of you, slowly lower into a squat position with your left leg bending throughh 90 degrees, and your right leg parallel to the ground (B). Return to the start; 10 reps per leg is one set.

3/ PRONE LEG CURL 3 SETS OF 20 REPS Lie face down with a resistance band looped around both ankles. Tighten your core and bend your righht leg at the knee (A). Bring youur right heel as close to your glutes as possible before slowly letting go (B). Do 10 reps per leg to complete a seet..

B

A

B

B

A

EAT THIS

BUY THIS

The connective tissues around your muscles have viscoelastic properties, meaning they’re slow to recover from damage. Give them a much-needed hit of reparatory collagen by dining on bone broth after your toughest session.

A resistance band may not be the manliest of purchases, but if you want to keep training long after your bros have injured themselves out of the game, this is the heavy hitter for you. Men’s Health Resistance Bands £32.99 argos.co.uk/menshealth

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UPFRONT IMBALANCES

3 SETS OF 10 REPS PS A Hinge forward at the waist, knees slightlyy bent and back flat. Raisee your arms overhead to foorm a Y shape with yourr thumbs up (A). Then reach your y arms to the sides foor Mr T (B). That’s one rep.


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He definitely lifts, but sadly he’s more focused on filling his deep V-neck T-shirt than crafting a well-balanced physique. He might act like king of the gym, but his egocentric strength training lacks imagination and is invariably hiding serious weaknesses – which become painfully apparent on legs day See: the cast of Geordie Shore

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03 The Dad Bod

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The owner of the ubiquitous Dad Bod combines the occasional moderate hour at the gym with more frequent epicurean sensibilities. Unchecked, his Mr Average physique will hinder both his ability to grow new muscle, and to repair injury. And, unless you’re a millionaire film star, it’s a difficult look to pull off See: Leonardo DiCaprio

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GAINS NATURALLY SLIP WITH AGE – ADJUSTING YOUR TRAINING IS KEY

GROWTH SPURT If age or indolence has grounded your gains, high-intensity ‘drop sets’ will lift things off the ground. Whatever you’re doing, aim for twice as many reps as normal, lifting your usual weight. When you tire, drop the weight by 20% and keep going with this method until you’ve finished all reps. Pushing through fatigue engages dormant muscle fibres, promoting growth and strength to recapture your youthful physique.

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hether you’re out of the game completely or no longer seeing the fast results you did 10 years ago, lapsed athletes face a triple threat, says ‘career extension specialist’ Mackie Shilstone (mackieshilstone.com). Having helped quarterback Peyton Manning lift the Super Bowl trophy this year after his multiple neck surgeries, 65-year-old Shilstone still terrifies clients such as Serena Williams with his fitness levels. “If we let fitness slide, we face sarcopenia, or age-related muscle loss; anabolic resistance, which is the failure of exercise to stimulate growth like it did when you were 20; and a reduced ability to recover,” he says. If you happen to be a Dad Bod denier, complacency is your enemy. Whether it’s a penchant for partying or a new addition to the family keeping you awake at night, it’s clear your priorities have shifted since those halcyon days when you could pack on muscle and keep off fat while eating whatever, whenever. In your head, you’ve still got it; in reality, you’ve got a burgeoning middle-aged spread and fading muscle memory. But turning things around doesn’t require Inception levels of complexity. “By far the biggest contributor to the Dad Bod is being too busy or tired to dedicate proper time to progression,” says Shilstone. The answer isn’t more time in the gym, but to rethink what you’re doing while you’re there. “The same short warm-up on the bike followed by those biceps curls you’ve been doing forever won’t solve anything,” says Shilstone. To mix things up, it’s time to embrace a technique beloved of Arnold Schwarzenegger, AKA the true fitness daddy.

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The amount by which testosterone in new dads can plummet

2 SETS OF 20 REPS A A heavy bar on your back isnn’t ideal when working toward failure. Hold dumbbells by your sides (A) and slowly lower into a squat with your back straight (B). Explode up and repeat, reducing the weight by 2kg each time you feel like you can’t go on.

B

B

2/ BENCH PRESS

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The number of weeks spent taking omega-3 supplements for anabolic resistance to reduce, reigniting your ability to build muscle

YOUR BODY SHOP

2 SETS OF 20 REPS Lying on a bench, start with a barbell weight you can comfortably lift for 10 reps. Lower the bar to touch your chest (A), then power it back up (B). Once you hit the wall, drop 5kg and continue – with a spotter on hand should your arms give out before your will does.

A

3/ DUMBBELL LATERAL RAISE 2 SETS OF 20 REPS A bodybuilder’s favouritte, this ropes in the entire uupper back, shoulders and tricceps. Stand up straight with a medium-weight dumbbell ell in each hand (A). Raise youur arms to the sides to makke a T shape (B). Lower and d repeat, working down thhe rack until all reps are done.

B

A

EAT THIS

BUY THIS

Uncovering hidden abs involves reworking your nutritional intake. With exceptional levels of glutamate – source of the satiating ‘fifth taste’ umami – soy sauce is your friend. Douse lean meats and veg in the Japanese staple to curb overeating.

If you are going back to the gym, don’t just reach for your old knackered trainers. The Nike Metcon offers the stability and grip you need to lift with confidence and stay injury-free. £110 nike.com

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ARE YOU FIT TO WORK?

The modern employee is more stressed than ever. Wellness boffins think they’ve cracked it, but can algorithmic bio-tracking really boost productivity? MH’s guinea pig plugs in to the desk-tech zeitgeist to find out WORDS BY TOM WARD PHOTOGRAPHY BY MICHAEL HEDGE

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ow was your day at work? Let me guess. Optimistic start, productive run-up to lunch, then an unexpected afternoon brain dump, a mad, hair-pulling dash to get everything done by EOP, followed by deep-breathing exercises on your commute home. About right? Unless you work at Google and spend your day in one of its deep-immersion, holistic-overhaul, free-sushi-and-Xbox relaxation pods, it’s

likely the above describes at least one of your nine-to-fives over the past week. It’s a vexing state of affairs. A recent study by the government’s Health and Safety Executive initiative found that “work-related stress, depression and anxiety continue to represent a significant health condition,” accounting for 35% of work-induced ill health. Worse still is that British employees are officially the most stressed in Europe, with pressure to succeed, overtime and inadequate breaks putting 46% of us at risk of a (presumably

less violent) Falling Down-style burnout. And unless Theresa May decides to give us time off for good behaviour, we’ll likely be punching in past our 70th birthday. However, as more forward-thinking companies and entrepreneurial trendspotters become aware of the need for improved corporate hygiene, a desk-bound existence needn’t come at the expense of a wellness-sapping career. There is now a burgeoning industry in


IN BRIEF What is it? A minimalistic wristband that scraps calorie-counting in favour of rhythmic, calming pulses. Should I be worried? Fast tempos can negatively affect mood and thus productivity. A University of Wisconsin study found a tempo of 120-130bpm increases heartrate, while 50-60bpm does the opposite, leading to reduced tension. Does it work? Independent researchers at Royal Holloway University gave subjects a ‘psychomotor vigilance task’, measuring the speed at which they react to various stimulants. Those wearing the band had fewer lapses, indicating a greater degree of focus. How easy is it to use? A refreshingly simple alternative to Fitbit et al.

GOOD VIBRATION

Overall score:

••••

Doppel Band £99 doppel.london

tech designed not to save labour as such, but to save you as you continue to take on more. For those looking to de-stress, manage their workloads and revitalise their health without serving notice and moving to remote Alaska, there is now a host of office-centric gizmos available, tailored to monitor everything from hydration to blood pressure to posture. So, with multiple deadlines hunting me down – then gleefully grinding me into the ground as they roll past – I decided, like a white-collar Inspector Gadget, to plug myself into the mains and see if they could help me become a brilliant, more dedicated and diligent worker.

Pressure Gauge I don’t know about you, but around 3pm, just as I’m on the verge of pushing my pen into my eyeballs, I rarely think, “Well, today’s certainly been a kick in the teeth, but I wonder what all this stress is doing to my blood pressure?” Wellness brand Withings clearly takes a different

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approach to after-lunch asthenia and has acted accordingly, rolling out its new Wireless Blood Pressure Monitor. The inoffensive-looking, FDA-approved cuff is placed around the left biceps and charts a graph of your blood pressure, allowing you to share the information with your GP through the handy app. The idea is that you’re able to monitor your risk of hypertension over time, especially during periods of intense office-related stress. Every day, then. According to the British Heart Foundation, seven million of us are living with undiagnosed hypertension, putting us at risk of stroke, kidney damage and heart disease. Despite this, I’m sceptical of the need to monitor my blood pressure multiple times per day – after all, is my cushy, freebie-laden media job really going to jack up my vitals that much? Surely I can get away with exercising occasionally and worrying about blood pressure in 30 years’ time. Professor Julian Paton, a research fellow specialising in neurogenic hypertension at Bristol University, puts

a downer on my protests. “You can’t feel high blood pressure, and you certainly have no conscious control over it as you do with breathing. It’s been labelled by the World Health Organisation as ‘the single most important risk for the global burden of disease and death’.” Disconcerted and out of excuses, I open the box and get going. I download the app and receive an email congratulating me on walking 12,000 steps yesterday, which is suspicious as I’ve only just got hold of the device. I’m starting to think Edward Snowden was right. But things immediately start looking up: the band’s installation process is so laborious that you naturally start with high blood pressure, and presumably only see improvements from there. I strap in and switch on. The cuff squeezes my arm like an anaconda four times, and I’m told that every reading has failed. The bulky white and green device isn’t exactly a subtle workplace aid, and considering I’m squeamish about blood anyway, I’m concerned my colleagues might think I’m ill. Or, worse, technologically illiterate. Aware that I’ve wasted an hour of my working day, I scour the web for help and discover that, ironically, I may be too stressed to get an accurate reading. I close my eyes and imagine a pristine beach, with not a single email from my editor in sight. Miraculously, the device works, informing me I have a systolic reading (when the heart contracts) of 144 mmHg and a diastolic (when the heart dilates) of 84mmHg. I ask Paton to explain. He tells me I have nothing to worry about, but to build up an accurate picture, I’ll need to continue taking readings. But I can’t find any information on how often decrease in I’m supposed to do this. UK workers’ Or what course of action activity levels over 50 years I’m supposed to follow afterwards. Should I reduce my alcohol intake? Sign up for a fun run? Cut back on sodium? The cuff on my arm doesn’t know. And even if it did, it’s likely that my GP would prefer to rely on her own readings – you know, ones taken by someone with an actual PhD. “GPs will be cautious when interpreting the results, because home tests aren’t

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Are You Fit To Work?

“There is now a host of office gizmos that track everything from hydration to posture” IN BRIEF

PRESSURE POINTS Withings Wireless Blood Pressure Monitor £110 withings.com

What is it? A stylish hypertension monitor that helps you track blood pressure at home or at work. Should I be worried? High blood pressure can lead to heart disease, kidney problems, dementia and stroke. Just 15% more diagnoses would save the NHS £850m in treatments over the next 10 years – and more than a few lives. Does it work? “Your blood pressure fluctuates constantly so occasional readings could be misleading,” says Professor Julian Paton. “Take it with you next time you see your GP to validate its accuracy.” How easy is it to use? Through-the-roof levels of complexity. Overall score:

•• as accurate as they could be,” confirms medical director of Bupa Dr Steve Iley, casting no little doubt on the operation. At 6pm, as my colleagues are heading out the door, I take my second reading, hoping that the end-of-day calm will provide a more insightful measurement. This time it only takes two attempts for the device to work, revealing I have a systolic rate of 127mmHg, and a diastolic rate of 80mmHg, which either means I’ve calmed down considerably, or I’m dying.

Water Weight After the stress of dealing with the blood pressure monitor, I need a drink. But, considering it’s only 10am when I reach my desk the following morning, I decide it’s too early to start hitting the

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hard stuff by at least two hours, and opt for water instead. Luckily – and hugely coincidentally – I have a suitable piece of tech to hand. Any GCSE student can tell you that we’re made up of 60% water, and almost every bodily process from cognition to metabolism is affected if we don’t drink enough of it. The recent launch of the Pryme Vessyl ‘smart cup’, then, seems like the perfect opportunity to put my own workplace hydration to the test. Looking like Apple CEO Tim Cook has snuck into your house in the middle of the night and redesigned your tea flask as part of some aesthetically homogenised iUtopia, the Pryme is a smooth white cylinder designed to cater

to your ‘individual hydration needs’, based on metrics from age to height to biological sex and sleeping patterns, with an app breaking down your moisture levels into percentages. I ditch my box of tea bags and reach for the Vessyl. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) suggests that, of my RDA of 2.5 litres of water, 80% should come from drinks and the rest from food. But Vessyl’s health director, Dr Hanson Lenyoun, thinks it’s not so straightforward. “You wouldn’t expect Taylor Swift and Shaquille O’Neal to eat the same amount, so why would you expect them to drink the same amount?” he argues, exposing the extent of our universal ignorance in

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IN BRIEF

one eloquent pop-culture reference. Iley agrees that being more attentive to our hydration is a good idea. “Thirst is a late symptom of dehydration, so don’t leave it until you’re thirsty before having a drink.” I fill the Vessyl and raise my cup to progress. By 1pm I’ve drunk a full cup’s worth, amounting to 400ml. According to the feedback, I’ll have to drink five times this amount to reach 100% of my potential – which is directly in line with the general EFSA suggestions. I ask Lenyoun if the device’s claims to cater to our personal hydration metrics are really accurate, and his answer is confusing. “Pryme won’t provide you with an upfront hydration plan – how much you should drink at what time throughout the day – because it doesn’t yet know exactly how much activity you will do.” I turn to Iley, hoping for clarification. He isn’t so sure about the cup’s accuracy, either. “Unless the device is checking your blood results, it can only ever provide an estimate,” he says. I give Lenyoun the benefit of the doubt and press on, wanting desperately to believe the Vessyl is more than just a fancy cup resembling the other robot from WALL-E. I’m soon knocking back fluids like Shaun Ryder on a heavy night at The Haçienda. The result being I have the cup in one hand and my phone in the other, app open, with a full inbox of unopened emails waiting on my computer. Contrary to the device’s claim, I don’t feel like I’m working at my optimum, or indeed, my ‘Pryme’. Sure, students who drink water during exams improve their concentration by up to 5%, but I haven’t got time to be distracted. Four hours and six cups later, I’m only – somehow – at 80% of my Pryme, but I do have a headache coming on. The cup suggests I keep going. I turn it off and make a coffee instead. As caffeine warms my flooded insides, I can’t help but think that the Pryme’s a nice idea – and it’s certainly made me drink more than the hydration app that comes with my smartwatch – but it’s let down by the bemusing science surrounding its raison d’être, the personalised metric tracker. Still, it looks better on my desk than my crumpled, ancient Evian bottle.

Corporate Alignment So far, the two pieces of tech I’ve put to the test seemed to interfere with my day – or offer scary prognostications rather than augment productivity. The Doppel, then,

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What is it? An inoffensive cushion designed to monitor posture and movement through six separate sensors. Should I be worried? A recent Lancet study found that one million sedentary British office workers have increased their risk of premature death by up to 60%. The report strongly recommends taking regular breaks to counter the harmful effects of inactivity. Does it work? “We know that muscle strain caused by prolonged sitting leads to a variety of chronic conditions,” says Dr Steve Iley. “Take a short break every 30 minutes and a longer one every hour or two.” So, don’t rely solely on the cushion, but it will help if you forget to take a break. How easy is it to use? As simple as sitting down (then standing up again). Overall score:

•••••

“The tech offers scary prognostics rather than augmenting my productivity” is a breath of fresh air. Worn on the wrist like a fitness tracker, it delivers a vibration against the inside of your wrist, influencing your heartbeat to help keep you calm and focused. There’s no step counter. No inbuilt GPS. Nor does it shoot lasers if you fiddle with the bezel. But does it work? “The brain responds to sensory information, and a faster rhythm makes us more alert, while a slower one calms us down,” says Professor Manos Tsakiris, head of the department of psychology at Royal Holloway University. Tsakiris’ research group was asked by Doppel to carry out an independent investigation and put the device through its paces.

CHAIR CARE

Darma Smart Cushion £120 darma.co

The study discovered that, at a tempo of 100-120bpm, the band improved concentration by up to 5%. Iley backs Tsakiris’ findings. “Relaxation can positively influence our stress hormones, leading to a feeling of wellbeing,” he says. “Whether you use tech, listen to music or just stare at the clouds, it’s important to do it regularly.” I’d like to spend the day lying in a field looking at the clouds, imagining I was happy, but London rent is equivalent to the GDP of a small nation. Besides, there’s a coat I’ve got my eye on, so giving up work isn’t an option just yet. I start with a slow tempo and feel instantly more relaxed, like there’s a Bon Iver concert on my wrist. And, owing to the band’s minimal design and general lack of ‘look-at-me’ fanfare, I don’t feel self-conscious wearing it at my desk. The Doppel does its job, allowing me to do mine, and as the afternoon draws on there’s no challenge I can’t deal with. But if the Doppel calmed me down, the stiffness in my lower back is threatening

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Are You Fit To Work? to send me in the opposite direction. Help arrives in the form of the Darma Cushion – a six-sensor pad that measures weight displacement and sends a reminder to your phone when you need to sit up, take a walk or perform some stretches. The device’s purported benefit is to stop us slumping over our desks all day – useful, considering musculoskeletal disorders accounted for Brits taking a combined 30.6 million days off in 2013. Iley supports this, explaining that better posture will ease muscle strain and, as a result, reduce the amount of stress hormones charging

around. And with a recent Lancet report strongly advising sedentary people take a five-minute break every hour, the Darma seems bang on the money. To begin with, I’m required to get into good posture to give it something to go on. I do this but I’m worried that – considering I creep around like a Ralph Steadman illustration – setting my own questionable standard of good posture may be slightly redundant. But sitting on the cushion is a lot more comfortable than my desk chair, so I throw caution to the wind and continue on, heroically. After half an hour the device goes off, telling me to stand up and twist from side

IN BRIEF What is it? A sleek, hydration-monitoring flask with a design lifted from 2001: A Space Odyssey. Should I be worried? A study published in Physiology and Behaviour claims that, on average, dehydrated individuals make roughly 50% more errors when concentrating on mental tasks – such as driving – than their well-hydrated peers. Does it work? The Health and Medicine Division at the National Academies, US, reports, “The vast majority of healthy people adequately meet their hydration needs by letting thirst be their guide.” Plus, 20% of our water comes from food – so getting enough shouldn’t be difficult. How easy is it to use? As painless as pouring a drink.

CUP HALF FULL

Pryme Vessyl £76 myvessyl.com

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5x

Progress Report

Overall score:

•••

to side. There’s even a video on the app showing me how to do it. I feel awkward stretching at my desk, so I give it 20 seconds rather than the recommended minute and sit down again. Still, the break has broken my train of thoughts and I feel fresher returning to my work. It goes off again a bit later, telling me to WHO exercise stand up. I’m in the middle guidelines need of an important email, so to rise by this, say new studies I half stand, leaning over my desk as I finish it off, then sit down again. The device has no complaints but my heart sinks as I realise I’m only fooling myself. I resolve to play it by the book from now on. At the end of the day I get a message congratulating me on beating my goals. I’ve had 91% ‘good sitting time’ and 100% good posture, which seems ridiculously impressive for a lifelong sloucher. I’ve sat for six hours with 14 breaks and, even though I occasionally cheated, I realise that I did get up from my desk a lot more than usual. Best of all, the device informs me that I’m now just 41% tense, and my back pain has eased accordingly.

As I box up the various gadgets it seems apparent that, for now, our tastemaker overlords are mostly content with putting a high-tech twist on mundane apparatus, often with underwhelming results. But the two most useful bits of kit succeeded in different ways. The Doppel’s rhythmic pulse blocked out distractions, while the Darma offered momentary reprises, followed by renewed focus and diminished stress upon my return to my computer. On the strength of these two devices, effective and innovative progress seems to be years rather than decades away. But with a little more thought given to practical applications, there’s no reason why the workplace tech industry can’t help us all relax. Let’s see pens that delete emails with every click; computers programmed to switch off during lunch hours; desk phones that, when you pick them up, whisper, “It’s OK, you can do it.” Because, until we’re all living in Google’s vision of workplace bliss, we’ll have to. But for now, the solution may be to unplug yourself from your desk at least once an hour. Tech-inspired or not, you’ll feel better. And, of course, your work will still be there, waiting for you when you come back from staring at the clouds.

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DAR I N G WIN TO

The SAS might be the world’s elite fighting force, but high-profile training deaths, unpredictable new enemies and advanced military technologies have led detractors to question whether our glorification of these home-grown super soldiers comes at too high a price. MH embeds with the best of the best in the Ecuadorian jungle to ask, in 2016, what does the SAS really mean? WORDS BY DAN MASOLIVER – PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEVON BISS


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SELECTION PUSHES THE LIMITS OF PHYSICAL BRUTALITY, BUT PSYCHOLOGICAL STAMINA TAKES THE HARDEST HIT

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y the time we find ourselves kneeling by the freshly dug grave in the depths of the Ecuadorian rainforest, MH has lost all sense of which pains are real and which are merely a psychological hangover from the beastings endured over the past few hours. The 30-degree heat, our sweat-soaked combat fatigues and the aches in our joints all fade into insignificance as behind we hear what sounds like a machine gun being cocked. We feel something against our back and resist the urge to vomit. But it’s just Ollie, our ex-special forces guide, telling us it’s over; telling us that, against all the odds, MH has passed its unofficial special forces selection. The fatigue – compounded through constant burpees while carrying a breezeblock-filled rucksack – has made it one of the toughest challenges we’ve faced. And we’ve only been at the mercy of our trainers since 6am. As our instructors can attest, this journo-friendly jaunt through the jungle pales in comparison to the real thing – a selection process so tough that not all who apply make it out alive. On 13 July 2013, 24 year-old Lance Corporal Craig Roberts of the Territorial Army’s 3rd Battalion Royal Anglian Regiment began the first stage of his SAS selection: the ‘Fan Dance’ – a gruelling 16-mile march across Pen y Fan, the largest mountain in South Wales’ Brecon Beacons. By midday the temperature had reached 30 degrees. By 3.30pm Roberts was found collapsed and vomiting. He was airlifted off the mountain but succumbed to heat exhaustion. Two other reservists – Lance Corporal Edward Maher and Corporal James Dunsby – also lost their lives that day, with 10 others hospitalised after displaying symptoms of hyperthermia. During the subsequent inquest, coroner Louise Hunt ruled that the three experienced soldiers had died as a result of neglect. The blame, Hunt declared, lay with the selectors who had failed to spot the signs of hyperthermia; failed to provide adequate water at the checkpoints; failed, in short, to

3% The average proportion of troops who make it through SAS selection

“ W E LO O K F O R T H E W I L L TO KEEP GOING... PEOPLE WHO A R E H E R E TO DO OR DIE”

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ensure their safety. In July this year, the government rejected the notion that the Ministry Of Defence should be prosecuted, arguing that undergoing the toughest training system employed by any extant military is “inherently hazardous”. How else, it asked, are we to select the best soldiers if they are not first pushed to their physical and psychological limits? But one might like to look at it another way: in demanding unwavering perfection, are we pushing special forces recruits to unnecessarily dangerous extremes? And, with myriad

new technological advances becoming commonplace on the battlefield, is the elite soldier becoming an anachronism?

UNCERTAIN TERRAIN Ever since grainy news footage broadcast a team of masked men abseiling through the windows of London’s Iranian embassy during a spectacular hostage rescue in 1980, there has been a romantic fascination with the SAS. The unit’s actions in the first Gulf War spawned the

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DA R I N G T O W I N

MENTAL FORTITUDE IN THE FACE OF DANGER IS WHAT SEPARATES THE FIT FROM THE TRULY ELITE

bestselling memoir Bravo Two Zero, and the film of the same name, starring Sean Bean as an SAS soldier. Since then, even De Niro has signed up, taking on the role of a retired officer in the 2011 adaptation of Sir Ranulph Fiennes’ novel The Feather Men (retitled Killer Elite for the screen). Former SAS soldiers Andy McNab and Chris Ryan regularly top bestseller lists with their SAS-inspired thrillers, earning £30.4m and £21m respectively. Even in 2016, when masculinity is no longer exemplified by the professional warrior, Channel 4 series SAS: Who Dares Wins – the reason a ‘civvie’ journalist has been flown halfway around the world to endure so much pain – continues to bag viewing figures in excess of 1.7 million. Often deployed to hostile environments at a moment’s notice, British forces – the Special Air Service (SAS) and Special Boat Service (SBS) – are sent on missions that, if successful, you will never know took place. Hostage rescues, kidnaps, counter-terrorism, anti-narcotics – all are just another day in the office. And, far from damaging the special forces’ rep, these fictional portrayals serve as much as recruiting fodder as they do light entertainment. “I liken it to representing

MIND GAME Ollie’s protocol will raise your mental capacity under duress. Take 60sec to memorise 11 random words. Recite them as you complete the workout. Add 5 words and 5 reps. Repeat for 3 more sets

your country in the Olympics,” says ‘Foxy’, an ex-SBS member, over the pho phone. “It has the same sort of cachet.” A Among international forces, the SAS and d SBS have a reputation for being the bes b st of the best. “Even within the military, ma aking it into the special forces is seen as a an almost unachievable goal,” says Ma atthew Ollerton, a six-year SBS vet. “The caliibre of people you’re working with, the responsibility… It’s overwhelming.” Ollerton – or ‘Ollie’ as we come to know him over the course of our expedition – cuts an imposing figure, his face all angles, his body like a sock full of frag grenades. Retired from the military, Ollie now co-runs an SAS-style training facility called Break Point (break-point.co.uk), making him the perfect candidate for one of four instructor roles on the Channel 4 show. Ollie leads us through the dense jungle at an uncomfortable pace. We gasp for breath in the heavy air. He, however, is feeling chatty. “Obviously selectors look for a high level of physical ability, but after that it’s about digging deeper,” he says. “They’re looking for people with the will to keep going regardless. Someone who says, ‘I’m here to do or die.’”

SQUAD GOALS The bitter irony is that this “do or die” attitude is at once the SAS hopeful’s greatest chance of making the grade and his greatest risk of ending up in harm’s way. It has been three years since Kelvin Roberts learned of his son Craig’s death on the Brecon Beacons. Over the phone, he is quick to establish that while he has the utmost respect for the SAS, he believes his son’s death was avoidable. “The greatest protection these men need

1/ PRESS-UP

2/ BURPEE

3/ SIT-UP

22 REPS, NO REST Hold your body straight, arms extended and toes touching the floor. Keep your elbows tucked in as you lower (A). Power back up (B). Keep reciting those words.

22 REPS, NO REST From standing, drop into a squat (A) then kick your legs into a plank position. Hop your legs in again and power up, jumping into thee air, arms raised d (B).

22 REPS, NO REST With your back flat and knees bent (A), sit up by contracting your abs until your elbows touch your knees (B). Slowly st for 10sec 10sec, then go again. lower. Rest

B B B

A

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WITH THE DEFINITION OF MODERN WARFARE SHIFTING RAPIDLY, OUR RECRUITS MUST KEEP PACE is protection from themselves. That ‘do or die’ determination means they won’t stop, even when they should.” His son, Roberts says with palpable pride, was always striving to be the best at what he did. In order to be considered for special forces selection in the UK, you must have five years’ military service under your belt. Only then can you begin an intense half-year process, which includes 28 days in the jungle. Here, it isn’t just the physical strain that is an issue, but the psychological. “The environment is so claustrophobic,” says Ollie. “You’re taking leeches off yourself, your skin starts rotting and every morning you have to put your dripping wet kit back on. Just the basic administration of staying mentally sane is a mission in itself.” The hardcore few who make it are then given training in abseiling, demolitions, communications and survival, before being dumped in the Brecon Beacons. For their final task, they must make it to a designated end-point while evading a hunter force consisting of helicopters, tracking dogs and a battalion of men. Succeed and you must then endure 36 hours of interrogation. Cold, hungry, exhausted, you must give nothing away. Of the hundreds who start, typically 90% will drop out, with just a dozen being welcomed into the ranks of the SAS.

and MP Richard Benyon. “But there’s simply no need to put men in harm’s way in selection.” The report’s proposed measures include ensuring that the GPS transponders, given to each man and designed to alert selectors to any problems, actually work – unlike the allegedly faulty ones used in 2013. It also recommends calling off exercises in poor weather, and ensuring that checkpoints are manned by medical staff. “None of this,” argues Benyon, “reduces the fitness requirements for selection, but it could save lives.” Yet the majority of those associated with the special forces – from politicians to the soldiers themselves – are adamant that the barriers to entry remain as stringent as ever. “These guys must have the ability to adapt,” Dr Sundeep Chohan tells us when we meet in the (relative) comfort of a bare-bones hotel on the edge of the rainforest, prior to training. Until recently, Chohan was the chief medical officer for selection for the Royal Navy, Marines and Air Force. “Take Afghanistan: the terrain was such that you could be in the desert flatlands, in the extreme heat, then be choppered up into the mountains where it’s minus 30°C.” The requirement is for “elite warrior athletes”, as Chohan calls them. “We’re looking for 3D fitness. A professional footballer runs on the flat for a particular period of time. But what happens if you stick 70kg on his back and ask him to trek up a mountain? How does a man react when he’s constantly being belittled? When he’s seeing the most horrific sights on the planet? I’ve been out to places where they’ve been skinning people alive and eating them. So you strip out his safety net. You strip out his regular meals. You strip out his regular sleep.

MORTAL COMBAT While deaths during selection are unusual, they are not unheard of. Earlier this year, Parliament’s Defence Select Committee published a report outlining recommendations to keep candidates safe while retaining the ethos of SAS selection. “When we send troops on operations, we require them to put themselves in harm’s way,” says committee member

FITNESS MILITIA Five years in the Royal Artillery has put British Military Fitness’ David Burke (britmilfit.com) in prime position to launch an allout endurance assault. Let’s find your limits

Psychologically, that exposes what he is really like under stress and pressure.”

TOY SOLDIERS An estimated £5.5m went into every medal won by Team GB at Rio 2016. While the figures for special forces are not publicly available, insiders hold that the amount invested in training each soldier will comfortably eclipse that amount. Understandably, officials want to ensure every penny is utilised, hence the need to weed out all but the elite few. But in 2016, sending in troops is no longer our only option when it comes to resolving conflicts quickly and with minimum risk. With unmanned drones and robotics

1/ SIDE PLANK WITH HIP ABDUCTION

2/ HANDSTAND PRESS

3/ TUCK JUMP

3 SETS OF 10 PER SIDE, 10SEC REST Form a side plank, body in a straight line, resting on your forearm (A). Raise your top leg and hold for 3sec (B). Lower and at 10 times before switching sides sides. repeat

3 SETS OF 10 PER SIDE, 10SEC REST With one foot touching the wall, slowly lower your head toward the ground (A), then p press back up p explosively p y (B) tto hammer youuur core and sshoulders..

3 SETS OF 10 PER SIDE, 60SEC REST Feet shoulder width (A), jump and bring your knees as high as you can into your chest (B). Return; immediately repeat ty and your glutes. to boost both agility

B

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Rogers too believes that as we see a shift toward irregular warfare – such as counter-terrorism operations in Somalia and anti-narcotics deployments in South America – the roles of both the SAS and SBS will expand, not diminish. “Special forces are seen as the way of responding to irregular warfare and overall, their activities are on the increase,” he says. Foxy, the ex-SBS soldier, agrees: “Combat today is suited to special forces because we have experts for counterrevolutionary, counter-insurgency work. Today we’re fighting an unidentifiable enemy, not soldiers in a different patterned camouflage. If we didn’t need the SAS they’d get rid of it, because it’s a drain on cash.” In actuality, the future of the special forces looks set to include greater cooperation between men on the ground and new technologies, with the SDSR report outlining plans to double the UK’s drone fleet, while investing an extra £2bn in the SAS and SBS. Rather than lowering admission standards in order to take on a greater number of troops, or scrapping units altogether, technology could well work in tandem with the forces. Speaking to BBC Radio 4, Major General Jonathan Shaw, former special forces director, suggested this would be an intelligent way forward. “You can increase the capability of the supporting assets. The man on the ground is only as powerful as what’s supporting him – you need intelligence, drones, air assets, land transport...” There’s an argument to be made, then, that as conventional military are faced with increasingly unconventional enemies, far from reducing our special forces, we’ll rely on them more – whether they’re the ones operating the drones, breaking into secure compounds, or both. Driving back to civilisation, our 12 hours of mock-SAS training over, we reflect on the duality of the need to create a thoroughly modern fighting force even as the definition of this modernity is in flux. And of testing the mettle of those seeking to join the world’s elite, while also ensuring their safety. Of creating ultimate warriors, capable of surviving in any environment, yet ensuring prospective members don’t perish on home soil in the process. The human cost of producing the best of the best is shown to be high, but in a world without special forces, the loss of life is certain to be higher still.

“IS THE SAS OUR BEST P R OT E C T I O N AG AGAINST A CHANGING E N E M Y? ”

8hr45

GROOMING: LAURA DEXTER | MODEL: JONNY HAMILTON AT W MODEL MANAGEMENT | CLOTHING FOXTROT-PRODUCTIONS.CO.UK WORKOUT PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC AT HEARST STUDIOS

How long recruits are allotted to complete the toughest part of selection: the 16-mile ‘Fan Dance’

becoming increasingly prevalent, is our money best invested elsewhere? As of March 2016, the UK is believed to have carried out 682 airstrikes against ISIS, reports the Stop the War coalition. A large number of these were carried out by reaper drones. Guided by pilots many miles from the front line, these drones are often equipped with laser-guided bombs. Even such an elite force as the SAS is unlikely to pack as much firepower, or be able to deliver it without taking casualties. Yet, the argument for replacing soldiers with drones is not as clear-cut as it seems. “Drones’ capabilities are limited,” argues Professor Paul Rogers from defence thinktank the Oxford Research Group.

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“They can hit targets from afar, but they can’t – at present, at least – go into buildings, identify individuals, kidnap a person and interrogate them.” The SAS has been carrying out such bread and butter operations since the ’40s. But, in a world where fanatics storm concerts armed with AK-47s and drive HGVs through peaceful parades, is the SAS really our best protection against such an unpredictable enemy? Rather than limiting the special forces’ powers, last year’s Strategic Defence and Security Review suggested a second tier force be formed to provide auxiliary support.

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COUNTING SLEEP As lives grow more frantic and sleep becomes an increasingly sought-after commodity, big money is being made by monitoring our restlessness. But is the burgeoning shuteye business simply keeping us awake? Men’s Health gets its head down to find out if the cure for your insomnia can really be purchased WORDS BY MARK RICE-OXLEY

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIAN BENJAMIN


FRANTIC MINDS HAVE GIVEN RISE TO NATIONWIDE INSOMNIA

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PRESCRIPTED REST Nearly half of those on sleeping pills have spent more than a decade trying to drop off. Here we breakdown the make-up of longtime insomniacs*

63%

of Brits will experience a health issue that leads to sleep loss

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7% – 6 months 6% – 6m to 1 year 6% – 1-2 years 22% – 3-5 years 17% – 6-10 years 42% – 11+ years

‘sleep water’ enriched with l-theanine, an amino acid that aids restfulness. The result is that we’re beset by information on how best to maximise our night’s rest, compiled from an exhausting profile of biometrics, exercise habits, diet and alcohol intake. Yet caught up as we are in this rush to find a cure, we’ve failed to ask one crucial question: do any of these new developments actually work?

“Our round-the-

Nocturnal Creatures Having trouble sleeping is nothing new, but in 2016 insomnia has never been more à la mode. Earlier this year, The Guardian announced that, among time-pressed professionals prepared to pay through the nose for fitness classes and cold-pressed juices, sleep tops the list of wellbeing concerns. A good night’s rest is now “the ultimate status symbol”. Elsewhere, the BBC has suggested that getting more sleep may have advantages for your career, with ‘sleep courses’ promising to turn around exhausted employees’ prospects through breathing exercises. Of course, sleep hasn’t always been so on trend. For a long time, being partial to a good night’s kip was seen as a sign of weakness. Margaret Thatcher’s infamous declaration that “sleep is for wimps” came at the height of ’80s machismo, with her ability to get by on just four hours echoing the cigar-chewing, tommy gun-toting bravado of another prime minister, Winston Churchill, who also claimed to survive on the same amount. It isn’t that attitudes have relaxed today; rather, that the round-the-clock working culture that proliferated under Maggie’s rule seems to have finally caught up with us and is now hampering our ability to switch off. “Anxiety is certainly a root cause of insomnia,” says Jerry Siegel, professor of psychiatry at the University of California. “Some insomniacs just operate at a higher

level of arousal throughout the day, meaning they don’t get sleepy.” This increased arousal is arguably but one symptom of our ‘always on’ culture, in which modern and ambitious white-collar workers are expected to arrive at work early, leave late, and check their emails from their pillows. Sleep doesn’t get written into the schedule. According to the TUC national trade union, the number of employees working over 48 hours a week has risen by 15% since 2010. The effect, as outlined by the government’s Health and Safety Executive, can have a negative impact on our home life, removing our “buffer

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*GREAT BRITISH SLEEP SURVEY 2012

an’t sleep? No, me neither. I know what it’s like, lying there hour after hour as you gravitate ever closer to tomorrow. To start with, there is hope: maybe this night will be different; maybe you’ll drift off in the deliciously early hours before midnight. Seventeen glances at the clock later and you know it’s not going to happen. Outside the traffic has almost stopped. There’s a pulse in your stomach and your heart seems to have taken up residence in your throat. The clock relays its hideous messages: 2:47, 3:13, 4:09. As your sleeplessness deepens your mind becomes stuck on a massive feedback loop, insomnia feeding anxiety, aggravating insomnia, feeding anxiety… Tonight – according to the most recent Great British Sleep Survey – this situation will play out in 23 million bedrooms across the UK. That amounts to a blearyeyed 36% of the population living with insomnia. It’s a knackering prospect. But for entrepreneurial trendspotters, it’s also a burgeoning business opportunity. From smart pillows to sleep trackers, apnea devices and medications, the sleep industry is a fast-growing sector, with a predicted global worth of $80bn by 2020. To put this into perspective, coffee – the world’s most sought after commodity bar oil – is worth $100bn. The latest sleep advancements are as varied as they are outlandish: Neuroon, a cross between Oculus Rift and a sleep mask, monitors biometric data to regulate sleep according to your circadian rhythm. Ukranian-made headset Luciding hopes to encourage lucid dreaming, and thus nurture a more serene night. And, in Japan, Coca-Cola recently launched


COUNTING SLEEP tech companies and health obsessives alike, the antidote to insomnia remains both enigmatic and attractive.

Pillow Talk

clock culture is catching up with us”

MODEL: DAVIDE AT BMA MODELS | GROOMING: JULIE READ AT CAROL HAYES MANAGEMENT | PYJAMAS DEREK ROSE | THANKS TO COURTHOUSE HOTEL, SOHO

RACING THOUGHTS AND RESTLESS NIGHTS BLEED INTO OUR 9-5

against the stressful events of work”. Essentially, with the thin line between work and home blurring, the ability to compartmentalise thoughts has been lost, with anxiety over tomorrow’s tasks often the last thing we think about at night. Now, having identified a pressing problem, the wellness industry has morphed and expanded to exploit it. The net worth of this business in the UK has grown by a not insignificant £4m since 2011, and now sits at £28m. With the average person spending 30% of their life asleep, seeking to maximise efficiency here makes as much sense as trying to boost productivity elsewhere, be it at work or in the gym. In today’s lingua franca of calorie and step counting,

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15

Million

Brits a year take time off work due to missed sleep

the health-conscious among us are learning that sleep is just one more metric to be recorded. “Most people have a pretty sophisticated take on their diet – they understand calories and BMI,” says Dr Kevin Morgan, professor of psychology and director of the Clinical Sleep Research Unit at Loughborough University. “But until recently, a lot of us would have struggled to string two sentences together about sleep and how it works, despite it being one of the key pillars underpinning our health.” This is changing fast. And while there is yet to exist a quantifiable cure-all for a lack of sleep, it means that for innovative

Sleep is a natural subject for holistic overhaul. As most of us can attest, a bad night’s rest isn’t exactly conducive to an overall feeling of wellness. According to the Society for Neuroscience, the impaired mental capacity we experience after a restless night is due to underfunctioning metabolism and blood flow in certain areas of the brain – something that can only be remedied with, well, sleep. But there are more serious health implications than not being able to speak to anyone until you’ve had your double shot macchiato. We produce up to 70% of our human growth hormone during REM, our deepest sleep cycle, which aids in the rejuvenation of muscle tissue, bone, organs and immune cells. To go without sleep is to deter muscle growth, damage your organs, and open your immune system to attack. The real kicker, however, comes from Tokyo Medical University, which found that the sleep-deprived among us are twice as likely to suffer from depression. With suicide now the leading cause of death among young British men, this effect is not to be taken lightly. Still, the latest data suggests that all might not be quite as it seems. According to Sleep Cycle research, the average Brit gets a respectable seven hours and 22 minutes shuteye per night, positioning us as the fourth most rested country in the 50-nation study. So do we really have a sleep problem? Or have we been suckered by entrepreneurial trendspotters who have invented a problem so as to cash in on the solution? Certainly we have an appetite for their wares. Ambient ‘white noise’ apps are becoming increasingly popular; one, Sleep Pillow Sounds, claims to have over 500,000 “happy customers” – each paying £2.29 to download it. Devices controlling temperature, light and even scent conditions are also becoming fixtures in restless bedrooms across the country. Meanwhile, mattress companies’ decision to target ‘wellness’ rather than simple comfort reportedly saw the UK industry emerge from a global recession with 4.4% annual growth. So the demand is there. But with the average British snoozer closing in on his prescribed eight hours, our perceived

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COUNTING SLEEP

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Up All Night

NOCTURNAL OCCUPATIONS

Light levels

*DRINKAWARE, **GREAT BRITISH SLEEP SURVEY

Racing minds need something to turn over. Here’s what’s keeping the nation awake**

Room temperature

natural circadian rhythms. “Universally they went to sleep as the temperature dropped, and woke when it reached a minimum, just before sunrise. In many ways, this makes them healthier than people in Western society.” Reconfiguring our own circadian rhythms, then, may be a challenge. Despite their best efforts, the current crop of sleep devices struggle to account for the subtleties of the various phases and waves of sleep. There are five stages altogether, including REM, and as some stages are deeper than others, it’s possible that insomniacs drift around in a sort of ‘shallow sleep’ rather than stay awake all night long. “Because of their presence in the room and potential for false feedback, sleep monitoring devices could well be creating preoccupation problems, rather than encouraging sleep,” warns Kyle. “And, at present, not many of them have scientific data to support their validity.” Neither does the insomniac need a device to tell him what he already knows: that he’s been awake all night. Another disconcerting factor is that, according to the Changes In Insomnia Prevalence study, the use of sleep medication in this country has doubled since 1993. Perhaps that’s because there are no shortage of options: benzodiazepines, like Valium, Xanax and Temazepam, slow down nerve transmissions in the brain for a sedating effect, while so-called ‘Z-drugs’, such as zopiclone and zaleplon, suppress brain receptors, encouraging a calm state of mind. The bad news is that in addition to being a short-term fix, many of these medicines have also been proven to be highly addictive, with GPs putting stringent caps on prescriptions in order to prevent one problem becoming two. “There’s a strong likelihood that when you stop taking sleep medication you will

Naturally, for purveyors of everything from sleep medication to bio-tracking apps, profit can only be made while we remain restless. This begs the question of whether the sleep industry is really working for us, or if we’d be better off to simply stop worrying about sleep. Siegel believes the latter may be the answer. “Anything that reduces anxiety will help,” he says. “What doesn’t help is worrying that not sleeping will have dire consequences for your health. For the most part, it won’t. Unless you’re taking sleeping pills.” Despite his suspicions, Kyle is certain that with more refinement sleep tech will become an inevitable part of treatment in the future. “Technology will continue to play an increasingly important role in supporting all wellbeing, sleep being no exception,” he says. “In clinical practice, people with persistent insomnia rarely get offered the best treatment, but wearable devices – if shown to be reliable indicators of sleep – may have the potential to provide patients with unique insights into what’s keeping them awake.” Until such time, however, Kyle suggests a more targeted approach may be in order. “Cognitive behavioural therapy [available on the NHS] is a structured approach, addressing thoughts, behaviours and

Partner

We are, of course, unreliable witnesses to our own sleep – and there’s even a study (published in the journal Epidemiology) to prove it. It seems we overestimate how much sleep we’ve had by 48 minutes – a significant margin in a game where every second counts. Sleep monitors (featured on your Apple Watch, Fitbit, Jawbone et al) may ironically be part of the problem. “The most common cause of sleep trouble is an inability to dial down mental activity in the evening,” says Dr Simon Kyle, senior research fellow in Nuffield’s sleep and circadian neuroscience institute. As smartphone screens become increasingly present in our bedrooms, the ‘blue light’ they emit interferes with the body’s production of sleep hormone melatonin, meaning that when it comes to drifting off, that extra 50 minutes of Game of Thrones could set you back hours. To test the impact of our lifestyles on sleep patterns, researchers publishing in Current Biology monitored huntergatherer tribes in Africa and Bolivia to see if their back-to-basics habits put them at an advantage. The hypothesis was that the tribes would go to sleep as night fell and wake at dawn. In fact, they stayed up for a good three hours after sunset – minus the Netflix binge. Siegel posits that the tribes’ sleeping patterns are linked to

A pre-bed session at the pub can slash your number of essential REM cycles from an optimum seven to just two, distilling your exhaustion*

Noise

Pacing Hallways

NIGHT CAPS

Physical discomfort

lack of sleep is perplexing. The general consensus is that it is not how long we sleep, but rather the quality of our sleep that matters. According to the Sleep Cycle study, in the UK we roll out of bed feeling a meager 60% of our best. This ‘wake-up mood’ score positions us as the forth-worst sleepers in the world in terms of quality – just ahead of Japan, South Korea and Singapore. In fact, by collating national surveys dating back to 1993 under the Changes In Insomnia Prevalence And Hypnotic Use In England study, researchers have determined that rates of insomnia have doubled over the last 20 years, with “worry” the most commonly reported cause. Already in the UK, sick days due to lack of sleep cost the economy £1.6bn per year, and with job security and the overall economic outlook dropping off post-Brexit, it’s likely that few of us are sleeping soundly any more. As a report from The Sleep Council explained, “With Britain in the grip of a serious economic downturn, it’s little wonder that many of us are too anxious to sleep.”

suffer rebound insomnia and experience further trouble sleeping,” says David Branford, a board member of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society. “Most people think that the cure for this is to start taking the tablets again, but by then they will have built up a tolerance and require a higher dose to see any effects. It’s easy to develop a dependency, and withdrawal can be horrible.”

67% 36% 34% 34% 19% MENSHEALTH.CO.UK


sy to develop a dependence on medication” “It’s ea

OXFORD UNIVERSITY IS LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS AT ITS SLEEP AND CIRCADIAN NEUROSCIENCE INSTITUTE. ENQUIRE AT DISCO@FMRIB.OX.AC.UK

WHEN THE LIGHTS GO OUT, OUR MINDS RETURN TO THE BOARDROOM

arousals that disturb sleep,” he says. “Decades of research have proven it to be the most effective treatment for persistent insomnia.” Without further research, it’s near impossible to say which of the latest batch of sleep gadgets and toys is actually helping, but it is clear that to many insomnia sufferers, such devices provide a degree of comfort – even if the effect may be more placebo than proven. After all, the alternative – adding your name to a protracted GP waiting list – is unlikely to be of much solace as the clock strikes 3am and you’re yet to drift off. In my own experience, the best advice came as I reached the pinnacle of my desperation. Feeling as though I’d exhausted all other options, I sought out Colin Espie, professor of sleep medicine

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at the University of Oxford. “The ultimate reassurance for the insomniac is that sleep is irresistible,” he said, citing the example of First World War soldiers who, bombarded by enemy shells, scared rigid in trenches and sentry posts, could nevertheless not prevent themselves from dozing while on duty. “You can resist eating, you can choose not to drink, but you can’t choose not to breathe and you can’t choose not to sleep,” says Espie. And if young men scared witless in the muddy fields of France can find shuteye, there’s no reason why I, in my comfortable London home, shouldn’t be able to do the same. Espie reiterates the psychosomatic root of the problem, advising that rather

than looking to ostentatious technology or pharmaceuticals, we must instead embrace our insomnia and face the problem head on. The technique is simple: for a few nights stay up very late and set your alarm to go off early. Regardless of when you fall asleep, get up with your alarm. This may seem counter-intuitive, but going to bed early simply increases the amount of time you lie there fretting. Repeat until you find it harder and harder to make it to your late bedtime. then behold – your sleep drive is returning. You will understand, with great relief, that your insomnia can be managed on your own terms. And as you drift off to sleep, victorious, you will find that bedtime no longer holds such terror. You will know that, for tonight at least, it is time for some well-earned rest.

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Away from the combat arenas of boxing and MMA, a niche cadre of British fighters are grappling for position among Mexico’s flamboyant lucha libre performers. But behind the sequined curtain, who are the men in tights? MH travels to London’s Bethnal Green to find out what motivates the so-called ‘free wrestlers’ and what could be in it for you WORDS BY DOMINIC BLISS PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREW WHITTON

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THE MAN IN THE MASK 01\ Pre-competition, Brazilian wrestler ‘Zumbi’ straps up the body parts that are most likely to endure a battering. The fights may be staged and the names fake (‘Zumbi’ is Robson Bartelz), but the risk of injury is very real

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A HALFNAKED MAN IN A SKIMPY MONKEY OUTFIT IS GRABBING HIS CROTC leaping about, jabbering. Next to him, a long-haired Viking in tight leather trousers applies red make-up to his eyes. Malik, an Asian from Ealing who likes to dress up as an evil Mesopotamian demigod, is shadow-wrestling, sweat dripping down the small of his back. Another man, going by the name of ‘Lagarto del Plata’ – or ‘Silver Lizard’ – is tugging on the long tongue protruding from his reptilian mask. Backstage in the cramped dressing room of East London’s famous York Hall, these men are but a few of the curiosities to be seen. Together, they are Lucha Britannia, a local amateur wrestling troupe gathered here tonight for the UK’s annual exposition of Mexico’s numero uno rough-house pastime, an event billed as ‘The Greatest Spectacle of Lucha Libre’. Upstairs, in another grubby dressing room, the professional Mexican and Brazilian wrestlers who have flown to London for the weekend are completing their pre-match routines. Zumbi, a toned Brazilian from Sao Paolo with unfeasibly long nipples, is limbering up by doing handstands and aggressive press-ups. Next to him is Silver King, a household name in the lucha libre business thanks

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MARTIAL RULES 02-03\ Back stage in east London’s York Hall, the British wrestlers limber up for the big fight. Some are trained in combat sports; others simply rely on stamina and studied choreography to make it to the final round unbloodied

02 to his appearance as the villain in the middling 2006 Jack Black film Nacho Libre. To see the 48-year-old wrestler slouched on a bench in singlet, baseball cap and reading glasses, is to be reminded that 2006 was a long time ago. But as he dons an ominous black mask and leather cape, suddenly, he becomes regal. “It’s fake leather,” he says, disappointedly. This shouldn’t come as a surprise – everything about lucha libre is fake, and that’s the whole point. This isn’t sport so much as theatre, albeit an extremely physical, violent and camp version thereof. “Imagine the lovechild of Hulk Hogan and The Mighty Boosh,” says Greg Burridge, one of Lucha Britannia’s bosses. “Throw in a bit of Benny Hill and you’re about halfway there.”

FREEDOM FIGHTERS Spanish for ‘free fight’, lucha libre is enormously popular across Mexico, with fans following the fortunes of their favourite luchadores in the same way your better half (and perhaps even you) remains glued to Bake Off. The fights

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IN THE RED CORNER... 04-07\ The wrestlers of Lucha Britannia, clockwise from top left, are: Malik, personal trainer Pure Britannico, flamboyant ‘exotico’ Cassius and El Nordico Fuego, the Viking Fire God. “They are like the stuntmen in films but without wires, without second takes and without crash mats,” explains troupe boss Burridge

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FAMILIAR FACES 08-09\ Zumbi is from São Paulo, and stays fit with capoeira and samba dancing in his free time. Some-time actor Silver King (real name César González) is the most experienced – and most fearsome – member of the lucha libre group

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are fast-moving and acrobatic, with wrestlers sporting masks and colourful outfits. In common with reality TV or soap opera, the fights follow a loose, pre-determined routine – loose being the operative word. Combatants regularly leap or get thrown out of the ring, literally into the lap of spectators. The basic rules – no kicks to the groin, no pinning to the ropes, no attacking the referee – are often ignored, to the delight of the crowd. All in, it’s a bizarre hybrid of gymnastics, boxing, circus, slapstick comedy, superheroics and pantomime. Most matches feature four varieties of wrestler: the técnicos are the goodies (or faces), the rudos are the baddies (or heels), the luchadoras are the female wrestlers, and the exoticos are the flamboyantly camp members of the troupe, who often perform in drag. Lucha Britannia’s very own exotico is Cassius, AKA Louis Paule, a 22-year-old from Wood Green, North London. Immensely excitable, he fights in hot pants and masquerade tassels hanging from every possible vesture. Kitsch ’90s TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer was the gateway drug that first drew Paule to wrestling, before WWEthemed video games pulled him firmly into its grasp. “I became utterly obsessed with WWE as a kid,” he says. “When all my friends grew out of wrestling, I just carried on.” Paule loves the combination of sport and theatre that lucha libre offers, and has already attracted a significant fan base thanks to regular shows at the nearby Lucha Britannia venue (where fights are billed as “10,000 volts of sexy mayhem”). “Lucha libre is a sport in the sense that you’re doing something you have to train for and it’s physically tough,” he says. “But it’s also theatre in that everyone’s dressed up and in character. It’s the best of both worlds. In the ring, I feel like me times 100.” But you don’t get to become 10,000% of yourself without taking the occasional battering. “I will have a very red chest later because it’s

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DOUBLE LIFE 10-11\ Unlike in American WWE, the life of a lucha libre fighter is not easy and most must work fulltime to support their passion. By day, Malik is a youth worker, El Nordico Fuego is a stuntman and copywriter, and Cassius is a clothes shop cashier

“If people found out Pure Britannico is a PT from Havering, it would break the whole illusion”

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12-13\ Though fights may fall under the theatrical side of performance, competitors share much with athletes. Without thorough prep – including a diet and training plan – a wrestler’s career faces an early curtain call

unavoidable that someone will chop me [wrestling talk for a slap across the torso]. You can’t fake the chops. You have to hit people hard so the crowd knows it’s real. You’ve got to make it look brutal.”

ALTER EGOS One luchador who’s worked hard to embody this primal brutality is Malik, the sometime Mesopotamian deity, a youth worker from Ealing who holds the unique position of being the only Muslim in Lucha Britannia. “Wrestling gives me a platform to represent Muslim people in a positive way,” he says, flexing. Like Paule, he also discovered lucha libre through his childhood love of American wrestling. His father – who was once a professional bodybuilder – gifted Malik the genes he now utilises to grapple and throw his opponents. With his body uniformly shaved (“It makes my muscles look good!”) and his name in hieroglyphics sewn onto his shin pads, he cuts an imposing figure. There’s one kicker, though: tonight’s wrestling match falls during Ramadan, which would normally

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require him to fast during daylight hours. “Today is an exception,” he explains. “There’s no way I could perform without eating. I would probably faint.” That’s no exaggeration. Lucha libre matches involve sequences (or spots, as they are called) of choreographed jumps, kicks, strikes, tackles and takedowns which would test the fitness of any professional athlete. One of the fittest of the British wrestlers here tonight is Thomas Dawkins – AKA Pure Britannico – a 29-year-old personal trainer from east London. “Before this I did MMA and drama, so it was a natural progression. When training, I mainly focus on calisthenics and bodyweight exercises for flexibility. I don’t really lift weights.” Like most of his Mexican counterparts, Dawkins’ bond to both the sport and his equipment is routed in a mixture of tradition and superstition – the mask, for instance, is sacred; the face something that must remain hidden. “It’s a respect thing,” Dawkins explains. “If people found out that Pure Britannico is a personal trainer from Havering, it would break the whole illusion.” Despite admiring the theatricality of his unorthodox weekend job, Dawkins’ partner, an actress, is no fan of wrestling. Like most hobby-beset better halves, she’s forbade Dawkins to talk about it in the house. But unlike the long-suffering wives of the model train set, she also has to contend with her husband coming home with blackened eyes and split lips. “We do injure ourselves,” Dawkins shrugs. “We’re not afraid to hurt ourselves for our art.” He points to a bandaged finger, sliced open recently during a practice match. Wrestling on a twisted ankle, he explains, is also a common occupational hazard. When it comes to his day job, Dawkins is careful to pre-warn new clients that their PT may well turn up with a black eye. And like any sportsman, a wrestler will always be juggling one or two niggling injuries. “You get very good at learning how to

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fix yourself in this game. You’re always somewhat in a state of rehab.”

SMACK DOWN As show time approaches, York Hall is thronged by almost 1000 fans. The MC, a moustachioed chap from Missouri, bellows in a fake, somewhat hackneyed Mexican accent to ramp up anticipation. Before making their entrance through a mist of dry ice, with huge neon letters spelling ‘Lucha Libre’ at their backs, Zumbi and Silver King are getting a final pump on with press-ups. In the corridor, the Lucha Britannia franchise owner is giving his wrestlers a pep talk. “Lucha! Lucha! Lucha!” they chant. Then, with rituals completed, the wrestlers are sent out to do battle. Later, when it’s all over, Pure Britannico sits in the dressing room, blood flowing over his chin. Out in the ring, a flying kick caught him square in the mouth, knocking him to the mat. The gaping V-shaped split to his top lip leaves no doubt as to whether the injury is real or fake. The scratches across his chest are a shining reminder of

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the power of the ‘chops’, while cuts across his back and – bizarrely – what looks like a love-bite on his neck, show even the most patriotic of British fighters cannot wander into Mexican territory without returning both bruised and dazed. He stands, unsteady on his feet but still pumped on adrenaline, and offers a breakdown of his injuries. “I was knocked out three times, I think,” he says. “Twice I was slightly concussed, and the third time I was knocked out cold. I remember coming round as the ref was undoing my mask to let me breathe.” There’s no qualified medic here tonight, so an eager York Hall employee with a first aid kit will have to do. Concerned, one of the promoters asks Pure Britannico if he needs stitches. “Steri-Strips should do the job,” he replies, admiring his injury in the dirty mirror. “Then I’ll have a hot salt bath to get the bacteria out of my skin. And some yoga to stretch before bedtime.” But first he has to drive back home to the suburbs; then, tomorrow, back at his day job as PT, he’ll have to face his clients. By then his split POSED lip will be ugly and swollen. PERFORMANCE And it won’t be his last. 14-16\ Brazilian wrestler Zumbi celebrates his victory after laying waste to his British counterparts. In the hierarchy of lucha libre, fighters from the UK remain very much the scrappy but hungry underdogs

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BLOOD AND GLORY 17\ Injuries may spur on the braying spectators, but an over-zealous opponent can end a wrestler’s career. British hopeful Pure Britannico has got off lightly after being kicked in the mouth For more, visit luchalibreworld.co.uk

“The gaping split in his top lip leave no doubt as to whether the injuries are real or fake”


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KEEPING YOUR COOL G

etting that clean, smooth shave you love – and she’ll love even more – is a daily battle for most of us. And even though you’ve probably been shaving for decades, it’s hard to ditch bad habits. One of the biggest mistakes guys make when they pick up their razor is to go over the same area of skin too many times. In fact, most of us take around 170 strokes per shave. After the first 50 strokes, the gel is gone, leaving skin less protected and open to irritation. Just like bad form in the gym will take its toll on your body, bad grooming habits negatively impact your skin. And, being more time-poor than ever before, guys are speeding through shaving without giving a second thought to their grooming technique.

But now there’s a way to minimise the damage and avoid skin irritation for a more precise shave. Gillette has a created the Fusion ProShield Chill, a razor with improved blade cartridges that shield and cool during the shave to get the job done right. The Fusion ProShield Chill works by lubricating both sides of the blade, so stroke after stroke there’s extra protection against bumps and irritation. Plus, the added cooling technology held within the Lubrastrip is released with every stroke to provide a refreshing feeling and to help you look your sharpest. So update your grooming routine to include this ProShield – and no matter how much of a rush you’re in, or how many bad habits you’ve racked up, you can enjoy a nice clean, smooth shave.

MEN TAKE, ON AVERAGE, 170 STROKES EVERY TIME THEY SHAVE – AND 120 OF THESE ARE GOING OVER THE SAME AREAS*

*A 2016 STUDY COMMISSIONED BY THE GILLETTE R&D TEAM

SHAVING CAN BE TOUGH ON YOUR SKIN, AND REDNESS AND BUMPS THREATEN A CLEAN SHAVE. NOW GILLETTE’S FUSION PROSHIELD RAZOR WITH COOLING TECHNOLOGY IS FIGHTING BACK TO KEEP YOUR SKIN IN TOP SHAPE


MH PROMOTION

MEET THE EXPERTS The perfect shave is all about preparation and precision. Gillette’s fitness experts – who will be put to the test at this month’s Men’s Health Survival of the Fittest adventure race – know all about these things

FAISAL ABDALLA @faisalpmafitness When Faisal is not hitting the treadmill hard at Barry’s Bootcamp as part of a high-intensity workout, he’s leading an army of runners through the park in his role as Nike Master Trainer. For balance, he prepares his schedule in advance and creates workout routines to keep himself and those he coaches continually motivated.

AEXPERIENCE CLOSER SHAVE: SHIELD AGAINST DAMAGE A MORE PRECISE SHAVE WITH GILLETTE’S FUSION PROSHIELD CHILL RAZOR Precision is crucial: it’s the difference between a good training session and a great one. Taking that idea on board, the new Fusion ProShield Chill is designed for precision for a shave that helps keep your skin in optimum shape. The breakthrough cooling technology keeps your skin lubricated and less susceptible to irritation – no matter how many strokes you take. It also has advanced features such as Flexball technology, allowing the razor to glide along the contours of your skin, and a precision trimmer for accurate edging. The launch of this razor is the result of

numerous studies at Gillette’s research centre in Reading, where every day up to 80 men are invited to shave in front of two-way mirrors, so the team can analyse typical grooming habits and provide the best tools for the daily task. More than 20,000 shaves are carefully analysed each year to figure out the best way to help guys upgrade their routine for a more refreshing shave. The result is the Fusion ProShield Chill – your strongest ally against skin irritation. It will transform your grooming routine, so that you can enjoy the closest of all shaves.

ALI GORDON @aligordon89 Ali Gordon is always in fitness mode, whether that’s lifting weights in the gym or stretching out in a bro-style yoga class. When he’s not training, he’s filming workout videos for his YouTube channel to motivate and inspire others to fit in their fitness, even if they are short on time.

01 02 DIFFERENT STROKES ON THE EDGE

03 CHILL OUT

04 BALL CONTROL

Sidestep the irritation caused by shaving over the same areas, thanks to the Fusion ProShield Chill. It lubricates before and after the blades hit your skin, no matter how many strokes you take.

Staying cool and avoiding skin irritation is the end goal of every shave, and the Fusion ProShield Chill’s built-in cooling tech can help you get there, for a refreshing feeling after every stroke.

The razor features Flexball technology, which pivots to respond to your facial contours, limiting bumps and scratches. The technology also provides a closer, more comfortable shave.

A successful shave depends on the blade – and the Fusion ProShield Chill comes with the thinnest, finest blade edges. This means less pulling at the hair for a smoother shave.

Preparation and precision are not just keys to a great shave – they’re also central to a great workout. Gillette has teamed up with Men’s Health Survival of the Fittest to get health gurus Ali Gordon and Faisal Abdalla adventure-race-ready. To read their workouts and tips go to menshealth.co.uk/gillette.


CHEAT’S PULLED PORK, READY IN A FLASH P/ 119

PERSONAL

TRAINER Because fit is the new rich r EDITED BY JACK HART

THHE KEY PILLARRS OF STTRENGTH TRAIININGG P/ 128

BURN 800 CALO LORIES ON YOUR LUNCCHBREAK P/ 124 WISE WORDS FOR HUGE GAINS P/ 123 1 3

BRAISE YOUR RECOVERY GAME P/ 131 TAKE A WRECKING BALL TO YOUR FAT STORESS P/ 120 0

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POWER SAUCE #17

SWEET RELIEF FROM DOMS

i ll

MICROWAVE MUSCLE #19

BOAR DOWN ON FATIGUE

2-5MIN

18 12 0

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YOU WILL NEED...

9

15

6

18

3

21

9

548 CARBS 46G

Rich, tangy flavour in the microwave? You bet. Pop the pork in Tupperware with our marinade and leave to infuse all morning in the office fridge, advises chef Michael Wignall of Gidleigh Park Restaurant.

6

7MIN PROTEIN 34G

CALORIES

3

TIME TO MAKE

12

• Pork fillet, pre-cooked • Cos lettuce, ½ • Low-fat mayo, 1tsp • BBQ sauce, 1tsp 21 18

15

9 12

• Light soy sauce, 2tbsp • Fresh coriander, 1tsp • Honey, 1tsp • Red chilli, 1tsp, chopped

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FOR THE MARINADE:

When you’re ready to feast, shred the pork with a knife and fork to achieve a ‘pulled’ consistency. Blast it, with the marinade, for 2min in the microwave. Meanwhile, chop up the cos lettuce.

5-7MIN

0

3

Blend 4 peppe peppers, 100g chillies, one tomato, 5 garlic cloves and 1 knob of ginger in a processor until pulped

Tired of tedious chicken breasts? Our pulled pork bun is stuffed with muscle-fixing protein and energising B vits. Call it your pig for victory 0-2MIN

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Sweet chilli sauce can spice up flavourless dishes in a dash. This concoction is packed with fresh h ginger to root out any post-gym gy musclle l pains

FAST FOOD FIXES

Combine the pork, mayo, BBQ sauce and lettuce. Stuff it in a brioche bun, or save yourself 30g of carbs by wrapping it in the larger outer leaves of the cos, for punchy flavours with zero post-lunch lethargy.

WITH THANKS TO GIDLEIGH.CO.UK/RESTAURANT | WORDS: JACK HART | PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC | FOOD STYLIST: TAMARA VOS

08 THE NUMBER OF ENERGY-ENHANCING B VITAMINS AMPLY PROVIDED BY YOUR PORK FILLET

PULL AHEAD OF YOUR FITNESS COMPETITION

wi 450g sugar, Boil the above with 350ml white wine vinegar, 2tsp salt, 1tbsp balsamic vinegar and a pinch of pepper for 15-20min

F FIERY CHILLI SAUCE Puts out the fire in your quads

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MEN’S HEALTH 119


PT / 11.2016

1 BIT OF KIT, 10 WAYS #14

GRAB FAT LOSS BY THE BALLS

The Swiss ball is a more potent weapon of fat destruction than you might think. Stop rolling past them on the way to the bench and start constructing smarter workouts

01 OVERHEAD MOBILISATION

02 PLANK ROLLOUT

3 SETS OF 30 SECONDS

3 SETS OF 10 REPS

Start by stretching your range of motion. Kneeling, place your hands on the ball and tense your abs (A). Hinge forward at the hips, rolling out until your arms are outstretched (B); sway from side to side.

Ready to work? Clasp your hands and rest your forearms on the ball, then extend your body into a plank (A). Keep your hips low as you push your arms forward (B). There and back is one rep.

A

A

B B

3 SETS OF 12 REPS

Roll onto your back and hold the ball just off the ground behind your head (A). Crunch your arms and legs up to meet each other, keeping them straight as you transfer the ball to your feet (B). Repeat.

Begin in the ‘handover’ position from before, with the ball in the middle. Take away your right arm and left leg, lowering them to the floor while keeping the ball stable (A). Repeat to the other side (B).

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3 SETS OF 12 REPS

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04 ALTERNATE HOLLOW BODY HOLD

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BALLER’S GUIDE MH’s gym ball lets you perform new variations of classic moves. Ball £12.99 argos.co.uk/ menshealth

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BALL AND GAIN

05 DUMBBELL PRESS

06 DUMBBELL PULLOVER

3 SETS OF 8-10REPS

3 SETS OF 8-10 REPS

Set your upper back against the ball (A). Slowly lower two dumbbells beside your chest (B), then press to the start. Tense your core to keep your body straight.

Now to balance out those chest presses. With your shoulders on the ball, raise one dumbbell (A). Arms slightly bent, lower it behind your head (B), then press back up.

A

A

B

B

08 DECLINE PRESS-UP

07

RENEGADE ROW 3 SETS OF 12 REPS

3 SETS OF 12 REPS

Hoist your feet onto the ball and adopt a press-up position. Lift one dumbbell to the side of your chest (A) and plant it again (B), then repeat on the other side.

MUSCLES USED

B

CIRCLE IN ON YOUR LOVE HANDLES

SPEC

A

A

WORDS: JACK HART | PHOTOGRAPHY: PHIL HAYNES | MODEL CHRISTOPHER WHITLOW AT APM | STYLING: ABENA OFEI GROOMING: SUSANA MOTA | SHORTS POLO RALPH LAUREN ATMRPORTER.COM, ULTRA BOOST’ TRAINERS ADIDAS.COM

Lose the dumbbells and keep your elbows narrow (A) as you lower your chest (B) and press back up. The decline angle isolates upper fibres of your chest for full definition.

B

09 JACKKNIFE

10 OBLIQUE TWIST

3 SETS OF 10 REPS

3 SETS OF 6 REPS

Stay where you are. In press-up position with your feet on the ball (A), tuck your knees to your chest (B). Push back out again to return to the starting position.

Your final move requires coordination. Roll back from a press-up position so your hips are on the ball (A), twist to one side and point your top leg to the floor (B).

WORKOUT

20 MIN

RESULTS IN

3

WEEKS LEVEL

MED

A A

B

B

MEN’S HEALTH 121


MH PROMOTION

MUSCLE FUEL MADE EASY

TOP CHEF DAN DOHERTY PROVES THAT BEING BUSY DOESN’T HAVE TO DERAIL FITNESS AMBITIONS. JUST MAKE SURE YOU GET YOUR PROTEIN FIX

he pressure of work means making time for exercise isn’t easy. But spinning plenty of plates – sometimes literally – doesn’t stop Dan Doherty, executive chef at London’s Duck and Waffle. While skipping the occasional leg day is to be expected (we won’t tell anyone) there are ways to squeeze more exercise into your schedule. “Try to use your commute as much as possible,” advises Doherty. “I take the long route to work twice a week and do a 10-15K

fasted run before I get to the kitchen.” But what about minimising the time-sink of meal prep? Not everyone has time to pack chicken into lunch boxes. “Arla Protein snack pots give the perfect post-run protein fix before I start work,” says Doherty. “And with the other products in the range, such as milkshakes and cottage cheese, I can easily fuel my exercise and work throughout the day. ” Find out how you can add a delicious twist to these fitness-fuelling ingredients at menshealth.co.uk/arlarecipes.

SQUEEZING IN A FITNESS REGIME IS HUNGRY WORK – TOP CHEF OR NOT. WHETHER YOU’RE STANDING ON TWO FEET OR RUNNING ON TWO FEET, FUELLING WITH ARLA’S PROTEIN OPTIONS MAKES EVERY STEP TO A BETTER BODY EASIER

Find your protein fix in the dairy aisle of your local supermarket. Stay strong, ng, fitness-fans fitness fans oof Britain

ARLA PROTEIN IS HIGH IN PROTEIN, WHICH CONTRIBUTES TO THE GROWTH AND MAINTENANCE OF MUSCLE MASS


PT / 11.2016

TRADE SECRETS

WHAT’S THE KEY TO PACKING ON SIZE?

Forget the bro science and listen to the real experts. This is the biological lowdown on how hypertrophy – muscle growth – really works, along with some biomechanically sound tweaks to lift the pace of your progress

IT’S ALL

TRY RY SOMETHING S NEW TODAY You’ll likely have experienced the symptoms of the ‘‘repeeated bout effect’, even if you haven’t heard of it. Musc M cles grow accustomed to exercise movements, cau c using a plateau in your progress. Avoid it by diveersifying your workouts and hitting muscles from differen d t angles. Sideline your bench press PB attempt in i favou f r of press-ups on incline and decline benches – you’ll y work more muscle fibres for fuller definition.

TAKE A BREAK If you’re taking each set to absolute failure, you’re going to burn out. Structure your training into five-week blocks: gradually increase intensity for four weeks before taking it easy for a week, then start again.

VARY YOUR REP RANGES

WORDS: JACK HART | ILLUSTRATIONS: BEN MOUNSEY

The classic ‘hypertrophy range’ of 8-12 reps per set needs to be your mainstay – but don’t get stuck. Venturing into shorter and longer rep ranges won’t just alleviate boredom; short sets build strength while sets of 15 reps or more increase your lactic threshold.

EXPERT Dr Brad Schoenfeld EXPERIENCE Assistant professor in exercise science, Schoenfeld has some big ideas when it comes to building muscle. CONTACT lookgreatnaked.com

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

IN

JUST THINK ABOUT IT It’s what’s up top that counts. Research suggests that by focusing hard on the muscle you’re contracting, you can increase fibre activation and shift more weight. This mindmuscle connection reduces the efforts of your supporting ‘ancillary’ muscles, isolating the ones you’re aiming to grow. Harness your brains to p power yyour b brawn..

RUNNER’S CURSE CUR RSE Excess cardio can be detrimental to muscle mus usscle s l gai gains gains by stimulating catabolic – or energy releasing eaasing – proce processes, ces esses, ses, which slow down the body’s ability too synthesise synthesise protein. prrrootein. cle les es can can’t n t repa air and Without enough protein, your muscles repair grow, even if you’re training balls too the w wall. all. Limitt cardio to three high-intensity interval val w workouts orkouts nutes es each. a week, lasting no longer than 20 minutes

GO H HARD & FAST Strength gains made early in Streng a woorkout are significantly greater than any from g m moves at the end of a sessio essio So if your goal is to session. b bulk lk up p your arms, then you need n d to hhit the preacher bench sstraight gh away. Sure, it sounds obvious, b but b it’s the basic things that aree too easily forgotten and yet y most effective.

BUILDING BLOCKS Contrary to what gym junkies might think, you don’t need to chug protein at every opportunity. About 1.7g per kg of bodyweight is the ideal daily quota – and that’s easily achievable without downing a pint of raw eggs at breakfast.

YOUR MIND MEN’S HEALTH 123


PT / 11.2016 THE BIG WORKOUT

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For shredded abs and a redefined fi torso, heed the call off a growing movement. This circuit of functional moves keeps the pace high t burn fat to f and sculpt muscle, all in the space off your lunchbreakk

02A 01B 02 02B

0 01A

T T

R

Iff you’re trying to lose weight h yet another h tedious d with eevening jog, it’s time to face f up tto the burning truth off fat f loss: tthe game has evolved. HIIT cclass F45 ffuses a high g tempo t functional fu ct o resistance es st ce with o es to torch to c calories c o es fast. st moves Thiss workout Th o kout iss divided d ded into to ttwo ‘pods’. p d At each h station in the h fi first p pod, do ffour sets off 20sec h 10sec rests. Do another h llap p with f moving to the next pod.. before 1

P O D 1

01 MEDICINE BALL BURPEE

02 BATTLE ROPES

4 SETS OF 20 SECONDS

4 SETS OF 20 SECONDS

Stand upright with a medicine ball held in both hands – now drop to the ground in a press-up position, your legs out straight behind you and your weight supported above the medicine ball (A). From here, jump your feet back in and leap as high as you can, raising the ball above your head (B). The ball-induced instability engages more muscle fibres for sharper definition throughout your torso.

Fast-paced waves push your heartrate into its fat-burning zone. Stand in a half squat with one end of the rope in either hand, back straight and core tensed. Raise your left hand and quickly whip the rope down to send a ripple along its length (A). Immediately lift your right hand and repeat (B). Alternate sides in a fluid motion, keeping your core braced so just your arms are working. MENSHEALTH.CO.UK


FAST & FURIOUS FAT LOSS

THE SPEC MUSCLES TARGETED

WORKOUT

03B 3

45 MIN

RESULTS IN

2

0 04A

WEEKS LEVEL

HARD 04B 04

04B

03A 3

03 BOX JUMP

04 MEDICINE BALL SLAM

4 SETS OF 20 SECONDS

4 SETS OF 20 SECONDS

Move straight into some plyometric jumps onto a high box – the key is to start close to the box, so you don’t waste energy jumping forward. With a box in front of you, sink into a half squat and push your arms behind you (A) before driving your knees up and swinging your arms to jump up onto the box (B). You should land in the same half squat position you started in. Step down to repeat.

This strength-based exercise will keep your heartrate high to round off a tough first circuit. Rise to your toes as you raise a medicine ball above your head with both hands, stretching to fully extend your arms (A). Now slam the med ball to the ground, following through the movement to contain the ball as it hits the floor (B). Throw all your effort into the slam to engage your core muscles. MEN’S HEALTH 125


PT / 11.2016 20 6

EXPERTT Rob Smyth y EXPERIENCE CE Director off F45

Training London d Bridge, d Smyth knows it’s hard,, f st work fast o that t t burns bu s fat f t – not ot hours ou s of o tedium ted u CO CONTACT T f45training.co.uk

0 06B

0 05B

P O D 2

05 RUSSIAN TWIST

06 PLYO REVERSE LUNGE

4 SETS OF 20 SECONDS

4 SETS OF 20 SECONDS

Twisting movements engage y your obliques q for more complete p a definition. Start by holding abs a medicine ed c e ball b to one o e side s de in a s seated d position withh your knees k b and bent d your body b d leaning l g b back to form f a 45-degree g angle g w h the h g d (A). (A) From there, h , with ground p proceed d to twist your torso to e h side either d (B) – the h kkey is to k p your y p fixed f y keep hips so your core c muscles l have h to workk h d You’llll thank h k us later. l . harder.

This plyometric version of a bodyweight g lunge g proves aanything but easy after four rrounds. The score, though, iis stronger g fast-twitch f fibres f tto b boost p power and d complement pl your weightloss. gh l From standing, d g jjump your right gh lleg gb d backk and lland in a deep lunge, g left f leg g b bent to 90 degrees d g (A) (A). Jump d switchh legs l d up and in mid-air, llanding d g in another h llunge g on h opposite pp d (B). the side

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WORDS: JACK HART | PHOTOGRAPHY: PHIL HAYNES | MODEL: CHRISTOPHER WHITLOW AT APM | STYLING: ABENA OFEI | GROOMING: SUSANA MOTA | SHORTS ALEX MILLS AT MRPORTER.COM, ULTRA BOOST TRAINERS ADIDAS.COM | ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY: MATTHEW LLOYD

05 05A


FAST & FURIOUS O FAT LOSS O

THE SPEC M S S MUSCLES TTARGETED G

WORKOUTT

45 MIN

08 08B

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0 KETTLEBELL BURPEE U E

08 DUMBBELL SQUAT Q PRESS

4 SSETSS OOF 200 SSECONDS O S

4 SSETSS OOF 200 SSECONDS O S

Weighted g burpees might g sound horrendous,, but this move concentrates on the strength elements withoutt th tempo. the p Withh a kkettlebell l b ll in each hand, hinge g forward f att the th hips h and d bend b d your knees k s tto plant l the h weights gh on the h g ground d (A). (A) Now, withh strong wrists, kick your feet f back, f (B then perform one press-up (B), jjump back up and deadlift the kkettlebells l b ll to the h start position..

Round off the session using g your largest g muscle groups g to keep your body burning fat for hours after you’re done. Hold a d bb ll in eachh hand dumbbell h d by your y chest h and d squat to 90 degrees d g ( Press back up using (A). g the g momentum to push the weights overhead (B). ( Keep working until you’ve finished two full laps of this final pod then revel in the satisfaction of having l d your weightloss. gh l accelerated MEN’S ’ HEALTH 127 12


PTT / 11.2016

FIRST S GGEAR #166

Weightlifting g g is, for most men, a means to an end – a wayy of buildingg strength g for other disciplines. B But commit to shifting ever increasin ng numbeers, aand y you jjoin an exclusive club of athlletes. Herre’s the gear g you y need to gget things g off th he gground d

HELPING BAND These ‘hip circle’ bands, worn around the legs, correct faulty hip mechanics, so you can maintain more power through your squats. Mobility guru Kelly Starrett advises all new starters buy one. Mark Bell Hip Circle £22 improveyourbench.co.uk

WHIP INTO SHAPE Made from rubber rather than iron, these ‘bumper’ plates are designed to be dropped from a height without wrecking your environs. Not only are they perfect for the nervous amateur, they help you look pretty cool in the process – a hallmark of any serious lifter in training. From £260 strengthshop.co.uk

BIGGER KICKS FOR STRONGER LIFTS Resembling chunky wedges, weightlifting shoes won’t do weell on the track – but that’s becausse they’re so finely tuned. A rigid heel h provides a stable platform, whille upper straps support your ankles. Nike Romaleos 2 £175 store.nike.com

128 MEN’S HEALTH

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK


RAISE YOUR BAR

BUCKLE UP If you’re serious about shifting some steel, a weightlifting belt is essential. Research published in Clinical Biomechanics journal found the intra-muscular pressure in the abdomen caused by a belt increased maximum efforts. Modifit Olympic Weightlifting Belt £25 mobilitytools.co.uk

PILLARS OF STRENGTH Even if you have no history of knee injuries, it’s worth shoring them up when tackling big weights. Knee sleeves stabilise your joints without compromising mobility – ideal for beginners and vets. Rehband RX Knee Support £25 rehband.co.uk

BUILDING BLOCKS OF MUSCLE Any decent weightlifting gym will already stock these technique boxes for balancing barbells, but if you’re creating a home studio it’s wise to invest. The various height options allow you to break down each move into stages. Jordan Technique Box Set £854 jordanfitness.com

GRIP, DON’T SLIP

WORDS: JACK HART | PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC

Offering the same service as a piece of chalk – ie increased grip and lifting style – these keep the powder contained and stop it breaking into pieces. You’ll appreciate that extra security when launching a barbell overhead. Simond 2 Chalk Balls £3 decathlon.co.uk

STICK WITH TH IT

THAT’S A WRAP

Kinesiology tape – try saying that with a barbell overhead – provides support to joints and muscles. And while it might not directly reduce your risk of injury, it does enhance proprioception, helping you stay aware of how your joints are moving. Goat Tape £7 battleboxuk.com

Wriist wraps provide support without restricting mobility. Tighter ones are available for powerlifting, but these 12in options are specific to Olympic lifts. Plus, they’re a great way to let people know that, yes, you do even lift. Rogue Wrist Wraps £12.50 rogueeurope.eu

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

MEN N’’S HEALTH 129 N


MH PROMOTION

GET 20% 0 OFF! O !

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01 FOAM ROLLER £24.99 This roller is ideal for o a range of core strrength g and stabilising exeercises. It assists with stretc tches es and deep tissue maassage. g

02 GYMNASTIC RINGS £19.99

03 AB WHEEL £24.99 With hand and foot strap ps, this piece of kit lets you perform unlimited exercises to work your core from every angle.

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06

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£39.99 With these bars, master your bodyweight and progress from tricep dips to handstand press-ups and more.

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Build explosive upper body strength and master multiple moves including press-ups, iron cross and pull-ups.


PT / 11.2016

BULK ORDERS

MACRO ECONOMICS #06

BRAISE YOUR GAME A slow-roasted game stew not only offers comfort on dark autumn tumn evenings, it it’ss the perfect way to cook u up a whole week’s worth of muscle-repairing protein n

COOKING TIME SLOW COOKING FOR FASTER GYM RECOVERY

6HR 821 PROTEIN 124G CARBS 52G FAT 13G

CALORIES

1/2 AS MUCH SAT FAT IN VENISON VERSUS BEEF

WORDS: JACK HART | PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC | FOOD STYLING: TAMARA VOS

64% OF YOUR RDA OF IMMUNISING ZINC PER BOWL

YOUR GAME PLAN SERVES 7 • Onions, 3, chopped • Venison shoulder, 500g, diced • Venison shanks, 5 • Wild boar neck/shoulder/ belly, 500g, diced • Chanterelles, 500g • Bay leaves, 2 • Black peppercorns, 10 • Cinnamon sticks, 2 • A star anise • Caraway seeds, 1tsp • Greek yoghurt, 13tbsp • Dried apricots, 200g • Beef/chicken stock, 1L • Eggs, 5

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

METHOD

Step 1 In a pot on a medium heat, soften the onions for 30min until they caramelise; set to one side. Season and brown the meat in batches – it’s the best way to maximise flavour, says Andy Waugh, chef at London’s Mac & Wild.

Step 2 Combine the bay leaf, peppercorns, cinnamon, star anise and caraway in the pan. Stir until the seeds swell, then add the meat (with juices), onions and half the yoghurt, stirring well. Add the apricots and stock; bring to the boil.

Step 3 Place the pot in a 130°C oven for 4hr. Remove, stir in the mushrooms and leave for 1hr. Hungry? Crack five eggs over the top and bake for 5min more. Serve with extra yoghurt. Consider it a warm embrace for mind and muscle. MEN’S HEALTH 131


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EDIT ED E D IITT EEDD B Y EER ERIC R IICC D OOW OWN W N & MMA MATT AT TT T H AAM AMBL M BBL BLY LY

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NOVEMBER

In fashion terms, the link between European runway and municipal shopping centre has never been closer. Know what you’re looking for and this is the best time to be both on trend and in pocket

PHHOTTOG PHOTOG PHO TOOGRAPH RAPHY RAP HY BBY Y JOOBEE LAAWR JJOB AWRENS WREENS NSOONN ------------------------------ -----------------------------

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SET DESIGN: CARRIE LOUISE | STYLING: ERIC DOWN AND RICCARDO CHIUDIONI | SEE OVER FOR PRODUCT AND STOCKIST DETAILS

2016

TAKE CATWALK TRENDS TO THE HIGH STREET CHECKOUT

MEN’S HEALTH 133


11 / 16 – STYLE / THE HIGH STREET EDIT

01

Be a baller

--------------01

Grooming and style author The Chic Geek “I like Gillette’s Flexball razor. It’s like a Dyson for your face: the ball moves along the contours of your chin and jawline, which means a very close shave along the curved parts of the face. In fact, it’s the best razor I’ve ever used.”

06 03

02

£15 BOOTS.COM

GROOMING GROOMING NG -- ------------------------------------- --------

MANUA AL

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The grooming industry is a lucrative business, with cosmetic companies well aware that men will pay big to look sharp. Happily, we’ve met a few connoisseurs who know how to spot a bargain ---------- ---------------------------------------- ------------------- ---

02

Locks stock

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04

03

Oil slickness

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Joe Mills, owner of barbershop Joe and Co “Black & White pomade has a knockout smell and works on short, textured cuts through to longer, messy styles and quiffs. Use a 2p-sized blob on dry or slightly damp hair. To wash it out, shampoo your hair when dry; lather, rinse.”

Men’s grooming artist Desmond van Staden “I always keep a bottle of Baby Oil mixed with a few drops of water on me. You can use it as a moisturiser all over your body and, when diluted, it won’t be greasy. You can also use it in your hair to smooth it out, a little bit like serum.”

£4.65 SUPERDRUG.COM

05

£1.25 BOOTS.COM

04

Dry runs

Soft approach

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Russ Harris, head trainer at Six3Nine fitness “I get up at 5am and I’m in the gym with clients all day. Invisible Ice deodorant by Sure has what they refer to as ‘microcapsules’ that pop when you move, releasing more antiperspirant. Plus it doesn’t leave white marks on my black gym kit.”

Make up artist and beauty editor Emma White Turle “Nivea’s Post Shave Balm is reliable and suits every skin type, leaving your face soft without any greasy residue. Girls even use it as a primer. Elsewhere, if your eyebrows or beard need taming, use some lip balm to smooth them down.”

£1 TESCO.COM

134 MEN’S HEALTH

05

£3.50 BOOTS.COM

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK


06 WORDS: MATT HAMBLY | PHOTOGRAPHY: JOBE LAWRENSON | SET DESIGN: CARRIE LOUISE | STYLING: ERIC DOWN AND RICCARDO CHIUDIONI

Drop acids

--------------Emmalene Gale, hair stylist at Ruffians barbers “You’ll have to order it online, but Schwarzkopf Gliss Total Repair outdoes many more expensive shampoos. It contains all of the 19 amino acids that are found in your hair, but are lost if hair is damaged. This shampoo replaces them.” £1.59 AMAZON.CO.UK

07

Eye opener

--------------MH associate style editor Matt Hambly “Most eye creams cost well over a tenner, but what you’re really paying for is tannins. Found in tea and other plants, these reduce swelling. Put cold teabags over your eyes – or take a shortcut and use Bulldog’s Original Eye Roll-On.” £9.99 BOOTS.COM

07

08

Multi-tool

--------------Make-up artist and hair stylist Oscar Alexander “I’m a fan of Embryolisse Lait-Crème Concentré. It’s a mouthful, yes, but this slightly thicker moisturiser can be used as a facemask, cleanser, and even to shave with. If you want a product that will deal with many jobs in one go, this is it.” £13 BOOTS.COM

08

THE BILL RAZOR ___ RAZOR _ ___ ______ __ ___ £1 £15 POMADE POM ADE __ _____ ______ _____ £4.6 £4.665 BABYY OIL BAB OIL ___ ______ _ _ £1. ___ 1.255 DEODOR DEO DOR O ANT __ _____ ______ _____ £1 £1 SHAVE SHA VE BAL BALMM ____ _ _____ __ £3. £3.50 50 SHA HAMPO MP O ____ MPO _ ______ _____ £1.5 1.599 ROLL-O ROL L-ONN ____ L-O _ ___ __ ___ _____ £9.9 £9.999 MOISTU MOI STU T RIS R ER E ___ ______ ___ £1 £ 3

TOTAL TTOT OTAALL ___ ______ ______ ___£49 ££49.98 49..98 98

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

MEN’S HEALTH 135


11 / 16 – STYLE / THE HIGH STREET EDIT THE ROUND-UP ROUND-U D-UPP

November Style Digest MH canvasses expert opinion on the month’s most important retail highlights, each en route to a high street near you MEN’S HEALTH STYLE EDITOR MATT HAMBLY ----- ---------------------------------------

RETAIL STRATEGIST AT PORTAS AGENCY GABRIELLE KAEGLER

DRAPERS’ HEAD OF FASHION GRAEME MORAN

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01 / Top Of The Pops

04 / Basic S titc h

--------------------------------

Topman is collaborating with exciting new designer Nasir Mazhar for a 10-piece collection. Having supported the young Brit’s career by featuring him in LC:M’s acclaimed Man shows, Topman deserves credit for giving a boost to a burgeoning homegrown talent. Prices start at £25, and the collection includes the kind of outré tracksuits that got Mazhar noticed.

--------------------------- -----

Gabrielle:

Graeme:

Mazhar’s skill is in turning sportswear into something new: tracksuits become Sunday best, shorts and Ts are clubwear. All chime well with the athleisure trend.

While collaborations with niche brands don’t often sell well, this feels relevant to Topman’s sphere of influence. It also has a ‘grass roots’ feel that big collabs lack.

What better way for an emerging designer to widen his fanbase and sell his product at an accessible price? Topman, meanwhile, picks up extra cool points. It’s a win-win.

--------------------------------------------------------------------- ----FROM £29 COS X MR PORTER

02 / C ut D own To Size ------------------- -------- ----------------------------------- ------------------ ------------ ---

Moss Mo s Broos haas re ss reco cogn gnis i ed tha is hat, t whi t, h le l mad adee-to to-m - ea -m easu sure re and n besp be spok sp okee su ok suit itss off it offer er unp npar aral ar alle al lele le led le d ae a stthe heti ticc vaaluue, ti e the h y al also soo take ta ke a str trip ip out u of yo your urr wal alle let. le t. Acc ccor ordi ding di ngly ly,, it ly itss ne n w Ta Taililor or Me serv se rvic rv icee is des ic e ig igne ned ne d foor th thos osee wh os whom om pri r ce oftten e proohi hibi bits t . ts From Fr om £10 100 0 it wililll peerf rfor orm or m al alte tera te rati ra tion ti onss at key poi on oint ntss inn you nt ourr s itt’s con su onst stru st ruct ru ctio ct ion, io n, tak akin inng it fro rom m hi high g str gh tree eett to Sav ee avilililee Ro Row. w. Matt:

Gabrielle:

Graeme:

Change Cha ngess are mad nge m e whi h le the h su suit itt is in creati cre at on, gi ati g vin ving g you t ch the c anc ncee to nc to add perrson onali alility tyy to t you yourr thread thr eadss – a cru rucia ciall cia point poi nt of o diff differe ere rrence ce from fro m conv nvent ention ent ional a al off-the offthe-pe the -pe p g retaile pe etaaile i rs.

Mostt know Mos know n n for o its rentab ren t lee tux tab tuxes, es, Mo Moss s ss Bross has Bro has str st ugg g led gg witth styl styl y e poin poin oints. t Th ts. This is le ell of ser lev servic vicee and vic and det etail aill co could uld he help lp p the h m he w th win t e custome ome m rss me A tinn Reeed Au Aus ed’ d’s rece rece ecent nt c sin clo s g has h s fre f ed d up. p

Withh besp Wit besp espoke oke of often ten vieewe wed d as a lux luxury ury,, ury thiss is thi is a ca canny nny moove. Men no now w real real ealise ise it payys to inve inve nvest st in fitt, not not jus justt b bran ran and d name. nam e. Jus e. J t don’ don’ on t go go mad a on th t e lini ining, ng, g David Dav id d Dicckin kinson son... son ...

Uniqlo Uni q ha qlo hass a wi winni nning nni ng formul for mula: mul a: sim simpli plicit pli cityy + cit qualit qua l tyy x lo lit low w cost s = world wor ld d dom domina inatio ina tion. tio n. New re recru cruit cru itt Lem e air airee has wi wisel ssel ely reco reco ecogni gnised gni sed t t he need tha eedn’t n’t fi fixx wha h t isn’ isn’ sn’’t brok r en. e

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GGa abbr brie riieelll lle lee: : Gabrielle: ‘Ba Basic sics’ sic s’’ colllec e tio tions nss h e beeco hav come muc muchh moree embe mor embe m elli llilshe shed d of of lat a e. Thi Thiss feel eee s like Uni U n qlo l ’ss att lo a emp m t to to fut uture ture ur prooof its itself elff an and d rem emind ind uss ju just stt how w welll itt do does es ess essent ential ent ials. ial s.

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GGr Graeme: raaeemme: me e:

03 / A Match Victory --------------------------------------------------------------

The high-street-meets-high-end crossover continues this autumn as the architects of Swedish minimalism, Cos, collaborate once more with Mr Porter. Called The Art of the Everyday, you can expect an upgrade to your regular white shirt and – as it’s autumn – some outstanding jumpers, too.

136 MEN’S HEALTH

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Matt MMa Matt: att ttt: t:

Matt:

Gabrielle:

Graeme:

Again, these brands demonstrate why theirs is a natural marriage. Inevitably, Cos’s classic white shirts are iterated over and again, and represent excellent quality for the cost.

Strategically, collabs work by introducing brands to a different audience. So while the collection is very cool, I’m not sure whom it benefits. Their consumer is pretty much the same.

Cos’s stripped down aesthetic makes it just about the only high-street brand that could work with Mr Porter. The result is a quality collection that looks far more expensive than it is.

Simpli Sim plicit pli cityy isn’ cit isn’ sn’tt alwa lways ys sexy, sex y, so thi thiss coll coll ollect ection ect ion iss a way of rei e nje njecti cting cti ng lif i e into n th thee bran rand. d d. Willl it Wil it work workk? I th think in soo. ink Treends d co come me and go go,, b ev but every eryone ery one ne needs eds well-m wel l-made l-m ade ju jumpe mpers. mpe rs.

CREWNECK £35 UNIQLO

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

ILLUSTRATION: ADAM NICKEL | TOPMAN.COM, UNIQLO.COM, MRPORTER.COM, MOSS.CO.UK

--------- -----------------------------------

Matt:

Uniq Uniq i lo lo’s ’s lattes estt collllec co eccti tion on,, Un Uniq i lo iq l U, wass des esig igne ned d by b t e br th bran a d’ an d’ss neew crea cr e tiivee dir ea irec ecto torr Chri Ch riist s op ophe h he Lema Le m ir ma ire. e. His aim i w th U was to maake wi k ‘bas ‘b asic as ics’ ic s for you s’ ourr ward wa rdro rd robe ro be tha hatt ar ae anyt an ytthi hing ng but ut.. So So,, busi bu sine si ness ne ss as us usua ual.l.l.. ua


HOW TO ------------- ------ -------------- ------------ ---------------- ------ ----------------------------------- ------------- --- --- ---------- ---

It might sound like teenage profligacy, but to break new style ground in 2016 you need to rip it up and start again, says Topman designer Gordon Richardson

PHHOTTOGRAP PPHO TOG OGRRAP RAAPHHYY BBY Y JJOB OOBBE LAAWR WREEN ENS NSOON N ----------------------------

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--------------------- ------------------ WEAR... WEAR R...

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LIGHT SABRE The rips on our Topman lines are based on vintage samples we’ve acquired and each pair is laser-cut from a rip pattern. Anything from small pocket abrasions to full blow-out knees.

THROW A COUNTER PUNCH Why ripped? Now that jeans are ubiquitous from street to boardroom, they’ve lost their edge. Rips remind people this was once the wardrobe of counter-culture.

MAKE AN UNDERSTATEMENT The key to pulling off ripped denim is to keep your top half subdued. Pair with a plain T-shirt and don’t over do it. See Kanye West and David Beckham for pass notes.

DON’T LOOK BACK IN ANGER Ripped jeans of the ’90s had a far less flattering silhouette. New stretch fabrics retain their fit better than ever, preventing subtle rips turning into huge tears.

STEM THE RIP TIDE To prevent rips turning into gaping holes, wash on low in a wash bag. But the truth is, they often look better with increased wear. If that’s the case, ditch the bag and turn up the heat.

ENGAGE IN JOINT ENTERPRISE RIPPEDD J EANS £45 TOPMAN

If you’re unsure whether to shred, knee rips are a good start. A natural rip would sit directly on the knee and will be most comfortable, especially when sat down.

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK


THE HIGH STREET EDIT / STYLE – 11 / 16 INSTANT T UPGRADE ADE

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Disregard tired associations with ’70s car dealers – camel is your AW wardrobe’s secret weapon. This is the best the high street has to offer

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BREAST PRACTICE Double-vented jackets were designed to allow movement for people riding horses. Unless that’s how you’re planning on getting to work, a single vent will provide a sleek fit.

WORDS: MATT HAMBLY | SET DESIGN: CARRIE LOUISE | STYLING: ERIC DOWN AND RICCARDO CHIUDIONI | TOPMAN.COM, RIVERISLAND.COM

F

ew items at your disposal this winter have the transformative power of a single-breasted overcoat. Which is fortunate because, since few items require so much of an outlay, it pays to invest wisely. An overcoat is, after all, the first and last thing people see you wearing, and thanks to the relaxing of dress codes, it’s now just as acceptable to pair with denim or tailored joggers as a suit. However, if like many Men’s Health staffers, you are guilty of ‘going dark’ during the colder months, note that the overcoat’s power is amplified by colour – in this case, camel. “Over the last three seasons you could say that camel has become the new grey,” says Matthew Braun, menswear design manager at River Island. Its camel overcoat is part of a Style Staples range, which is intended to form the building blocks of a sharp wardrobe. “It’s chic and understated, but still allows you to stand out in a sea of navy and black.” In addition, the yellow hue in camel complements blue and white, immediately elevating the clothes that are already on your hangers. A good coat can be extremely costly but this one is excellent value. Cut to flatter your shape and free of unnecessary detail, it has all the hallmarks of a classic for well under £100. Pick up some Savile Row style on the high street and use it to break the grey monotony this winter.

FASTEN FURIOUS Tradition dictates the bottom button of your coat should be undone. We say if it’s cold, tradition can go to hell. Just make sure it’s not the only button done up.

SLIM SHADING Pulled in at the waist, this tailored fit hangs better than a duffel or parka by giving you a V-shaped silhouette – broader shoulders and a trimmer waistline.

OVERCOAT £75 RIVER ISLAND

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

MEN’S HEALTH 139


11 / 16 – STYLE / THE HIGH STREET EDIT

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STYLE CYCLE YCLE

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MH charts the journey of sneakers from runway to high street with the help of Dan Bisson, footwear editor at trend forecasters WGSN, to find out what you really get for your money

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001 1

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KNITT KNIT 03

01

APL Techloom Pro

APL is £150 ££1 1550 50.0 0..0 .00 00 targeting an audience that values exclusivity above all. It’s difficult breaking into the trainer market from a performance point of view, and whether you get much more than Nike gives you is debatable, but the price is close enough not to throw those seeking that all-important point of difference.

02

02 02

Nike Flyknit

0033

New Look

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I honestly £130 ££1 1330 30.0 0..0 .00 00 didn’t expect flyknits to prove as popular as they have done. Their success, it seems, lies in the fact that Nike has been able to produce something that is both stylistically credible and comfortable, marrying athletic performance into the bargain. Comfort is one of the big trends driving footwear at the moment so it’s a holy trinity.

High-street £25. ££2 255. 5.00 .0000 0 retailers will always look for the most cost-efficient way of producing footwear. The outlay for a knitting machine that can make these shoes is significant, so instead they source a material that imitates the look. The result does a decent job of looking the part, but won’t perform in quite the same way.

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Alexander

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SNEAKER

01

03

Adidas

River

01 01 McQueen -------- ----- --- --------------

02 02 Stan Smith -- -------------------------------

0033 Island ------------------------------------

Designer £360 ££3 3660 60.0 0.0 .00 00 brands are always looking to push the envelope as far as possible. McQueen’s business model isn’t based on selling sneakers in volume, hence this take t e on o a class c ssic shoe with a much thicker outsole. If you were wond dering what g h succh a high gives them mark-up, m p thinkk premium m l and d production. materials

The Stan £70. ££7 700. 0.00 .0000 0 Smith is perennially popular for its clean, classic styling. It’s a quality product that looks good on pretty much any guy. Adidas has tapped into ’80s and ’90s nostalgia better than most, and this runs throughout its clothing lines, not just its kicks. In short, the Stan Smith is a failsafe trainer, unaffected by the vagaries of fashion.

High-street £25. ££2 255. 5.00 .000 0 retailers have to predict what people want before they know it. Footwear takes around six months from idea to production, but people see things online and want them immediately. There are limitations, but high-street designers produce the best shoes they can. As a budget option, these are great.

02

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------- --- --- -------- -------- --- ----- ----------------------------------- ------ ---------------01 01

-----------------------------------------------

SLIP-ON -ON 03

02

01

Lanvin Slip-on

Despite what £ £315 £3 3115 15.0 5.0 .00 00 cynics think, there is a direct link between production cost and retail price. Expensive trainers tend to be made in Italy or Portugal where volumes are lower and better materials are used. The big difference here is a durable cup sole made from a mould – each size requiring a new one. You get what you pay for.

Vans

Asos

0022 Classic ------------------------------------------

03 03 Slip-on -------------------------------------

Vans are £47. ££4 477. 7.00 .0000 0 synonymous with this style, but they weren’t by any means the first. The name is enough to persuade most customers to purchase, but a consideration here is the use of vulcanised rubber, which means a rubber strip is glued around the outsole. This is much cheaper than moulding a cup sole, the trade-off being that they wear out faster.

Production £16. ££1 166. 6.00 .0000 0 methods differ little from the likes of Vans at high-street level, and high volume keeps prices low. Like Vans, they have a vulcanised sole and the materials used to make the upper will inevitably be of a lower quality. The result is cheap, cheerful and respectable – just don’t expect them to last forever.

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140 MEN’S HEALTH

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOBE LAWRENSON | ADIDAS.CO.UK, ALEXANDERMCQUEEN.COM, ASOS.COM, ATHLETIC PROPULSION LABS AT MRPORTER.COM, LANVIN AT MRPORTER.COM, NEWLOOK.COM, NIKE.COM, RIVERISLAND.COM, VANS.COM

-- ----

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------HIGH-END HIPSTE HHIP IPSSTE TER HIGH STREET --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------ -------------- ----- ------------------------------------------- -------- -------------- ---- --- --------


11 / 16 – STYLE / THE HIGH STREET EDIT

-------------------------

WRIST WR IST ST -------ASSESSME ASSESSMENT SMENNT

Don’t let the watch snobs tell you otherwise – it really is possible to rock a ticker that ticks all the boxes without the three-fifigure pricetag --- ---- ------ ----------------------------------------PHOTOG PPHO HOTOGRAPHY RAPHYY BY JOBE JJOB OBBE LAWRENSON LAWRENSON SON -------------------------------------------

------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----

- --- --- -------- ----------------------------------- --------------------------- ------------------------------------------- -----------

--------------------- ------------ ------- --

01

ALEX DOAK

As MMen As en’’ss HHea Health eeaalth lth’ss reside rres esiide ident id denntt wwat watch atc atcchh bbuf buff, bu ufffff, , Doa DDoak oak wiill ll een ensur nssur ure yoou our uurr nnew ew ppu purch urrch rchase chaase asse sst sta taand ands n ds nd tthe he tte test esstt oof f ttim time ti im e

clever about throwing everything at your creation, only to charge the requisite telephone-number price for the bother? The same goes for watches. There are countless examples out there costing the same as a Dacia Sandero – and plenty more besides that match the pricetag on a Lamborghini Aventador – which snobs will cite as the only things worth wearing with pride. And certainly,

£35. 355. 5.00 .0000 0 ------------ ££3

The fake-gold digital watch trend is getting a little silly now – you can barely move in east London without seeing a bearded sort drinking jam-jar cocktails with one hand and wearing one of these on the other. But if you do want in on the retro revival, stand out from the crowd with a more versatile steel bracelet. This is the watch you wanted when you were 10; a model of ’80s playground sophistication.

--02

Swatch Blue Rebel

£47. 477. 7.50 .5550 0 ------------ ££4

You wore a Swatch way back when – and guess what? You still can. Admittedly, most are too garish for cool men of a certain age, but go for this understated number and have the following riposte down pat: “Yes it’s plastic, but the success of Swatch in the ’80s singlehandedly bailed out most of Switzerland’s ailing brands. Breguet and Omega wouldn’t exist otherwise.” Enough said.

N

ostalgic Top Gear fans might well remember James May’s particular (and particularly amusing) obsession with the Dacia Sandero – a no-frills car coming in at just under £6000. His reasoning was that it’s a far more impressive feat of engineering to make a reliable, safe motor at such a low cost than a supercar. After all, what’s so

Casio A168WA-1YES

--there’s much to be said for investing in the best that Swiss watchmakers have to offer – their reputation as masters of the horological arts is not without reason. It also goes without saying that, as with a pair of shoes or a new suit, it pays to invest as much as you can afford and no less. But the point is, if you shop smartly, you can easily spend under £100 on a watch that is clever, interesting and invariably well-made. Of course, pieces like these cannot be judged by the usual tenets of Swiss watchmaking. But as affordable, reliable and canny pieces of engineering, they stand up to the task. Timepieces in this bracket will not be driven by micromechanics meticulously tweezered together by Swiss craftsmen. In fact, they will almost certainly be spat out of a vast production line in China, and might even be made of plastic. But as our recommendations demonstrate, heritage, innovative technology and on-point styling are all you need for a solid workaday watch that you won’t mind losing in the locker room, nor will it get you laughed out of the boardroom. And that is infinitely more than can be said for the Dacia Sandero.

03

Citizen Eco-Drive BM8240-11A £90. 900. 0.00 .0000 0 ----------------- ££9

Japanese giant Citizen created a nigh-on perpetual motion machine for the wrist in 1976 with Eco-Drive, and the technology hasn’t been bettered yet. By bending a flexible solar cell around the dial rather than underneath, there’s no restriction on dial layout or decoration. Remarkably, this tech can come in at under £100, albeit without frills – in this case, no bad thing.

--04

Timex The Waterbury

£75. 755. 5.00 .0000 0 ---------------££7

For people who thought Swatch was a little too plastic to be fantastic, Timex has always been the no-brainer alternative – albeit rather less trend-led. The arrival of The Waterbury collection changes all of that, however, tapping into the current move toward a vintage military aesthetic, complete with threaded utilitarian strap. Classy, manly, and bafflingly bargainous.

--142 MEN’S HEALTH

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STYLING: ERIC DOWN AND RICCARDO CHIUDIONI | SET DESIGN: CARRIE LOUISE

01

02

04

03

MEN’S HEALTH 143


MH PROMOTION

THE FINER THINGS The Cool Fresh range is loaded with essential features to optimise freshness all day long

DON’T SWEAT IT Moisturiser equipped within the Cool Fresh roll-on antiperspirant protects your skin from dryness and irritation.

FRESHEN UP A glacial scent inspired by leading men’s fragrances refreshes both body and mind throughout the day.

GYM BAG FRIENDLY Cool Fresh deodorant is available in a compressed bottle, which is perfect for packing into your lunch-break gym bag.

KEEPING YOUR COOL FRONTING UP TO LIFE’S CHALLENGES DOESN’T HAVE TO MEAN BREAKING A SWEAT, AT LEAST NOT WITH DOVE’S MEN+CARE COOL FRESH RANGE

ure, your 9-5 might not require literally picking yourself out of the dirt like Dove ambassador Sam Warburton – but the modern man’s life presents its own obstacles. Professional athletes and desk jockeys alike need to keep cool under pressure, and no matter what your day throws at you, the right skincare products and

routine are essential for maintaining a brave – and fresh – face. Dove Men+Care Cool Fresh is the latest instalment in the grooming brand’s impressive skincare range and is designed to keep performing when you’re taking the heat, be that physically or mentally. With shower gel and moisturiser built into the roll-on deodorant, helping to combat dry skin as you progress through the day, it’s the signature Cool Fresh fragrance that provides an ace up your sleeve. The refreshing scent will help you keep your cool, giving you an extra layer of protection when you need it most.

DON’T MISS OUT Put Dove Men+Care Cool Fresh to the test this year by taking on Men’s Health Survival of the Fittest. There’s a free sample in every post-race goody bag – handy after taking on the world’s biggest urban adventure race series. Enter at ratrace.com/mhsurvival2016


THE HIGH STREET EDIT / STYLE – 11 / 16

Deecent frames can be exorbitant, but who is anyone to say you shoouldd have gone to Specsaveers? Thankfully, a new breeed off workshops are caatering to the short of sight without robbing you blind --------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------

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------------------------------------- ------------ -------------------PHOTOG PPHO HOTTOGRAP OGRRAPHY APHHYY BBY Y WARDROBE E JJOB OOBE BE LLAWR AAWR WREENS ENSON NSON NNS SOONN ------------------- CLASSIC ---------------------------------------------

WORDS: MATT HAMBLY | SET DESIGN: CARRIE LOUISE | STYLING: ERIC DOWN AND RICCARDO CHIUDIONI | ACEANDTATE.COM

W

ith over a third of the UK population requiring four eyes, it’s no surprise that the spectacles industry is thriving. But this doesn’t always mean great options. Many high-street opticians sell cut-price frames and lenses that are lucky to see their first birthday. For those looking for something a little more artisan, prices quickly escalate. Not so long ago this was a frustration that faced Mark de Lange, founder of Ace & Tate, an eyewear label dedicated to producing quality frames at fair prices. “I bought frames in the US and the process of fitting them with lenses was astronomically expensive,” he says. “I knew there had to be another way.” Turns out there was. By removing unnecessary stages in the supply chain, Ace & Tate is able to design, manufacture and sell a stylish pair of specs with prescription lenses for under £100. The quality doesn’t come up short, either. “We make our frames in Italy, from the best acetate, in the very same factories as some of the big designer brands.” MH is particularly fond of the Jeff model, an update on the clubmaster design redolent of ’50s Americana, with a fit wide enough to suit most face shapes. “A good fit is actually not about arm length or frame width but bridge width,” says de Lange. “If the bridge doesn’t fit your nose, your lenses won’t be centred. It’s most flattering if you’re staring through the lens dead-centre.” As always in life, it pays to keep your eyes on the prize. JEFF GLASSES ROSEWOOD £89 ACE & TATE

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

MEN’S HEALTH 145


11 / 16 – STYLE / THE HIGH STREET EDIT

----- ------------------ ----

Merino wool’s luxuriously fine thread and lightweight warmth are what make quality knits so damned expensive. These, however, are high-street options bucking that trend PROO

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SELECTORR

JUMPER £30 H&M

146 MEN’S HEALTH

PPHO HOTTOGRAP TOG OGRRAP RAPHY APHHYY BBY Y JOBE LLAWR JOB AAWR WREENS NSOONN --- ----- -------------

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ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC AT HEARST STUDIOS | SET DESIGN: CARRIE LOUISE | STYLING: ERIC DOWN | PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: JONNY BAKER | STOCKISTS: ALLSAINTS.COM, BURTON.CO.UK, COSSTORES.COM, GAP.CO.UK, HM.COM, MARKSANDSPENCER.COM, MASSIMODUTTI.COM, NEXT.CO.UK, SUPERDRY.COM, TOPMAN.COM, WHISTLES.COM, ZARA.COM

£35 BURTON

£35 TOPMAN PREMIUM

£30 ZARA MAN

£125 COS

£39.50 M&S COLLECTION

£35 NEXT PREMIUM

40LB THE AMOUNT OF WOOL WOO OOLL A PEPPIN MER MERINO INO NO RAM CAN PRODUC PRODUCE RODUCEE EAC EA EACH CH YEAR EAR – ENOUG ENOUGHH FOR JUST T 30 SWEATERSS

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

£40 GAP

£65 MASSIMO DUTTI

£78 ALLSAINTS

£75 WHISTLES

£85 IDRIS ELBA + SUPERDRY

MEN’S HEALTH 147


THE HIGH STREET EDIT / STYLE – 11 / 16 ------------- ------- -----------------------------

- ------------ ------------------

CAROL LIM AND HUMBERTO LEON

THE Q&AA ----

The resurgence of Kenzo hass been celebrated by thhose in the know, and those in the money. Butt even better news for value hunterss is its new collaboration with H&M. MH got the lowdown from design duo Carol Lim and Humberto Leon

WORDS: MATT HAMBLY | HM.COM

------------------------- --------- -------------

Where does a collection like this start? Is it in the archives or is it a chance to start with a blank slate? HL: This collection is the first time we’ve ever really played with the archives. Kenzō Takada moved from Japan and founded the brand in Paris nearly 50 years ago, and he was a real pioneer. We want everyone to know the depth of the Kenzo story, and to mix and clash it with our 21st-century take on it. CL: We wanted to push this collection to the extremes and make it really bold and fun. Every single piece is special. None of it has existed before – it’s all brand new and exclusive to the collection. You’ve talked before about merging Kenzo’s archive with the new direction the brand is taking. Are you bringing the same principles to this collaboration? HL: This collaboration with H&M has really been like a conversation between us and Kenzō Takada. For Carol

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

and I, it has been an honour to get to know Mr Takada and he now comes to almost all of our shows. It’s important for a new generation to know about the work he did, and we want to show how much respect we have for him and his incredible legacy. There’s a definite contrast in the collection between bright sweaters and more subtle bombers. Was this a conscious decision? CL: Humberto and I love fashion that’s wearable. We want men to come and find the piece that suits their personal style best in the Kenzo x H&M collection, whether that’s a major statement piece such as the fake fur printed hoodie, or something a bit more subtle, like the bomber jacket or black jeans. We’re never precious about fashion – we want men to mix these pieces into their own wardrobes and wear them in their own way.

CHELSEA BOOTS £140

PADDED DOWN COAT £200

TIGER PRINT PULLOVER £140

Plenty of colour and print has been deployed, but mostly in a subtle way. Is this so that wearing the collection feels like you’re part of a special club? HL: We obsess over the finer details in everything we do. In this collection, we love the zipper pulls, which are in the shape of tiger heads, or the beaded logos on the hoodie and sweater. We really liked the idea of making pieces reversible, so that men could play with their look, especially the reversible bomber with the zip-off panel that’s made up of four different prints. CL: We always consider every ssingle detail when we’re d designing, no matter how ssmall it may be. It pushes the p product to be the best it can b be and makes it more special fo for whoever’s wearing it. H Humberto and I are both ssuburban kids from California, and when we were growing

up, it was these little details that acted as a code between you and your friends. It’s very exciting for us to be able to incorporate that sentiment into what we do today. I guess this is a bit like asking you to choose between your children, but do you have a favourite piece and if so, why? HL: That is such a tough question. If you were to ask me that same question tomorrow I’d almost definitely give you a different answer, but right now I love the green tiger pullover top. It’s a really cool way of doing outdoor clothing, and makes for such a strong look. CL: I’m going to have to go with the multi-print padded down jacket with the zipper details. It’s such a special piece. I love how this collection is so immediate. You have to get it, because as soon as it’s sold, it’s gone. MEN’S HEALTH 149


INTO HIGH GEAR UNIQLO TAKES THE BRAKES OFF YOUR WEEKEND ADVENTURES WITH FABRIC BUILT TO WITHSTAND ALL WEATHER

LL: DOWN PARKA PARKA, £99 £99.90 90 T-SHIRT, £9.90 JOGGER PANTS, £29.90 R: DOWN JACKET, £59.99 T-SHIRT, £12.90 PANTS, £29.90


MH PROMOTION

L: DOWN JACKET, £59.90 T-SHIRT, £9.90 PANTS, £29.90 R: DOWN JACKET, £59.90 T-SHIRT, £12.90 SWEATPANTS, £29.90

W  

hen you’re penned in by the forecast, escaping the city can feel like trying to abscond from Alcatraz. Rain falls heavy. Wind puts a dampener on your plans. And that trendy coat keeping you lukewarm during your working week just won’t rise to the challenge as the mercury falls. You want to get away – to hit the trail and decompress after a week of 9-5. You rummage through the functional end of your wardrobe. But the down jacket gathering dust since your 2009 ski trip makes you look like some sort of acid rave Michelin Man.

Dressing for the occasion is fraught. Thank fabric science that style and function are no longer mutually exclusive. Thermal shouldn’t have to mean ugly. High-tech doesn’t equal low aesthetics. With Uniqlo’s autumn/winter range of heat-saving, water-resistant clothing, the science is hidden in slick silhouettes and the colours wouldn’t look out of place anywhere. It’s function that’s on form. Function like that interweaved through HEATTECH garments, created in conjunction with Toray Industries – a Japanese advanced

materials firm with knowledge spanning from fabric technology to aircraft fuselages. Super-thin tops, bottoms and underwear have micro pockets that keep in warm air. So before you even put on your jacket, you have an unfair advantage. You can also layer the Ultra Light Down jacket, perfect for days when the weather is changeable and you want something that packs away without fuss. Easily transportable as they are, don’t let the soft shell fool you: these items are durable.


L: COMPACT DOWN VEST, £39.90 T-SHIRT, £12.90 SWEATPANTS, £29.90 R: DOWN PARKA, £69.90 T-SHIRT, £12.90 JOGGER PANTS, £29.90

With the help of the brains at Toray, Uniqlo packed all the heat-saving technology possible into these lightweight jackets using ultra-fine nylon yarn (about one tenth of the thickness of a strand of human hair). So thin are the resulting garments that you can easily wear them over your work clobber if the destination at the end of the bike ride happens to be your office. But if you’re heading to the path less pedalled, you might need something more heavy duty. That doesn’t mean you can’t look good en route, mind you. Using seamless bonding technology, this season’s down jackets lock in more heat while minimising weight and keeping out the wet. So far, so functional. But add to this the stretch wool and flattering silhouette and what you’re looking at is the only coat you’ll ever need for both work and play. So you can transition from bike trip to bar drinks smoother than Bradley Wiggins on a Sunday ride. British conditions or no.

DOWN COAT, £149.90 COMPACT DOWN VEST, £39.90 T-SHIRT, £12.90 SWEATPANTS, £29.90


BIKES SUPPLIED BY TOKYOBIKE.CO.UK

DOWN PARKA, £99.90 T-SHIRT, £9.90 PANTS, £29.90

Going further requires clothing that keeps pace. To ensure your wardrobe lasts the distance, invest in heat-saving fabrics that work as hard as you do. For more information on the full range, visit uniqlo.com/uk


EDITED BY SCARLETT WRENCH

MH QUIZ

ADDICTION NO.30

CAN YOU BREAK THE HABIT?

Every high can come with an accompanying low – that of dependence. Our test will help you stay in control of your compulsions, bad or otherwise


NOVEMBER 2016

\ Q Q1 Is an ‘addictive personality’ a thin ng?

\ Q5 Men with a

Q4\ Match the addiction to its supposed cure:

heavy porn habit enjoy sex more than other people…

A

Y Yes

A

i

Heroin

Nalmefene

A

B

No

B

ii

Cocaine

Elvanse

C Alcoholism

B There is no universal ‘addict’ addict . How However, the University of Bonn in Germany found many people who displayed internet dependency possessed a genetic variant also found in heavy smokers, suggesting some people may be innately vulnerable.

\ Q2 Which of the following might

D

True B

iii

Suboxone

False

iv

Binge-eating

Ritalin

B ‘XXX’ doesn’t always hit the spot. Cambridge Uni found that addicts craved sex, but didn’t derive additional satisfaction from it compared to their non-compulsive peers. In fact, half those studied struggled to achieve an erection with their partner. Lots of therapists specialise in porn addiction; deal with it now, rather than after you’ve forgotten to delete your browser history.

A, iii / B, iv / C, i / D, ii Needless to say, guidance from your GP is always necessary. For a softer approach to compulsive overeating, amino acid 5-HTP has been shown to reduce hunger and elevate mood-boosting hormone serotonin. Plus it won’t give you dry mouth and heart palpitations.

prompt a visit from ‘Uncle Rhabdo’?

Q6\ Over spending

B

Over eating

C

Over exercising

C The fitness addict’s nickname for ‘rhabdomyolysis’ is caused by training to the point of muscle breakdown and kidney damage. Pain, nausea and a persistently hammering heart are all red flags. But that just sounds like a typical legs day to you, right?

What proportion of men visiting Open Road needle exchanges were steroid users?

A

50%

\ Q3 How many days of practice does it take to make a wholesome habit stick? B

30% A

21

C B

C

66

84

B Popular myth has it that 21 is the magic number, but psychologist Jeremy Dean found little evidence to back it up. By asking would-be habitees to keep an 84-day log he arrived at 66. So make it to 7 March without partaking and your new year’s resolution should stick. 156 MEN’S HEALTH

70% C In 2016, the queue for sterile syringes looks less like a Trainspotting audition and more like the line for the squat rack. It’s more estimated than one million Brits are regular steroid users. Tempted? Try examining your fat intake first: an International Journal of Sports Medicine study found men who went heavy on the eggs and avocado had higher testosterone levels. Needles are far less Instagrammable.

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

WORDS: MIKE SHALLCROSS | ILLUSTRATIONS: ADAM NICKEL AT SYNERGY ART | PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY, PETER CROWTHER, SUN LEE, LOUISA PARRY, STUDIO 33

A


MH QUIZ: ADDICTION

\ Q10 According to the NHS, what proportion of

Q7\ Fixed-odds betting terminals generated a sweet ____ in the UK alone last year...

UK men show signs of alcoholism?

A

£300 0m

A

B

3%

9%

C

16%

D

25%

B This is the point at which doctors define you are not able to function without alcohol. Drying out? Get your vital organs on side with glutathione – a nutrient that’s depleted by heavy drinking. Whey protein is a great way to boost your levels. Drinking it out of a pint glass probably isn’t a good sign.

Q11\

B

£950m

Certain n food d ds are chemicaaally addictiv ve....

C

£1.7bn

A

True B

False se C These devices are said to be particularly addictive because of the speed and frequency with which bets can be placed, as well as the psychological thrill gained from the number of ‘near misses’. Raging against the machines? The NHS estimates there are 590,000 problem gamblers in the UK. Check gamcare.org.uk if you’re concerned. We bet it helps.

\ Q8 Q Thee blissed-out state caaused by anandamide is known in fitness cirrcles as ____?

Q9\ What does the Japanese word ‘karoshi’ mean?

Q12\

A

Runnner’s high

What compulsive activity did Australian Okan Kaya engage in for 5½ days straight in 2012?

B

Athlete’s foot C

Tennnis elbow A Onnce thought to be caused byy enndorphins, scientists are now tturning their attentions to ‘enndocannabinoids’, the chem micals stimulated by the effeccts of marijuana on the bodyy. It’s the most legit high you’lll get on your lunchbreak. MENSHEALTH.CO.UK

B While com ming off ff the Krispy Krem mes sho hoouldn’t ld give you the shake h kees, studies d by the Univversity oof Edinburgh found the hhit of   f dopamine pamine we get after eating can lead too aa compulsion compulsion to binge binge. Scientists say treating this as a behavioural, rather than substance, addiction would see better results.

A

B

C

Training to Working A drinking exhaustion to death game B Afraid to take your foot off the gas? Research in the Harvard Business Review found that people who use up all of their allocated holiday leave stand a greater chance of promotion. Working yourself into the ground is not the route to a high-flying career.

A

Playing Call of Duty

B

Updating Facebook

C

Re-watching 24

A Although he did squeeze in a few hours sleep. If you struggle to switch off, psychologist Dr Aric Sigman suggests only playing with friends who have better self-control than you do. Consider it a black ops strike on an insidious habit. MEN’S HEALTH 157


MH QUIZ: ADDICTION

NOVEMBER 2016

Q16\

Q13\

What surprising cure is credited with helping Robert Downey Jr and Anthony Kiedis conquer drug addiction?

Which of the following is a symptom of iPhone withdrawal? B

A Photography

Loonneeliness

A

B Knitting

C Ultra-running

C Running away from your problems may well be the answer. Frontiers in Psychiatry posited “neurobiological consequences of exercise” can reduce compulsive patterns of drug-taking.

Confusioon

Q17\ Which of these is the world’s most commonly used psychoactive drug? B

Cocaine C

Anxiety ty D A

Less artful lunchhes

Cannabis D

Methylated xanthine C A, B & C Disconnecting i can carry consequences bbeyond d missing i i the h odd Kanye meme. The University of Maryland found that four in five of us itch for Insta when deprived of technology. Switch off your push notifications – starving yourself of the dopamine spikes from constant alerts is the first step in rewiring your brain.

Q14\

Q15\

Willpower is a finite resource…

On average, smokers try to give up how many times before quitting?

Methamphetamine D Although the non-chemists among us know it better as caffeine. In moderation, however, the drug has its perks, including a lower risk of dementia and improved liver health. Just try to reduce your grande habit to three cups a day.

Q18\ Is there such a thing as an adrenaline junkie?

A3

A

B 12

Yes

B

No

C 30 A True

B False

A & B According to Stanford Uni, those who believe inhaling a bag of Haribo is the only way to survive cigarette cravings generally find this to be true, while those who view their diet and addictions as separate get by fine without a sweet fix.

How did you score?

158 MEN’S HEALTH

C So found a recent Canadian study, though a BMJ review determined answers ranging from six to 142. Swap cigs for gym rigs: according to Nicotine & Tobacco Research, smokers who embark on a 12-week weight-training programme are twice as likely to quit.

A Medical classifications focus on personality types over physical cravings, but scientists note similarities between the brains of thrill-chasing athletes and drug addicts.

0-6 AWARENESS

7-12 RECOVERY

13-18 MAINTENANCE

The first stage in treating an addiction is acknowledging you have one. Look out for classic signs like dropping hobbies or friends, ignoring health difficulties and becoming secretive. Keep an emergency stash of your little helper in your car? It’s probably time to clean up your act.

You can minimise chances of relapse by developing coping strategies. Top of the list is to avoid the high-risk situations known by the acronym HALT: hungry, angry, lonely, tired. These are the times you’re most likely to reach for your old poison, be it Marlboros or Maltesers.

Change never ends with action, say the experts. While at this stage the addict is attuned to the situations that can lead to relapse, work is still required. Active monitoring of thoughts, ongoing practice of new skills and maintaining a support system are essential here.

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK


THE MH DIRECTORY Look good and feel great with this selection of life-enhancing products

£50 FOR THE ULTIMATE EXTRA LEAN MEAT SELECTION – NORMALLY £75.25!! THE GENTLEMEN’S WATCH CO. www.musclefood.com/mhtry-the-ultimate-extra-lean-meat-hamper Stock up for the entire month with the Best Award-Winning, Extra Lean Meat Hamper Muscle Food have EVER created! Every item has Less than 5% fat, UKAS Lab Tested, Gluten Free and Deliciously Tasty! For just £50 you will receive: - 12 x 200g Premium Chicken Breasts (2.5kg) - 2 x 170g Matured Grass Fed Rump Steaks - 2 x 170g Matured Grass Fed Flat Iron Steaks - 2 x 170g Matured Grass Fed Hache Steaks - 2 x 400g Extra Lean Steak Mince (800g) - 2 x 400g Premium Chicken Mini Fillets (800g) - 2 x 113g Extra Lean Steak Burgers - 6 x 75g Low Fat Meaty Pork Sausages - 6 x 75g Low Fat Chilli & Garlic Sausages - 2 x 113g Premium Chicken Breast Burgers - 2 x 113g Sweet Chilli Chicken Burgers Join the thousands of athletes, cover models and gym goers across the UK– everyone from Liverpool Footballer Simon Mignolet to World Champion boxer Tony Bellew are using Muscle Food. www.musclefood.com-@Musclefood-#TweetYourMeatwww.musclefood.com-@Musclefood#TweetYourMeat

The Gentlemen’s Watch Co. is home to an unrivalled collection of unique affordable timepieces. The strikingly minimal Mesh Chrono from Megir boasts a steel mesh band, precision stopwatch and calendar wheel at 4 o’ clock. 3 variations, £49. Shop at www.gwcwatches.com Quote MHNOV for 10% off, expires 31/10/2016.

OBVIOUSLY APPAREL COMFORT AND STYLE Designed in Australia, Obviously offers the ultimate in comfortable underwear, combining a unique anatomical pouch design and premium fabrics. Get ready for the underwear experience you didn’t know you were waiting for. Visit obviously. com.au for more.

GRENADE® CARB KILLA® Carb Killa™ is a triple-layered deliciously crunchy low carb high protein bar. Made using a specially selected baking process for exceptional taste it is high in complete protein, low in impact carbs and loaded with tons of fibre. * High Protein – over 23g Per Bar * Less than 1.5g of sugar and 1.5g of high impact carbs and just 214 calories. * Informed Sport approved and accredited This bar really is the perfect high protein low carb snack and an ideal chocolate treat. With Grenade® Carb Killa® you really can have you chocolate and eat it!!!! Available in a range of flavours. www.grenade.com

BRINGING PLEASURE TO THE MASSES

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SHREDDIES Shreddies garments are the perfect solution for all flatulence related issues. Our discreet and stylish designs include an activated carbon panel which absorbs and neutralises flatulence odours. Shreddies range of garments include two styles of Men’s underwear, Pyjamas and Jeans. Visit www.myshreddies.com Prices start from £24.

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To advertise in this feature call Hearst Magazines Direct on 020 3728 6260


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REAR VIEW PRINTS You’re never closer to the world of gasoline culture and iconic art than when you’re on rearviewprints. com. Founded by film industry artist Patrick Redmond, Rear View Prints specialises in highquality prints, apparel, and other items celebrating classic design. From luxury cars to jet-setting gear, it’s your source for memorabilia acclaiming minimal and sleek, but also rugged and dirty. With our recent debut, you’ll have a chance to pay tribute to what fuels the modern man. Discover your drive with us. rearviewprints.com Twitter: @rearviewprints Instagram: @rearviewprints Facebook: rearviewprints

STOÜT DAILY SPF FOR MEN Take your skincare to the next level! Stoüt is a brand-new, “all-in-one” daily natural SPF face cream, specifically formulated with non-nano zinc oxide to protect from harmful UV rays, and includes luxurious moisturisers to hydrate, menthol to provide an aftershave cooling effect, and antioxidants for protection against the effects of ageing. www.stoutfacecare.com

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Hand and Terry is on a mission to create the most comfortable socks in the world by sourcing the finest raw materials and using the best possible technology available. Our dress sock features a unique construction that will fit your feet like a second layer of skin. Use code ‘MHUK’ for 20% off your order. www.handandterry.com

This lovely piece will be engraved by hand in London with the names, dates or message of your choice. The team at Merci Maman will handcraft your necklace within only a couple of days and they will gift wrap it in their signature box. Available in sterling silver, gold plated and rose gold plated. Visit www.mercimamanboutique.com

ITALIAN SILK BLAZERS BY BOIGA LONDON BOIGA is proud to introduce the latest line of Blazers for men. The perfect blend of old school and urban, our suits will help you stand out in unforgettable colours and precision cuts. Crafted with the best Italian silks - you’ll get heads turning in no time. Made from 75% silk from Italy, these high-end tailored pieces are sharp, timeless and eclectic, encapsulating classic style whilst adding exciting pops of colour. Made in England, these are a must-have addition to any man’s wardrobe. www.boigalondon.com 100% Ethical Menswear for the Bold & Proud.

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To advertise in this feature call Hearst Magazines Direct on 020 3728 6260


ONE WORD ANSWER #30 QUESTION

What kind of metal should you be stacking plates with for a better body?

ANSWER

Copper

162 MEN’S HEALTH

converts body fat into a useable source of energy. And the effects are accumulative, too: “The more copper there is, the more the fat is broken down,” says study author Chris Chang. While iron deficiency is fairly rare in healthy men, an estimated threequarters of us fall short of the ideal copper dosage. Sesame seeds are one of the top sources, so try adding a spoonful of tahini (a Middle Eastern paste made of the pulped seeds, and an essential ingredient in houmous) to your post-workout shakes in place of the usual peanut butter. The sun may be going down on ‘guns out’ season, but there’s no reason to let that tarnish your fitness goals.

WORDS: SCARLETT WRENCH | PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL HEDGE

f your pursuit of a solid physique begins and ends with heavy lifting, you’re missing a trick. It seems that incrementally increasing the weight on your barbell will only get you so far. In fact, it’s the metal on your dinner plate that could make the difference. And that means copper, which new research from the University of California has found plays a crucial part in fat metabolism. Until now, iron has been the metallic dietary focus of athletes, thanks to its part in building red blood cells, transporting oxygen to your muscles and providing Arnie with something to pump. But not only have scientists found that copper is vital for adequate iron absorption, this mineral also

MENSHEALTH.CO.UK


Autumn 2016

Epicure 20\

Gourmet Immunity

9\

Root Of Power Why Jerusalem artichokes are the best food you’re not eating

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15 flu-fighting foods worthy of a connoisseur’s tastebuds

Into The Fire Get a handle on your culinary skills with pans chosen by pros

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Young Knives

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Lessons In Tapas Spanish-inspired small plates to impress discerning amigos

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Meet the UK’s most exciting new talent shaking up the capital’s dining scene

Best Gins Under £30 The spirit has been reborn. Upgrade your next G&T with our edit of the best bottles

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We remix cold-pressed juice – with a slug of the hard stuff

Swap cash for flavour with your butcher’s special stuff

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The ceviche trend continues apace. Learn how to prep hot dishes, no cooking required

Epicure grabs a bite with the characters fronting centuryold pie and mash dynasties

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Food critic Marina O’Loughlin teaches you how to size up a good eatery at a glance

Is it a pub? Is it a restaurant? No, it’s a new way of eating out

To Your Good Health

Deep Cuts

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Chef Talk Top restaurateur Karam Sethi shares his recipe for success

Life Of Pie

Playing It Cool

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The UK’s Best Delis Fill your basket with Epicure’s round up of the freshest delicatessens in the country

Public Image

Expert Opinion

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Moorish Tastes

Epicure’s Back Room Team 01 DANIEL CLIFFORD chef patron at Midsummer House 02 APRIL BLOOMFIELD chef and co-owner of The Spotted Pig 03 MELISSA AND JASMINE HEMSLEY wellness queens

09 MARTIN MORALES Ceviche founder 10 KARAM SETHI chef, restaurateur and entrepreneur 11 SHAUN SEARLEY head chef at The Quality Chop House

04 TONY CONIGLIARO mixology luminary

12 ANNA TOBIAS head chef at Rochelle Canteen

05 TOMOS PARRY head chef at Kitty Fisher’s

13 MARK SARGEANT Michelin chef and restaurateur

06 MARK HOOPER editor of artisan mag Hole & Corner

14 SAM AND SAM CLARK owners of Moro and Morito

07 MARINA O’LOUGHLIN restaurant critic at The Guardian

15 BEN TISH chef director at Salt Yard Group

08 JAMES LOWE head chef at Lyle’s

16 CHARLIE HOLLAND Gusbourne wine master craftsman

The pioneering owners of Moro invite us into their kitchen

17 JOSEPH COOKE F Cooke’s fourthgeneration pieman

Grape Britain Once a francophile’s bad joke, British wine is having its day

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ILLUSTRATIONS: ADAM NICKEL AT SYNERGY ART

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Editor’s Letter

PLAYING WITH FOOD Our cover in creation at Soho-based tattoo parlour One By One

hen it was first decided that this, our second annual issue of Epicure, would take on a Made In Britain theme, any notion of Brexit seemed distant, if not improbable to most minds. I say this lest readers mistakenly presume they have picked up a magazine cynically curated to bait John Bull and roll out a hackneyed list of epithets that make old Albion great. This, be assured, is certainly not that. On the contrary, the working title of this issue might well have been: Made In Britain (But Actually A Bit Like France). For while it’s true there are stories here that focus on indigenous British products and time-honoured institutions, the majority reflects a change in our attitude toward food and drink on these shores that has much in common with the continent. So, in our Deep Cuts feature we celebrate the gnarlier, cheaper and ultimately tastier cuts of meat that until recently we have been too conservative, ignorant or just damn profligate to eat. Of course, the French have always done this. Visit a typical Parisian bistro for a plate of steak frites and it’s not sirloin

you can expect to be served but bavette or onglet – cuts that have invariably been destined for the British mincer. On p28, we tell you what to ask your butcher for, how to cook it and what you save. Meanwhile, in Grape Britain (p46) we visit the Kentish winemaker Gusbourne where the South Downs terroir is helping produce sparkling wine that has caught the eyes of Champagne’s most illustrious producers. Elsewhere, in Public Image (p40), we chart the elevation of the old British pub to new foodie destination. It wasn’t so long ago that the concept of Michelin-quality food being served in homespun environs was an oxymoron, but in France… well, you get the picture. This issue, then, is dedicated to Britain and its wares. But it’s not a backwardlooking Britain that we are celebrating – one vainly trying to cling on to some atavistic idea of cultural sovereignty. Rather, we herald an exciting, modern, international Britain that relishes its traditions, its brilliant ingredients and its congenital qualities, but crucially sees a bright future for them, too. Toby Wiseman, Editor

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EDITOR TOBY WISEMAN CREATIVE DIRECTOR DECLAN FAHY PHOTO DIRECTOR RACHAEL CLARK DEPUTY EDITOR DAVID MORTON PRODUCTION EDITOR SCARLETT WRENCH PICTURE EDITORS CINDY PARTHONNAUD AND FRANKIE HILL ART DIRECTOR TOM PLUMSTEAD SENIOR DESIGNER JESSICA WEBB / SUBEDITOR AARON TOUMAZOU GROUP PUBLISHING DIRECTOR ALUN WILLIAMS BRAND DIRECTOR TOM LAKE CREATIVE PARTNERSHIPS DIRECTOR MORGAN HARRISON-DOYLE PRODUCTION MANAGER ROGER BILSLAND COVER PHOTOGRAPHY BY AGATA PEC

PHOTOGRAPHY: STEVE RYAN

Made In Britain W


Morsels To Trade

Market

Skills To Savour

Tapas Tuttorial 100 / Co Cold-Presseeed Cocktails 13 / Ceviche Toolkit 16 /

RIGHTEOUS PLANT Just 100g provides 20% of your RDA of energising iron at a cost of 73kcal

Root Of Divine Power The Jerusalem artichoke is the best food you’re not eating this month. Time for a conversion

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ost foodies know that it neither hails from Jerusalem, nor is it a member of the artichoke clan, but beyond that very little. Aside from its reputation for promoting flatulence, this rich, versatile and nutritious tuber – which is about to enter its five-month season – is woefully underappreciated.

Like a Paul Pogba of the vegetable world, the Jerusalem artichoke has it all. It can lend dishes silky sweetness, hearty punch or soft nuttiness, depending on its treatment. Sliced thinly, it adds umami depth to any potato dish; roasting and pureeing transforms it into an intense, velvety soup. All the while, its heart-abetting potassium makes this a comfort food for the health-conscious. Inexplicably, shops rarely stock these ’chokes, though anyone with a pot and a balcony can grow them with ease. All that’s left is to serve with roast chicken for a holy communion – then give thanks.

Photography by Jobe Lawrenson MENS ME M NSHEALTH.CO.UK S CO UKK

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Light Bites

A Snob’s Guide To

Tapas

A well-executed Spanish small plate is nutritious fare for the discerning grazer. Done poorly, it’s just a bar snack. We explain how to slice it just so

THE SMALL THINGS One legend has it that tapas were originally small pieces of flat bread handed to drinkers to place atop their beer or sherry to guard against flies (tapar is the Spanish verb ‘to cover’). Another goes that enterprising bodega owners would use the strong flavours of the local cheese and meats to ‘cover’ the taste of cheap wine. Either way, the definition of tapas can be reduced to bite-sized portions of simple Spanish cuisine. And this is what makes it easy for the home cook to do well, because fewer ingredients mean you can concentrate on quality and precision. Ben Tish, executive chef of the Salt Yard Group and tapas connoisseur, has arranged the finest foods to turn small plates into a big deal.

PADRÓN PEPPERS Again, you can get these in larger supermarkets, but real padróns have a ‘DOP’ on the packet. It stands for ‘denominazione di origine protetta’ and means they are from the small region in Spain where they should be grown. These peppers are ideal for frying or adding to salads, thinly sliced.

BEECH-SMOKED ANCHOVIES Nardín’s are the best available: plump, juicy and delicately smoked. The Spaniards know how to do tinned fish products. These are renowned world wide – in Spain there are even restaurants serving solely tinned products (brindisa.com).

Photography by Louisa Parry

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A LEG TO STAND ON Jamón on the bone is an investment in flavour – and not one to be wasted. A stand will steady your ham for precise carving: “Plastic is cheaper, but I prefer a wooden base with a solid metal clamp. Over time the wood takes on the natural oils from the ham fat, giving it a wonderful aged hue,” says Tish. A knife with a long, thin blade (£28 thetapas lunchcompany.co.uk) lets you shave off thin slices, maximising the yield. “Tweezers (£12 jamones exquisitos.com) help you arrange the perfectly cut jamón strips when preparing a board or plate,” Tish advises. “Using your fingers just melts the fat.”

PHOTOGRAPHY: LOUISA PARRY | FOOD STYLIST: TAMARA VOS | DISHES £9.20 FOR 4 THETAPASLUNCHCOMPANY.CO.UK,

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SPANISH ARBEQUINA EXTRA-VIRGIN OIL The arbequina olive originates from Catalonia and has a unique, earthy flavour for an oil with such a distinctive fruity note some are even a little tropical. Aura Arbequina is a lovely one, available at Tesco, and it’s what I use at home.

JAMÓN IBÉRICO This cured ham h is now widely available in ready-sliced form. But while the pre-cut stuff is good, you can’t beat it freshly carved from the bone. A longer cure is more expensive, but has superior complexity and depth of flavour. I use Castro and Gonzalez (brindisa.com).


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PLATE SERVICE Tish shows you how to serve up superior ingredients for maximum taste with minimum fuss, so you can get on with the business of eating it. And washing it down with a glass of good Manzanilla, of course.

ANCHOVIES £5.95 BRINDISA.COM, ARBEQUINA OIL SOUSCHEF.COM, HAM AND STAND PROVIDED BY DEHESA

An acorn-rich diet makes meat from Iberian pigs high in oleic fatty acids which balance your cholesterol

JJAMÓN MÓN ÓN IBÉRICO DE BELLOTA ‘De be ellota’ means the animal was rearedd on a diet of acorns, rather than wwith grains (‘recebo’). This shows in the marbling and sweet,

nutty flavor. Each slice should have 50% fat for the perfect bite. Cut so thin it’s almost translucent and served at room temperature, the meat will melt on your tongue.

NARDÍÍÍN ANCHOVIES ON TOAST WITH SSHALLOTS AND PARSLEY Eleva at your anchovies with ate a simmp mple assembly on toasted ciabaat atta. Spread with butter,

top with the anchovies and add shallot rings, flat-leaf parsley, olive oil and a squeeze of lemon juice to cut through the richness of the fish.

CHORIZO-STUFFED PADRÓNS CHORIZO WITH A RED R WINE DRESSING C Choose e the larger peppers, removiing the stalks and seeds. Mash ssome cooking chorizo, then

stuff the peppers and lightly sauté. Sprinkle with salt and drizzle with a vinaigrette made from olive oil, red wine vinegar and honey.

MASH S POOTATOES WHIPPED WITH ARBEQUINA OLIVE OIL Peel aand cook some desiree potato t ttoes, then press through a potaato ricer. Stir in cream,

butter and seasoning. In a food processor, slowly whip in arbequina olive oil to emulsify. It’s one of the most comforting dishes I know.


Drink Clean

To Your Good Health Take one part fitness trend and two parts pure nutrition, then mix with a healthy slug of booze. MH remixes the cold-pressed cocktail Unless you’ve been living under a single malt on the rocks, you’ll be aware that cold-pressed juice is the liquid gold of the clean-eating congregation. Heat from industrial blenders and pulpers, they will gladly tell you over gluten-free canapés, is Beelzebub’s work – scouring the nutritional purity of a vegetable or fruit with its hellfire and rendering them bereft of their benefits. And as far as the science is concerned, they have a point. It’s just that the cold-pressed movement is all a bit worthy; too many

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‘elixirs’ and ‘tonics’ and ‘cleansing infusions’. We think a man’s wellbeing is about balancing the good with the less than good, and if your glass already contains three of your five-a-day and a fruit you can’t pronounce, it stands to reason that a shot of something stronger can’t do much harm. So, we asked our experts to devise the finest cold-pressed cocktails for your healthy delectation, proffering a payload of nutrients in a high ball of late-night indulgence. Charge your glasses.

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Drink Clean 02\ INGREDIENTS SEEDLESS BLACK GRAPES, 110G The Water Of Life • By Mark Sargeant A pear’s skin contains up to four times the phytonutrients as the flesh, including cancer-fighting cinnamic acids. Never peel them.

The Carrot Gimlet By Tony Conigliaro Tough day? The potassium in carrots is a vasodilator, relaxing tension in blood vessels and arteries to decrease blood pressure. You’d best have another.

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The Beetroot Mary

By The Hemsley Sisters Beetroot is resplendent with nitrates to improve blood flow to your muscles and alleviate soreness, making this the ideal rest-day tipple.

METHOD ‘Eau de vie’ is any distilled drink made from fruit other than grapes. In this case, pear. Blend all the fruit, pears last, and then add to the eau de vie over crushed ice in a tall glass. Garnish with a curl of pear skin and energise yourself.

INGREDIENTS • BEEFEATER GIN, 40ML • CARROTS, 5 • SUGAR, PINCH • CUMIN, PINCH METHOD Juice the carrots and add a pinch each of sugar and cumin to amplify the natural sweetness and add a depth to balance the gin. Add 20ml of this cordial with the gin to a cocktail tin filled with cubed ice, stir and then double strain into a small coupette. Sip delicately.

INGREDIENTS • BEETROOTS, 4 • CELERY STICKS, 4 • A LEMON (UNPEELED IF ORGANIC) • LIMES, 2 (UNPEELED IF ORGANIC) • GRATED FRESH HORSERADISH, 2TSP • HIMALAYAN SALT, ¼TSP • WHITE PEPPER, PINCH • VODKA, 100ML • WATER, 150ML METHOD Juice the beets, celery and citrus fruit, then add to a jug with the rest of the ingredients. Stir, then serve in tall glasses over ice and garnish with celery. For an extra kick, add a healthy splash of tobasco.

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The Red Cross By Mark Sargeant Sulphur-like chemicals in radishes serve to flush toxins from the liver. Consider this your first responder for the selfinflicted injuries of a crippling hangover.

INGREDIENTS • A LARGE CARROT • RADISHES, 10 • A BRAEBURN APPLE • LEMONS, 2, ZEST AND JUICE • GIN MARE, 50ML METHOD Juice the carrot, radishes and apple in that order. Add the lemon zest and juice then pour onto the gin over ice. Finish by topping up with sparkling water. Drink quickly and wait for aid to arrive.

Photography by Dan Matthews

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WORDS: DAVID MORTON | FOOD STYLIST: JACK SARGESON GU C

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• COX APPLES, 3, QUARTERED • LARGE PINEAPPLE, ½ • PEARS, 3 • POIRE WILLIAM EAU DE VIE, 50ML


Cold Cuts

Playing It Cool

Ceviche – the Peruvian art of cold ‘cooking’ raw fish in citrus – is the hottest, healthiest food trend in town. Martin Morales, founder of Ceviche and Andina, offers his tricks of the ice trade

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First Degree Ceviche doesn’t just taste good, it looks good. For the best presentation you should slice your fish into a diamond shape, and a sashimi knife with an 8in blade is ideal for this. Cut across the fillet at 45 degrees, about an inch apart, turn and repeat. The points of the diamond will ‘sear’ in the marinade, but the middle will remain pink. IO Shen at lakeland.co.uk

Photography by Michael Hedge

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Zest Practice For your cooking marinade, or Tiger’s Milk, mix 5mm ginger, half a garlic clove, coriander, salt, 2tsp of amarillo chilli paste and the juice of eight limes – Natoora’s are beautiful. natoora.co.uk

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Back To Basics Ceviche is simple food made with care and sazon (flavour). We use basic metal mixing bowls to marinate the fish. The high sides mean you can combine everything gently. johnlewis.com

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The Power Of Three Our chefs use three types of Peruvian chilli, or ajÍ. The ajÍ amarillo is fruity and less harsh, ajÍ limo is punchier and the smoky ajÍ panca holds its taste, even when ground. lacasadejack.com

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Green Goddess

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Avocados can be used as an alternative to butter. Sliced thinly, they also make good lasagne sheets, layered with quinoa and a garlic sauce. The Peruvian hass is in season between May and September. tesco.com

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In Grain Flavour The ancestral superfood of the Incas, quinoa is a complete protein rich in magnesium, iron, zinc and vits B and E. We import organic quinoa from Peru, but I also love the British Quinoa Company. britishquinoa.co.uk

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In Peru’s capital, Lima, barbecued skewers called anticuchos provide a source of income for hard-working women who set up on street corners. Soak ox heart or octopus in a chilli marinade for an hour, then grill it. waitrose.com

Pink maras salt comes from the Urubamba valley and has been harvested for more than two millennia at an altitude of 3000m. Using it to season a dish is like adding a diamond to a gold ring. edelices.co.uk

Out of the 4000 types of potato that exist, around 2500 come from Peru. But the UK has excellent varieties, too. We use purple in our dishes as you harvest more antioxidants than from their white-fleshed cousins. heritage-potatoes.co.uk

Light, luxurious and 40% proof, Pisco has the finesse of good brandy, the funk of tequila and the fragrant dexterity of gin. I recommend Pisco 1615 for cocktails, and Pisco Qollqe for sipping pure. amathusdrinks.com

Sticking Points

The Season Of Taste

Starch Contrast

Real Latin Spirit


Opinion

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ith new restaurant openings heralded by the indiscriminate hypesteria of social media, it can be hard to determine the truly delicious from the deleterious. Likewise, with only the agenda-laden knuckle draggers of TripAdvisor to guide you, dining out can be a lottery. But I’ve been visiting more restaurants than anyone has a right to for years. Along the way, I’ve found reliable signifiers that guarantee a pleasurable feed, as well as becoming wise to the unscrupulous box of tricks that, when spotted, should result in a swift about-turn. Follow these signposts and you’ll rarely go wrong.

Avoid! Menu language ‘Trio of vegetables’, ‘symphonies’ or ‘medleys’ of anything, food ‘nestling’ on other food: no, no and thrice no. Menus that galumph across the globe offering curries, ‘Thai’ food and pizza on the same page must likewise be exiled. The word ‘drizzled’ is shorthand for ‘run away and keep running’. Design by numbers The aesthetic that until fairly recently shouted ‘edgy Williamsburg’ – bare brick, filament light bulbs, subway tiles – now just says ‘lazy corporate designer’. When Greggs gets in on the act, you know this trope is over. Blackboard witticisms Bad puns and edgy statements of intent are a sign that someone values attitude over tastebuds. Any iteration of the ‘sweet dreams are made of cheese’ meme deserves opprobrium. Likewise: ‘unattended children will be given unlimited black coffee and a free kitten’. This is something that started and peaked with the ‘soup of the day: tequila’ blackboard about four years ago. Concepts If the way a menu ‘works’ isn’t immediately comprehensible, it’s a bad menu. Here’s a good concept: you order delicious food, we bring it to you. Food served on things that aren’t plates Gastropubs serving dripping sauces on cracked boards; Michelin botherers with convoluted metal arrangements like instruments of gynaecological torture; chips served in mini frying baskets. Don’t

Behind The Kitchen Door

How can you tell a good eatery from a bad before crossing the threshold? Trenchant restaurant critic Marina O’Loughlin can smell unhappy diners a mile off

COLUMNIST’S PROFILE Marina O’Loughlin is a journalist, writer and restaurant critic for The Guardian

Illustration by Adam Nickel

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think we don’t know who you’re kidding. Laminated menus and/or menus that include pictures I will make a small exception for abstruse Chinese canteens, authentic Korean dives or Japanese izakayas. Everyone else: paper and text only. Overloud music This is one of many things indicating that a restaurant is more about the owners than it is you. Let them get on with it.

Go For It! A daily changing menu Especially one with no more than six choices at each course. I don’t even mind if, like east London’s Pidgin, there’s no choice at all. If they’re only doing a limited number of dishes, chances are they’re doing them well. A busy restaurant ignoring trends Piquet in Fitzrovia has a menu that could have happily existed in the ’70s, complete with roast trolley and punctilious senior staff. At Otto’s in Bloomsbury they’re reviving the duck press, last fashionable a century ago. These places are usually the preserve of the maniacal perfectionist and can only be good news for diners. Reasonably priced lunchtime prix fixes A good restaurant that’s accessible to all is a very good restaurant indeed. A present boss In France, restaurants often used to bear the sign: ‘Le patron mange ici’. ‘Well, duh,’ I used to think. But even in smaller, non-chain outfits, it’s no longer a given. Restaurants where the chef is off counting the money elsewhere can do without your custom. Quality house wine House wine should not be cheapo paint stripper but rather a statement of intent by the restaurant, the quality of which should reflect the rest of its offerings. You should neither be afraid nor ashamed to order it. The right priorities The last word goes to Jeremy King of Corbin & King, the visionaries responsible for The Wolseley and its glamorous siblings. “The moment staff see someone walking through the door as a source of income, the business is doomed,” he says. “You have to look at people [peering in] as an opportunity to give someone a good time.” Any restaurateur following this mantra is one who deserves to succeed.


15 Gourmet Immunity Boosters If you associate effervescence with Bollinger more readily than Berocca, fill your flute and take a seat. This is an epicure’s guide to fighting illness, armed only with a knife and a fork 02

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Reishi

Himalayan Shilajit

Turmeric

Yams

Olive Leaves

Teff

The spice that gives curry its saliva-inducing yellow hue dishes out curcumin, an antiviral compound proven to fight everything from colds to cancer. “Adding black pepper increases absorption,” Bailey says, so season well. £14.90 for 1kg organicdelivery company.co.uk

Oft confused with sweet potatoes, these West African tubers aren’t likely to be found at your local supermarket. Along with 27% of your vit C RDA, yams are rich in beta-carotene, which strengthens your skin – an active immune organ – while maintaining healthy mucous membranes. 95p for 1kg tesco.com

Extend your next cold a pre-emptive peace offering. “Olive leaves have traditionally been used to enhance immune function,” says Bailey. “They appear to stimulate phagocytosis – when immune cells destroy invading organisms.” Try the powdered form. £8.16 for 250g justingred ients.co.uk

Soft-shell Crab

China’s ‘mushroom of immortality’ is packed full of polysaccharides. According to Immunological Investigations, these carbs boost white blood cell production for bolstered immunity. Bypass the barklike outer layer by brewing it into tea. £7.99 for 50g indigo-herbs.co.uk

This smokey resin is the concentrate of forests crushed by the formation of the Himalayas. “It has a range of minerals plus fulvic acid,” says nutritionist Dr Christine Bailey, author of The Raw Food Healing Bible. Put it at the summit of your spice rack. £19.65 for 25g hybridherbs.co.uk

To shield yourself against winter bugs, you need a soft approach. A single serving of crab hits your RDA for immuneboosting vit B12, meets half of your selenium needs and nets you the DHA and EPA fats that raise white blood cell activity. £9 for 160g thefishsociety.co.uk

“Teff is a source of protein, iron and vit C – all important for immunity,” says Bailey. You’ll find this gluten-free grain scattered across Ethiopian menus. Try it as injera flatbread, an edible ‘plate’ on which other food is served. £4.99 for 1kg healthy supplies.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHY: DAN MATTHEWS | FOOD STYLIST: NICOLAS GHIRLANDO

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THE RAW FOOD HEALING BIBLE BY CHRISTINE BAILEY (APPLE PRESS £9.98) CHRISTINEBAILEY.CO.UK

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Elderberry

Astragalus Root

Black Garlic

Spearmint Its sharp flavour means it’s better suited to savoury dishes (add it to your next lamb roast) than its sweeter cousin peppermint. It can also make a killer cold-downing julep: “Menthol has antibacterial properties, fending off infections,” says Bailey. Here’s to your good health. £2.35 for 14g steenbergs.co.uk

Garbanzo Beans

Sun-dried Tomatoes

Wakame

Unlike regular cloves, these dark varieties have been aged to develop a sweeter, almost balsamic flavour. They’re also higher in antioxidants, plus the “antiviral compounds allicin, allistatin, garlicin and ajoine,” says Bailey. Black magic. £2.50 per bulb souschef.co.uk

Manuka Honey The buzz around New Zealand’s ‘hipster honey’ is warranted. Rich in antibacterial methylglyoxal, manuka makes a beeline for sinusblocking biofilms and clears your airways faster than antibiotics, found a Canadian study. £21 for 340g waitrose.com

Make these pulses your defence force. The houmous base and falafel fillers (alias: chickpeas) are among your richest sources of vitamin B6, which boosts production of T and B immune cells – these can ‘remember’ how they took down an enemy previously. £2 for 500g abelandcole.co.uk

Not only does the lycopene in tomatoes reduce your cancer risk but, according to Botanical Medicine in Clinical Practice, it regulates the function of immune cells. Research shows heating (or sun-drying) ups lycopene’s potency. £2.50 for 290g souschef.co.uk

Unless you’re turning left, you’re unlikely to find elderberry compote on your in-flight breakfast menu. So pick a punnet up before check-in. Griffith University found the bitter fruit reduces your chance of upperrespiratory issues after air travel. £1.20 for 25g realfoods.co.uk

Try this Chinese herb next time you find yourself rooting around for a health boost. “It has been proven to support health by increasing the activity of immune cells,” says Bailey. Add it to chicken broth for a comfort food classic. £9.98 for 250g justingred ients.co.uk

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Call on the unsung hero of the sushi menu to take a samurai sword to your post-Sake binge sniffles. With immune-raising polysaccharides and thyroidsupporting iodine, wakame seaweed is also rich in iron, which puts the production of red blood cells on a roll to fend off fatigue. £1.95 for 57g souschef.co.uk


Young Knives

A new breed of chefs, more concerned with innovation and originality than silver service pretension, are quietly changing the way in which good food is eaten. Meet the hip young pan-slingers transforming London’s kitchens

Interviews by Mina Holland Photography by Katie Wilson

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01 CHEF PROFILE JAMES LOWE co-owner and head chef at Lyle’s restaurant, Shoreditch

The Evolutionist


Young Knives 01\ James Lowe

CHEF PROFILE NICHOLAS BALFE founder of British seasonal restaurant Salon, Brixton

HAVING TRAINED AT THE FAT DUCK BEFORE HEADING UP ST JOHN, LOWE’S EXPERIENCE BELIES HIS 36 YEARS. NOW AT LYLE’S, HE IS TRAILBLAZING A NEW ERA OF BRITISH CUISINE In 2002, James Lowe started eating properly. Having completed a maths and science degree in Canada, he moved to London and began waiting tables at The Wapping Project, a power station turned arts space. It was here that a fascination with the kitchen was born. After a heated clash in which he told the head chef that European food was boring (“after the eyeopening Asian food in Vancouver, it just was”) Lowe was sent to learn a lesson. That week he ate in The Fat Duck and St John. He was blown away. He became a chef. After stints at both of these restaurants, as well as Chiswick bistro La Trompette, he teamed up with fellow young gun Isaac McHale. For all London’s hype, both felt the city’s restaurant scene to be cripplingly risk averse next to those of Copenhagen and New York. Locations such as Noma and wd~50 pioneered ingredients of which Lowe had never even heard. They also prized décor and crockery as highly as the food itself. In 2010, under the moniker of Young Turks, the pair started cooking “in a small, badly equipped kitchen” above The Ten Bells pub in Shoreditch. It didn’t take long to turn heads. But by the time the duo parted ways (McHale went on to start up The Clove Club) Lowe had a wait on his hands. Finally, Lyle’s – his “concrete, stone and wood, built-to-last” restaurant – opened in 2014 and was immediately hailed as defining a new British cuisine. This was never Lowe’s intention – he’s allergic to PR speak. (When asked about Lyle’s USP, he simply says that it’s “good and nice”). But he is still transparent about finding food abroad more interesting: “Brits have always brought ideas back to the island... Apart from kale, everything has been introduced here.” When considering an ingredient, first he thinks of the approaches he could take – Japanese, Italian, French – then assimilates these traditions into his own style. Lyle’s philosophy is one of evolution; signature dishes are not a feature. “I love restaurants more than I love cooking,” he admits. “Yes, the adrenaline of service is great, but it’s the package that fascinates me.” With Lowe, you sense that what makes a good restaurant work is an equation this mathematician won’t stop trying to solve. lyleslondon.com

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The Localiser

02\ Nicholas Balfe FROM THE CRAMPED CONFINES OF A FORMER HAIR SALON IN BRIXTON, BALFE USES LOCAL INGREDIENTS AND PROVINCIAL ARTISANS TO CREATE A RUSTIC BRITISH MENU FOR 2016 “We still get calls asking if we do braids,” says Nicholas Balfe of Salon, his tiny upstairs restaurant on Market Row. It’s been three years since he set up shop, at a time when “Brixton was exploding with restaurants, but none serving British seasonal food.” Salon is a no-frills place, instead priding itself on forging close relationships with suppliers: “The narrative of the ingredients and artistry of putting them together is more important to me than theatrical presentation.” At 15, Balfe started pot-washing in

Harrogate’s Pinocchio’s, an “old-school Italian meets ’90s Yorkshire”. Cooking came naturally. After university (and a brief spell in marketing), he crammed in a stellar schooling in emerging British restaurants, from Vauxhall’s Brunswick House to Upstairs at The Ten Bells with Isaac McHale and James Lowe (left). “At Salon we have next to no equipment or space. Nothing is heavy on process, aside from curing, salting and brining.” One of the restaurant’s most popular dishes is its nduja croquettes. “Nduja sausage originates from Calabria, but ours is made by Black Hand Food in Hackney,” says Balfe. “That’s an example of how British producers have appropriated ideas and made them relevant to the UK. It’s what makes it exciting.” salonbrixton.co.uk


CHEF PROFILE ANNA TOBIAS head chef at converted bike shed Rochelle Canteen, Shoreditch

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The Traditionalist

03\ Anna Tobias IN THE OFTEN VIRILE ATMOSPHERE OF THE PRO KITCHEN, TOBIAS HAS THE ASSUREDNESS TO SERVE GREAT FOOD, SIMPLY, ALLOWING CLASSIC RECIPES TO PUNCH ABOVE THEIR WEIGHT

The fire and knives aura cultivated by some contemporary chefs is not for Anna Tobias. Her ego is as restrained as her culinary creations. They may not wow on paper, but on the plate they tell a different story altogether. Aged 27, she became head chef at Margot Henderson and Melanie Arnold’s Rochelle Canteen in east London, gaining a reputation for a culinary maturity belying her years. Tobias puts a gentle spin on established recipes, eschewing menu jargon and serving them with

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the names they’ve always had. There are no fireworks, just delicate twists on familiar formulae. “Margot’s great phrase is ‘express yourself’,” she says. “And for me, that often means bringing back some of the dated, less fashionable classics of the ’70s. Dishes like stroganoff, goulash, strudel, quiche or beef wellington.” The resulting plates are not nostalgia trips but smart reiterations for 21st-century Shoreditch palates. So, for instance, a classic flavor combination of eel, mash and liquor is reimagined as a smoked eel, leek and parsley pie. Likewise, dreary dishes of yesteryear are reassembled as glamorous creations with simple flourishes. Simple doesn’t mean parsimonious, however. Tobias focuses on finding the best quality produce and using it charitably. “Food is about generosity of spirit, and that’s been an important lesson for me to learn as a chef,” she says. “If I’m cooking from a British book written during rationing, I’ll be more liberal with butter and cream. But if I say a dish has girolles in it, that doesn’t mean five sad mushrooms, it means a tumble of them, a celebration, a girolle party on the plate.” It’s statements like these that best echo her flamboyant mentor, Quo Vadis head chef Jeremy Lee, with whom she first trained at the Blueprint Café. Add to this experience Tobias’s term at the River Café and it’s clear hers has been an education in the causal link between exemplary produce and abundant flavour. As London’s reputation for multinational cuisine burgeons, her deft touch with time-honoured ingredients and combinations is all the more thrilling. arnoldandhenderson.com


CHEF PROFILE SELIN KIAZIM owner of TurkishCypriot eatery Oklava, Moorgate

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The Cosmopolitan

04\ Selin Kiazim HAVING EARNED A LOYAL FOLLOWING THROUGH RECENT POP-UP VENTURES, 30-YEAR-OLD KIAZIM IS NOW WOWING GOURMANDS WITH HER SOPHISTICATED TAKE ON THE EAST MEDITERRANEAN

It took years for Selin Kiazim to start drawing on her heritage. In fact, the chef, who last year opened her first restaurant, Oklava (it means ‘rolling pin’), spent her early career avoiding the Ottoman roots she now takes as her inspiration. Growing up in a Northern Cypriot community in London’s Southgate, home life revolved around food. But it was daytime cookery shows – Ainsley Harriott et al – that put her into the family kitchen aged 12. She remembers holding dinner parties for her friends, serving modern

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Euro classics like soufflé omelettes and stuffed chicken breasts. In her teens she started at Westminster Kingsway catering college. Kiazim then won a competition to spend five weeks in New Zealand, where she worked at Peter Gordon’s Dine in Auckland. Once back in England, the Kiwi chef invited her to join the team at his Marylebone venue, The Providores, famous for its sophisticated approach to fusion food. “My eyes were opened to so many flavours from around the world,” she says. “It endowed me with a fearlessness about combining them.” Kiazim worked her way through The Providores, then sister restaurant Kopapa, before realising she wanted to go it alone. “I began leaning toward my roots,” she says. “Turkish food at its best – kebabs, barbecue, stews – is as good as it gets for me, but there was no one thinking beyond the time-old traditional recipes, the conventional kebab shop.” Subsequently, Kiazim started reviving ingredients that were part of her cultural DNA – pomegranate molasses, a sundried pepper paste called biber salcasi – but presenting them in new ways. At Oklava, echoes of Gordon’s fusion influence are evident in dishes like monkfish cooked with soy sauce and urfa chilli. The lack of Turkish mainstays on her menu has irked some critics, but Kiazim says this is the point: “I don’t want to be just an upscale Mangal 1 [the renowned Ocakbasi restaurant in Dalston],” she says. “I don’t just want to ‘refine’ the food I grew up with and give people lamb shish. I’m here to do something that’s not been done before.” And what does that mean for her, here in London? “I’ve always worked in London, but I have this heritage. I think being a British chef has always meant having no boundaries, having food from different communities as your palette. That’s what I’m doing.” oklava.co.uk


Young Knives

CHEF PROFILE TOMOS PARRY head chef at Brit-Basque hit Kitty Fisher’s, Mayfair

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The Firestarter

05\ Tomos Parry AS THE MAN DOING ALCHEMICAL THINGS WITH A WOOD-FIRED GRILL AND GALICIAN BEEF, PARRY IS THE REASON KITTY FISHER’S HAS BECOME LONDON’S HOTTEST TABLE

When Kitty Fisher’s opened at the end of 2014, the objective was, “to put Shepherd Market back on the map, just not for the Jeffrey Archer connections,” says 30-yearold Tomos Parry. His point is clear: the cobbled close, off London’s Piccadilly, has long been known for average eateries with upstairs windows that glow red by night. The original intention was to open a Basque restaurant, he says, and it was on this premise that he bonded with its three owners. They’d gone to Climpson’s Arch in London Fields, where Parry was working at the time, because they’d heard there was a chef cooking grouse on a grill. “In fact, I grilled the whole menu: bread, grouse with bread sauce, sweetcorn... It fit with their vision of a Basque restaurant.” Although what eventually became Kitty Fisher’s is nothing of the sort – think modernised British faithfuls treated with a lick of fire – Parry maintains that there are many aspects that would be at home in Spain. He cites the feisty flavours and robust dishes like the Galician beef sirloin (the only meat they source from outside the UK), all served in generous portions. Parry’s journey to this small corner of Mayfair has been appropriately itinerant. Having grown up in Anglesey, he left Wales for the River Café, moving on to Kitchen Table via a stint at Copenhagen’s Noma, before turning up at Climpson’s. It only struck him recently, he says, that the three pillars of influence on Kitty Fisher’s – Cornwall (from whence most of its produce originates), Wales (his birthplace) and the Basque country – are all Celtic countries. There’s a sense of serendipity. Parry’s USP, the wood grill, has turned a limitation into a strength for the restaurant. “We don’t have an oven,” he says, “but that restraint makes us more creative. I use smoke and char in a way that doesn’t overwhelm but creates delicacy.” Novelty is key to Kitty Fisher’s success. There’s plenty to test the old-school Mayfair clientele – “We were originally worried about putting ‘burnt’ onions on the menu, that’s how conservative the crowd is!” – but enough that’s familiar to keep them sweet, like whipped cod’s roe or liver and onions. Incidentally, the name Kitty Fisher’s is an homage to an 18th-century courtesan, notorious for scandalous affairs with wealthy men. It fits. As the restaurant doffs its cap to Shepherd Market’s seedy past, it hails a place that now deserves to be noticed, not to hide. kittyfishers.com


For o serious se ous flavour ou att a bite b te off the price, it pays to look beyond the butcher’s w. y ’ window Know your learn the y beast, b l h language l g g and d enter a world ld off nutritious p protein to be savoured d like l k a king, k g withou h ut u paying g a ransom to matchh

GUTTTTER GU EERR CCRREEDI DDIT

Words by Toby Wiseman Photography by David Marquezz


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ood meat will cost you, and rightly so. Quality beef takes time, investment and care, from the 24-30 months the cattle will live to the dry-ageing process that occurs with weeks of hanging. Cows are big beasts – a good Hereford can weigh up to 850kg – so they eat a lot. Next time you baulk at the price of a steak on a restaurant menu, remember that it’s almost certainly the dish with the lowest mark-up. As beef aficionado John Torode once told this magazine: “Meat should be expensive. It’s a fucking animal.” Well, quite. But we don’t help matters. For such a large beast, a relatively small proportion of the cow is assigned value by Brits. Beyond the ubiquitous hindquarter rib roasts, sirloin steaks, rumps and fillets, the majority of a beef carcass is destined for stewing meat and mince. You don’t need to be an economist to understand that if an entire cow yields only six to eight T-bones, they’re going to be pricey. It’s called scarcity value. Environmentally speaking, such profligacy is a very real problem. But from the viewpoint of both your gullet and your wallet, it’s a nauseating waste, too. There is a wealth of underexplored and undervalued parts of both sheep and cow that yield immense flavour and high nutritional benefit for relatively little

cash. The key, as always, is befriending your butcher. This is no platitude. When short ribs became popular on restaurant menus a few years ago, I asked my local meat man in rural Essex for some. He didn’t know what I was talking about. But rather than fob me off or attempt to upsell, I was invited out back to look at the hanging carcasses and help identify the cut. It turned out that what I knew as short rib he referred to as Jacob’s ladder. I left with tasty meat in my shopping bag, change in my pocket and a fruitful relationship with my butcher in the making. Over the next few pages, Shaun Searley, head chef at The Quality Chop House (thequalitychophouse.com), recommends his favourite steaks and joints rarely found on the butcher’s slab, along with tips on how to serve them up. They require precise cooking to be enjoyed at their best, but be bold, broaden your palate and you’ll be rewarded in both taste and budget. The first cut is rarely the deepest.

Ultra-lean denver has less than 7g of fat per serving

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01\ Denver ALSO KNOWN AS Bottom chuck, underblade centre cut, cap of the chuck. WHAT TO ASK YOUR BUTCHER FOR The top of the chuck steak, a muscle that sits before the shoulderblade. It’s quite a large muscle (about 1.5kg on average) from which you can cut your desired steak weight (say, 250g). CHARACTERISTICS Lean, dense and seriously meaty. Well textured with good marbling. USE INSTEAD OF Rump. HOW TO COOK IT The Denver steak can be tough and dry if either under- or over-cooked. Try flash-frying in foaming butter and/or beef dripping, then slow-cook it at 90°C in an oven until mediumrare (a core temperature of about 48°C). WHAT TO SERVE IT WITH Shaved courgette salad with tarragon and lemon dressing.


Full of vit B12, this cut yields double your RDA

02\ Teres Major ALSO KNOWN AS Shoulder tender, shoulder petite tender, beef shoulder, mock tender. WHAT TO ASK YOUR BUTCHER FOR This cut sits just under the shoulderblade. There’s only one per side, and it’s approximately 300g, so you

will probably need to ask your butcher in advance. CHARACTERISTICS Because of where it sits, surrounded by muscles and bone, it’s incredibly flavoursome. Very rich, ultra-lean and, if cooked correctly, very tender. USE INSTEAD OF It’s similar to tenderloin, so a great alternative to fillet.

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HOW TO COOK IT As with the denver, flash-fry in a pan with foaming butter or beef dripping and then slow-cook at 90°C in an oven until medium rare. WHAT TO SERVE IT WITH Watercress dressed in olive oil and freshly grated horseradish. To finish the steak, mix the resting juices with brown butter and pour them over.


Deep Cuts 03\ Leg Of Mutton

This rich cut is particularly high in moodbalancing B6

ALSO KNOWN AS LMC, housekeeper’s cut. WHAT TO ASK YOUR BUTCHER FOR An old-fashioned, whole joint that’s cut from the inside of the shoulder. CHARACTERISTICS As tender as topside, but with the intensely rich flavour you would expect from a hard-working muscle. USE INSTEAD OF Topside.

HOW TO COOK IT Though most people would recommend slow-cooking this cut, it also makes a great alternative to a more traditional roasting joint. Ask your butcher to remove the large seam that runs through the middle of the cut and then tie it back together. Season generously with salt and English mustard powder, then roast at 200°C to brown, before reducing the temperature to 120°C and slow-cooking to desired cuisson. I’d recommend a core temperature of 52°C. WHAT TO SERVE IT WITH All the classic Sunday roast trimmings.


Deep Cuts

04\ Onglet ALSO KNOWN AS Hanger steak, skirt, butcher’s steak WHAT TO ASK YOUR BUTCHER FOR It sits between the stomach lining and the diaphragm. Strictly speaking, this falls under the category of offal. CHARACTERISTICS This is possibly the most flavoursome of steaks. It takes on a lot of rich offallike characteristics because of its position on the animal, but without the dry, bitter aftertaste you often get

from kidneys. Crucially, onglet is not hung like most beef, but used fresh instead. USE INSTEAD OF Any traditional steak cut. HOW TO COOK IT Flash-fry in a pan with butter and/or beef dripping, then slow-cook the steak at 90°C in an oven until medium rare. Ideally, this should be served very pink. WHAT TO SERVE IT WITH Baby gem lettuce with some Caesar dressing. It also works really well in a steak sandwich.

Onglet is a top source of protein with 24g/100g


STYLING: MAYA LINHARES-MARX | †WITH THANKS TO NUTRITIONIST ROB HOBSON, ROBHOBSON.CO.UK, CO-AUTHOR OF DETOX KITCHEN BIBLE

Make this your go-to for cold-fighting mineral zinc†

05\ Chuck-eye ALSO KNOWN AS Mock tender roast, Scotch tender WHAT TO ASK YOUR BUTCHER FOR While the chuck-eye is strictly from the forequarter of the animal, it comes directly after the ribeye. It’s often used in mince and burgers, or as

braising meat; instead, ask your butcher to seam out the eye from the chuck. CHARACTERISTICS Tender, rich flavour. As it’s a continuation of the ribeye, expect similar marbling, texture and moreishness, just without the pricetag. USE INSTEAD OF Ribeye.

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HOW TO COOK IT Season generously with salt and English mustard powder, and roast in an oven at 200°C to brown, before reducing the temperature to 120°C, and slow-cooking to desired cuisson. Aim for a core temperature of 52°C. WHAT TO SERVE IT WITH Thinly sliced potatoes baked with cream, garlic and horseradish.

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Life Of Pie Pie and mash is the capital’s original cucina povera, an archetypal street food long before the burrito bandwagon drove into town. Over the past 150 years, three dynasties have dominated the trade, but business is tougher than ever. Epicure tracks down the last piemen

Words by Toby Wiseman Photography by Steve Ryan

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Joe Cooke, fourthgeneration pieman Owner of F Cooke, 150 Hoxton Street, London N1

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n 1862 my great-grandfather, Robert Cooke, was the first person to put liquor with a pie. The liquor came from stewing the eels and was then flavoured with parsley. Before that you’d get separate eel stalls and pie stalls, but no man before him had sold them together under one roof. Whether he knew what he was doing or not, I don’t know. He happened to like a drink. The shop was on Sclater Street, between Bethnal Green Road and Brick Lane, and it was the first. Everyone knows Manze’s on Tower Bridge Road as the oldest surviving pie and mash shop, but not many know that was originally a Cooke’s, too. Michele Manze was an Italian who married Ada Poole, my greatgrandfather’s daughter, so he effectively married into our business. We trade as F Cooke – that’s Fred Cooke, Robert’s son. After him came my dad and his brother, and now there’s us lot. At one stage we would have had about half a dozen shops, plus a load that my Nan had in her maiden name, Burroughs. It’s always been in the family. There’s no competition with the other families like the Kellys and Manzes as far as I’m concerned. I can only speak for our stuff. I was at Smithfield meat market this morning at 5.30am and I picked up 300-odd pounds of meat on the bone. Hindquarter flank, either English or Scotch. It’s first class stewing meat and I bone it out myself. I always double-mince it too, which disperses the fat and flavour better. It’s probably 75-80% lean meat, which is a beautiful ratio for flavour. Our parsley is fresh and English and we grind it all ourselves. The mash is real – quality spuds. I wouldn’t know how to do it differently. We’ve only ever had cream gear. What other people use, I don’t know. The eel trade has gone downhill. It’s so precarious. Years ago, eels were so plentiful you would have got them for virtually nothing. Now they’ll cost you eight and a half quid a pound just in the bloody market. You’ve got no chance. To be honest, we sell a lot less in general. That’s partly to do with the way the population around here has changed, but it’s competition mainly. There’s over 30 places to eat down this street – and that’s just the shops, never mind the street food. The biggest hit we’ve had to suffer in recent times was all the trouble in the

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City. When Lehman’s went, that started the downturn for us. All the City boys used to have a drink on Thursday night and want pie and mash delivered Friday lunch. When that stopped it hit us hard. This shop has been here since 1986. My grandfather’s daughter used to have a shop across the road, but that packed up in the ’70s because the whole market became derelict for a bit. It was the old F Cooke in Dalston that was the most beautiful. It’s a Chinese restaurant now, but the original fittings are still there. Having made money out of our shop in Broadway Market, Fred bought this place in Kingsland High

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Street in 1910 and had it done out. It was tiled from floor to ceiling, with a terrazzo floor, marble counter and tables – all of it beautiful. Apparently, when they opened, people thought it was so posh they wouldn’t go in. They ended up sending the girls down the road with coppers, giving people the money to go and try it. There may be fewer of them now but the proper shops have never changed. A place that looks like a caff and sells pies is not a proper pie shop. It’s got to have sawdust on the floor and marble tables. Otherwise it’s not the real thing. We’re upholding a tradition. It’s important.


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F COOKE 01 Joe Cooke is passionate about his product: “If you only use good ingredients, even if you fuck it up, you’ll still have a quality base” 02 This shop was established as recently as 1986, but the Cooke family traded on Hoxton Street as far back as 1902 03 While the days of the penny pie have long gone, prices remain low 04-05 Aesthetics are as important as ingredients when it comes to tradition. F Cooke vigorously maintains both

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01 M MANZE 01 “It’s still food for working men, though we get plenty of City boys too”

Rick Poole, third-generation pieman

02 Chilli vinegar is the traditional accompaniment

Owner of M Manze, 87 Tower Bridge Road, London SE1

03 M Manze on Tower Bridge Road is the oldest surviving shop in London, though it had traded as a Cooke’s for 10 years previously

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ichele Manze, my grandfather, started out as an ice merchant and ice cream maker. He’d come to London with his parents in 1878 from Ravello, Italy, at just three years old. The story is that they walked barefoot to Naples to catch the boat. It’s a beautiful place, Ravello, but no good if you haven’t got any money or a job. When he grew up, he married the daughter of Robert Cooke and they took over the Tower Bridge Road shop. For 10 years or so it had been run as a Cooke’s but in 1902 it became the first M Manze. Later on, his brother Luigi got in on the act and at one point the family had 14 different shops in London. There’s an L Manze still going on Walthamstow High Street, and an M Manze in Chapel Market. But only three shops remain in the real family: Tower Bridge Road, Peckham High Street and Sutton. Does it bother me that there are others using the name? Yeah, it does to be honest. Especially if what someone

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else is doing is rubbish. It’s nothing to do with them really. Me and my two brothers run the business. We’ve worked in the shops all our lives, and I’m the youngest one. I was making pies at 10 or 11 as a Saturday boy. Nowadays the thing that takes up much of my time is the internet business. The original London customer has spread out so much. We even send to Northern Ireland. If it was feasible to ship it further afield then we would because we’re always getting emails from Australia, America, places like that. In terms of volume it’s still relatively small, but it’s a bit like having a fourth shop. We probably couldn’t do without it now, to be honest. The product is unique – even within our own shops the taste will differ slightly. But the ingredients and the method we use are the same as they were 100 years ago. We make the pastry by hand. I know how the Cookes make their liquor and we definitely do it differently. I only eat the pies myself. It would be nice to retire but there’s always something that holds you back. Probably one of the only reasons we’re still doing it is to uphold the family tradition. Of course we could sell up and move on but then you’ve got nothing left to be proud of. And there’s so much to be proud of.


Life Of Pie Neil Vening, fourthgeneration pieman Owner of G Kelly 526 Roman Road, London E3

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y mum Sue took over the shop from her parents – there are pictures of my grandparents up behind the counter. George Kelly was my grandad’s brother-in-law – George had married my great aunt. This shop was established in 1937, though George and his brothers and sisters opened up others in Bethnal Green, too. He was a competitive man and ultimately more interested in eels – they were more popular than pies then – so in the ’50s he decided to focus on running his eel factory next to Victoria Park and my grandparents took over the shop. I graduated a couple of years ago and then got flung headfirst into this because my father became ill, although I’ve been washing plates here since I was a kid. In any small business there’s a lot of micromanaging going on, so I do everything from scrubbing floors to making pastry. The pies are made pretty much the same way they always have. Everything is from scratch. One thing we do differently is to put the freshly minced beef into

our pies raw, so it cooks quickly in the pie. I like to think of it as coming out more like a gourmet burger because it’s occasionally a bit pink. That, for me, gives it a really nice, beefy flavour. But it’s how we’ve always done it. I still love pie and mash. I eat it every day. Back when Roman Road was a thriving market, this place was really busy. They would bake off 100 pies before they even opened their doors, so they would have to be ahead by 10 trays at any one time. There were no other takeaways beyond chip shops at that point. Once the market closed there was a steady decline. But in the last 12 months we’ve started seeing trade increase by about 30%. On a Saturday we sell between 600-800 pies to everyone from East End expats to the hipster crowd. It’s a healthy business. The plan for next year is to rebuild because the roof is in a pretty sorry state and it’s more of a shack than a structure. We’re going to restore the interior and dig out all of the original tiles to keep it as traditional as possible. Most surviving pie shops are Victorian but we came a bit later, hence the Art Deco feel. It’s important to me because it’s part of London’s legacy; it’s certainly part of my family’s legacy. Mum always says we’re running a museum more than a pie shop. Hopefully we can give it a new lease of life.

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02 G KELLY 01 Most surviving pie shops are Victorian, but G Kelly opened in 1937 and its art deco frontage is unique 02 A photo of Bill Kingdon, George Kelly’s brother-in-law, presides over the counter 03 “The liquor is just parsley really. Originally it would’ve been made with the stewing liquor from the eels, but not anymore. That’s actually odder than it sounds because in the beginning pies and eels were sold separately”

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Whenn so somee of the fiinest food f d in Briitain is being b served l ed in places moree traditionally d ll assocciated d withh warm d mb beer and lock-ins, time i it’s it’ ti to rethink your preconceptions about eating out

Words by Toby Wiseman Photography by Dan Matthews

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ntil late last year, n y the be est feed y you could have hoped p for at The Flitch of Bacon, a rather gnarle g ed pub in the t tiny y village g of Little Dunmo ow, was a pickled a egg gg nestling g in a pack ket of salt and a vinegar. g Today y an egg gg dish h remains on the menu,, but its treatmentt is rather more epicurean. p This one is po oached, encased within a crisp, p p potato--lace basket, and a served with thin slices off smoked duck, pickled p artichoke and wo ood sorrel on a p pillow off silky y Jerusalem artichoke puree. It is the best mouthful of food you will find in Essex and it costs just £8.50. The owner of The Flitch of Bacon is Daniel Clifford, chef patron of Cambridge’s two-starred Midsummer House, and while he has nothing against traditional pub grub, his ambitions are pitched somewhat higher. “I want people to come here and be amazed,” he says. “Every pub has the same menu; they’re all doing what was fashionable in London two years ago. Yes, we want this place to be the first in Essex to get a Michelin star, but we also want the fish and chips to blow your mind.” Clifford has invested much into this project, but the result is neither distressed

fine-dining g nor ersatz g gastropub. There is a mackerel dish with a piccalilli chantilly y that’s of architectural beauty, y but there a also local ales on tap are p and custom-built k kennels outside for thirsty y dogwalkers. g I a freehouse, just one serving It’s exceptional p food at sub-Michelin p prices. While Clifford talks of creating g a place that he can enjoy as a punter rather than a p proprietor, he also speaks with intensity y off the work that goes g into the perfect velouté a the quality and y of the local partridge. g So w which is it: pub p or restaurant? “Guides a always y want to put you y in a category g y b the industry but y has evolved so much in the last 10 years,” y says y C Clifford. “You get g people selling g a g food out of vans on amazing t e sside de o e road. oad. You ou can ca the of tthe y want. call it whatever you I ca itt The e Flitch tc of o Bacon.” I call g Of course, what he’s doing q is rare, but it’s not unique. g has won two Tom Kerridge c e stars sta s for o tthe e food ood Michelin he serves out of The Hand and Flowers in Marlow, and the similarly starred Galvin Brothers will soon be opening their own pub in Essex, The Green Man, just six miles away from The Flitch. While none of them would be conceited enough to talk of trends, it does point to a shift in focus away from the metropolitan stronghold of quality eateries. Just possibly, it’s a step toward the democratisation of good food. And, if that’s true, then it’s worth drinking to.

FOOD STYLIST: MAUD EDEN

Public Image


LITTLE DUNMOW,, ESSEX T MMichelin-starred h l t d Two chef Daniel Clifford b ht hhis llocal l on bought a whim in 2015. It h quickly kl turned t d has into a ppassion

Velouté off V P with Pork Pea B Belly Raviolo By Daniel Clifford, B ff T Flitch Off Bacon The f tc ofb co co u flitchofbacon.co.uk

INGREDIENTS G S An A onion o on Garlic,, 2 clovess Potatoes, 300gg C Chicken stock, , 1L L Frozen peas, p 00 500g Double cream, , 20 120ml Spinach, handful p Shallots, , 5 Parsley, 50g g Pork Belly, y 00 dicedd 500g, Chicken C breasts,, 2 Eggs, gg 2 Whipping g cream, 00 l 100ml Fresh ppasta, , s ee s 2 sheets

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1\ To make k the h velouté, l é chop h the h onion and d garlic, g l cut the h p h k then h potatoes into chunks, sweat in olive oil. Add boiling g stock, cook ffor ffive minutes, h add dd the h peas and d cream then and d boil for o another e two. t o Blend with the spinach and p chill over ice immediatelyy to preserve the intense green g colour. That’s the easyy bit. 2\ 2 For the ravioli filling, f g chop p the shallots and parsley, p y

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mix with the ppork bellyy and season. se so In oorder de to bbind d tthee mixture you y need to make a quick chicken mousse: q blend the chicken breasts,, add the eggs gg and blend again. g Add the whipping g cream and blend b e d a little tt e more. o e Once O ce it’s ts mixed,, take small amounts (about 50g g at a time), wrap them in cling g film tied at the ends and drop p them into boiling g water for two minutes.

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3\ Take y your fresh p pasta and roll it out as thinlyy as possible before cutting g out large g circles with a cookie cutter. Makee ravioli coo e cutte o from the pasta discs and p the pork, sticking g them together with a little water. g Carefullyy pplace the ravioli in boiling g water until they float to the surface. Reheat yyour velouté, v , season to taste,, and float a raviolo on top. p


LITTLE DUNMOW, ESSEX The Flitch’s ’ name is taken from trials d t dating bback k tto th the 12th century y in which half h lf a pig is awarded d d to the most happily pp y marriedd couple. l RReally lly

Crispy C i py Hen n Egg, gg g Jerusalem A i h k , Artichoke, Smoked k d Duck k B Daniel Clifford, By ff T The Flitch Off Bacon fflitchofbacon.co.uk f

INGREDIENTS A artichoke An Onions,, 3 Eggs, gg 4 A potato p o Jerusalem artichokes, t h k , 400gg C Chicken t k, 1L stock, Double cream, , 200 l 200ml Butter, 150g g A ssmoked o ed duck duc b t breast

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1 Make your artichoke 1\ i burntt onion ccrisps and d bu o o p powder in advance. Peel the raw artichoke, h k slice l thinly h ly w withh a mandolin d l then h d deep-ffry at 140°C until g golden. Blacken two peeled onions in B p a dry pan over high g heat, then place in a 140°C oven for 12 p hhours. Blend to a fine ppowder.. 22\ Now poach your eggs gg in a deep pan d n off simmeringg water with white wine vinegar. w g After

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ttwoo and d a half minutes utes remove e o e aand plunge g into iced water. Meanwhile, use a turning M g mandolin to turn the potato m p iinto fine noodles,, wash off the sstarch, then carefullyy wrap p tthe egg gg in the potato string g uuntil completely p y covered. 33\ For the puree, p sslice ce and d ssweat off the remaining g onion uuntil it’s translucent,, add the ssliced ced cchokes o es for o another ot e ttwoo minutes,, then the hot stock. m

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Boil for before Bo o fivee minutes utes be oe aadding g the cream for another ttwo,, then take off the heat. Brown blend B o some so e butter butte and db e d with the ppuree until smooth. w Once cool,, season with salt O aand lemon juice. j 4\ Deep-fry the eggs 4 gg at 180°C 80 C golden. Dust the plates uuntil g with onion powder and arrange w g slices of smoked tthe puree, p duck and artichoke crisps. d p Place the crispy eggs P gg on top..


Public Image ge Fried Pig’s g Ear Salad l d with Lemon Caper Dressing i g By April Bloomfield, f The T Spotted Pig t thespottedpig.com m

INGREDIENTS G S Pig’s g ears, 4 Renderedd duck fat, 675gg Endives,, 2 A raddichio a o Rocket, , handful Lemons,, 2 Shallots, , 2 Dijon mustard,, 2tbspp C p Capers, 2tbspp

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MANHATTAN, NEW YORKK ’ in OK,, New York isn’t Britain. B t BBut t BBrummie h f April A l Bloomfield Bl fi ld chef has h bbeen wowing g WWestt V ll th hher Villagers with culinary l y take t k on the th UK pub since 2004

11\ Put the pig’s i ears iin a pan with t a lid d tthatt holds o ds tthem e snugly, then add enough duck fat to fullyy cover them. Cut out a circle of baking g parchment h that h willll cover the h ears. Put it on top p of them, and d top p it withh a saucer to weigh g them down. Cook in the oven at 130°C for about four hours,, or until tender.

Allow o them t e to coo cool in the t e fat before wiping g dry. 2\ Separate p the different salad them l d lleavess then h place l h in the fridge g to chill while you make the dressing. g Segment g the lemons, squeeze the juice into a bowl,, then add the flesh. Add the chopped pp shallots, mustard and capers p as well as some sea salt, sugar g and good olive oil, then mix.. g

3\ Fry the pig’s g ears,, two t o at a time, in groundnut oil g for eight g minutes and then drain on ppaper p towels (warning: g it will spit). Dress the t e chilled c ed leaves e es with t fivee teaspoons of your dressing g then p plate up p with the warm, crispy py ears on top. p.


Public Image Galvin DeLuxe Frankfurter By Warren Geraghty, The Green Man galvinrestaurants.com

INGREDIENTS Pork shoulder, 230g Smoked pork belly, 230g Beef brisket, 300g Spices, 15g Salt, 17g Sugar, 4g Garlic, 2 cloves Natural hog casing soaked in cold water Choucroute, 850g White wine, 125ml Cider vinegar, 125ml Bay leaves, 4 Smoked bacon trim, 170g Carrots, 5, sliced Onions, 2, sliced

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1\ Dice the meat into 2cm pieces and chill, then use a mincer with a large-holed disc to pass the meat through into a clean bowl. Once this is done, change the disc to one with smaller holes and pass back through. Mix the spices, salt and sugar well into the meat. 2\ Place the mix into a food processor and blend, adding three cubes of ice soon after to help emulsify the mixture.

Continue blending for five minutes then place the smooth mixture into a piping bag with a 1.5cm nozzle. 3\ Take your hog casing out of the water and remove any excess liquid. Tie one end and pipe the mix in with even pressure. Once piped, tie into 10cm sausages and chill before cutting and grilling. 4\ Drain the choucroute and squeeze out excess moisture.

Meanwhile, add the wine and vinegar to a pan and reduce by half, then add the remaining ingredients and bring back to the boil. With a cartouche on top, place in a preheated oven at 120°C for three hours, stirring regularly. Once cooked and cooled, remove the bacon trim and herbs. Serve in a bun of your choice with truffled Maille mustard and some crispy shallots.

CHELMSFORD, ESSEX Having spent the last 11 years building up their Michelin empire across London, the Galvin brothers have returned to their Essex roots, reviving this 15th-century inn


BROMPTON O O QUARTER, Q LONDON O ON The Hour Glass describes desc bes itself se as a “traditional “ London boozer” o do boo e – albeit with rarebreed pancetta in p its sausage rolls s

INGREDIENTS Mixed ggame birds (pheasant, wild d duck, partridge), g 2 2kg, choppedd Lardons, 125gg Onions,, 2 A celery y stickk C Chestnut 2 0g mushrooms, 250g Flour, 50g g Bayy leaves, 2 Thyme, y 2tsp p Redcurrant j 22tbsp p jelly, Beef stock,, 500ml Red wine, , 500ml l Puff ppastry y roll

Feathered Game Pie ie By Luke k Mackay, k Th Hourglass The l h gl b k hourglasspub.co.uk

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11\ Brown the meat iin batches with vegetable g e o and d tthen e set aside. s de In tthee oil same pan, add baconn dd the h b a d the and h onions and d sweat fo a few fe minutes utes oor uuntil t for the t e onions o o s aree translucent. t s uce t Add A the celeryy and mushrooms and cook for a d coo o tthee ssamee ttimee again ag or until tender.

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2\\ Stir in the flour,rr, making g sure to cook out anyy lumps p before adding g the bay leaves, fresh chopped pp thyme y and redcurrant jjelly. Pour in the beef stock and bee stoc d red ed wine. e Season well, bring g the mixture tu e to a simmer s e and d cook coo uncovered u co e ed for o two t o hours,, or until the meat is tender. cool. te de Set aside s de to coo 3\ Fill a pie p dish with the cooked game meatt mixture,, g

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then roll out the puff p pastry p y uuntil it’s large g enough g to fitt over o e the t e dish. d s Paintt aaround the edge g of the pastryy case with beaten p egg and place the sheet oof pastry p y on top. p Cook in tthee ooven e att 190°C 90 C for o 35-40 minutes,, or until it golden brown. tturns g


Grape Britain

For years English wine was at best a novelty tipple, at worst a francophile’s bad joke. But as confidence grows and conditions improve, the French are starting to look over their shoulders Words by Mark Hooper Photography by Greg Funnell

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t’s a crisp winter’s morning in Appledore, Kent. We’re stood on Boot Hill, surveying the view across Romney Marsh. If you squint, you can make out the foreboding square shape of Dungeness nuclear power plant silhouetted against the sea in the distance. In the foreground, rows of vines, planted with the classic Champagne grapes of chardonnay, pinot noir and pinot meunier. This is not, it’s fair to say, your archetypal English scene. The Gusbourne Estate has stood here since 1410, but it’s the past 12 years that have etched it on the map. In 2004, South African entrepreneur Andrew Weeber

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took over the estate with the aim of establishing an English sparkling wine that would stand up alongside the best in the world. A decade later – to the surprise of many – he achieved that goal. Last year, Gusbourne received seven gold medals at international competitions, including the coveted producer trophy for ‘English Wine Producer of the Year’ at the International Wine & Spirits Competition (IWSC). But Gusbourne’s success isn’t a oneoff. If you’re not already, you may need to sit down for this bit: English wine is finally being taken seriously. “I think it’s progressed very quickly,” says Simon Field, a master of wine at Berry Bros & Rudd. “It’s not inverse snobbery, either. The cognoscenti – the

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OFF THE GRAPE VINE 01 Gusbourne’s Cherry Garden vineyard 02 Gusbourne Sparkling Rosé 2012 on the labelling line 03 Inside the vineyard workshop 04 Staff sample the 2012 rosé – a fruity wine with a delicate colour, focusing on pinot noir

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people really in the know – recognise that English sparking wine is darn good. Even the French sommelier mafia in London hotels are surprisingly receptive.” Better than that, the appreciative Gallic noises are being backed up with hard cash. In December, French champagne house Taittinger bought up 69 hectares of land in Kent – a huge pat on the back for English wine producers. “It’s taken a long time, but it’s interesting that it’s Taittinger who made the jump,” says Field. Berry Bros has recently taken on Gusbourne as its first English ‘Berry’s Own Selection’ sparkling wine, based on the Blanc de Blancs


THE TEAM 01 Charlie Holland, winemaker 02 Harry Pickering, assistant winemaker 03 Joseph Arthur, winery assistant 04 Laura Rhys MS, prestige development manager 05 Gary Langridge, vineyard operative 06 Jon Pollard, vineyard manager 07 Mick Minords, vineyard operative 08 Jim Pritchard, assistant vineyard manager 2010 vintage (“That’s very good,” purrs Field) and also represents Hampshire vineyard Hambledon as a full agency. It’s represented Nyetimber in West Sussex since the ’90s. Add to those Chapel Down in Kent, Denbies in Surrey and a few others chiefly across the south (thanks to climate) and there’s even talk of defining English sparkling wines by region, like the appellations of France. “It actually falls into some interesting geographical areas,” says Field. “So you’ve got Hampshire, Kent, Sussex and one or two stragglers in Herefordshire, Hertfordshire – even Wales. Not to forget Camel Valley down in Bodmin, Cornwall.” And while the word ‘Hampshire’ might not sound as evocative as, say, ‘LanguedocRoussillon’, Field stresses that this is no joke. Asked for his honest opinion, he replies, “I would say that English sparkling wine is very well made: lots of expertise, no corners cut – and experience in the ageing of the vines means that the quality is high.” The key factor is that parts of England share similar geology to the Champagne regions. “In the early days the English producers were planting Germanic varietals that are difficult for us to pronounce,” says Field. “But there are swathes of chalky crustacean sub-soil that run from Champagne all the way up to Dorset. So that’s why they’ve latterly taken to planting Champagne varietals.” For Charlie Holland, chief winemaker of Gusbourne, while the similarities with Champagne are clearly welcome, it’s also important that they establish and celebrate their own characteristics. “English wine started off being about how the soils, machinery and techniques were the same as Champagne; trying to convince everyone it was good because it was similar,” he says. “Which is what an emergent business does. Now, we’re talking in a more informed way about

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RAISING GLASSES 05-06 Vineyard machinery is repaired in the workshop 07-08 Rosé in production 09 Bottles are left to age in caverns, typically for three years 10 A proportion of the Rosé will remain in barrels for three to six months before bottling 11 Manager Jon Pollard tucks in vines at the Boothill vineyard 12 Joe Arthur, packing Gusbourne Rosé 13 Staff check ‘berry swell’ to get an early indication of the success of flowering

So why is this happening now? Well, global warming has seen temperatures rise in recent years – a significant factor what makes English wine different.” in England, where bad weather can And while the geological comparisons mean the grapes fail to ripen. But just with Champagne’s chalky soils are no as importantly, it’s been a question of bad thing, Holland highlights the range perseverance, having the expertise in of soils to be found on their own land place, and the confidence to do things (Gusbourne owns 40.1 hectares in Kent right. At Gusbourne, that means handand another 21.9 in West Sussex). “We’ve picking grapes and softly pressing them in got all sorts – flint, chalk, sandstone clay bunches, adding yeast after fermentation. – and they all bring something to the This produces the ‘fizz’ in sparkling wine mix,” says Holland. “Generally speaking after only a few weeks, but also develops the wines from clay vineyards are much a depth of taste the longer the wine is left more fruitful, quite big-bodied, whereas to age with it. those from the flint and Only now are we chalky sides tend to be more BOTTLE SWAP seeing the fruits of all perfumed and crisp.” Folkestone restaurant Rocksalt recommends that labour. “Starting Having given the proviso the best English Champagne houses that “they use the three swaps for committed from scratch is an Champagne grapes”, Field Champagne Charlies expensive business,” agrees that English sparkling If you like... Veuve Clicquot says Holland. “It wine offers a slightly different Ponsardin NV takes eight years from stylistic profile and, crucially, planting to get the is beginning to find the wine to maturity, and confidence to highlight the if you want to age it differences in character. Try Nyetimber Classic for long enough to “Often people have said that Cuvee 2010, £30 compete with the best the profile is too weedy, grassy It has aromas of brioche and apple, and is great with fish Champagne, you’ve or acidic – which are obviously and chips. Plus it outscored got to leave it for three negative comments,” he adds. Veuve Clicquot in tastings. years in the bottle.” “But they do have a freshness If you like... Bollinger Note we’re talking and a flowery lightness of Special Cuvée NV almost exclusively touch. And in terms of health, about sparkling wine these wines aren’t overly here: in order to alcoholic. In Champagne produce still wines there’s a big movement to Try Chapel Down of real quality it reduce sugar at the end of the Three Graces 2010, £27 process because of the relative requires aged vines Both are pinot noir-driven health benefits. In the early that simply aren’t yet blends. Chapel Down boasts established in the UK. days of English winemaking, flavours of red berries and toast – at an attractive price. Non-sparkling wines they’d overcompensate for the do exist (Gusbourne relative acidity and the final If you like... Ruinart Blanc makes a very light and wines tended to lack harmony de Blancs NV between the acid and sugar. quaffable pinot noir) It was almost like tasting but volumes are as two liquids in your mouth at yet tiny. What it can once. The fruit will be a bit produce to volume Try Gusbourne Blanc riper anyway these days, but and a high standard, de Blancs 2011, £38 Acidity cuts through rich crispness is what customers however, is a distinctly apple tarte tatin on the finish, are looking for, and that reflects fresh, floral, lighter a result of 39 months’ ageing. a general move away from sparkling wine – low This is a treat with oysters. over-oaked wines and higher in alcohol and high alcohol wines. It ties in with the zeitgeist.” in acidity – from younger fruit. Yes, that’s right. A world-recognised Significantly, Taittinger recognises that England brings something new to the wine expert just used the words “zeitgeist” table. “Our aim is to make something of and “English wine” in almost the same real excellence in the UK’s increasingly breath. And he’s not the only one. One of temperate climate, and not to compare it Holland’s most satisfying moments was with Champagne or any other sparkling when an Oxford University blind tasting wine,” said company president Pierrewrongly identified Gusbourne’s 2010 Emmanuel Taittinger. Which is about as Blanc de Blancs as a vintage Champagne. high a compliment as you could hope for. Better yet, when their mistake was revealed, rather than being embarrassed, they were “hugely complimentary”.


MH PROMOTION

Malbec & Steak:

The Perfect Match As classic culinary combinations go, there can be few better pairings than a perfectly cooked steak and a great Argentinian Malbec. M Restaurants, one of London’s hottest new restaurant brands, specialises in both. Here, executive chef Michael Reid and Sommelier of the Year Zack Charilaou take you through their autumn recommendations for combining South America’s finest reds with M’s choicest cuts of beef

Alpasión 2013, Malbec, Vista Flores, Mendoza, Argentina

Salentein Barrel Selection 2012, Malbec, Mendoza, Argentina

Alpasión Malbec is part of our unique range, exclusive to M Restaurants. Its bold character and jammy richness calls for a big, flavoursome steak. We like to enjoy this with our Italian or South African ribeye.

Salentein Barrel Selection Malbec is an outstanding wine, made with no expense spared. A rigorous barrel selection ensures only the highest quality juice from the finest barrels makes the cut. The balance of this particular wine is what makes it so interesting: an exciting blend of elegance and complexity, combined with a juicy, silky ripeness, earns it a place as one of M’s favourites. This pairs exceptionally well with the Wagyu 9++ inside skirt steak, combining extreme quality with full, rich flavour. All in all, a perfect match.

Doña Silvina 2013, ‘Fresh’ Malbec, Mendoza, Argentina Doña Silvina Malbec is also part of M’s exclusive range of wines. This is made in a very special style, with the grapes being picked extra early to create an elegant, fresh, light and floral style of Malbec. We think it pairs beautifully with our fillet – such an elegant wine needs an equally elegant and delicate steak.


Terrazas de los Andes 2012, Malbec, Mendoza, Argentina Terrazas de los Andes Malbec is a true benchmark for quality. This is classic Malbec at its finest. It’s silky, soft, juicy and ripe, with plenty of sticky black fruits and sweet spices from the oak. Our French striploin suits this wine perfectly, as the marbling contributes to the silky texture of this Malbec, while the full flavour of the steak stands up to the body of the wine.

RAISE A GLASS

Bodega Atamisque Malbec 2011, Mendoza, Argentina

Colomé ‘Estate’ Malbec 2011, Salta, Argentina Colomé ‘Estate’ is a totally unique Malbec. This wine originates from the highest vineyard in the world and extreme climates create extreme wines. It’s fullbodied, bold, rich and powerful, and so requires a rich steak. Our USDA on the bone is perfect. The big, intense character of the steak is perfectly matched with such an exciting, unusual wine.

Bodega Atamisque Malbec is the all-rounder. It has silky and smooth tannins with hints of fruit, flowers, oak and spices. While the body of the wine is full, the feel is fresh and elegant. This Malbec matches perfectly with the Argentine rump steak, which needs a super silky, soft wine due to the fact that its fat content is less than 2%; this means it doesn’t have the marbling to stand up to big tannins. However the meat’s rich, beefy, iron-y flavour does call for a wine with body and concentration, and Bodega Atamisque ticks all the right boxes to complement this great steak.

All featured wines are available to buy at mwinestore.co.uk

M is the brainchild of Martin Williams, the former MD of Gaucho restaurants, who teamed up with his highly acclaimed Gordon Ramsay/ Michel Roux-trained executive chef, Michael Reid, and hired the UK’s youngest sommelier Zack Charilaou. Their first venture was to open M Threadneedle St. This award-winning and multifaceted venue in the heart of the city won ‘Best New Restaurant 2015’. Next up was M Victoria St, which opened earlier this year, and has again been shortlisted as ‘Best New Opening 2016’. M’s ethos (and the reason it has become such a hotspot) is simple: aspirational yet accessible drinking and dining in a comfortable, quality environment, offering world-class products (in particular, of course, its outstanding steak and wine), plus the finest examples of hospitality and guest recognition. All of which has helped to create a homefrom-home for its growing community of guests. For more information on M, visit mrestaurants.co.uk

Enter code MH15 at checkout for a 15% discount on all purchases*

*Offer only available online on any purchase at mwinestore.co.uk. Not available in store. Offer ends 30 November 2016 at midnight. Offer not available in conjunction with any other offer, promotion or discount. M reserves the right to amend or replace the Terms and Conditions at any time.


Connoisseur Wisdom From Beyond The Pass

G n Buyer’s Guide 575 / Chef Talk 6060 / The U Gin UK’s Best Delis 633 /

Handle The Heat Ingredients might be king, but so is what you cook them in. These are the pans our chef friends couldn’t live without

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Bulletproof Tool Cast Iron Skillet £90 lecreuset.co.uk “It’s the heavier the better for me. A cast iron skillet maintains heat, providing an even surface for big chunks of meat. I use it like an indoor BBQ by caramelising the outside of my meat for a good crust, then going straight from hob to oven to finish off and keep the centre juicy. Just watch the handle on the way out.” Mark Sargeant, chef and restaurateur

Photography g by Dan Matthews


Flash Pans ns

02\ 02 P Power Sauce CCopper Saucier £80 f falkcoppercookware.com “ “Sauciers are handy because they givee y a totallyy even heat. That’s essentiaaal you fo sauces. for s uces Our Ou oone at Carousel ouse – wee ‘borrowed’ it from our old friend Freddyy ‘ Money M y – is made of copper, pp which conducts heat perfectly. c p y Copper pp tendss to but it’s definitelyy t be more expensive p worth paying extra. We use that pan foor everything now. Don’t tell Freddy that.” Ollie Templeton, Carousel

03\ Perfect Serve De Buyer Blini Pan £20 amazon.co.uk amaz ““These h small mall p pans are indispensable iin our kitchens. k h De Bu Buyer’s aren’t too eexpensive, either. They’re brill brilliant for ssauteing, or reheating h tities smallll quantities of g garnish or meat for f our tapas-style d dishes. h Where h they h really ll come into the h ir oown is for f individual tortillas;; we m k hhundreds d d a week. k At hhome,, make I use them for curryy spices.” p Ben Tish,, Salt Yard B

05\ Lion’s o sS Sharee

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S oc A Stock Answer

STYLING: NICO GHIRLANDO

Stainless Steel Stockpot £15 waitrose a ekitchen.com “The key tto good stock is cooking it long enough too extract all the goodness – as well as thee flavour – so you end up with a fine-tast f ting broth that’s also nutritious. Stainless l steel s or cast iron is best, so it can simmeer for hours, and a larger pot allows o s moore room for aromatic herbs and v vegetable ss. Make a few litres on Sunday night, thenn freeze it for the week ahead.” Melissa l Heemsley, author

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Bake Pan £10 falconenamelware.com “When I was a kid, my mum used to cook a chicken cobbler, which was shorthand for a chicken casserole topped with cheddar scones. Without fail it was served in an enamel roasting dish. I love them. Practically they’re great, but they look good on the table, too. The more battered they get the cooler they get.” Miles Kirby, Caravan


Mother’s Ruin

30 Best Gins Under £30 Gin’s renaissance has been a boon for new distilleries and traditional producers alike. And with so many botanicals on offer, you needn’t pay through the nose

Words by Rebecca Seal | Photography by Agata Pec

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Six O’Clock Gin Made with traditional botanicals, this spirit also packs bundles of elderflower. £24.50 thedrinkshop.com

Jensen’s J Martini lovers should try Jensen’s delicate Bermondsey gin, or mix the earthier Jensen’s Old Tom with lemonade and garnish with a sprig of rosemary. A taste of gin from yesteryear. Both £28 eebria.com

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Very Old Tom This robust gin is aged in wood casks – a treatment usually reserved for dark spirits. £30 masterofmalt.com

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Thomas Dakin Created by master distiller Joanne Moore, this uses red cole horseradish to provide warmth and strength. £30 31dover.com

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Whitley Neill An Africa-inspired gin made with cape gooseberries and baobab fruit. Try mixing with apple juice and cloudy lemonade. £21.50 £2 0 thedrinkshop.comm

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Oliver Cromwell Crisp and light, this budget choice outdid expensive rivals in a recent blind tasting. £10 aldi.co.uk

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Portobello Road A traditional style blend, this product of Notting Hill bar Portobello Star comes in individually numbered bottles. £25 waitrose.com

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Sainsbury’s Blackfriars For less than £15 a bottle, the awardwinning Blackfriars makes a G&T you’ll really be able to taste the difference in. £14 sainsburys.co.uk

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Boodles Unlike many gins, Boodles is made without citrus, using nutmeg and sage instead. £20 sainsburys.co.uk

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Hayman’s Old Tom Made to an old family recipe, Hayman’s Old Tom has a fuller flavoured blend than many more well-known gins. £25 waitrose.com

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Sipsmith Having arguably kicked off the craze by firing up London’s first copper ‘still’ in 200 years, Sipsmith remains one of the best. £30 thewhiskyexchange.com

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Williams Chase Great British Extra Dry

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Sloane’s Dry This is special for its unique balance of juniper with sweet orange, vanilla, iris roots, licorice, cardamom and coriander. £26 masterofmalt.com

A zingy, mouth-puckeringly dry taste isn’t made from grain or potatoes like most, but from cider apples. £27.50 masterofmalt.com

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Brockmans Made with angelica, coriander, blueberries and blackberries, Brockmans is more like a tart berry liqueur than a London Dry. £28.50 drinksupermarket.com

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Colonel Fox Otherwise known as Cremorne 1859, Colonel Fox is a fruity, earthy London Dry, launched – rather confusingly – in 2012. £21.50 drinksupermarket.com


Mother’s Ruin

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G’Vine Nouaison

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Warner Edwards Sloe Mates since agricultural college, Warner and Edwards make their jammy sloe gin in a barn in Northamptonshire. £26 31dover.com

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Two Birds Cocktail

With a grape spirit as its base (generally used in cognac), this French blend has a distinct flavour and a passionate following. £30 thedrinkshop.com

More likely to shake or stir than splash the tonic? This drink has extra juniper, so the classic flavour isn’t lost. £29 31dover.com

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Brecon Botanicals

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Penderyn distillery makes its spirit with pure Brecon Beacons spring water. Cloves and cinnamon add to its rich flavour. £27.50 penderynstore.com

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Opihr Spiced Inspired by ancient spice routes through Africa, Asia and the Middle East, this gin is stuffed with cubeb and coriander, but it’s cardamom that comes out on top. £22 tesco.com

Adnams Copper House Dry Best known for the seaside bitter, Adnams gin once won ‘World’s Best’ at the International Wine & Spirits Competition. £27 adnams.co.uk

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Bloom London Dry

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Gin Lane 1751 Victoria Pink

Edinburgh Gin With pine, heather and milk thistle, this Scottish gin is clean and aromatic, made with a modern approach. £30 edinburghgindistillery.co.uk

One of four small-batch gins launched by master distiller Charles Maxwell last year, the Pink is infused with spiced bitters. £27 selfridges.com

So-named because of its floral aromatics, Bloom’s botanicals range from citrussy pomelo to camomile and honeysuckle. £24 morrisons.com

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Burleigh’s Ingredients in this gin are sourced in the distillery’s surrounding woodlands. £29 masterofmalt.com

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Rathbone New London Dry

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Fair Juniper Feel instantly virtuous with a gin that’s entirely Fairtrade – from Kerala-grown spices to juniper from Uzbekistan. £28 vintageroots.co.uk

Created by top London bartenders Jamie Forbes and Jim Wrigley, this deceptively straightforward gin is as happy in a G&T as it is in a Corpse Reviver cocktail. £25 thewhiskyexchange.com

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Helsinki Dry Redolent of herbaceous forests, thanks to piney juniper and local lingonberries. £30 urban-drinks.co.uk

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Little Bird

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This spirit is all about ginger, reflected by the red-headed siren on its label. £30 thewhiskyexchange.com

Hoxton Painfully hip and it knows it. Thankfully, the self-styled “most distinctive gin in the world” redeems itself with ingredients including coconut and grapefruit. £28 drinksupermarket.com

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Chef Talk

A Drink With...

Karam Sethi As the tastebuds behind Gymkhana and Hoppers, he’s the most influential restaurateur you’ve never heard of. Here, Karam Sethi talks Michelin, five-star reviews and Zinger Burgers It all started at home. We’d eat together as a family every day and I learnt from my mother. We were privileged to have a house in Delhi, too, so I’d spend summer holidays watching our cooks produce fresh meals three times a day. We were always open to new ingredients, new flavours and different styles. I acquired a sophisticated palate from a young age. We lived in Finchley, north London, and as kids our parents would take us to smart restaurants every week – places like Gaylord in Fitzrovia, or my dad’s favourite, Le Caprice. I got a feel for the hospitality industry very early on.

a Bib Gourmand from Michelin, then a year later we won a star. So it worked. CHEF PROFILE Karam Sethi is the owner of JKS restaurants, along with his brother and sister. Together they are the force that backs Trishna, Hoppers, Gymkhana, Lyle’s, Kitchen Table, Bubbledogs and Bao. They are always hungry

It’s usual for a middle-class Asian kid to go into medicine or finance. But I knew from the age of about 14 or 15 that I wasn’t going to become an accountant. I was completely hopeless at maths, had no interest at all. My only interests were food and sport. I was made to go to a few interviews for investment banking jobs but they said all I talked about was restaurants and food. My parents never questioned it.

There’s still a very limited knowledge of Indian food in the UK. The whole industry went from curry house to modern high-end, but there was nothing in between. No one was doing the core stuff well. At Gymkhana, the idea was to take classic dishes to the next level. So I came up with a bhurji, a traditional scrambled egg dish, but using duck eggs and adding lobster. Our kebabs are made with quail, and the meat in our biryani is muntjac. Our keema is made with goat, which is traditional, but we add the brains for creaminess. It’s stuff I like to eat. No one expected Gymkhana to get the praise it did, least of all me. Fay Maschler gave us a five-star review and she’s only done that seven times in her career. Giles Coren said it was the best restaurant he’d ever been to. It adds to the pressure, so you just have to keep your head down and deliver. People expect to be blown away.

I opened Trishna, my first restaurant, with a head chef, but it didn’t work out. We clashed on the style of cooking. Within 18 months, I had taken over the kitchen and rewritten the menus. We made the mistake of anglicising the food too much, so I completely altered the spicing. That’s when things changed.

The food and menu always come first, but ultimately, a restaurant needs to make money. I don’t think anyone opens a restaurant for it not to make money. Put it this way, if Mourinho’s Manchester United side won the league playing shit football, you’d have to call it a success. But if they came second playing shit football, then really, what’s the point?

The word I’d use is chatpata, which basically means hot and fiery. I started spicing food more like you’d find in an Indian home. Within a year, we had won

Fresh ginger, garlic and onions are the holy trinity. Plus some good garam masala. Caramelise your onions for depth of flavour; add the aromatics; sear

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your lamb; then cook off the dried spices with tomatoes and put a lid on it. These things alone make a very good curry. I’m a restaurateur but I still get a thrill from working in the kitchen. I’ve only just stopped cooking at Hoppers every day. When it’s 2.30pm on a Monday lunchtime, the place is only two weeks old, and AA Gill walks in, you can’t help but feel the buzz. He gave it five stars. Indian people are jealous. If they see somebody else succeeding then they’ll come up with an excuse as to why that might be. I’m not a jealous person but I’m competitive. If I see someone up the road doing as well as we are, then that would just drive me to do better. The only way to improve is constant feedback. At Hoppers, my brother, his wife, my wife and my wife’s sister will come in two or three times a week and try out different dishes each time. At Gymkhana, my parents and our inner circle of friends will come in regularly and report back. My mother always has something to say. We constantly tweak. I still enjoy other people’s food. There’ll generally be a good 20 receipts in my wallet every month from eating out. I like Barrafina, Roka, Kitty Fisher’s – places serving good ingredients, cooked well, but without the stuffiness. That said, there’s always a Zinger Tower Burger or Big Mac in there somewhere. What’s our next big project? I’m not allowed to say. But we’re always planning. I don’t think we’ll ever stop.


Portrait by Julian Benjamin


Little Black Book

The UK’s 10 Best

Delicatessens

From organic village shops to revitalising Jewish eateries via family-run Italian importers, a good deli is a culinary treasure trove and nutritional powerhouse in one. Put these on your shopping list

Words by Rebecca Seal Illustrations by Adam Nickel

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01

Aston Marina Farm Shop Staffordshire

A decent delicatessen can assume many guises: muddy seasonal produce in crates still wet with dew; the twin aromas of roasted coffee beans and fresh-baked bread; pretty cans of preserved goods from the Continent; and so on. But from farm shop to inner-city sanctuary, all are united by carefully curated produce – goods chosen not just for profit, but because their owners really like them and think that you will, too. Now, if that slice of good-life worthiness is too rich for your palate, try chewing over the fact that local provisions and artisan products will also be high in nutrients, low in pesticides and, above all, invariably damned delicious. So we believe the UK deli is something to be valued, supported and nurtured. This is our pick of the best on British soil. All are different. All are worth your custom.

Whether you glide in on your vintage boat or arrive – like the rest of us – in a dirty car, clear some room in your hold/boot. Such is this award-winning farm shop’s commitment to locality, the butchery refuses to sell meat reared more than 20 miles away. Fill your fridge with naturally lean venison and 28-day aged Staffordshire beef. Lichfield Road, Stone, Staffs, astonmarina.co.uk

COUNTER CULTURES The Hungry Guest’s cheesemonger and friendly staff guide customers through their every dairy desire

03

Hunters of Helmsley North Yorkshire

Awarded Small Shop of the Year in 2015, this deli, housed in a butter-coloured stone building, is the kind of place that makes you consider uprooting and trading the rat race for the good life. At least 70% of what they sell is product of Yorkshire, the deli counter groans with homemade hams, joints and pies, while the shelves are stacked with chutneys and jams preserved on the premises. 13 Market Place, Helmsley, North Yorks, huntersofhelmsley.com

02

04

Sussex

Suffolk

Under the watchful eye of shop founder and Danish master baker Troels Bendix, the guys at The Hungry Guest are very, very serious about good food – especially their exceptional bread, which is left to slow-rise naturally overnight, making it easier to digest. As well as all the usual high-end chutneys, cheeses, pasta and pickles you’d expect, you can also buy fresh and frozen ready meals, all made with local, sometimes even foraged, ingredients. Middle Street, Petworth, West Sussex, thehungryguest.com

A throw of a stone from Suffolk’s coast, owners Richard Lawson and Claire BruceClayton aren’t afraid to go the extra food mile when the produce is worth it. That means rare-breed pork pies from North Norfolk sit next to home-glazed Suffolk ham and all the seasonal produce you can shake a carrot stick at. Aldeburgh is also home to unbeatable fish and chips Aldeburgh High Street, Suffolk, lawsonsdelicatessen.co.uk

The Hungry Guest

Lawson’s Delicatessen

The Aston Marina butchery will only sell meat reared within 20 miles of the shop

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Little Black Book Try leaving Lina Stores without bags of fresh pasta

08

Valvona and Crolla Edinburgh

It opened a decade before even Lina Stores, and Valvona and Crolla has been part of the fabric of Edinburgh’s community ever since. The shop is still situated in its original building, although the company has expanded to open more outposts in Edinburgh and beyond. Book in for a wine tasting or a ‘Fungi Foray’ for a wild mushroom education. 19 Elm Row, Edinburgh, valvonacrolla.co.uk

05

Made By Bob Gloucestershire

Unlike other shopkeepers on this list, James ‘Bob’ Parkinson first trained at Bibendum before decamping to the Cotswolds to open his dining-slashshopping space. This is no downgrade, however: a high wooden bar gives you full view of the excellent kitchen while shelves are stocked with highlights from the menu (we recommend the ready-tocook confit duck leg) to recreate the experience at home, minus the tip. 26 Market Place, Cirencester, Gloucs, foodmadebybob.com

06

09

Harp Lane Deli

07

Ludlow

Lina Stores London

This family-run Italian deli opened in 1944, but don’t expect a shop preserved in aspic – as well as traditional pastries and antipasti, you’ll also find modish ingredients like ‘nduja’, a spreadable salami popular with contemporary chefs. You might only drop in for a jar of juicy olives, but chances are you’ll leave with several bags of handmade pasta, a wedge of polenta cake and half a kilo of arancini. 18 Brewer Street, London W1 linastores.co.uk

PRETTY PICKLES The upstairs of Hunters of Helmsley is an Aladdin’s cave of chutneys, pickles jams and spices

Ludlow’s many restaurants have long made it a place of culinary pilgrimage, but this sweet little deli with its distinctive steel-blue painted shopfront is a worthwhile addition to your itinerary. Grab a stool, a coffee and an over-filled sandwich – or make that a barley and roasted squash tabbouleh with sumac – and enjoy the wall of cheese as you eat. 4 Church Street, Ludlow, harplane.com

10

Bucksum Farm Shop Aylesbury

Peckham General Store

You might not be able to pick up fresh juices, Waterperry honey and eggs from the next-door-neighbour’s farm here, but that’s not the point. The main attraction is an array of seasonal vegetables, most famously their award-winning, handsown and hand-cut range of Bucksum salad leaves favoured by chefs like Tom Kerridge. No greengrocer compares. Shabbington Rd, Aylesbury, bucksum.co.uk

London

Another step forward in the admittedly surprising foodification of Peckham, this south London local stocks goods with a firm commitment to quality and ethical production. Even so, the stacks of tins on bare wood shelves look so Instagramfriendly, it’s hard not to suspect that aesthetics play a deciding part, too. 174 Bellenden Rd, London SE15, generalsto.re

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Kitchen Confidential 08

09

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02 06 07 04

03 CHEF PROFILE Samuel and Samantha Clark opened the storied Moro in 1997, initiating a trend for rustic Iberian-Moroccan cooking with a hint of the exotic

01

Moorish Tastes Sam & Sam Clark’s love of North Africa is as palpable in the eclectic style of their home kitchen as on their menus

We bought our house in Highbury 10 years ago and spent most of our time and money refurbishing the kitchen. We wanted to transform the existing ’80s suburban décor into a bohemian, Moorish-style room where we could congregate as a family. The designer Agnès Emery has a wonderful shop in Brussels, which is a Moroccan treasure trove. At the time there was no outlet in the UK, so we boarded the Eurostar and spent the day selecting tiles, wallpaper, lamps and paint. The floor tiles are encaustic cement tiles designed by Emery herself and made in Morocco 01 . They’re similar to the tiles you’ll find in the toilets at Moro. The tile splashback behind the cooker is a Moorish geometric design 02 . The cooker itself, a pale blue enamel Chester Radiation 6 burner from the ’50s, is the Rolls-Royce of cookers 03 . It was bought from Ossies secondhand catering shop in Dalston, who reclaimed it from the Westminster Abbey kitchens. We love enamel: we fill little

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Moroccan teapots with extra virgin olive oil that we import direct from the Basilippo estate outside Seville 04 . There’s also a collection of enamel serving spoons and ladles, mostly from Labour and Wait in Shoreditch 05 . We have a hand mill from Marrakech made of two enormous slabs of stone to grind grains and spices 06 . Samuel managed to smuggle it back as hand luggage on EasyJet, even though he could barely lift it. You’ll also see two wooden vinegar barrels, one for sherry vinegar and one for cider vinegar 07 . But perhaps the most striking thing is Samuel’s ‘Circle of Death’ 08 : 20 knives of varying sizes on a clock face of cast iron above the cooker. The kitchen is filled with plants. Samuel has green fingers and has filled our garden with many fruit trees: quince, almond, fig, bramley and eating apples. On our beautiful Petter Southall-designed kitchen table are twigs of pink almond blossom, hinting that spring has indeed come early 09 .

Interview by Mina Holland Portrait by Julian Benjamin


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