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HOLIDAY 2 016

THE BIG HOLIDAY WISH LIST The Most Influential Menswear Shows of All Time

The New Status Symbols THE LIVING LEGENDS OF JAZZ

Dressed to the Nines & Still Making Noise

KING KENDRICK LAMAR Rick Rubin Interviews Rap’s Fearless Genius

32 Pages of Fashion, Watches, Scents, And Ceramics

SIX EPIC DESIGN ESCAPES


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

VO LU M E 1

ISSUE 3

GQ STYLE Holiday 2016 PAO L A KUDACKI

THE BIG HOLIDAY WISH LIST 142 Dynamite Gift Ideas for Your Home, Office & Closet

coat $2,995 Michael Kors sweater $1,135 The Elder Statesman P .48

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VO LU M E 1

QUICK READS

F E AT U R E S

JA ZZ GIANTS

66 5 Labels on Fire Missoni, Acne Studios, Noah, and more

90 Kendrick Lamar in conversation with rick rubin

74 Buying for Value: Travel Tech by michael williams

100 Spend the Night in a Design Shrine by brad dunning

136 The Explorers Club A jazz portfolio starring Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Pharoah Sanders, Roy Ayers, and more photographed by christian weber

76 The Little Shop of Wonders a q&a with erykah badu

112 Bubble Coats An alpine look book featuring Rose Bertram and Gregory van der Wiel

80 The Most Influential Runway Shows of All Time by noah johnson

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156 Speaker Melters: 11 Crucial Jazz LPs by hank shteamer

ISSUE 3

For Kendrick Lamar, every beat is an opportunity for intense and relentless selfreflection. So who better to plumb his musical mind than the great Rick Rubin? Read their interview on page 90.

jacket $3,840 Prada

124 The New Status Symbols photographed by arnaud pyvka

HOLIDAY 2016

GQStyle


LET TER FROM THE EDITOR 3

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This August, I found myself standing in snow in the Swiss Alps, waiting for a helicopter. A glacier was our photo set for the day, and soon I heard the thwack thwack of distant blades. Seconds later, a chopper touched down, and the model Rose Bertram and her soccer-star boyfriend, Gregory van der Wiel, hopped out. It was a sci-fi arrival, and, to me, Rose and Greg represent the couple of the future. Each is singularly beautiful, enviably talented, effortlessly cosmopolitan, and unceasingly digital. The previous night, Greg had played a match in Istanbul, so the couple had chartered a jet, then jumped in the helicopter. What a life. At one point during our shoot, Rose kissed the King Tut tattoo on Greg’s throat. “That’s how I cheat on him,” she said, giggling, and gave the pharaoh another smooch. Man, sometimes I feel like the pharaohs are following me. I went to Egypt last year on vacation, and what I remember most vividly is standing with my wife between the paws of the Sphinx at sunrise. The most powerful thing about Egypt is the mystery—how little we know about the sites. Who built them, and why. Yet there they stand, like they’ve got nothing to hide. It’s nuts! All that not-knowing freaked me out at first, but soon my fear turned into acceptance—then joy. It reminded me that the world is infinite, and my understanding of it is as small as a grain of sand in the vast desert. Since that trip, I’ve been trying to embrace the unknown, and in some ways, this issue is a tribute to people who’ve done that beautifully.

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Pharoah Sanders, who kicks off our big jazz portfolio, isn’t Egyptian, yet his 32-minute odyssey, “The Creator Has a Master Plan,” captures how I felt in Giza. Faced with a complex universe, Pharoah takes up his sax and goes exploring. For me, the closest thing to the truth is the sound of Pharoah using his horn to go looking for it. His playing is an act of faith. The same can be said about Kendrick Lamar’s music. Kendrick’s genius, beyond his astounding technical proficiency, is his love of complexity and contradiction. The long American election cycle

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and the culture wars surrounding it have made it clear that we are addicted to dualities: good-bad, right-wrong, black-white. We take sides, and dig in. Kendrick, however, is addicted to ruthless self-examination. I’m the biggest hypocrite of 2015, he once rapped. That can’t be true, but I think the world would be a better place if we all looked at ourselves and at least considered the possibility. At the end of Kendrick’s masterpiece, To Pimp a Butterfly, there’s a song called “Mortal Man.” In my opinion, he says, only hope that we have left is music and vibrations. That feels right to me. This is the holiday issue of GQ Style, but before we gather our families, we’ll hit the voting booths to cast our lots in the big battle over the Truth. I think it’s a perfect opportunity to acknowledge that we can’t know the Truth—and to re-dedicate ourselves to searching like hell for it anyway. In other words, it’s time for humility and action. Then we celebrate.

1. We met up with Rose Bertram and Greg van der Wiel in the Alps. I like to call them the couple of the future. 2. Pharoah Sanders’s 1969 LP Karma. My favorite jazz album of all time (right now, at least). Having Pharoah in our jazz portfolio makes my soul soar. So does his music. 3. I’ve spent 19 months listening to Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly, and I’m still uncovering new layers of meaning and lightning bolts of genius with every listen. 4. Me on location in the mountains above Zermatt, Switzerland.

Will Welch editor-in-chief HOLIDAY 2016

GQStyle

C L O C K W I S E F R O M B O T T O M : D A R I A K O B AYA S H I R I T C H ( 2 ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F I M P U L S E ! R E C O R D S ; PA O L A K U D A C K I . T O P R I G H T, N E C K L A C E : M A R T I N E A L I .

The Girl Who Kissed King Tut


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communications Carly Holden

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CONTRIBUTORS Erykah Badu with her mother, sister, and daughters—all wearing clothes from one of the best-kept secrets in American style: the L. A. shop called RTH.

Erykah Badu INTERVIEWEE

The Little Shop of Wonders, p.76 Hey, Erykah, how do you know when a holiday gift is a good one? “Objects are just an extension of the person who gives them. It’s not the gift I feel close to, it’s the giver.”

Christian Weber

Paola Kudacki

PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTOGRAPHER

Jazz Giants, p.136

Kendrick Lamar, p.90

Hey, Christian, what’s your favorite music to listen to during the holidays? “I’d have to say Elvis. My folks would play his Christmas album. In fact, all year was Elvis, Elvis, Elvis. They’d wake us up at 6:30 on Saturday by playing Aloha from Hawaii Via Satellite. As kids, it was annoying, but now I appreciate his music and voice because it reminds me of my parents.”

Yo, Paola, what’s your favorite holiday travel destination? “French Polynesia is paradise. Especially Bora Bora. The water is like a crystalline pool, with colorful fish swimming around you. At sunset, the women dip themselves in the water like a Gauguin painting. And the food is like being in Paris.”

Rick Rubin Kendrick Lamar, p.90 Hey, Rick, what’s the best holiday gift you’ve ever received? “Spending time with friends and loved ones in a beautiful place, enjoying nature. Nothing competes.”

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HOLIDAY 2016

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SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

INTERVIEWER


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THE

142 Dynamite Git Ideas for Your Home, Office & Closet

HOLIDAY WISH LIST


T H E B I G H O L I D AY W I S H L I S T

FROM LEFT

Patek Philippe $22,000 Hublot x Berluti $29,400 Rolex $37,550 Audemars Piguet $44,100

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JOSS McKINLEY

HOLIDAY 2016

GQStyle


1. The New Standard in Gold Watches • Men are like raccoons: We’re attracted to flashy objects. But if you’re the kind of guy who doesn’t just want a gold watch— you want the gold watch—sitting boldly at the top of your wish list, you no longer have to choose from 50 di≠erent options. You only have to choose from four.


T H E B I G H O L I D AY W I S H L I S T

2. Killer Croc

Ralph provides a miniature padlock in case you don’t want strangers stealing what’s inside your bag. As for someone stealing the bag itself—not much he can do for you there. FROM LEFT

Santoni $8,900 Ralph Lauren $25,000

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• With their glossy finishes and scaly textures, crocodile and alligator goods have a funny way of reminding the world that you’re on top of the food chain. Turn the page to see a briefcase with silver filigree corners. Dirty Harry would squeal like a schoolgirl if he pulled that out from under the Christmas tree.


With this one portfolio, Hermès has found a way to replace: your briefcase, your wallet, your laptop case…you basically don’t even need pockets anymore. FROM LEFT

Hermès $22,000 Brioni by Justin O’Shea $27,850

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3. Dynamic Turtlenecks • The turtleneck used to be seen as the dressiest, dandiest, most louche piece of knitwear. But right now the coolest way to wear one, whether layered or on its own, is with nonchalance.

A turtleneck is already a more advanced sweater. To take it up another level, find one with a surprising sartorial detail (like those elbow patches) or a busy pattern (like this floral jacquard). Dior Homme $920 + pants Dior Homme


T H E B I G H O L I D AY W I S H L I S T

Marc Jacobs $475 + pants and boots Daniel Cremieux bracelet Pandora

Tomorrowland $425 + pants Salvatore Ferragamo boots Dolce & Gabbana

Daniel Cremieux $695 + pants Daniel Cremieux

Etro $1,500 + coat Belvest

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BJA R N E J O N A SSO N

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4. Sublime Ceramics

Willy Guhl Planters AN T I Q UE

The influence of this Swiss designer is as mighty as his designs. These indoor-outdoor planters are instant game changers for any room or patio and only get better with the patina of time. $975–$1,200 Elizabeth Pash Antiques and Decoration via 1stdibs.com


• Thanks to a culture that’s skewed a little too digital and a little too corporate, there’s a much needed arts-and-crafts revival under way. And it’s created a boom in pottery. Ceramicists are finding new ways to make practical objects like mugs, pitchers, and planters into gallery-level sculpture. Here, we kick things off with two vintage pieces by the late, legendary Willy Guhl—before giving it over to our favorite contemporary makers from around the globe.

Architectural Pottery SA N DIEGO

Made by hand in the U.S. since 1950, these strikingly simple geometric planters were favorites among midcentury architects and have been exhibited at MoMA. $270–$1,150 architectural pottery.com

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1. Settlewell

2. Shino Takeda

3. K&R

L ONG BEACH, CA

BROOKLYN

L O S AN G EL ES

Tie-dyed concrete, anyone? Laura Cornman uses handmade molds and pigment blends to ensure that each piece transcends the ordinary. $50–$70 settlewell.com

Originally from Kyushu in southern Japan, an area known for its pottery, Takeda playfully blends traditional Japanese forms with the vibrant energy of her new home in New York. $280 shinotakeda.com

Husband-and-wife artists Kat Hutter and Roger Lee make high-fired stoneware that looks good enough to display, but is meant to be used on the daily. $60–$250 katandroger.com

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5. Suzanne Sullivan

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The Japanese master potter throws clay pots that look like they could be from ancient times. They’ve been sold and exhibited around the world at places like Heath Ceramics in San Francisco and Merci in Paris. $130–$580 akio-nukaga.com

Sullivan’s handbuilt porcelain pieces truly blur the line between art and craft—let her gilded, wonky teacups take your morning breakfast routine to a whole other dimension. $60–$70 suzannesullivan ceramics.com

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6. Derek Wilson Ceramics

7. Clam Lab

B EL FAS T

By using unique glaze and re-firing pieces several times, ceramicist Clair Catillaz creates primitive designs that look like ancient unearthed artifacts. $60–$350 clamlab.com

Made on his wheel or hand-slabbed, Wilson’s celadonglazed porcelain and stoneware designs are deceptively simple, with inventive color and geometry that upends expected shapes. $182–$468 derekwilson ceramics.com

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8. Robert Hessler

9. Heath Ceramics

K IN G STO N, N Y

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The freaky shapes of Hessler’s handthrown pieces are striking enough, but it’s the special glazing technique he uses to crystallize the surface that really makes them come alive. $275–$695 roberthessler.com

One of California’s original potteries and still in the game, Heath makes simple, modern pieces that serve as an ideal entry point for any burgeoning ceramics-head. $26–$122 heathceramics.com

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5. Gloves with Punch • Yep, there’s a chance that if you buy nice gloves you’ll leave them at coat check or in the back of an Uber. But it’s also true that timidity in style is never rewarded. So strap on your positive mental attitude and buy a legit pair of gloves. Wear them with pride and make them part of your regular winter routine and you’ll find that they’re as easy to keep track of as your keys, wallet, and iPhone— but they pack way more style.

J O S S M C KINLE Y

If you’re not ready to wear a full-blown fur coat like cover guy Kendrick Lamar, pull on some foxlined gloves—slightly more subtle but no less decadent. Kiton $1,060 + jacket by Berluti


Hestra $144

Ermenegildo Zegna $695

Moncler Gamme Bleu $430

Loro Piana $4,875

Dsquared2 $465

Prada $345

Tod’s $445

PS by Paul Smith $225

SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

Louis Vuitton $810

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Mad et Len Terre Noire If there is a more tasteful, distinctive way to enhance the smell of your living space than with scented amber rocks in a blackenediron tin, we aren’t aware of it. $145

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JOSS McKINLEY

Tom Ford Oud Wood Candle Still think candles are girlie? Meet Tom Ford’s superpremium line of musky wax packed in heavy burnished containers. $250

HOLIDAY 2016

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T H E B I G H O L I D AY W I S H L I S T High Lonesome by Mondo Mondo for Land Fragrance-andjewelry maker Mondo Mondo teamed with the Texas-based design house Land on this scent fit for a cowboy. (See: notes of mesquite, leather, dirt, and desert rain.) $175

Cinnamon Projects Incense sticks from this New York City– based creative agency come marked with the time of day that inspired them. Burn the 7 a.m., infused with black tea and marigold, before work, and the 2 a.m., infused with cedarwood, cinnamon, and honey, after a night out. $30 for 25 sticks $240 for burner

Ex Nihilo Amber Sky If the classic amber scent isn’t rich enough for you on its own, Bergdorf Goodman in N.Y.C. lets you laser-engrave the glass container with your initials. $525 for 100 ml.

6. Glorious Smell-Goods • The dawn of the artisanal-everything era has brought with it a fresh, fragrant universe of unique colognes, candles, incense, and more. From mystical room-cleansing wood to a new scent from an Italian luxury juggernaut, these are the gifts of good smell to give (and receive) this season.


1. Santa Maria Novella Acqua di S.M. Novella-Parfum You want old-school pedigree? This fresh, citrusy scent was first made by Dominican monks for Catherine de’ Medici in 1533. $125

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2. L’Homme Prada The latest from Prada is a mix of iris and amber. Plus, the bottle looks as nice on top of your dresser as Miuccia Prada’s shoes do on your feet. $98 3. Byredo Unnamed Perfume To celebrate ten years in the business, these Swedes released a perfume (smells like pink pepper and gin) that comes with a letter transfer sheet so you can name it yourself. $230 for 100 ml.

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4. Régime des Fleurs Water/Wood All of RdF’s scents are made by hand in Los Angeles. This one, our favorite, has been said to smell like an underwater forest. $165

SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

5. Frédéric Malle Traveling with your favorite fragrance? Luxury luggage brand Valextra has got you covered with leather cases made just for Frédéric Malle. 50-ml. case $280

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6. Land by Land The N.Y.C. fragrance atelier produces a variety of incense and candles made with natural ingredients, including ingenious one-ounce travel candles and these sixouncers for home. FROM LEFT

incense $34 candle $42 7. Norden Goods Two things we love—smell-goods and ceramics—were combined for these hand-poured candles that come in reusable stoneware containers. FROM LEFT

candle $55 hand soap $25 incense $20 8. Astier de Villatte It’s no wonder that these bottles of fragrance from a Parisian ceramics maker look as good as what’s inside them smells. -

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incense $52 cologne $110 cologne $165 cologne $165 candle $94 9. Incausa The company sources Fair Trade artisanal goods from around the world, including incense made using breu resin and palo santo—a mystical South American “holy wood” used to cleanse the energy in spaces— from Brazil and Peru. $18 for nine sticks

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The pride of Canada since 1931, Viberg makes these boots waterproof, but just in case, the company stashes a polishing cloth and bottle of leather conditioner in every shoebox. Viberg $640


T H E B I G H O L I DAY W I S H L I S T

7. Snow-Melting Boots • Whether you’re asking Fashion Santa for a pair or buying them for yourself, you need boots that’ll get you through the slushy season. The best ones out there hit right at your ankle and work everywhere from the woods beside your country house to the puddle-pocked crosswalks back in town.

Moncler $670

Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh $870

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Missoni $760 JOSH D I C K I N SO N

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Giorgio Armani $1,195

O’Keeffe $955

Kiton $1,835

John Varvatos $798

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The boots on this page are more for snowy city streets than muddy forest floors, but they still have serious tiretread soles that will keep your feet dry. Louis Vuitton $1,480


T H I S PAG E , C LO C K W I S E FROM TOP LEFT

hudson glass $2,590 John Hogan hourglass timers $13 to $29 Hay paperweight $117 Carl Aubรถck cuff links $150 Paul Smith bottle opener $55 Futagami

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8. Desk Toys for Grown-ups • Ever noticed how all the coolest stu≠ at all your favorite men’s stores is on the table up by the register? We have, so we surveyed all the highend knickknacks out there till we found the best of the best. And now we’re presenting them here as stocking stu≠ers for men of taste and style. The idea is to surround yourself with objects that are inspiring, entertaining—and, in some cases, actually useful.

T H I S PAG E , C LO C K W I S E FROM TOP LEFT

tape dispenser $117 Beyond Object antique lighter $1,150 Cartier diamond box $15 Areaware fountain pen $1,565 Montblanc


T H I S PAG E , C LO C K W I S E F RO M TO P

miniature barcelona chair $384 Vitra Design Museum english horn clothes brush $100 The Butler’s Closet pocketknife $1,815 Chrome Hearts pocket squares $60 each Drake’s copper flask $299 Jacob Bromwell quartz cluster $40 Rock Star Crystals


T H E B I G H O L I DAY W I S H L I S T

no.

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T H I S PAG E , CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT

silver feather pendant $460 First Arrow’s shoehorn $85 The Butler’s Closet silver feather ring $430 First Arrow’s matches $16 for 60 Skeem Design

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9. Suits That Never Leave the House • Every time we go out, we try to look our best—so why, at home, do we resort to souvenir T-shirts and mesh Phoenix Suns shorts? A proper pajama set, expressly made for leisure time, looks as suave as it feels. You deserve the upgrade, and so does whoever you’re sleeping with.

Back in the mid-1970s, when the answer to “Do ya think I’m sexy?” still could’ve conceivably been “Yes,” Rod Stewart posted up in his pajamas at London’s posh Royal Garden Hotel.


PA G E S 3 4 – 3 9 , 4 2 – 4 8 , 5 0 – 5 1 , 5 8 – 6 1 , 6 4 – 6 5 , P R O P S T Y L I S T: B R I A N P R I M E A U X A T M A R E K A S S O C I A T E S . PA G E S 4 0 – 4 1 , 6 3 , G R O O M I N G : S C O T T M C M A H A N F O R K A T E R YA N I N C . PA G E S 5 5 – 5 6 , P R O P S T Y L I S T: T R I N A O N G A T H A L L E Y R E S O U R C E S .

T H E B I G H O L I DAY W I S H L I S T

Dolce & Gabbana $995 Thom Browne New York $1,780

Emporio Armani Underwear $210 (shirt) | $135 (pants) bracelets Tateossian

Burberry $795 (shirt) + bracelet Pandora

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BJARNE JONASSON

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T H E B I G H O L I D AY W I S H L I S T

10. The Complete Home Bar Cart • The holidays call for a cocktail, and drinking cocktails at home calls for a cool vintage bar cart. As far as how to trick yours out, here’s the deal: Strike the perfect balance between classic and next wave with your booze. That means keeping inalienable standards like Beefeater and Wild Turkey on hand at all times while maintaining a steady rotation of new spirits like Greenhook Ginsmiths and W. L. Weller (the bourbon to get when you can’t get Pappy Van Winkle). There are only two essential mixing glasses (a Boston shaker with a strainer and a Yarai glass with a nice weighted bar spoon) and two essential bitters (Angostura and Peychaud’s). And when it comes to glassware, there’s only one name that matters: Baccarat.

Bottles

Tools

-

-

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT

old tom gin $46 Greenhook Ginsmiths mezcal joven $47 Ilegal vermouth $13 Cocchi Vermouth di Torino tequila $125 Don Julio 1942 gin $25 Beefeater japanese whisky $85 Suntory Hakushu 12 Year

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CLOCKWISE FROM

rum $30 Smith & Cross bourbon Wild Turkey 101 $25 W. L. Weller 12 Year $25

Glassware CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT

tumblers (2) $270 and old-fashioned glasses (2) $430 Baccarat

scotch $260 The Macallan 18

boston-style shaker $125 Alessi

tequila $45 Patrón Silver

mixing glass $45 Cocktail Kingdom

bitters Peychaud’s $6 Angostura $8

champagne coupe $180 Baccarat

JOSS McKINLEY

TOP LEFT

antique mechanical jigger $375 Sir Jack’s bowl $330 Christofle bar spoon $23 and fine strainer $7 Cocktail Kingdom coaster set $175 Ralph Lauren ice bucket $1,100 and tongs $355 Christofle

Bar Cart circa-1950 antique $2,950 Area iD via 1stdibs.com

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L ABELS ON FIRE

5 FASHION BRANDS THAT NOAH

All eyes are on a storied Italian house, an upstart Scandinavian studio, and a little spot in downtown N.Y.C. Add a couple of special projects so cool we’re practically throwing cash at the folks behind them, and you’ve got a lineup that will give your wardrobe just the right amount of buzz. MISSONI

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SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

ARE HEATING UP WINTER

ACNE ST U D I O S

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L ABELS ON FIRE

MISSONI

» A Royal Family of Italian Fashion Seizes Its Moment

With its special looms and long tradition of complex knits, missoni is perfectly poised for this rare moment in menswear: when there’s nothing we want more than color, pattern, and just the right dose of psychedelia.

O

ttavio Missoni was an Olympic hurdler, a remarkable colorist, and one of the best-dressed men in the world. (Don’t just take our word for it: He made the International Best-Dressed List in 1982.) He and his wife, Rosita, ran the business they started together in 1953 until 1997, when they passed it on to their children, making daughter Angela the creative director. Now, at a time when many major European fashion labels join conglomerations and hire celebrity designers to remain relevant, Missoni thrives by keeping the brain trust in the family and constantly referencing its history. “What was very inspiring was my father’s personality,” Angela says. “He always had this laid-back attitude. Dressing his own way. Totally different.” An athletic vibe remains a key part of Missoni today, and for fall ’16 it went outdoorsy, releasing a collection ready for the glorious natural landscape of woods, lake, and mountains that can be seen from the company’s home base in Varese, Italy. “We live and work in a beautiful place,” Angela says. “It takes your life to another level. My parents built the factory in a place where they would love to live, in the middle of woods with a beautiful view. This is the bigger gift that my parents really gave us.”— N O A H J O H N S O N

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THE ELDER STATESMAN SCORES THE MOTHER OF ALL COLLABORATIONS

SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

THE NBA

TAKE IT FROM A MENSWEAR PRO

“I’m all about new brands. But there’s always something particularly intriguing about a historic brand that is all of a sudden super relevant. Even though it’s an Italian brand, Missoni feels very West Coast American. For the past few years, there’s been a huge focus in menswear on the West Coast, and Missoni’s making collections

all about mountaineering in the Pacific Northwest or hippiesurf counterculture. Brands in menswear focus on black, navy, and gray, but Missoni has always been about color and pattern, and I think the rest of the world is catching up.”—Josh Peskowitz, co-founder of Los Angeles’s new menswear haven Magasin

There’s no shortage of wearable hoops memorabilia out there, but not much of it is designed for fans who care whether their Warriors tees are cashmere—and hand-tie-dyed in Los Angeles. So Greg Chait, founder of Cali-based luxury-cashmeregoods purveyor The Elder Statesman, dreamed up this collection of team merch made in partnership with the NBA. Expect drops of new gear throughout the season—and to see Jay, Bey, Drake, and other courtside types buying in early.— N . J .

Innovation is in Missoni’s DNA: Ottavio and Rosita developed their signature zigzag pattern by adapting a machine traditionally used for shawls and then adding their own wild colors.

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ACNE STUDIOS

» The High-Fashion Brand of the Future after nearly 20 years of making the official jeans of global cool kids, this boundary-pushing swedish brand is evolving along with its obsessive fan base. Time to refile acne as a major player in high fashion.

isit any Acne Studios store— you pick: Could be any one of the Swedish label’s locations in 22 cities around the world, including Paris, New York, L.A., Seoul, and Hong Kong—and you’ll likely find the most perfectly cut nylon bomber jacket hanging on a rack next to a sweater covered in hot dogs, or a crazy pair of pleated high-gloss polyurethane trousers beside some simple, elegant wool suit pants. Point is: No other brand in menswear has more perfectly balanced the eccentric with the essential. Makes sense, then, that Acne, founded by creative director Jonny Johansson in 1997, started out with something that can be equal parts both: jeans. Today, the brand is a rising player in global fashion, capable of hanging with the most avant-garde and mass-market designers alike. That duality is why the seemingly anonymous brand with the funny pink shopping bags is so compelling right now. We sat down with Johansson to figure out what makes him tick—and what’s making Acne grow.— N O A H J O H N S O N

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SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

V


“I think you always have to consider what space you’re in, where you are, what your opinion is about that,� says Johansson, whose personal love for art and architecture informs the interiors of Acne Studios stores around the world.

INSIDE THE MIND OF ACNE STUDIOS CREATIVE DIRECTOR JONNY JOHANSSON

Ć  ĆŞĆŹĆ­ ƲƼ Ćž 'R\RXIHHOWKDW\RXU FROOHFWLRQVKDYHEHFRPHPRUH SHUVRQDOZLWKHDFKVHDVRQ" ƣƨƧƧƲƣƨƥƚƧƏƏ ƨƧ I’m really into the word “honestâ€? in fashion. I’m trying to stay contemporary, you know, and also personal at the same time. I find that sometimes fashion becomes about exoticism. I think everyday life is more interesting, in a way.

Johansson booked two fellow surfers, board shaper Robin Kegel (to model) and David Sims (to shoot photos), for Acne’s spring ’16 campaign.

3RSFXOWXUHDQGIDVKLRQDUH VRFRQQHFWHGQRZ'RHVWKDW LQWHUHVW\RX" There’s always this need for companies to promote themselves via celebrities, but I think it’s a double-edged sword. I like Drake, for instance. I think he’s an amazing

songwriter, but I’d like it to stay that way. I’m not the person that needs to dress him in my clothing. You would like somebody to ask for your clothing rather than forcing them to wear your clothing. 2WKHUZLVHLWVHHPVPDQXIDFWXUHG I meet a lot of young designers who want to be part of the fashion circus, and actually, you know, it’s not a circus. It’s really about expression. Creative expression. It’s not about who’s wearing it, really. I like the democratic point of view rather than the exclusive. I think there’s something else going on at the moment, in these last ten years. It’s been more about branding than anything else. Like, if I see Rihanna, for instance, you know, it’s just the latest brand. There’s no expression. She expresses amazingly with her voice, but the other communication is soulless. Branded. :KDWĹ?VWKHVWRU\EHKLQG$FQHĹ?V LQVWDQWO\UHFRJQL]DEOHSLQN VKRSSLQJEDJV" People considered pink ugly. They didn’t want the pink bag. And that’s like when we did the first pair of jeans—I gave them to a lot of my friends, and most of my friends said, “Yes, thank you,â€? but didn’t use the clothing and thought it was pretty weird. The same with the

pink bag. If everybody thinks it’s beautiful, it’s wrong in a way. I don’t want it to be sort of blah, you know, like soulless. I want it to have some sort of energy. 7KHVWRUHLQWHULRUVDUHLQVWDQWO\ UHFRJQL]DEOHWRR I always said that I don’t want the McDonald’s concept, or like a Gucci sort of store, where it’s all looking the same. Not that I don’t like Gucci, but they’re always very, very similar everywhere. They create the format, and then they mass-distribute. And that becomes a bit disconnected from time, disconnected from the area or the place they’re in. 'R\RXIHHOFRQQHFWHGWRWKH KLVWRU\RI6FDQGLQDYLDQGHVLJQ" When we got our first press recognition, I was asked in every interview if we were doing Scandinavian design, and I never really understood how to answer the question. I did a big project on a Scandinavian architect—it took, like, one year—to see if I have some relationship to Scandinavian design, trying to figure out what it is. My big conclusion was that I’m a maximalist, unfortunately. And the thing is, I think maximalism is more important and democratic than minimalism. Minimalism is very restricted.

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LABELS ON FIRE

NOAH

» New York’s Underground Street King CLOTHES THIS CHILL AREN’T SO EASY TO MAKE

Brendon Babenzien’s growing fashion cult thrives on retro sportswear, dgaf punk attitude, and a dedication to making clothes with real conscience and soul.

Y

ou don’t have to wear wacky clothes to be an interesting person,” says Noah designer Brendon Babenzien. “Andy Warhol, Basquiat, David Byrne—these guys all knew how to take something really normal and turn it on its head and make it look fresh.” Having spent more than a decade as design director at Supreme, Babenzien knows a thing or two about making fresh (and incredibly covetable) menswear. But even without a box logo on the clothes, Babenzien has quickly turned Noah into one of the most buzzed-about brands in New York. While it would be easy to repeat a wildly successful Supreme-like formula, Babenzien aims to do more with Noah. “I want to layer on top of my past 20 years a few new important components: I want the clothes to be cool and interesting, sure, but I also want to work with the best suppliers in the world and be concerned for the things around me, bring information to people, establish a new relationship with the public.” His goals are more punk than capitalist. “We don’t have massive, projected plans. The best thing that could happen to us is if we feel better about the stuff we make season to season.”— S A M U E L H I N E

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The ribbed cashmere sweater is milled and knit in Scotland at one of the world’s premier knitting mills. “They’re dealing with the best luxury brands in the world,” says Babenzien. “Then we come along, and for whatever reason, they’ve been very open to working with us and very excited to see us do something a little di≠erent with their things.”

HOLIDAY 2016

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PLEASE TAKE OUR MONEY NOW

SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

N OA H ’ S N O L I TA C LU B H O U S E When it opened in 2015, the Noah store in Manhattan’s Nolita neighborhood quickly became a go-to hangout spot for the city’s styleminded dudes. “We’ve done our best to make this a home away from home, in the same way that a family that owns a pizzeria spends their whole lives there.” The store stocks items from a select few other brands, including Paraboot shoes, sunglasses from Vuarnet and Etnia Barcelona, and Smathers & Branson belts.

“I like the mix of athleticism and style,” Babenzien says. “It’s a very traditional mentality. Maybe I’m just nostalgic, but I don’t particularly care for the contemporary version of that, with the spandex tights and weird neon tops.”

DRAKE’S THROWBACK PRINT SCARVES “We make things the oldfashioned way,” says Michael Hill, creative director of Drake’s, “not just for the sake of the story, but because it makes the products more beautiful.” Case in point: this season’s exotic-animal prints, Egyptian motifs, and archival patterns on the finest wool and silk fabrics out there. Drake’s started in 1977, but these are easily the flyest neck warmers of 2017.— S . H .

The overshirt is made of Italian Casentino wool, which is traditionally used in overcoats and even monks’ robes. It’s also extremely durable: “I expect to see this shirt in 20 years not looking very di≠erent from how it does today.”

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B U Y I N G F O R VA L U E

After getting raked over the coals one too many times by his wireless provider, our well-traveled chief value correspondent, Michael Williams, assembled the ultimate money-saving, stress-obliterating, vacationelevating travel kit.

This summer Dwyane Wade, Chris Paul, LeBron James, and their wives rented a yacht together in Spain. Soon after the trip, D-Wade told Kelly Ripa that LeBron refused to turn on his data roaming when out of range of the yacht’s Wi-Fi. Now, this makes you think, if a bazillionaire doesn’t want to pay for data, no one does. Anyone who regularly travels internationally has to ask himself the question: Why does mobile data cost so freaking much? If you’re not vigilant about living in airplane mode, it can be very easy to get skewered by the phone company. And it happens to the best of us…like the time I went to Tahiti and racked up $1,000 in data charges within 15 minutes of hitting French Polynesia. After that trip, I vowed to take charge of my travel tech and quickly found a bunch of simple work-arounds that will keep you ’gramming, snapping, tweeting, and Google Mapping—even when you’re thousands of miles from home. Because prepaid mobile 4G costs a fraction of what you would pay for your U.S. data-roaming plan, the first thing you need is the mobile Wi-Fi unit known as a Huawei 4G mini device. (Make sure you get the unlocked version.) Then buy a pre-paid SIM card when you arrive in whatever far-flung destination you find yourself in. Huawei is not a well-known brand in the States—and apparently the U.S. government has security concerns about using the Chinese manufacturer—

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ANDREW B. MYERS

but it doesn’t really bother me if Beijing knows I’m deep into streaming season two of Narcos on my vacation. I do this every summer when I’m in Italy. I swing by the local TIM shop, flash my passport, load up, and get the Wi-Fi flowing. This past summer in Florence, I got a deal on 30 gigabytes’ worth of data for 50 euros, which meant I could wake up every night at 3 a.m. and stream the NBA Finals without fear of bankruptcy. If you don’t want to buy the MiFi device, there are also services that rent mobile Wi-Fi all over the globe. In Japan, you can take delivery via Japan Post right at your hotel. In Iceland, for an extra ten euros a day, a mobile Wi-Fi machine was included with the Land Rover we rented and came with unlimited data. That noise you hear is the sweet sound of the phone company’s accounting department crying. The next challenge when it comes to being outward-bound is battery life. My favorite power-charger brand is Anker. Its smart-charger ports automatically know what current to deliver to all my various devices, so along with an outlet converter from the simplicity masters at Muji, that’s my charging hub back at the hotel. But it’s also crucial to have an extra mobile-battery backup to keep that Wi-Fi pumping out the Spotify and navigation. And Anker makes simple power bricks that work really well. The version I like has multiple USB ports for different devices, and it packs a big punch of power, giving me something crazy like five iPhone recharges. Take this thing to Burning Man and everyone in your commune can power their mindfulness apps—and still have enough juice to call for a ride out of there when it all becomes too much. Gone is the stress of always searching for a place to recharge. Gone is the desperation of sitting on the airport floor, wheezing juice from a wall outlet. Because I travel with a camera and lens that have to be carried on, my focus is always on simplifying my kit—eliminating extras and getting ever lighter. Being able to do more with less led me to switch to the Apple iPad Pro (with the Apple keyboard cover) as a laptop replacement. It’s smaller and lighter, and the TSA says it doesn’t need to come out of my bag at security. It also means I don’t need to haul around a laptop charger. I don’t know about you, but when I travel, the thing I value the most is feeling like a local—and having a poweredup and dialed-in smartphone with a slew of apps chewing through data is the first step. From there, I just have to remember to look up from my phone every now and then to take in the epic views. is the founder of the blog A Continuous Lean—and many other stellar menswear-related projects. MICHAEL WILLIAMS

HOLIDAY 2016

C LO C K W I S E F R O M TO P L E F T

utility bag $19 Topo Designs converter $25 Muji mobile wi-fi unit $173 Huawei portable charger $22 Anker camera from $1,500 Leica wall charger $26 Anker ipad pro from $599 ipad pro keyboard $169 Apple

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P R O P S T Y L I S T: G R A C E H A R T N E T T. I L L U S T R A T I O N : L A U R E N T A M A K I .

THE TRAVEL-TECH GO-BAG YOUR GREEDY PHONE COMPANY DOESN’T WANT YOU TO HAVE


To walk through the doors of RTH is to fall right o≠ the grid. You are not in Los Angeles anymore. This is not the year 2016. You have entered an insanely stylish wrinkle in time filled with hand-thrown ceramics, reworked vintage jeans, and all sorts of sublime curios curated by a man named René Holguin. As Erykah Badu explains, there’s something ancient about RTH’s two side-by-side shops— but they also feel like the future. 76

JONATHAN SNYDER

TKTKTK SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

THE LITTLE SHOP OF WONDERS


T E M P L E S O F A D VA N C E D S T Y L E

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T E M P L E S O F A D VA N C E D S T Y L E

“Ceramics and pottery are a global truth,� Holguin says. “There’s not a culture that doesn’t work in the forms. A bowl can serve as art or serve a meal or hold your mail. It’s like a white shirt: What you choose to do with it is where your style comes from.�

The ever changing walls of RTH are dense with Holguin’s art finds and style inspirations. And the presentation of the clothes is just as heavily layered.

Ć  ĆŞƏƭƲ ĆĽ Ćž  +RZGLG\RXILUVWGLVFRYHU57+" ƞƍ ƲƤƚ ĆĄƛƚĆ?ĆŽ  About six years ago, I was walking down the street in L.A. and I saw this small little shop. I was attracted to it; it was the pots, I guess. When I went in, I felt like I was in heaven. It smelled glorious—the incense. The color palette at the time was tan, navy, and red. Everything looked so dreamy. ,WWDNHVDERXWPLQXWHVWRDFFOLPDWHWRWKHVKRS8QWLO\RX WDNHLWDOOLQLWĹ?VKDUGWRIRFXVRQDQ\RQHWKLQJ Before RenĂŠ got the second shop, it was just the one. The first shop is so small. You walk around it one or two times—then you just want to do it again. You want to stay in that world, you want to see what’s at the back door. You want to know RenĂŠ. +RZGLG\RXWZRFRQQHFW" We just kind of fell in love! We exchanged numbers and started to text each other: photos of stuff we’d seen, beautiful things we love. A cloud, a sky, something blue, something beautiful. We have so much in common. We both feel connected to nature, and yet we also try to face society. We both gravitate toward the aesthetics of tribe-based societies.

GROOMING: HEE SOO KWON USING DAVINES

:KDWLVLWDERXWWULEHV" I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how to describe itâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I just feel very close to tribe-based cultures, the indigenous people of the land that we walk on. Before colonization, before industrialization, there was this beautiful art conceived just from our minds. Shoes, jewelry, clothes, the way we wore our hair. The dance, the aroma, the food. When I see RenĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I see. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mixture of Asian and Native American and Mexican and South Americanâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so many different things. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s combined with comfort. The clothes are very, very comfortable. <RXDQG5HQÂŤERWKORYHWREUHDNWKHWUDGLWLRQDO$PHULFDQ VLOKRXHWWH:K\LVWKDW" I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been called a nonconformist, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been called avant-garde. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think it stops with my clothing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way I sing, the way I write, the way I tweet, the way I talk, the way I dance, the way I move. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where it comes from, but what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m attracted to aesthetically is what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to communicate. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much in my brain, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know how Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to get it all out. But when I met RenĂŠ, I felt a very kindred kinship. A friend, a brother, a twin, you know. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ancient-futuristic.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is my RTH tribe,â&#x20AC;? says Holguin (center). â&#x20AC;&#x153;The new collection has leopard and python prints. I was in Japan with the clothes, and I asked how to say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all a little fucked-up.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; They said the closest thing is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all a little psycho.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Perfect.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been cropping and tapering my pants forever; I started slouching them when I moved to L.A.,â&#x20AC;? Holguin says. To get the RTH slouch, he adds a panel of found fabric to the crotch of vintage jeans.

'R\RXWKLQNREMHFWVOLNHWKHRQHV5HQÂŤFROOHFWVLQ WKHVKRSKDYHHQHUJ\" I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, but I feel them. When someone gives me a gift, I feel the energy and the love and the intent of the thing. And photos of peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;when I put them up in my house, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m reminded daily of that personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy and love, their encouragement. When I take the photos down, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little weirdâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hear from that person for a while. So I know which ones I need to take down. [laughs] Everything that fans give me, I keep. My partner calls me a hoarder. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made altars of the jewelry, and the paintings line the floors to the ceilings in my home. It means a lot that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d do thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really their heart. Same thing with clothes. Everything I wear means something. 6RGR\RXJHWDWWDFKHGWREHDXWLIXOWKLQJV" When I lose something, I just feel like: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supposed to belong to somebody else now. ,WVHHPVOLNHWKHSHRSOHZLWKWKHEHVWWDVWHâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;DOOWKHJUHDW FROOHFWRUVZKRDUHOLNHPDJQHWVIRUVWUDQJHZRQGHUIXO LQWHUHVWLQJREMHFWVâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;DUHDOVRWKHPRVWZLOOLQJWROHWVWXIIJR

Or to give things away. When RenĂŠ and I see each other, we are always giving one another something off of our bodies, or heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s putting extra stuff in my bag. We really want to exchange energy in any way possible. +RZGLG\RXUSKRWRFROODERUDWLRQZLWK57+FRPHDERXW" 'LG5HQÂŤVW\OH\RXLQ57+FORWKHV" Yeah. You know, I style myself. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really have a stylist. But with RenĂŠ, it was different. I wanted to be what he saw in his mind, and I was totally honored to be the muse for him. And my family was in the shoot as well. My mother, my sister, and my children were all in the shoot. So it became the tribe of us. [For a first look at RTHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoot with Erykah and her family, see page 30.] +RZGR\RXXVXDOO\PL[57+FORWKHVLQZLWK RWKHUVWXII\RXZHDU" I have on a piece of his every day. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so comfortable and exchangeable and easygoing. And they always smell like the shop. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just part of the everyday fabric of my life. It sounds like a commercial, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it? [singing] The fabric of my lifeâ&#x20AC;Ś And walking into the shop is like walking into RenĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heart. Just without all the blood, you know?

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FAS H I ON SC H OO L

When the right designer puts the Zeitgeist in a choke hold with an inspired collection, 12 minutes of loud music, bright lights, and runway catwalking can send the culture careening in wild new directions. Here, we break down 16 fashion shows that changed the way we dress. by Noah Johnson

THE MOST INFLUENTIAL RUNWAY SHOWS OF ALL TIME PRADA

Fall-Winter 2012 •••

Miuccia Prada wasn’t the first designer to send celebrities striding down the catwalk as models, but she did it biggest and best. In fact, the wattage she pulled still hasn’t been outshined. In a show that’s gone down as one of fashion’s greatest flexes, she turned her runway into a red carpet for seven Hollywood leading men—among them Gary Oldman, Adrien Brody, and Willem Dafoe—and expanded the size of menswear’s circus tent forever.

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DIOR HOMME

Spring-Summer 2002 •••

Before he stormed the gates at Yves Saint Laurent, Hedi Slimane made his mark with an influential stint as the creative head of Dior Homme from 2000 to 2007. Among his contributions to the menswear canon: skinny jeans, skinny ties, and skinny models, many cast from the street by Slimane himself. Perhaps his most indelible legacy from those years is the skinny black suit, with high armholes, narrow sleeves, and lowrise trousers, that became the uniform for rockers (both real and imagined) throughout the aughts.

There came this new line from Hedi Slimane at Dior that you needed to be slim to wear. It said: “You want this? Go back to your bones.” And so I lost it all. I lost 88 pounds and never got them back. —KARL L AGERFELD, 2010

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D O L C E & G A B B A N A | Fall 1996 •••

According to the label’s co-founder Domenico Dolce, “absolute elegance” was the inspiration for his then ten-yearold brand’s famous Rat Pack collection, which channeled the masculine swagger of the Sinatra–in–Palm Springs era. That meant retro polo shirts, velvety smoking jackets, coats with massive fur lapels, and a raft of swanky accessories: Models wore felt fedoras, chomped on long cigarette holders, draped their necks with silk ascots, and even cradled live exotic cats in their arms. (Hey, a show doesn’t become legendary without a few truly wild, unforgettable moments.) To quote GQ creative director Jim Moore, who was seated front row at the show in Milan, “Every piece was perfect.”

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R I C K O W E N S | Fall-Winter 2006 •••

Few designers can match Owens’s uncanny knack for jaw-dropping runway high jinks. (His recent collections included penis-exposing tunics and models backpack-strapped to other models in the 69 position.) Ten years ago, at Pitti Uomo, he installed a wax statue that depicted him urinating on the floor. But even that wasn’t enough to eclipse the sports-inspired clothes, which were so far ahead of their time they are still influencing collections a decade later. The truly groundbreaking moment came with the introduction of his iconic high-top Geobasket sneakers, the first-ever high-fashion basketball shoes (there have been about, oh, a thousand trillion variations since), that came to be known, simply, as “the Rick Dunks.”

I wanted monster trucks on my feet.

S T Y L I S T: J O C E LY N E B E A U D O I N . T H E S E PA G E S : S E E A D D I T I O N A L C R E D I T S .

—RICK OWENS

H E N RY L E U T W Y L E R


FAS H I ON SC H OO L

S T E P H E N S P R O U S E | Fall 1984 •••

Back when the East Village concert venue Webster Hall was known as the Ritz, punk-design legend Stephen Sprouse packed the house for a show of graffiti-inspired prints and Pop colors that brought street culture to high fashion. Among the 1,500 in attendance were the most glamorous downtown personalities of the time, including Andy Warhol and Debbie Harry. It was “near pandemonium,” wrote Roger Padilha, co-author of The Stephen Sprouse Book. Transgender model Teri Toye led the show, which ended with a video

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of a NASA shuttle launching into space—the perfect metaphor for Sprouse’s trajectory. In 2001, fellow punk-influenced designer Marc Jacobs would collaborate with Sprouse on graffitiprint bags for Louis Vuitton (and siphon off untold sums of cash from fanboy Kanye West as a result).

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H E L M U T L A N G | Autumn-Winter 1998 •••

For arguably the single most influential runway event ever, the minimalist (and now highly collectible) designer, a man famous for pioneering distressed denim and making military outerwear chic, embraced technology in fashion like no one had before him. The show was initially held in a raw space with concrete floors, where he presented his men’s and women’s collections not for a seated audience but to be recorded and broadcast over the fledgling Internet and later distributed to the press via CD-ROM.

J E A N PA U L G A U L T I E R

Spring-Summer 1990 •••

Whether they know it or not, the labels leading the next wave of sporty, gender-indifferent fashion—Givenchy, Hood by Air, Public School, Off-White—owe a major debt to Gaultier. His spring-summer 1990 collection had a rather esoteric inspiration (The Invisible Man, the 1933 film of the H. G. Wells novel), but the clothes, which combined boxing attire with tailoring—think ringready boots, hoodies under suits, blazers with shorts and leggings— set the precedent for integrating luxury fashion and athletic gear.

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I sought comfortable clothes that gave ease to movement, comfort, and nonchalance. —GIORGIO ARMANI

GIORGIO ARMANI

Fall 1990 •••

As early as the mid-1970s, Giorgio Armani was gutting jackets of the lining and padding that give them their structure, redefining Italian tailoring along the way. “Around me, I only saw men who wore rigid jackets that concealed the body, imprisoning it, in a sense,” Armani tells us today. “I sought the exact opposite: comfortable clothes that gave ease to movement, comfort, and nonchalance. Gradually, I also changed the layout of the buttons and changed its proportions: It was a process that radically transformed this garment. Since then, my jackets have been comfortable, lightweight, and even sensual in their construction.” His fall 1990 collection was the ultimate expression of his mission, one that still resonates today. “The excessive volume of the ’90s now seems outdated,” Armani says, “but the insistence on softness is still seen.”

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J U N Y A WA T A N A B E

Spring-Summer 2006 •••

Fashion is still collaboration-crazy (see recent collections from Gosha Rubchinskiy and Vetements), and nobody did it earlier, better, or more obsessively than Junya Watanabe. The Tokyo-based visionary combined tailoring with rugged workwear, bringing new life and a fashion edge to tough fabrics like canvas and denim by partnering with eight iconic brands—including Levi’s, Pointer, Dickies, Lacoste, and Converse—in one collection.

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THOM BROWNE

Fall-Winter 2009 •••

Thom Browne doesn’t just make beautifully constructed, instantly recognizable suits— he creates an entire world around them in the form of fashion shows that are more like performance art or theater. His fall-winter 2009 show was a proper clinic on the Thom Browne aesthetic: Models dressed as office workers wore the designer’s signature gray cardigan and trousers in a 1960s workplace (complete with individual desks and coat racks on which they hung their identical trench coats). They typed up assignments on typewriters and even brought apples to the desk of their model boss.


D R I E S VA N N O T E N

Spring-Summer 1996 •••

Thumbing his nose at self-serious fashion shows where models are instructed not to make eye contact or smile, Van Noten hung a disco ball over the statue of David in Florence’s Piazzale Michelangelo and turned his show into a raucous free-for-all party where the models bounded in gangs through the crowd. It felt like exactly what fashion should be— something you want to participate in, not watch from the sidelines.

RAF SIMONS

Spring-Summer 1998 Spring-Summer 1999 Fall-Winter 2001 •••

Of his many contributions to fashion, Raf’s first few collections, particularly springsummer ’98 (Black Palms), springsummer ’99 (Kinetic Youth), and fall-winter ’01 (Riot Riot Riot), remain touchstones for their mastery of proportion, graphic imagery, and bristling energy—the kind Rihanna, Travis Scott, and Kanye West channel when they wear archival pieces from those collections today. Simons also stays far ahead of the curve with his locations: Kinetic Youth was held in front of an enormous mirror ball in La Villette’s Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie.

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For Kinetic Youth, I wanted a space (or, maybe better, a nonspace)—an environment that felt like a record cover from Pink Floyd. A space where technique and surrealism come together. —RAF SIMONS

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FAS H I ON SC H OO L

GUCCI BY TOM FORD

Autumn-Winter 1995 & 2004 •••

When Tom Ford took the reins at Gucci, his impact was immediate. He slimmed the suits, cranked up the sex appeal (jewel-toned velvet, anyone?), and introduced chic styling touches (like loafers sans socks) that still resonate in menswear. His sense of showmanship carried right through

his last Gucci show, which featured pole dancers (both male and female) flanking the runway. Instead of coming out for a quick bow, Ford capped off his game-changing Gucci tenure by swaggering down the runway as only he could: shirt unbuttoned to midsternum, highball glass in hand.


COVER STORY We always knew Kendrick Lamar could rap. But nobody expected his album to pimp a butterfly to be a staggering musical masterwork that galvanized Grammy voters and protest marchers alike. The big question now is: what will k.dot do next? We got Rick Rubin to ask him.

TOP 5 DEAD OR ALIVE PAOL A KUDACKI

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Here’s where Kendrick Lamar stands as 2016 comes to a close: He is currently the best rapper alive. He has busted his way into the conversation about the top five MCs of all time, dead or alive. He is eliciting comparisons to musicians beyond the borders of rap. Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder: strident artists who shook up the culture and awakened the consciousness of their day. Kendrick’s kept a pretty low profile in 2016. Yet his 2015 album, To Pimp a Butterfly—a multi-layered LP that unfurls slowly over many, many listens—is still percolating, especially as the single “Alright” continues to be the unofficial anthem of nationwide police-brutality protests. In March of this year, Kendrick also dropped a surprise album called Untitled Unmastered. It’s really a compilation—a loose gathering of perfectly unpolished songs, death-defying rap verses, and improvised vamps from the sessions that birthed Butterfly. (Side note: We might have LeBron James to thank, at least in part, for the album. After Kendrick performed an untitled track at the Grammys, James tweeted at the CEO of Kendrick’s label, Anthony “Top Dawg” Tiffith, imploring him to release the music.) Untitled held fans over for a while, but we’re starting to get antsy. So the real question right now isn’t where Kendrick belongs in the firmament—it’s where he’s taking us next. To tease that out, we asked venerable producer and noted genius-whisperer Rick Rubin to interview Kendrick at Rubin’s own Shangri La studios in Malibu. The two had never previously met. They spoke on the lawn of Shangri La for an hour. Then they walked directly into the studio and started recording new music. What follows are excerpts from their conversation.— W I L L W E L C H

RICK R U BIN: What were the inspirations along the way for you—musically, lyrically, or philosophically—that got you to this stage? K ENDR I C K L A M A R : Oh, man. First off would have to be how I was raised. The environment. My father being a complete realist, just in the streets. And my mother being a dreamer. It starts there first, before I even heard any type of melody or lyric. That’s just DNA. It’s always the yin and the yang, the good versus the evil. And that pushed me toward the music that I love to listen to. You know, Tupac, Biggie, Jay. Your usual suspects. These were the people that was played in my household.

Was the music playing in your house your choice of music, or was it the music your parents were listening to? Definitely my parents. My parents were fairly young in the city of Compton. So the things that they played—you know, that was the hip crowd. So I was being exposed to all these ideas, from Big Daddy Kane to Eazy-E to the Bay Area— Too Short, E-40—you know, back to Marvin Gaye

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coat (at Dover Street Market New York) $1,140 MP Massimo Piombo + shirt $225 Levi’s Vintage Clothing his own jeans Levi’s

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coat $8,150 Berluti + cardigan $2,930 (for similar style) Berluti shirt $310 AMI Alexandre Mattiussi

and the Isley Brothers. This field of music just broadened my ideas to come. We never would’ve thought in a million years that I’d be doing it.

So when was that moment? About three months into my second LP, To Pimp a Butterfly.

When did jazz find its way into your world? It’s a trip, because I was in the studio one day, and my guy Terrace Martin noticed something about the type of sounds that I was picking. He was like, Man, a lot of the chords that you pick are jazz-influenced. You don’t understand: You a jazz musician by default. And that just opened me up. And he just started breaking down everything, the science, going back to Miles, Herbie Hancock.

After hearing the first album, when the second album came, it was completely unexpected. Like, nobody was expecting you to make that. Yeah, definitely. I knew from the jump that it was gonna be a challenge for my listeners’ ear. But if I’m challenging myself in the studio, I want to challenge you as well. I just went full-fledged with it, man. We built everything from scratch.

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This is kind of a funny thing, because I’m going to ask you to project into the future here. But do you feel like Butterfly— what do you refer to it as? Butterfly, To Pimp a Butterfly. It’s a few things. Okay, I thought maybe To Pimp. But let’s say the second album. Do you feel like that’s more indicative of where things will be in the future? Or is it more like, based on the difference between the first album and the second album, we should continue to expect it to change? That’s a great question.

It may not even be possible to answer, but tell me your best thoughts. My best thoughts… The best answer I can give you, um… That was me then. Yeah. Not to say that it wouldn’t be continuous. It’ll always have some type of DNA in my music. But me, as a person, I grow. I’m like a chameleon. You know? That is a gift and a curse for me. But more so a gift, because it never puts me in a box. And my ability to express and still make the connection wherever I go, that is my high point. That’s something I pride myself off of.

I think that what’s infectious about your music—the reason other people connect—is they feel your connection to it. Probably a lot of your fans might not have been into jazz. But they feel your connection to it, and it inspires them to open themselves to hear new music that they might not have heard. We’ve been told to call the consumers dumb, but they’re not. They know when it’s real. And that’s something that I always understood—just from being a fan myself.

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coat $2,295 Burberry + denim jacket $840 Tom Ford silk shirt (right) $550 and loafers $640 Salvatore Ferragamo his own jeans Leviâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ring David Yurman


When making music, do you ever consider the audience at all, or is it more just self-expression? I used to consider the listener. But now I’m in a space where if I’m not inspired, I can’t really do the music. I can’t feel it. I put in enough hours to be able to pen a hundred-bar verse on the spot at any given moment. But for me to actually feel an idea, it has to come from me. And a lot of times, I have to block out different needs and wants just for my own selfish reasons. But at the end of the day, it comes out where, whether you like it or not, you know it comes from a real place. It’s gonna feel unapologetic, uncompromising, and it’s gonna feel me. When you say unapologetic, has there ever been anything that comes up that you feel like, I don’t want to say that on a record? That’s a great question. I always said to myself, if I said it on a record, I never retract my statements. Because it’s my self-expression, and you can have your opinions on it, you can feel a certain type of way, but it’s how I feel. And I can’t contradict that at all. Beautiful. And do you ever look back on anything and feel like you’d like to change any of the things that you’ve written? It would be me saying, I want to go deeper. I shoulda went deeper. Content-wise, do you feel like you could talk about anything? I could talk about anything. That is the challenge for me. Being able to talk about anything and make it connect to a listener. Where a listener can either feel like you or feel like they understand you. Talking to a little kid and making that feel like something. Or saying the most brutal, harsh things on a record, where, you know, society may not want to hear it. That’s what music is about for me.

Let’s talk about “Alright” for a second. It has become our generation’s protest song. Yeah, yeah. When you wrote it, did you have that in mind? Did you think of it as a protest song? No. You know what? I was sitting on that record for about six months. The beat’s Pharrell. And between my guy Sam Taylor and Pharrell, they would always be like, Did you do it? When you gonna do it? I knew it was a great record—I just was trying to find the space to approach it. I mean, the beat sounds fun, but there’s something else inside of them chords that Pharrell put down that feels like—it can be more of a statement rather than a tune. So with Pharrell and Sam asking me—Am I gonna rock on it? When I’m gonna rock on it?—it put the pressure on me to challenge myself. To actually think and focus on something that could be a staple in hip-hop. And eventually, I came across it. Eventually, I found the right words. You know, it was a lot going on, and still, to this day, it’s a lot going on. And I wanted to

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approach it as more uplifting—but aggressive. Not playing the victim, but still having that We strong, you know? So you had the beat for six months, but you didn’t have any words? I didn’t have any words. P knew that that record was special. Sam knew that the record was special. They probably knew it before I even had a clue. So I’m glad that they put that pressure on me to challenge myself. ’Cause sometimes, as a writer, you can have that writer’s block. And when you like a sound or an instrumental, you want to approach it the right way. So you sit on it. Yeah, the timing is not really in our control. You can’t say, I got this track I like, so I’m gonna write to it now. It comes when it’s supposed to come. You just have to be open to it and ready for it when it comes. Exactly. I remember hitting P on a text like, Man, I got the lyrics. And typing the lyrics to him. He’s like, That’s it. And did you have a scat over it before? Yeah, I had a scat. Did it have that phrasing? Different cadences. You know? Hook or not yet? P had the hook. Oh, cool. It’s a good hook. Yeah, P had the alright. That’s him on the hook. And just saying the alright phrase—what does We are gonna be alright represent? I’m glad that sparked the idea, ’cause that song coulda went a thousand other ways.

Do you consider yourself first and foremost a rapper? Yeah, definitely. Could you imagine making an album in the future where you’re not rapping? Yeah, I think I got the confidence for it. If I can master the idea and make the time to approach it the right way, I think I can push it out.

It’s really interesting now, with what’s going on in hip-hop. It’s almost like you’re a throwback to when lyrics mattered. So much of hip-hop today is about vibe and swag and personality, and less about words. And it sometimes sounds like even the MC doesn’t know what he’s saying on a lot of today’s records. So it’s interesting to hear the sort of clarity and depth that you go into lyrically. The clarity, I got my clarity just studying Eminem when I was a kid. How I got in the studio was all just curiosity. I had a love for the music, but it was curiosity. The day I heard The Marshall Mathers LP, I was just like, How does that work? What is he doing? How is he putting his words together like that? What’s the track under that? An ad-lib? What is that? And then, Why don’t you go in the studio and see? So I do that. Then it became, How’s his words cutting through the beat like that? What is he doing that I’m not doing, now that I’m into it? His time is impeccable. When he wants to fall off the beat, it’s impeccable. These are things that, through experience and time, I had to learn. It’s lucky that you got to learn it so young. It gave you time to grow so much. Yeah, definitely—13, 14 years old. Crazy. In one of your lyrics, you mention meditation. Do you have a meditation practice? Yeah, man. I have to have at least 30 minutes to myself. If it’s not on the daily, every other day, to just sit back, close my eyes, and absorb what’s going on. You know, the space that I’m in. When you in music—and everybody knows this—the years are always cut in half, because you always have something to do. We in the studio for four months, that go by. Now you gotta go on the road for five months, that go by. Next thing you know, five years going by and you 29 years old. You know? So I have to find a way to understand the space that I’m in and how I’m feeling at the moment. ’Cause if I don’t, it’s gonna zoom. I know. I feel it. And I’m sure you know what I’m talking about. It just goes and then you miss out on your moment because you’re so in the moment you didn’t know the moment was going on, if that makes sense.

SOMEONE BROUGHT IT TO MY ATTENTION— MUSIC IS ALL I THINK ABOUT. IT BECOMES ME, IT BECOMES MY LIFE. I BREATHE IT. I CAN’T THINK ABOUT NOTHING ELSE.

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Absolutely. You can get lost. I know some artists get lost in touring. They become less relatable. All they know is being onstage and accolades and hotels. Their reality is so different from everybody else’s reality that it’s not so interesting. I like to call it a cartoon world. And you know, you can really get lost in it so fast. It’s scary out there. How’d you get the idea to do the 30 minutes every day or every other day? Well, just knowing my schedule and how much I think about music. Someone brought it to my attention—it’s all I think about. And it’s nothing wrong with that. It becomes me, it becomes my life. I breathe it. I can’t think about nothing else. And once I started realizing that, I know that I have to give it some time and space every now and then. And that 30 minutes helps. That 30 minutes helps me to totally zone out and not think about my next lyric. You know? It gives me a re-start, a jump start, a refresh. It lets me know why I’m here, doing what I’m doing.

Do you have anyone around you who tells you if something’s not good? For sure. Man, I’d be head over heels right now if I didn’t have a certain type of grounding. Family, a team that has my best interests— not only in music but as a person. Everyone that’s around me has been with me since I was 15 years old. I know we’ll all grow as people, and I’ll outgrow some people and different natures, but I hope that these same people will continue to grow with me. ’Cause I can’t stop. You know? I can’t stop. Do you have any idea of the direction that’s coming next, as far as writing goes, or is it too soon? It’s soon. I have ideas, though. I have ideas and I have a certain approach. But I wanna see what it manifests. I wanna put all the paint on the wall and see where that goes. Maybe you can help me with that. I’m down. Cool. For Butterfly, did you record more songs than the ones on the album? Yeah, definitely. I have so many floating around—24 bars, 16 bars, hooks and choruses and bridges and ideas. References that I had in mind for people to sing. Beautiful.... Anything else you want to talk about? Let’s check out this space, man! I’m in a creative zone! [laughs] Should we go inside and record? Exactly. For video of Kendrick Lamar’s summit with Rick Rubin in Malibu, go to G Q S T Y L E . C O M .

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coat $11,500 (made-to-order) Dolce & Gabbana styled by mobolaji dawodu. hair by whitney alford. grooming by hee soo kwon for malin+goetz. set design by ward robinson for wooden ladder. produced by portfolio one.


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architecturally significant homes aren’t just for co≠ee-table books. They’re meant to be lived in. By you. Even if just for a few inspiring nights. Here are six design escapes that will stimulate your mind and change the way you vacation. • by Brad Dunning

A DESIGN SHRINE 101


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few years ago I rethought the whole idea of a vacation. And I realized that, for me, a holiday should be about more than a break from workaday responsibilities. It should make my fantasies come true. If you’re a Morrissey fan and you go see him play in Manchester, you’ll remember it for the rest of your life. Every baseball fan worth his salted peanuts has been to Wrigley Field. Me, I like design and architecture. Sure, I can beeline to the third floor of the Museum of Modern Art or trek through the woods to Fallingwater with all the other tourists, but those are relatively fleeting and crushingly communal experiences. I want to be singularly immersed in my own poetic and inspirational visitation. I want to see and study architecture from every angle, at every time of the day: sleep in it, eat in it, draw it, and photograph it. Cosset it. Have sex in it. Have it all to myself and experience the theories of legendary architects in 3-D. That’s my kind of vacation. Perhaps you are the same. If so, we hereby present legendary design you can rent and inhabit for as long as your AmEx limit allows. The majority of these listings hardly cost more than a decent big-city hotel room, and some quite less. Every one will enlarge your world.

YOU CAN’T GO WRONG WITH FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT Wright is architecture’s Picasso, a genius and an original. His custom houses were sometimes quixotic yet always shockingly inventive and hugely influential—visit them all when you can. More than a dozen can now be rented through websites like Airbnb and VRBO or their own private sites. The living room of the Penfield House in Ohio (seen on our opening pages and rentable at penfieldhouse.com) is one of Wright’s most transparent and dramatic designs, essentially a glass box, and is highlighted with a stunning suspended staircase. (From $275 a night)

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You don’t often think of Cape Cod as a bastion of modern architecture, but lovely and inviting examples dot the rugged, secluded landscape. Three houses owned by the Cape Cod Modern House Trust are now available for rental, and my favorite is the Hatch Cottage (Jack Hall, 1962, pictured at right). Built for an editor of The Nation, it’s quite small—just three rooms and one bath—but it has an unparalleled setting perched a little off the ground, affording a bay view and access to a mostly vacant beach and numerous trails. Crisp, modest, warm, and sophisticated, it embodies modernism at its most lifeaffirming and is a beacon for those who aspire to a Thoreaulike experience. There are two other houses for rent in the trust, the Kugel/ Gips House (Charlie Zehnder, 1970) and the Paul Weidlinger House (1953), both enviable statements of midcentury ideas cradled in nature. You’ll have little to do in any of them except enjoy the scenery and relax, so bring a pile of books. If you truly must get out, the big cultural attraction might be the Wellfleet DriveIn movie theater. (From $2,750 a week)

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T H E S E PA G E S : S E E A D D I T I O N A L C R E D I T S .

CAPE COD FOR MODERN LOVERS


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THE WORLD’S MOST STYLISH DORMITORY Responsible for so much of the modern furniture, typography, and architecture we love today, the Bauhaus school in Germany was as influential on the world of design as the Beatles were on 20th-century music. From 1925 to 1931, students there were educated in architecture, industrial design, metalworking, painting, photography, and even color theory and weaving. And then, in 1933, the school was closed under pressure from the Nazi regime, which considered it a threat due to its emphasis on individualism, creativity, and intellectualism. There were three campuses during its lifetime, but founder Walter Gropius designed the largest one, in Dessau, where you can now spend the night in a dorm room. It’s an easy 90minute train ride from Berlin’s Zoologischer station—and upon arrival in Dessau, a pleasant 15-minute walk through the quiet little town over to the campus. The restored Bauhaus Building is one of the greatest and most faithful architectural restorations I have ever seen, absolutely perfect. I swear to God, the canteen looks like an Apple Store. The rooms are ridiculously affordable and spotlessly clean, with bare walls and hard floors, yet each also has a beautifully designed (of course) bed and furniture by Bauhaus designers and illustrious alumni. Communal bathrooms are down the hall. (From $39 a night)

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TIME-TRAVEL TO ’70s CALIFORNIA AT ITS MOST DRAMATIC No place on earth finds itself more squarely in the crosshairs of our cultural Zeitgeist than Sea Ranch on California’s SonomaMendocino Coast. The Golden State seems to be having more influence in popular culture than ever before, and ditto for the 1970s. Sea Ranch epitomizes both. This planned community, with a hotel, condos, and freestanding homes, was started in the mid-1960s, but for me the Sea Ranch look—weathered wood-plank exteriors, angular profiles, cane-seat Breuer chairs, chromeframed Equus posters, and Sheila Hicks textile wall hangings—is decidedly rooted in the ’70s. Sea Ranch is post-hippie, academically approved, moneyed-up, groovy NorCal style. And the big extra ingredient is that Sea Ranch is located, duh, right on the rugged Pacific coastline, all windswept and lonely, dramatic and Rod McKuen–ly lovely. Almost every house has an enviable view, and most have the requisite period-perfect hot tub. Squint and Steve McQueen and Ali MacGraw are tearing up the beach in an orange dune buggy and their Persols. It’s about 100 miles north of San Francisco, with famed vineyards and breweries nearby. Bring your own cable-knit turtleneck. (From under $200 a night)

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WORSHIP AT THE ALTAR OF LE CORBUSIER Gaze at any modern building and you’ll see breadcrumbs leading back to Le Corbusier’s desk. His continuing oracular authority verges on the sacred, so why not stay in a Corbusier-designed convent? Rooms at the Convent at La Tourette (Lyon, France) are small and monastic, but the structure remains a masterpiece of inspiration, introspection, and rejuvenation. It’s your chance to get closer to God and Le Corbusier. Or are they one and the same? Alternatively, you can stay in Hôtel Le Corbusier (Marseille, France), arguably Le Corbusier’s most famous creation. It’s part of La Cité Radieuse (The Radiant City), which was to be the prototype for a new wave of postwar housing— a nine-story building (pictured at right and top left), with one floor of shops and a rooftop garden, that is one of the most famous and most photographed modern architectural spaces in the world. Cradle yourself in a monument; it’s an erection of the senses. (Convent at La Tourette, from $57 a night; Hôtel Le Corbusier, from $89 a night)


The phoenix-like revival of Palm Springs has been well documented and lovingly appreciated. The houses and architecture that were abandoned like bones at a barbecue during the 1980s and ’90s roared back into vogue (and Vogue) as the world re-discovered midcentury modernism. As one of the key players in the Palm Springs School, architect Donald Wexler created sublimely simple pavilions of glass and often steel. One of his most luxurious commissions was the Dinah Shore Estate (1964), smackdab in the middle of what could be called the Beverly Hills of Palm Springs—the neighborhood of Old Las Palmas, a setting of flat labyrinthine streets and high-walled estates. Quiet and peaceful, perfect for bicycling and projectileweeping house envy. Did Leonardo DiCaprio buy this important home simply to have a party pad during Coachella? Maybe. It seems to be about the only time he is seen around town. Still, it’s hard to separate the DiCaprio pussy mojo from your experience here. It’s sexy as hell being in that hot sun and tranquil pool, and under those stars at night. If you can’t get laid in this house, my friend, something is truly amiss. (From $3,750 a night)

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TKTKTK SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

CHANNEL YOUR INNER DI CAPRIO (WHILE PARTYING AT HIS HOUSE)


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LOOK BOOK

DARIA KOBAYASHI RITCH

B U B B L I Up N G Thankfully, the coolest coats of the season are also the warmest: bubble coats. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because designers have transformed them from giant arctic sleeping bags to oversize statements of style. To prove it, we took model rose bertram and her soccerstar boyfriend, gregory van der wiel, to a peak above zermatt, switzerland. 112

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Introducing the Peak-Lapel Bubble Topcoat coat $1,095 Z Zegna + pants Brunello Cucinelli boots Rag & Bone beanie Michael Kors

A Coat That Will Elevate Your Commute coat $1,260 Herno + shirt Missoni leggings Calvin Klein Collection boots Dsquared2 beanie Brunello Cucinelli ON HER

coat (menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) $3,005 Visvim + leggings Aether boots Moncler helicopter Air Zermatt

O P E N I N G PAG E S

coat $2,395 Maison Margiela + tank top Calvin Klein Underwear leggings Calvin Klein Collection beanie Michael Kors sunglasses Ray-Ban his necklaces Miansai (top) Renvi ON HER

coat (menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Dsquared2 bathing suit Stella McCartney boots Rag & Bone socks throughout Brunello Cucinelli sunglasses Dior 115


Guaranteed Collectorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Item: The Raf Simons Bubble Coat ON HER

coat (menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) $2,554 Raf Simons + bikini Missoni boots Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh her necklaces Cartier (on top) Louis Vuitton bracelets and silver ring Cartier watch Rolex ON HIM

pants Brunello Cucinelli beanie The Elder Statesman sunglasses Ray-Ban necklaces, from top Miansai Renvi

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THE TOM BRADY & GISELE OF THE SOCIAL-MEDIA GENERATION • Rose Bertram and her soccer-star boyfriend, Gregory van der Wiel, didn’t invent the model-athlete super-couple, but they are revolutionizing it. They are the quintessential multi-hyphenate hustlers, harnessing the powers of social media to turn themselves into the global #brands of the future. On Instagram alone, they have more than 1.5 million combined followers, and they freely share snapshots from their daily grinds, much of which is spent in humdrum places like private jets, epic cliffside retreats, and, of course, the gym. “We’re a couple, and every couple that’s in love wants to show that,” Bertram says of their capacity for sharing, although she admits that one downside is that guys are constantly trying to slide into her DMs. (Good luck with that, dudes.) Being the global couple of the future also means that both Bertram and Van der Wiel have side hustles— she’s currently launching an eponymous label; he’s a founder of the threeyear-old lifestyle brand Balr—something to help grow their profiles and keep them busy when they’re not occupied with soccer games and photo shoots. Bertram is Belgian, and Van der Wiel is Dutch, but to keep things interesting, the two moved to Istanbul over the summer, where Van der Wiel is a defender for a local team, Fenerbahçe. “It’s cool to be here in a new city with new people,” Bertram says. But with her profile on the rise and projects lined up into next year, it’s safe to assume she’ll mostly be on the go. Want to go with her? Just give her a follow. —MAX BERLINGER

ROSE BERTRAM

@rose_bertram

GREGORY VAN DER WIEL

@gregoryvanderwiel


This Oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Bubble Coatâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bomber Jacket Hybrid coat $3,995 Ralph Lauren + pants and boots Ralph Lauren beanie The Elder Statesman sunglasses (opposite page) Bottega Veneta

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Add a Fur Hood for More Warmthâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and Baller Bonus Points coat $6,745 Brunello Cucinelli + cardigan Brunello Cucinelli


If Your Girl Wants to Steal Your Cool New Bubble Coat… Let Her coat (men’s) $6,295 Bally + bathing suit Etro boots Brunello Cucinelli beanie Moncler Grenoble

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This One Will Get You Extra Attention (the Good Kind) coat $4,800 Dior Homme + pants Michael Kors boots Maison Margiela hat Stetson ON HER

bodysuit Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh boots Stella McCartney styled by mobolaji dawodu. hair and makeup by susana sanchez for balmain hair couture and dior makeup. produced by kiku xicoira for bcn skies productions.

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PARADISE AT 12,000 FEET â&#x20AC;˘ Our location for this shoot? The peak at Matterhorn Glacier Paradise, a breathtaking mountaintop located a few steep gondola rides above the postcardperfect town of Zermatt, Switzerland. Down in Zermatt, there are no gas engines allowed, which keeps the smog down and the views crystal clear. Up top, you feel like you can reach out and touch the dizzying Matterhorn, just one peak over. And best of all, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skiing all year around here. (Believe it or not, we took these photographs in August.) 123


Louis Vuitton Zigzag Scarf This oversize scarf by designer Kim Jones will be identifiable as Louis Vuitton only to people who really know. To everyone else, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the biggest, coolest, warmest, and most impressive statement scarf money can buy.

$2,860


FASHION It’s not about labels and logos. These 11 designer pieces have the right mix of hype, cred, and design to make them proud staples of your wardrobe—and to make people think “Damn!” when you walk into a room. And since tearing into the packaging is half the fun, we threw in the boxes and bags as well. ARNAUD PY VKA

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Brunello Cucinelli Topcoat The winter piece you’ll get the most wear out of (your topcoat). Designed by one of Italy’s finest and noblest suitmakers (Mr. Cucinelli). Made with the world’s most luxurious winter-tailoring fabric (cashmere).

$4,745

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Missoni Knit Sweater The genius of Missoni’s kaleidoscopic knit sweaters is that they don’t need a logo—because no other brand on earth has the means to make them. Let your drunk uncle wear the Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer sweater. You wear this.

$1,275


Bottega Veneta Crepe-Soled Chelsea Boots in Barolo Suede Crepe-soled Chelseas have been in heavy rotation among stylish dudes for a few seasons now. Bottega makes the Platonic version, and this unique shade of suede will keep you from getting confused with the guys in knockoâ&#x2030; s.

$820

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Cartier Love Bracelet Every time we see a celebrity with actually dope style—or any other man of wealth and taste—guess which bracelet he’s wearing. Note that it comes with the screwdriver you need to put it on and take it o≠. (When we get ours, we’re never taking it o≠.)

$6,300 (at the Cartier Fifth Avenue Mansion)


Hermès Playing Cards Hermès is deservedly famous for its leather pieces, but we’re nerds for its ridiculously luxurious home goods. Like ashtrays with hand-painted tigers. Or these silver-tipped playing cards. For best results, use them. If your cards are too sti≠, you might be, too.

$100 (single deck) $140 (double deck)


Rick Owens Calfskin Jacket When Rick Owens started making leather jackets in the ’90s, they quickly became essential to the fashion-obsessed. And soon a cult developed around the guy, one to rival any rock star’s following. Try this jacket on once and you’ll either buy it on the spot or start saving up for it.

$2,343

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Gucci Horsebit Loafers Frankly, horsebits have always been a status symbol. What’s new here is the slightly pointier, more elegant and fashiony silhouette that Gucci’s white-hot designer, Alessandro Michele, gave to his house’s most iconic piece of menswear. (While he was at it, he made the packaging more glorious, too.)

$695

Goyard Du≠el Bag These days it takes more than cash to distance yourself from the pack. Which explains why Goyard is the luxury “trunkmaker” with all the heat right now. You can’t buy this duffel online, so track it down at one of the brand’s boutiques in Paris, London, Milan, or New York City. Sit it on top of your roller bag at the airport. Feel like a king.

$4,990

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The Elder Statesman Cashmere Blanket Thanks to social media, we are now in the era of status symbols for the home. And while this hand-dyed cashmere blanket will light up your likes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the cotton-candy softness that makes it so sweet. Watching Monday Night Football will never be the same.

$5,995

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Vetements “Sexual Fantasies” Hoodie There are rare occasions when hype is deserved and resistance is futile. Maybe it was the frenzy over designer Demna Gvasalia’s high-concept streetwear. Maybe it was seeing Frank Ocean wearing it. Either way, our desire to own this hoodie is as raw and direct as the words printed across the front.

$770 (at Dover Street Market New York) styled by emilie meinadier. prop styling by sinan sigic. produced by johanna scher at workingirl.

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JAZZ GIANTS Using nothing more than simple instruments and an audacious will to improvise, these ten giants of jazz have taken us places no man has gone before. And theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still here, still playingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and always dressed to kill. What a time to be alive.

The Explorers Club by Nick Marino

CHRISTIAN WEBER 136

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Ron Carter AGE :

79

LIFE ON A STRING:

A graduate of the Miles Davis Sideman University, Carter still tours and gigs around the world, leading his bands on the same upright bass he’s been using since 1960. “It’s on all these records,” he says. “I maintain it. It’s like having a Bentley.” THAT HERRINGBONE SUIT:

It was designed by his wife, the former model Quintell Williams-Carter. suit (both pages), his own + shirt $345 Ermenegildo Zegna hat $275 JJ Hat Center scarf Kiton pocket square Polo Ralph Lauren shoes, his own Fratelli Rossetti

Pharoah Sanders AGE :

76

M U S I CA L L A N E :

A freethinking astral traveler and spiritual gangster, he’s the o∞cial saxophonist of your soul’s awakening. His definitive song may be “The Creator Has a Master Plan,” a 32-minute vision quest that journeys from moments of pastoral beauty to demonpurging squall—just like life itself. THE LOOK: “I got tired of wearing suits and ties,” he says. “I decided I would look another kind of way.” coat $2,490 Ermenegildo Zegna Couture + sweater $345 Sandro sunglasses Krewe fez from Nigeria

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bracelet and ring, vintage


I WOULDN’T GO TO WORK WITHOUT A SUIT. IT SETS THE WHOLE TONE FOR ME. —Ron Carter


I THINK STYLE IS AN INNATE THING. SOME PEOPLE HAVE IT—OR NOT. —Charles Lloyd

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Charles Lloyd AGE :

78

Between 1989 and 2015, Lloyd recorded his beautiful and painterly playing for art-music label ECM. But he’ll always be best known as one of the first jazz artists to sell a million copies, with the 1967 live set Forest Flower.

HIS SOUND:

M O D E L I N G S I D E H U ST L E :

“Yohji Yamamoto has made a lot of clothes for me and invited me to model in Paris and in Tokyo. We share an aesthetic sensibility.” blazer $2,395 shirt $1,045 pants $2,095 Giorgio Armani + vintage beret Hermès sunglasses Melissa Eyewear rings, vintage


Wayne Shorter AGE : 83 The sax he played in his mid1960s prime was as elegant and cutting as a samurai sword. The work included a torrent of solo material (Shorter recorded at least six albums between 1964 and ’65) and a coveted position in Miles Davis’s blockrocking “second great quintet” (with his buddy Herbie on piano). O N S I G H T: “Miles used to say, ‘I can tell whether somebody can play or not by what they wear and how they move in it.’ ” shirt and pants, vintage + necklace Loree Rodkin LEG ACY:

ring and top bracelet David Yurman bottom bracelet Bottega Veneta watch Zenith


Herbie Hancock AG E :

76

GREATEST HITS:

He was a key figure in jazz’s midcentury heyday, then went platinum with the 1973 fusion record Head Hunters, then embraced hip-hop on the smash 1983 single “Rockit,” and then won the Album of the Year Grammy in 2008 for a set of Joni Mitchell covers (with his buddy Wayne on sax). SHOP HARD: “I don’t go shopping that often,” he says. “When I go out, I will get a lot of stuff ’cause I know I’m not gonna do this again for another year and a half. So I will just get everything that I could conceivably want. Spend that fortune!” coat $2,400 Jeffrey Rüdes + shirt $245 Sandro vintage pants Etro hat (on knee) $120 Stetson Cloth Hats & Caps shoes, his own Emporio Armani watch Chopard ring David Yurman sunglasses L.G.R

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Chick Corea AG E :

75

A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING:

Nominated for a staggering 64 Grammys, Corea has embraced the possibilities of both acoustic and electric piano, dabbled in children’s and Latin and classical music, and even recorded a Christmas song with John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John. FIT TER, HAPPIER:

“About five years ago I went on a plant-based diet, and I took off a hundred pounds. You can probably find pictures on the Internet of me when I was 250— I’m now down to 140. I came down from a 44 waist to a 33 waist. None of my clothes fit me anymore; I had to get rid of them all. It felt so good.” jacket $2,495 Ralph Lauren + scarf $175 Paul Smith

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Roy Ayers AGE :

76

Credit Ayers with putting the vibes in vibraphone. Mashing together jazz, funk, and disco boogie, he’s the master of 1970sbachelor-pad grooviness that holds its edge.

M R . S M O OT H :

CA R E E R H I G H L I G H T:

Ayers still believes his slinky hit “Everybody Loves the Sunshine” is the best thing he’s ever done—and Dr. Dre apparently agrees. The song made the soundtrack to last year’s Straight Outta Compton biopic. coat $3,528 Louis Vuitton + sweater $2,895 pants $1,025 Giorgio Armani fedora $240 Worth & Worth by Orlando Palacios necklaces Degs & Sal (top) Renvi ring David Yurman bracelet John Hardy

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I’M JUST A TRAVELING MUSICIAN ENJOYING THE GOOD ROAD. —Roy Ayers


JAZZ IS ONE BIG BAND An abridged guide to the many stellar collaborations between the giants in this portfolio—and beyond

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McCoy Tyner AGE :

77

LEGACY:

A heartbreaking balladeer who defines sophistication on the piano, he also spent years as a sideman to the adventurous John Coltrane, playing on My Favorite Things and Traneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transcendent masterpiece, A Love Supreme. suit $6,395 sweater $595 Ermenegildo Zegna + watch Chopard ring and link bracelet John Hardy cuff bracelet Le Gramme NE X T PAGE

sunglasses Dita Eyewear socks Pantherella loafers, vintage


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Cecil Taylor AGE :

87

P L AY I N G ST Y L E :

Taylor approaches the piano the way Jackson Pollock approached a canvas: with a wild sense of improvisational abandon that borders on violence. MUSIC (AND FASHION)

Never mind that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pushing 90. When Taylor performed this year at the Whitney Museum, he wore a chocolate beanie, ivory shoes, and a satin jacket printed with swirls of regal purple and gold. suit jacket $1,198 vest $598 pants $398 John Varvatos + shirt $195 PS by Paul Smith AS ART:

necklaces, from top Tiffany & Co. Miansai rings Cartier vintage cap Burberry

TKTKTK SEE ADDITIONAL CREDITS.

bracelet and glasses, vintage

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Roy Haynes AG E :

91

PL AYED WITH:

Everyone you’ve ever heard of. For starters: Sonny Rollins, Stan Getz, Thelonious Monk, Eric Dolphy, and Sarah Vaughan. O N E O F O N E : “I was having my clothes made at a young age,” says Haynes, who also drummed with saxophone godhead Charlie Parker back in the 1940s. “Even before I had a good gig, I was having stu≠ made. Some people would come to my gig to see what I was wearing—to see what the little M.F. was wearing.” blazer $2,150 Caruso + turtleneck $375 Boglioli sunglasses Krewe pants and ring, vintage styled by mobolaji dawodu. for additional credits, see page 163.

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WINTER MUSIC

SPEAKER MELTERS Ten Crucial LPs from the Giants in These Pages (and One from the Greatest Bandleader of All) by Hank Shteamer

C E C I L T A Y L OR

Silent Tongues, 1975 •••

Cecil Taylor’s reputation as the granddaddy of free jazz can make you think he’s out to scare audiences away. But as this jawdropping live solo set proves, on a good night, he was actually one of the great crowd-pleasers in American music. On the two marathon tracks that open the album (the first one alone exceeds 18 minutes), he sounds like a player piano gone rogue, zipping madly between low-register thuds and lightning-fast highend runs. Take a cue from the hooting, hollering Montreux audience on Silent Tongues: This is avant-garde party music.

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CH A R L E S L LOY D

Forest Flower, 1967 •••

Forest Flower changed everything for Charles Lloyd. Before this live album became a surprise millionselling hit, he was a soulful jazz saxist following in Coltrane’s footsteps; afterward, he was sharing bills with Janis and Jimi and turning up on Doors and Beach Boys records. But there’s no pandering to pop here: On several lengthy tracks, Lloyd and his band of fellow future stars— including pianist Keith Jarrett and drummer Jack DeJohnette—use breezy themes as launchpads into sky-kissing post-bop ecstasy.

ROY H AY N E S

Out of the Afternoon, 1962 •••

Every single track on this album kicks off with a brief, impeccably cool drum intro, a not-so-subtle reminder that Haynes is the man in charge. Yet Out of the Afternoon offers way more than just cocky shot calling—what makes the album endure is its hip eccentricity. From its mesmerizingly weird cover (was it really necessary to lug all that gear into the woods?) to its inspired choice of personnel (especially the blind multi-instrumental virtuoso Roland Kirk, who could play two horns at once), Afternoon reaches for a sound just beyond the hard-bop norm.


P H A ROA H S A N D E R S

Karma, 1969 •••

The pinnacle of the dashiki era in jazz, and the blueprint for new-school revivalists like Kamasi Washington, Karma is a heady blend of soothing and searing sounds. It seems somehow designed not to be heard so much as felt. On the half-hour album centerpiece “The Creator Has a Master Plan,” Sanders juxtaposes New Age atmospherics—think flutes, shakers, and gospel-ish lead vocals from the yodel-prone Leon Thomas—with volcanic climaxes that hark back to his time spent scandalizing the squares as a member of John Coltrane’s legendarily gritty late-period bands. Karma is where jazz went full Woodstock.

HERBIE H A N COCK

Head Hunters, 1973 •••

“I was tired of everything being heavy,” Herbie Hancock once explained of Head Hunters. He may have lifted the mood on this milestone, but the album’s fierce grooves are anything but soft. From the buttmoving synth strut of “Chameleon” to the remake of Hancock’s early-’60s track “Watermelon Man” (featuring an unforgettable whistle-like hook that percussionist Bill Summers achieved by blowing into a beer bottle), the platinum smash made jazz as danceable as mainstream funk.

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I WAS TIRED OF EVERYTHING BEING HEAVY. I WANTED TO PLAY SOMETHING LIGHTER. —Herbie Hancock

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WAY N E S HO R T E R

Footprints Live!, 2002

T H E S E PA G E S : S E E A D D I T I O N A L C R E D I T S .

•••

Wayne Shorter cut a string of classic solo albums in the mid-’60s while he was still working with Miles Davis. But for our money, his greatest chapter as a bandleader didn’t begin until 2000, when he recorded an electrifying live set that infused key tunes from his back catalog with an almost punk energy. On tracks like “Masqualero,” Shorter sounds like he’s holding on for dear life— and loving every second of it.

MCCOY T Y N E R

The Real McCoy, 1967 •••

By the time the great pianist McCoy Tyner left John Coltrane’s famed quartet in 1965, he was getting obscured by the saxophonist’s increasingly wild and furious sound. So it’s not surprising that Tyner had something to prove on The Real McCoy, the next record he made as a leader. With help from Ron Carter, Trane drummer Elvin Jones, and edgy tenor giant Joe Henderson, Tyner tears into five dramatic originals—perfect tracks to reach for when you need an early-morning rush of aural adrenaline.

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M I L E S DAV I S

Miles Smiles, 1967 •••

If the ultimate bandleader was smiling during the recording of this mid-career masterpiece, it’s because he was leading a crew staffed with young radicals, three of whom are in this magazine— Carter, Hancock, and Shorter—plus the late drum prodigy Tony Williams, whose job description was to knock their boxing-obsessed middleaged boss on his ass every chance they got. The otherworldly calm of 1959’s Kind of Blue is nowhere to be found here; on Shorter originals like “Orbits” and “Dolores,” the band sounds hungry, wired, and hell-bent on musical liberation.

C H I CK COR E A

Now He Sings, Now He Sobs, 1968 •••

Chick Corea had plenty of sideman experience with Herbie Mann and Stan Getz (and one solo record to his name) when he recorded Now He Sings, Now He Sobs, but nothing in his prior work could’ve prepped listeners for this wide-ranging monster. The album takes Bill Evans’s idea of the fully democratic piano trio and turbocharges it: Corea, bassist Miroslav Vitous, and drummer Roy Haynes are three hyperconfident all-stars pushing one another to the brink.

NOTHING IN COREA’S PRIOR WORK COULD’VE PREPPED LISTENERS FOR THIS WIDER ANGING MONSTER.


ROY AYERS

Stoned Soul Picnic, 1968 •••

Before he was playing full-on funk, providing mountains of raw material for sample-hungry beatmakers, Roy Ayers was making supremely fly chill-jazz soundtracks for the blissed-out and baked. Look past Stoned Soul Picnic’s poppy title track and you’ll find a gently trippy set, filled with fluttering flute, heavenly horn arrangements, and the leader’s sparkling vibraphone. When the party is in full swing, you’ll want later Ayers like Red, Black & Green. When it’s time for the comedown, have yourself a Picnic.

R O N CA R T E R

Where?, 1961 PLUS: Alone Together with Jim Hall, 1973 The Low End Theory with A Tribe Called Quest, 1991 •••

Ready to start listening? In collaboration with our friends at Amoeba Music, we’ve bundled an exclusive set of LPs representing every artist in our Jazz Giants portfolio. It’s 11 albums in total, all on high-fidelity vinyl, and available at amoeba.com/gqstyle. At checkout, enter the code GQSTYLE15 to receive 15 percent off the retail price of $305.78.

GQStyle

HOLIDAY 2016

Ron Carter has played bass on so many classics by other artists that his own records—dozens of them, stretching back more than five decades—can be easy to overlook. If you’re just diving in, start at the beginning: Carter’s outside-the-box 1961 debut, on which he doubles on cello, duets with fellow bassist George Duvivier, and trades licks with multi-instrumental radical Eric Dolphy. Beyond his era-defining ’60s work with Miles Davis, the best place to sample Carter’s collaborative side might be on 1973’s Alone Together, the first of several duet LPs he made with late guitar legend Jim Hall. The album’s got a low-key

veneer but tons of swagger below the surface. And don’t forget A Tribe Called Quest’s 1991 track “Verses from the Abstract,” off the group’s aptly titled landmark The Low End Theory, which pairs Q-Tip’s unflappable rhymes with the bass master’s sinfully funky support: Yeah yeah yeah, this one goes out to my man, thanks a lot, Ron Carter on the bass, yes, my man Ron Carter is on the bass…

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HOLIDAY 2016

GQStyle


Additional Credits Page 20. Clockwise from top left: Stuart Tyson; Joss McKinley (2); Josh Dickinson; Bjarne Jonasson; Joss McKinley; Josh Dickinson; Joss McKinley (2); Ian Dickson/ Redferns/Getty Images Page 30. Clockwise from top: courtesy of Patrizia Montanari and RTH Shop; Alan Gwizdowski; courtesy of Paola Kudacki; courtesy of Adolfo Doring Page 49. Tod’s and PS by Paul Smith: Stuart Tyson/prop stylist: Jill Edwards at Halley Resources. All other photographs: Josh Dickinson/prop stylist: Trina Ong at Halley Resources. Page 52. L’Homme Prada and Régime des Fleurs Water/Wood: Stuart Tyson/prop stylist: Jill Edwards at Halley Resources. All other photographs: Josh Dickinson/prop stylist: Trina Ong at Halley Resources. Page 62. Ian Dickson/Redferns/ Getty Images Pages 66–67. From left: courtesy of NOAH; Chris Barham/ANL/ REX/Shutterstock; courtesy of Acne Studios Page 68. From left: Adriano Alecchi/Mondadori Portfolio/ Getty Images; Sergio del Grande/Mondadori Portfolio/ Getty Images Page 69. Top and bottom: courtesy of Missoni (5). Right: courtesy of The Elder Statesman (3). Page 70. Clockwise from top left: courtesy of Acne Studios (4) Page 71. Clockwise from top left: courtesy of Acne Studios; Jorge Monedero/Camera Press/Redux; courtesy of Acne Studios (2) Page 72. Courtesy of NOAH (3) Page 73. Top and bottom: courtesy of NOAH (3). Right: courtesy of Drake’s (3). Pages 80–81. Courtesy of Prada (3) Page 82. Clockwise from top: Bertrand Rindoff Petroff/Getty Images; Maria Valentino/MCV Photo; Pascal Rossignol/Reuters Page 83. Top: courtesy of Owenscorp (3) Page 84. Left: Roxanne Lowit Page 85. Top: courtesy of hl-art. Bottom: courtesy of Jean Paul Gaultier (3). Page 86. Clockwise from top left: courtesy of Armani; firstVIEW (2) Page 87. Bottom: firstVIEW (3) Page 88. Clockwise from top right: courtesy of Dries Van Noten (3); Maria Valentino/MCV Photo; courtesy of Raf Simons (2)

Page 89. Top left: firstVIEW. Bottom: courtesy of Dan Lecca/Condé Nast Archive (3). Pages 100–101. Courtesy of Eric Hanson and the Louis Penfield House Page 102. Richard Brine/ VIEW Page 103. Courtesy of Antoine Lorgnier and Cape Cod Modern House Trust (2) Pages 104–105. From left: courtesy of The Bauhaus Dessau Foundation; Marcus Hoehn/Laif/Redux Pages 106–107. Courtesy of © Jim Alinder from the book The Sea Ranch: Fifty Years of Architecture, Landscape, Place, and Community on the Northern California Coast, Revised Edition, by Donlyn Lyndon and Jim Alinder, published by Princeton Architectural Press, 2013; Saxon Holt Page 108. From top: courtesy of Hôtel Le Corbusier; Fred Marvaux/REA/Redux (2) Page 109. Iain Masterton Pages 110–111. Courtesy of 432 Hermosa (3) Pages 136–155. For Sanders, Lloyd, and Corea, producer: Joy Asbury. Set design: Keith Evans. Grooming: Carissa Ferreri using Lancôme. For Shorter and Hancock, grooming: Tracy Moyer using Suavecito. For Carter, Ayers, Taylor, Tyner, and Haynes, set design: John Robinson. Hair: Barry White for www .barrywhitemensgrooming .com. Grooming: Kumi Craig at The Wall Group. Page 156. Deborah Feingold/ Corbis via Getty Images Page 157. From left: AF Archive/Alamy; Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images Page 158. From left: Mosaic Images/Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images; Roger Ressmeyer/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images Page 159. From top: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images; David Redfern/ Redferns/Getty Images Page 160. From top: Globe Photos/ZumaPress/Alamy; Tom Copi/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images Page 161. From left: David Redfern/Redferns/Getty Images; Ed Perlstein/ Redferns/Getty Images

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WHEN K.DOT MET DOUBLE R

Our cover-story interview between Kendrick Lamar and Rick Rubin took place on September 28, 2016, at Shangri La, Rubin’s legendary Malibu studio (where the Band once lived). To see video footage of the conversation, go to GQStyle.com.

VOLUME 1, NO. 3. GQ Style (ISSN 2471-5393) is published quarterly by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Charles H. Townsend, Chairman; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President & Chief Executive O∞cer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial O∞cer; Jill Bright, Chief Administrative O∞cer. Application to mail at periodicals postage prices is pending at New York, NY, and at additional mailing o∞ces. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. Canada Post: Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: P.O. Box 874, Station Main, Markham, ON L3P 8L4. POSTMASTER: SEND ALL UAA TO CFS (SEE DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to GQ Style, P.O. Box 37673, Boone, IA 50037-2673. FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS, OR BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to GQ Style, P.O. Box 37673, Boone, IA 50037-2673, call 800-289-9330, or e-mail GQStylecustserv@ cdsfulfillment.com. Please give both new and old addresses as printed on most recent label. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to GQ Style Magazine, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. For reprints, please e-mail reprints@condenast.com or call Wright’s Media 877-652-5295. For reuse permissions, please e-mail contentlicensing@condenast.com or call 800-897-8666. Visit us online at www.gqstyle.com. To subscribe to other Condé Nast magazines on the World Wide Web, visit www.condenastdigital.com. Occasionally, we make our subscriber list available to carefully screened companies that o≠er products and services that we believe would interest our readers. If you do not want to receive these o≠ers and/or information, please advise us at P.O. Box 37675, Boone, IA 50037-0675 or call 800-289-9330. GQ STYLE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE RETURN OR LOSS OF, OR FOR DAMAGE OR ANY OTHER INJURY TO, UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS, UNSOLICITED ARTWORK (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, DRAWINGS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND TRANSPARENCIES), OR ANY OTHER UNSOLICITED MATERIALS. THOSE SUBMITTING MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, ARTWORK, OR OTHER MATERIALS FOR CONSIDERATION SHOULD NOT SEND ORIGINALS, UNLESS SPECIFICALLY REQUESTED TO DO SO BY GQ STYLE IN WRITING. MANUSCRIPTS, PHOTOGRAPHS, AND OTHER MATERIALS SUBMITTED MUST BE ACCOMPANIED BY A SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE.

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