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INDIA

16 20

8Special th Anniversary

DS AR AW

OCTOBER 2016 `150

CELEBRATING INDIA’S MOST ACCOMPLISHED GENTLEMEN

TIGER SHROFF PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

YOUTH ICON


ADAR POONAWALLA

ARUNABH KUMAR & BISWAPATI SARKAR

PHILANTHROPIST

DIGITAL DONS

RUCHIR SHARMA

SUDARSHAN SHETTY

GLOBAL INDIAN

ARTIST


WOMAN OF THE YEAR


DLF EMPORIO MALL VASANT KUNJ NEW DELHI 110070 T 011 41033059


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on the same page


CONTENTS 241

GQ MEN OF THE YEAR 2016 Here’s a group of gentlemen who’ve risen above everyone else in their respective fields, and won’t be brought down any time soon.

PHOTO: TARUN VISHWA

242 The Legend: Amitabh Bachchan 244 Philanthropist: Adar Poonawalla 245 Sportsman: Devendra Jhajharia 246 Actor: Ranveer Singh 250 Digital Dons: Arunabh Kumar & Biswapati Sarkar 252 Artist: Sudarshan Shetty 258 Breakthrough Talent: Vicky Kaushal 261 Inspiration: Raghu Rai 268 Global Indian: Ruchir Sharma 269 Businessman: Vijay Shekhar Sharma 270 Designers: Shantanu & Nikhil Mehra 272 Director: Abhishek Chaubey

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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OCTOBER 2016

— 21


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CONTENTS

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

262

WOMAN OF THE YEAR She keeps finding new ways to upend the rules of Bollywood, which puts her in a league of one. By Tarun Vishwa DRESS BY VIVIENNE WESTWOOD. WASPIE BY L’AGENT BY AGENT PROVOCATEUR. EARRINGS BY LOUIS VUITTON

24 —

OCTOBER 2016


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CONTENTS

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

274

MOST STYLISH: SAIF ALI KHAN This guy doesn’t need a stylist. Ever. By Errikos Andreou SUIT BY HARDY AMIES. TURTLENECK JUMPER-BY TOMMY HILFIGER. TROUSERS BY TAILORMAN. POCKET SQUARE BY THE BRO CODE. WATCH BY ROLEX 28 —

OCTOBER 2016


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Contact: (91) 11 4609 2943 Chennai - The Helvetica, Tel (044) 2846 4095/96 Mumbai - Ethos Summit Luxury Boutique. Tel (022) 66151308 New Delhi - Johnson Watch Co. Connaught Place, Tel (011)4151 3110 Johnson Watch Co. South Extension, Tel (011) 4164 6788


CONTENTS

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

254

YOUTH ICON: TIGER SHROFF His explosive debut and millions of diehard followers have raised the bar for success. By Tarun Vishwa COAT BY CORNELIANI. JUMPER BY ETRO. TROUSERS BY SHAHAB DURAZI 34 —

OCTOBER 2016


Contents

336

The nexT episode

How to break the fashion rules this season. By R Burman CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: JUMPER BY SALVATORE FERRAGAMO. TROUSERS BY CORNELIANI. SUNGLASSES BY GIVENCHY JUMPER BY CORNELIANI. SUNGLASSES BY GIVENCHY JUMPER BY SALVATORE FERRAGAMO. SUNGLASSES BY POLAROId

38 —

october 2016


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CONTENTS

62 68 86 92 403 406

Editor’s letter Contributors GQ Digital GQ access Where to buy Open letter

DRIVE

THE GOOD LIFE

95

GQ lunches with the duo behind Mumbai’s trendiest dining spots; All the luxury that matters this month; The next big earworm might just come out of the W Bali

PLAY

113

The Swet Shop Boys are two irreverent brown dudes rapping about social issues; How photographer Waswo X Waswo made sepia cool again; Fan fiction is the reality at Wattpad; Why this London-based indie band is on the line-up at NH7 Weekender; Meraki is the new kid on the VR block; A succint rulebook of social media etiquette; The GQ-vetted TV binge guide; Startups we don’t want to see

STYLE

141

We’ve got our eye on Oxblood Ermenegildo Zegna trainers this month; The GQ way to rock suits + sneakers; Brioni’s bearded, tatted creative director is shaking up haute couture; You should own at least one of these bombers; Timetravelling with designer Peter D’Ascoli; Wallets that can buy you happiness; Meet the guys behind cult sneaker label Common Projects; All the black-tie tips you need from Van Heusen + GQ Fashion Nights; Top picks from the style desk

WATCH

189

All the deets on Cartier’s new Drive collection; Swiss watch brand Tissot’s got a thing for sports; Hrithik Roshan talks time and watches

44 —

OCTOBER 2016

217

The Chiron is a worthy successor to the legendary Veyron; Aston Martin goes full-speed on a collab with fashion house Hackett London; What Jose Mourinho thinks of the Jaguar F-Pace

GQ TALK

291

291 Humour: Bengalis love and loathe Durga Puja in equal measure. By Sandip Roy 294 City: Byculla is Mumbai’s coolest ’hood. By Alisha Sadikot 298 Music: Classical music and hip-hop have a lot more in common than you think. By Lindsay Pereira 302 Sport: The US Open really loves its underdogs. By Aditya Iyer

FEATURES 202 The art of the reveal A ghostwriter’s tale of the man behind Trump. By Jane Mayer 232 The Zenzi movement Remembering the underground bar in Bandra that started it all. By Bhanuj Kappal

312 The last days of Sumner Why controversy will follow Sumner Redstone to the grave and beyond. By Michael Wolff 320 Zayn’s new direction It involves tricked-out utility pants and super slick kicks. By Anders Overgaard 330 The GQ Guide to Parenting How to successfully manipulate your tykes. By Rami Niemi 348 Time of your life Watches that are more than just timekeepers. By Edward Urrutia 362 The Gentlemen’s Club Pune’s sharpest men tell us what makes the city so laid-back. By Dave Besseling 370 The encyclopaedia of Matt Damon Everything you need to know about Hollywood’s favourite star. By Sebastian Kim

GROOMING

382

The raddest hair gods of all time; Charcoal is the new black in grooming; Rock ’n’ roll designer John Varvatos’ 10 basic rules for

278 Universal soldier What it means to be part of the legendary Gurkhas. By Aarti Betigeri

looking good


NEW DELHI DLF Emporio 011 4604 0713/31 BANGALORE UB City 080 4173 8997/98 / MUMBAI Palladium 022 4009 8685/86 H Y D E R A B A D Ta j K r i s h n a 0 4 0 6 6 3 6 5 1 1 2 / 1 3 / KO L K ATA Q u e s t 0 3 3 4 0 0 0 4 6 4 3


CONTENTS ON THE COVERS

INDIA

DS AR AW

OCTOBER 2016 `150

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8th Anniversary Special

AMITABH BACHCHAN PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

CELEBRATING INDIA’S MOST ACCOMPLISHED GENTLEMEN

DEVENDRA JHAJHARIA

SPORTSMAN

AMITABH BACHCHAN Photographed by Tarun Vishwa

SHANTANU & NIKHIL MEHRA

DESIGNERS

Look by Tom Ford (archives)

Mr

Bachchan THE LEGEND

Kangana

WOMAN OF THE YEAR

ADAR POONAWALLA

PHILANTHROPIST

ABHISHEK CHAUBEY

DIRECTOR

ADAR POONAWALLA Photographed by Arsh Sayed Shirt by Dior Homme. Tie by Giorgio Armani. Tie bar, Pocket square; both by The Tie Hub

INDIA

DEVENDRA JHAJHARIA Photographed by Adil Hasan

DS AR AW

OCTOBER 2016 `150

16 20

8

th Anniversary Special CELEBRATING INDIA’S MOST ACCOMPLISHED GENTLEMEN

DEVENDRA JHAJHARIA

Kangana

WOMAN OF THE YEAR

VIJAY SHEKHAR SHARMA

BUSINESSMAN

Suit by Paul Smith. Shirt by Corneliani. Tie by SS Homme. Tie bar by The Tie Hub

VICKY KAUSHAL

BREAKTHROUGH TALENT

KANGANA RANAUT PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

SPORTSMAN

Ranveer

ACTOR OF THE YEAR

RAGHU RAI

INSPIRATION

RANVEER SINGH Photographed by Tarun Vishwa Jumper, Trousers, Shoes; all by Ermenegildo Zegna. Watch by Bvlgari

INDIA

AW 16 20 DS

OCTOBER 2016 `150

8

th Anniversary Special CELEBRATING INDIA’S MOST ACCOMPLISHED GENTLEMEN

RUCHIR SHARMA

GLOBAL INDIAN

RANVEER SINGH PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

Ranveer

SHANTANU & NIKHIL MEHRA

DESIGNERS

WOMAN OF THE YEAR

ACTOR OF THE YEAR

ABHISHEK CHAUBEY

DIRECTOR

SUDARSHAN SHETTY

ARTIST

DS AR AW

OCTOBER 2016 `150

CELEBRATING INDIA’S MOST ACCOMPLISHED GENTLEMEN

ADAR POONAWALLA

PHILANTHROPIST

ARUNABH KUMAR & BISWAPATI SARKAR

DIGITAL DONS

TIGER SHROFF PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

WOMAN OF THE YEAR

SUDARSHAN SHETTY

ARTIST

On Biswapati: Suit by Brooks Brothers. Shirt by Dior Homme. Tie, Tie bar, Pocket square; all by The Tie Hub

DS AR AW

OCTOBER 2016 `150

16 20

Blazer by Canali. Shirt, Trousers; both by Philipp Plein. Bow tie by SS Homme

8

th Anniversary Special CELEBRATING INDIA’S MOST ACCOMPLISHED GENTLEMEN

SAIF ALI KHAN PHOTOGRAPHED BY ERRIKOS ANDREOU

50 —

ARUNABH KUMAR & BISWAPATI SARKAR

DIGITAL DONS

Saif

Turtleneck jumper by Etro. Trousers by Shahab Durazi VICKY KAUSHAL Photographed by Suresh Natarajan

INDIA

MOST STYLISH

RAGHU RAI

INSPIRATION

OCTOBER 2016

VICKY KAUSHAL

BREAKTHROUGH TALENT

VIJAY SHEKHAR SHARMA

BUSINESSMAN

Kangana

WOMAN OF THE YEAR

Shirt by Corneliani. Bow tie by Dior Homme. Tie, Pocket square; both by The Tie Hub SHANTANU & NIKHIL MEHRA Photographed by Tarun Vishwa

On them: Menswear by Shantanu & Nikhil ABHISHEK CHAUBEY Photographed by Prabhat Shetty

SAIF ALI KHAN Photographed by Errikos Andreou

YOUTH ICON RUCHIR SHARMA

VIJAY SHEKHAR SHARMA Photographed by Adil Hasan

On Arunabh: Suit by Kenneth Cole. Shirt by Emporio Armani. Tie, Pocket square; both by The Bro Code

TIGER SHROFF Photographed by Tarun Vishwa GLOBAL INDIAN

Suit, Shirt; both by Corneliani. Bow Tie by The Tie Hub

Suit by Brooks Brothers. Shirt by Thomas Pink. Tie by The Bro Code. Scarf by Roberto Cavalli

Suit, Shirt; both by Kenneth Cole. Scarf by Ermenegildo Zegna. Tie, Pocket square; both by The Tie Hub

16 20

8

th Anniversary Special

RUCHIR SHARMA Photographed by Prabhat Shetty

ARUNABH KUMAR & BISWAPATI SARKAR Photographed by Prabhat Shetty

SUDARSHAN SHETTY Photographed by Prabhat Shetty

INDIA

Bodysuit by Agent Provocateur. Trousers by Stella McCartney. Cuffs by Hermès

RAGHU RAI Photographed by Tarun Vishwa KANGANA RANAUT Photographed by Tarun Vishwa

Suit by Tailorman. Turtleneck jumper by Tommy Hilfiger. Pocket square by The Bro Code


EDITOR

MANAGING EDITOR Maniza

Bharucha

FASHION DIRECTOR Vijendra ART DIRECTOR Mihir

Bhardwaj

Shah

PHOTO DIRECTOR Gizelle DEPUTY EDITORS

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Arjun

Che Kurrien

Cordo

Shikha Sethi, Dave Besseling

DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR Vivek LIFESTYLE EDITOR Megha AUTO & WATCH EDITOR Varun ASSISTANT EDITOR Nidhi FASHION FEATURES EDITOR SENIOR COPY EDITOR

Surve

Shah Godinho

MARKETING DIRECTOR Oona Dhabhar SENIOR MARKETING MANAGER Komal Puri ASSISTANT MARKETING MANAGER Aditi Sharma SENIOR MARKETING EXECUTIVE Roshni Chandiramani

Shivangi Lolayekar

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR – SUBSCRIPTIONS Bindu Nambiar AGM – ADMIN & SUBSCRIPTIONS OPS Boniface D’Souza ASSISTANT MANAGER – SUBSCRIPTIONS Radhika Dani

Vritti Rashi Goel

JUNIOR FASHION EDITOR

Tanya Vohra

SYNDICATIONS MANAGER Michelle SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Richa

PHOTO ASSISTANT Fawzia SYNDICATIONS COORDINATORS Giselle

ASSISTANT MANAGER – PR Amrita Hom Ray

Channa

HEAD – EVENTS Fritz Fernandes ASSISTANT MANAGER – EVENTS Khushnaz Daruwala

Pereira

CREATIVE DIRECTOR – PRINT PROMOTIONS Dipti Soonderji Mongia ASSOCIATE PROMOTIONS EDITOR Sherrie A Marker SENIOR PROMOTIONS WRITER Kinjal Vora SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Malavika Jadhav, Karishma Gupta COPY EDITOR AND WRITER – PROMOTIONS Karishma Mehrotra GRAPHIC DESIGNER Varun Patil

Khonde

Megha Mehta

FASHION BOOKINGS EDITOR

Khan

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR – CIRCULATION Anindita Ghosh MANAGER – ALLIANCES Kosha Gala CIRCULATION COORDINATOR Jeeson Kollannur

D’Mello, Dalreen Furtado

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Vidisha FASHION ASSISTANT Desiree

Srinivasan

DIGITAL EDITOR Rochelle

SENIOR WRITER (DIGITAL) Arun PHOTO RESEARCHER (DIGITAL)

Pinto

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR – BRAND SOLUTIONS Poonam Tharar PLANNING MANAGER Alisha Goriawala

Zonunpuii

HEAD – HUMAN RESOURCES Arundhati Kumar ASSOCIATE MANAGER – HUMAN RESOURCES Disha Makharia

Venkatraman

Simone Dhondy

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT (DIGITAL)

FINANCE DIRECTOR Vishandas Hardasani FINANCIAL CONTROLLER Rakesh Shetty SENIOR ACCOUNTANT Dattaprasanna Bhagwat ACCOUNTANTS Anthony Paulose, Nitin Chavan

Fernandes

ASSISTANT EDITOR (DIGITAL) Pauline

DIGITAL WRITER

DIGITAL MONETIZATION DIRECTOR Rohit Gandhi SENIOR MANAGER – DIGITAL BRAND SOLUTIONS (BENGALURU) Anitha Ramabhadran SENIOR ADVERTISING MANAGER – DIGITAL (NEW DELHI) Kritika Sharma COMMERCIAL MANAGER – DIGITAL Ishani Roychoudhary BRAND SOLUTIONS (BENGALURU) Madhavi Varanasi AD OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE Vartika Sohal

Gupta

FASHION STYLIST (LONDON) Ravneet

Sanika Waglay

Surekha Rao

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER (DIGITAL) PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Amit

Anita Dake

Navarange

SENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER Sunil COMMERCIAL PRODUCTION MANAGER

Mehra

PUBLISHER Almona Bhatia ADVERTISING DIRECTORS Kapil Kapoor (New Delhi), Charu Adajania SENIOR ADVERTISING MANAGERS Mala Kashyap, Amit Gokhale ASSISTANT ADVERTISING MANAGERS (NEW DELHI) Siddhartha Swarup, Medhavi Nain ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Jainik Avlani ITALY SALES REPRESENTATIVE Angelo Carredu US ADVERTISING MANAGER Alessandro Cremona MIDDLE EAST SALES REPRESENTATIVE IAS Media

Nayak

DIGITAL DIRECTOR Gaurav Mishra DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR Kiran Suryanarayana SOLUTIONS ARCHITECT Santosh Bhagat PRODUCT ARCHITECT Vishal Modh UX DESIGNER Anurag Jain TECHNOLOGY PROJECT MANAGERS Amrita Sudheendran, Dipak Raghuwanshi DATA TECHNOLOGY MANAGER Shanky D’souza AD TECH MANAGER Saket Sinha AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Saurabh Garg MANAGER – DATA ANALYTICS Udit Jain ASSISTANT MANAGER – AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Neha Mathew SENIOR EXECUTIVE – VIDEO MARKETING Shruti Sen SENIOR EXECUTIVE – AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Tanishta Singh

Sudeep Pawar

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

ASSOCIATE BRAND SOLUTIONS DIRECTOR Abhishek Mehrotra MANAGING EDITOR – DIGITAL BRANDED CONTENT Nisha Samson

Anish Trivedi

ASSISTANT MANAGER – DIGITAL BRAND SOLUTIONS Rukmini Guha

Iain Ball

HEAD – ENTERPRISE IT Prem Kumar Tiwari DIRECTOR – VIDEO Anita Horam CREATIVE PRODUCER Ishita Bahadur

Karan Johar Rajeev Masand

ASSISTANT CREATIVE PRODUCER Mehek Azmathulla

Suhel Seth

EA TO MANAGING DIRECTOR Andrea D’souza

MANAGER – PARTNERSHIPS Janvi Morzaria

MANAGING DIRECTOR Alex

Kuruvilla

Conde Nast India Pvt. Ltd. MUMBAI 2nd Floor, Darabshaw House, Shoorji Vallabhdas Marg, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400 001, India Tel: +91 22 6611 9000 Fax: +91 22 6611 9001 NEW DELHI Unit No. 503-B, 5th Floor, Salcon Rasvilas, Plot No. D-1, Saket District Centre, New Delhi 110017, India Tel: +91 11 4066 9000 Fax: +91 11 4066 9001 DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR, CONDE NAST UK

Albert Read Coleridge

PRESIDENT, CONDE NAST INTERNATIONAL LTD. Nicholas

RNI.NO.: MAHENG/2008/27014. Printed and published by Almona Bhatia on behalf of Conde Nast India Pvt. Ltd. Printed at Thomson Press India Ltd., 18/35, Delhi-Mathura Road, Faridabad — 121 007, Haryana and published at 2nd Floor, Darabshaw House, Shoorji Vallabhdas Marg, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400 001. Editor: CJ Kurrien. Processed at Commercial Reprographers. Distributed by Living Media Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is strictly prohibited. All prices are correct at the time of going to press but are subject to change. Manuscripts, drawings and other materials must be accompanied by a stamped addressed envelope. However, GQ cannot be responsible for unsolicited material. CHAIRMAN, CONDE NAST INTERNATIONAL LTD.

54 —

OCTOBER 2016

Jonathan Newhouse


SABYASACHI C A L C U T TA


Scan the QR code below to get your digital edition

In the USA: Condé Nast CHAIRMAN EMERITUS: S.I. Newhouse, Jr. CHAIRMAN: Charles H. Townsend PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER: Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr. ARTISTIC DIRECTOR: Anna Wintour

In other countries: Condé Nast International CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE: Jonathan Newhouse PRESIDENT: Nicholas Coleridge VICE PRESIDENTS: Giampaolo Grandi, James Woolhouse, Moritz von Laffert, Elizabeth Schimel CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER: Wolfgang Blau PRESIDENT, ASIA-PACIFIC: James Woolhouse PRESIDENT, NEW MARKETS AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, BRAND DEVELOPMENT: Karina Dobrotvorskaya DIRECTOR OF PLANNING: Jason Miles DIRECTOR OF ACQUISITIONS AND INVESTMENTS: Moritz von Laffert

Global

INDIA

PRESIDENT, CONDÉ NAST E-COMMERCE: Franck Zayan EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CONDÉ NAST GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT: Jamie Bill DS AR AW

OCTOBER 2016 `150

16 20

8th Anniversary Special CELEBRATING INDIA’S MOST ACCOMPLISHED GENTLEMEN

The Condé Nast Group of Brands includes: US: Vogue, Vanity Fair, Glamour, Brides, Self, GQ, GQ Style, The New Yorker, Condé Nast Traveler, Allure, Architectural Digest, Bon Appétit, Epicurious, Wired, W, Golf Digest, Teen Vogue, Ars Technica, Condé Nast Entertainment, The Scene, Pitchfork UK: Vogue, House & Garden, Brides, Tatler, The World of Interiors, GQ, Vanity Fair, Condé Nast Traveller, Glamour, Condé Nast Johansens, GQ Style, Love, Wired, Condé Nast College of Fashion & Design, Ars Technica France: Vogue, Vogue Hommes International, AD, Glamour, Vogue Collections, GQ, AD Collector, Vanity Fair, Vogue Travel in France, GQ Le Manuel du Style, Glamour Style

YOUTH ICON

Italy: Vogue, L’Uomo Vogue, Vogue Bambini, Glamour, Vogue Sposa, AD, Condé Nast Traveller, GQ, Vanity Fair, Wired, Vogue Accessory, La Cucina Italiana, CNLive Germany: Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Myself, Wired Spain: Vogue, GQ, Vogue Novias, Vogue Niños, Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue Colecciones, Vogue Belleza, Glamour, AD, Vanity Fair Japan: Vogue, GQ, Vogue Girl, Wired, Vogue Wedding Taiwan: Vogue, GQ Mexico and Latin America: Vogue Mexico and Latin America, Glamour Mexico and Latin America, AD Mexico, GQ Mexico and Latin America, Vanity Fair Mexico India: Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, AD

Published under Joint Venture: Brazil: Vogue, Casa Vogue, GQ, Glamour, GQ Style Russia: Vogue, GQ, AD, Glamour, GQ Style, Tatler, Condé Nast Traveller, Allure

Published under License or Copyright Cooperation:

What a man’s got to do

Australia: Vogue, Vogue Living, GQ Bulgaria: Glamour China: Vogue, Vogue Collections, Self, AD, Condé Nast Traveler, GQ, GQ Style, Brides, Condé Nast Center of Fashion & Design Czech Republic and Slovakia: La Cucina Italiana Hungary: Glamour Iceland: Glamour Korea: Vogue, GQ, Allure, W, GQ Style Middle East: Condé Nast Traveller, AD, Vogue Café at The Dubai Mall, GQ Bar Dubai Poland: Glamour Portugal: Vogue, GQ Romania: Glamour Russia: Vogue Café Moscow, Tatler Club Moscow South Africa: House & Garden, GQ, Glamour, House & Garden Gourmet, GQ Style The Netherlands: Glamour, Vogue Thailand: Vogue, GQ, Vogue Lounge Bangkok Turkey: Vogue, GQ, Condé Nast Traveller, La Cucina Italiana, GQ Style, Glamour Ukraine: Vogue, Vogue Café Kiev


Letter from the Editor

EIGHT BALL DS AR AW 16 20

CHE KURRIEN Editor

62 —

SEPTEMBER 2016

PHOTO: MAX HERMANS/THOMPSON PHOTO IMAGERY (CHE)

 

elcome to the GQ Men of the Year Awards: the slickest, most potent awards ceremony on the Indian media calendar. From billionaire business barons to creative mavens and movie star moguls, these awards bring together a diverse line-up of Indian overachievers for an evening brimming with witty speeches, bonhomie and champagne-fuelled celebration. These awards are held in most countries where GQ is published – and are congregations of the most influential personalities on the planet. This year’s winners from India include an array of extraordinary gentlemen (as well as one special woman) who will join a global fraternity that includes Barack Obama, Leonardo DiCaprio, Martin Scorsese, Lewis Hamilton and Tom Ford. We’ve also pulled out all the stops to produce a stellar set of stories for this, our eighth anniversary issue. This includes a compelling feature on the Gorkhas, that explores the role of this fierce Nepali tribe of warriors in a globalized, post-Empire world; a flashback piece that shows how Bandra’s explosion into hipsterism can be largely traced to a single, folkloric nightclub; the big GQ guide to parenting in the modern world; and a riveting read that in some sense pinpoints the rise of the Donald Trump phenomenon back to a GQ cover in the mid-Eighties. Not to mention one of the strongest MOTY shoot portfolios that we’ve ever had. Boom. So enjoy the anniversary issue and stay tuned for the coverage of GQ India’s Men of the Year Awards 2016 on Star World, mid-October. We’ve dialled up the quality of the broadcast this year, and are presenting the show in an exciting new narrative structure just to mix things up. And you certainly won’t want to miss Ranveer Singh’s Dsquared2 getup or impressionistic acceptance speech. What a guy!


TO BREAK THE RULES, YOU MUST FIRST MASTER THEM. THE VALLÉE DE JOUX. FOR MILLENNIA A HARSH, UNYIELDING ENVIRONMENT; AND SINCE 1875 THE HOME OF AUDEMARS PIGUET, IN THE VILLAGE OF LE BRASSUS. THE EARLY WATCHMAKERS WERE SHAPED HERE, IN AWE OF THE FORCE OF NATURE YET DRIVEN TO MASTER ITS MYSTERIES THROUGH THE COMPLEX MECHANICS OF THEIR CRAFT. STILL TODAY THIS PIONEERING SPIRIT INSPIRES US TO CONSTANTLY CHALLENGE THE CONVENTIONS OF FINE WATCHMAKING.

ROYAL OAK CHRONOGRAPH IN STAINLESS STEEL

DELHI KAPOOR WATCH CO 243-A EMPORIO MALL 1ST FLOOR TEL: (9111) 4676 7777 MUMBAI TIME AVENUE 189 TURNER RD TEL: (9122) 2651 5858 AUDEMARSPIGUET.COM


CONTRIBUTORS VIJENDRA BHARDWAJ WHO: Fashion Director, GQ India. Instagram @vijendra.bhardwaj WHAT: Styles the 2016 Men of the Year shoots, page 241 SMOOTH SAILING: “It’s always good when shoots happen with no bumps or crazy incidents. When it comes to Ranveer Singh, though, unexpected’s the norm – this was my third time working with him, and he was an absolute riot. He got everyone pumped up with some incredible shots.”

TARUN VISHWA WHO: Photographer WHAT: Behind the lens for our Youth Icon of the Year shoot with Tiger Shroff, page 254 MOVER & SHAKER: “It was fantastic to work with Tiger – what that man can do with his body is amazing! For one shot, he casually swung his leg all the way up to do a standing split, and held it for almost half a minute. That takes a lot of strength.”

SEBASTIAN KIM

SANDIP ROY WHO: Author of Don’t Let Him Know. Journalist. Twitter @sandipr WHAT: Gives us a quintessentially Bengali spin on Durga Puja and the Indian festival season, page 291 TRADITIONS: “I always try to leave town for a vacation during this time. But if I am home, then I keep plenty of digestive aids with me and enjoy Durga Puja at someone’s home, where family and friends converge from far and beyond.”

WHO: Photographer. Instagram @sebastiankimstudio WHAT: “The encyclopaedia of Matt Damon”, page 370 DAREDEVILRY: “Matt Damon is a pleasure to work with because he’s game for anything – like running across a street full of cars when the producer tells him not to. We got a great shot out of it.”

PRABHAT SHETTY WHO: Photographer. Instagram @prabhatshetty WHAT: 2016’s Digital Dons, TVF’S Arunabh Kumar and Biswapati Sarkar, page 250 FOOD FOR THOUGHT: “These guys are brilliant in their innovativeness, and the shoot reflects this – who’d have thought a watermelon slice would make a good pocket square?” 68 —

OCTOBER 2016


SMALL PERFECTIONS MAKE GREAT IMPRESSIONS Whether you’re trying to get the attention of a certain lady or making a presentation to acquire new business, it only takes a tenth of second for someone to evaluate you. Together with Mercedes-Benz, we bring you a list to show you how to be your absolute best


ACCELERATE THE RIGHT ATTITUDE

DRESS FOR POWER

Body language, tone of voice, choice of words and facial expressions – together and apart – speak volumes about your approach. You want to come across as powerful yet empathetic, self-assured but not arrogant. Maintain eye contact, lean in to show interest. Wear a smile. Be confident, avoid fidgeting and don’t cross your arms in front you.

It has been said a million times before that the right suit exudes sheer power. But when it comes to this sartorial piece, fit is everything. It should hug your shoulders and not hang from them. Taper the sleeves and trousers. Wear a crisp dress shirt and complement the look with a pocket square that matches the colour of your tie. Overlooking details is not an option.

GET THE RIGHT GEAR Within that fraction of a second when you’re in the midst of putting the best of yourself forward, trust us when we say that the accessories you wear and carry, from your shoes, watch and tie to your belt, cufflinks and even pen, make a massive difference. Pick up pieces that are conversation starters. Go for classic, understated elegance, instead of flashy. It never fails to impress.

DRIVE THE MERCEDES-BENZ C-CLASS BECAUSE THE BEST KNOWS NO ALTERNATIVE Ultimately, it all boils down to the car you drive. And it can’t be anything but a C-Class. Every single element and detail is thoroughly thought through. From its sporty yet stylish exterior and svelte interiors to its innovative features and embellishments, everything is crafted to deliver an impression of elegance and power.

GROOM VROOM Nothing kills a first impression like an ungroomed appearance. So make sure your hairstyle works with your personality. If you have a beard, trim it regularly. If you’re clean shaven, show your skin some TLC with a good aftershave moisturizer. Find your signature scent. Musk top notes usually work best and, for the love of God, carry breath mints.


CONTRIBUTORS ADITYA IYER WHO: Sports writer. Twitter @i_and_iy WHAT: The magic of 2016 US Open underdog Juan Martín del Potro, page 302 JOINING THE UNDERDOG CLUB: “The champion of them all would have to be Fabrice ‘The Magician’ Santoro, for his incredible longevity and success over the top players of the Nineties and Noughties, despite his wildly inadequate technique. Also, the unheralded Lucas Pouille, 22, taming two-time US Open champ Rafa Nadal in five sets in the fourth round.”

WHO: Art Director, GQ India WHAT: The 2016 Men of the Year special, page 241 IN TECHNICOLOR: “Even though this year’s theme is black and white, the personalities we’ve chosen are very vibrant. Take Ranveer Singh, who breathes life into every character he plays. Or designers Shantanu & Nikhil, who with their historic opening show for GQ Fashion Nights in 2015 gave us all goosebumps, and are revamping men’s fashion in India. Then there’s the National Award-winning Kangana, who only gets sexier every time we shoot her.”

ANDERS OVERGAARD WHO: Photographer. Instagram @andersovergaardphotography WHAT: Gets Zayn moving in cargo pants and high-tops, page 320 TURN IT UP: “Musicians are fun to shoot, especially when they decide to give the crew a mini concert – like Zayn did with his guitar.“

MIHIR SHAH

RID BURMAN WHO: Photographer. Instagram @ridburman WHAT: Shoots the season’s coolest rule-breaking fashion, page 336 IT’S A MAD WORLD: “When food, good style and GQ’s fashion team are part of the shoot, there’s always something crazy going on. Like models stepping on candy or, American Pie-style, mashing up fruit tarts.“

WHO: Freelance writer. Contributing editor, Vogue India. Instagram/Twitter @pahullbains WHAT: Interviews rapping duo The Swet Shop Boys, page 113 LISTEN NOW: “My favourite song from the Swet Shop Boys’ album Cashmere is undoubtedly “Din-eIlahi”. The title alone – the name of a syncretic religion drawing largely from Hinduism and Islam, founded by Akbar in the 1500s – is on point as far as the themes of the album and the duo itself go. And I like that while the majority of the songs on the album ring out loud with bravado or angst, this one swells with vulnerability and emotion. It’s a completely different trip.” 74 —

OCTOBER 2016

PHOTO: ANKITA CHANDRA (PAHULL)

PAHULL BAINS


Vermillion

M-66 Greater Kailash-1 Market New Delhi 110048 T: 41634788 29231155 JMD The Empire Square MG Road Gurgaon Next to Bristol Hotel T: 0124-2889101/02 For Appointment Call: 9873173456 W: www.sunilmehra.co.in E: contact@sunilmehra.co.in


MEGHA MEHTA

CONTRIBUTORS

WHO: Fashion Bookings Editor, GQ India. Instagram @magzmehta WHAT: Produces our 2016 Men of the Year shoots, page 241 OLD-SCHOOL COOL: “Black-and-white is timeless. We were shooting such strong personalities – and this classic theme brought out the best in them.”

BHANUJ KAPPAL WHO: Freelance culture vulture. Twitter @stonerjesus WHAT: Reminisces about one of Mumbai’s seminal nightspots and music incubators of the Noughties, page 232 THE NEXT BIG THING: “I think Bengaluru, with its plethora of post-rock bands and lo-fi bedroom producers, is putting out some of the most exciting, forwardlooking music in the country.”

AARTI BETIGERI WHO: Australian multi-platform journalist based out of Delhi. Instagram/Twitter @pomegranita WHAT: Visits the training grounds for the legendary, fearless Gurkhas, page 278 NOT YOUR USUAL: “I’ve always found Nepalis to be gentle and polite, so it was somewhat amusing to meet these retired soldiers, who look like kindly granddads and enjoy gardening, pull out a kukri and demonstrate how they would use it on an enemy.”

KASHMIRA SARODE WHO: Illustrator. Instagram @kashmira_sarode WHAT: Puts a graphic spin on our column about Durga Puja, page 291 NOT JUST FOR DURGA PUJA: “The Sarafa night bazaar in Indore is a must-visit for food lovers – especially during Diwali.”

ABHISHEK BALI WHO: Photographer. Instagram @abhishekbaliphoto WHAT: Captures the Gurkhas-in-training in Nepal, page 278 SUBJECTS: “It was raining the evening we were in Pokhara and I could see some of the candidates doing last minute training and preparations for the British recruitment process the next day. The commitment they had to becoming Gurkhas – which has one of the most difficult training programmes in the world – was inspiring. My camera got wet while I was photographing them, but it was worth it.”

80 —

OCTOBER 2016


WHAT’S NEW ON

INDIA

com

FOR THE LATEST STYLE ADVICE, PRODUCT PICKS AND BREAKING NEWS, FOLLOW THE TEAM ON...

25 BEST SNEAKERS TO BUY RIGHT NOW

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INSIDE THE HOTTEST PARTY OF THE YEAR

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THE MEN WHO COULD TEACH JAMES BOND A LESSON IN STATEMENT DRESSING

10 CELEBRITIES AND THE WATCHES THEY WEAR

GUESS HOW MANY AUDEMARS PIGUET TIMEPIECES SACHIN TENDULKAR OWNS

86 —

OCTOBER 2016

PHOTO: PRASAD NAIK (SACHIN), DABBOO RATNANI (HRITHIK), ERRIKOS ANDREOU (RAHUL)

THE MOMENTS YOU DON���T WANT TO MISS


IWC PORTUGIESER. THE LEGEND AMONG ICONS.

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p o w e r s o f a t t r a c t i o n a r e a l m o s t s e l fexplanator y. Af ter all, legends are simply IWC . ENGINEERED FOR MEN . irresistible. Mechanical movement, Pellaton automatic winding, IWC-manufactured 52615 calibre, 7-day power reserve, Power reserve display, Perpetual calendar with displays for the date, day, month, year in four digits and perpetual moon phase for the northern and southern hemispheres, Sapphire glass, Seethrough sapphire-glass back, Water-resistant 3 bar, Diameter 44.2 mm, Alligator leather strap by Santoni

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ACCESS

YOUR EXCLUSIVE PASS TO THE MOST HAPPENING PARTIES AND EVENTS

A delicious spread courtesy of Alto Vino

Sagar Chordia, Ruchi & Anshul Goel

AN EVENING TO REMEMBER

WHAT: GQ Gentlemen’s Club WHERE: Bar 101 & Alto Vino, JW Marriott, Pune The GQ Gentlemen’s Club, in partnership with Ermenegildo Zegna and Audi, saw some of Pune’s most distinguished citizens gather for a convivial evening of conversation, style, fine food and drink. The warm and rarefied setting was a perfect reflection of the burgeoning city that is Pune.

Almona Bhatia & Ajinkya Firodia

Manish & Manisha Jaitha

Rohit Rathi

Niraj Khinvasara, Shikha & Dhiraj Kochhar with Dave Besseling

Umeed Kothavala & Khodu Irani

Sanjog & Sonika Shah

Dushyant Thakkar & Surabhi Negi Sanjana Patwardhan

Aditya Bhartia

Deepika Rathi, Aparna Firodia & Shribala Chordia Govind Thakkar

Krishna Mohan

Jaideep Patwardhan 92 —

The Ermenegildo Zegna display

Mallika Chatterjee, Indraneel Benadikar & Ramandeep Marwah OCTOBER 2016

Tasneem & Gaurav Gadhoke

The Audi TT


EDITED BY M EG H A S HA H

THE

ALL THAT’S HOT THIS MONTH//THE NEW BREED OF CREATIVE HOTELS

Power

LUNCH with

RYAN AND KEENAN THAM

After Henry Thams, Trilogy and Koko, and over hot edamame soup, the princes of party reveal to Megha Shah plans for their newest nightspot, which they believe Mumbai badly needs

LOCATION: KOKO, MUMBAI

Photographed by Manish Mansinh

1:40  

pm on a Thursday, it turns out, is too early for Ryan and Keenan to be talking shop. They roll into the winding Kamala Mills compound in a black Porsche, squinting at the fairly cloudy sky, about 40 minutes late, but appropriately apologetic. “It’s a part of the business. I’m a night person, my day starts late,” Keenan offers. 

OCTOBER 2016

— 95


We are at Koko, their shiny new bar, which right now glowers with masculinity, dark wood tables and plush velvet chairs. But on weekends, it flaunts its glamorous side. Shopping bags from Burberry and Gucci are parked under the tables, the first salvos of gossip loosed and the claim of world-standard cocktails by Parisian mixologist Dimi Lezinska playfully tested. Through much of our lunch, Ryan, elder by two years, responds to my attempts at conversation monosyllabically, and sometimes the syllable is a goodnatured grunt. He’s also the taller of the two, but has scooched down lazily into his seat, making him seem a little shorter and a lot more insouciant. Keenan, 32, has a cold, but is making an effort to look bright, often throwing uncomfortable glances at his brother’s indolence. “He needs a couple of coffees first. Once it’s about 4pm, he’ll be talkative.” In the days leading up to this lunch, I discovered a startlingly sizeable number of my friends and acquaintances have partied with one or both of them, or knows someone who has partied with one or both of them. Their mention evokes a similar response. First a round of echoes, “What a great guy”, “He’s a legend”, “They’re legit” and then a distant look, along with a chuckle and a shake of the head, signalling 96 —

october 2016

Power

lunch

with

When you see them working the crowd at their club, you realize it's a talent

the reliving of a particularly crazy memory. They range from 3am escapades at Trilogy to witnessing one of their poker nights at an affluent South Bombay kid’s home, where lakhs of rupees are won or lost in a matter of minutes. But when you see them working the crowd at their club, surrounded by their bro circle of trust, you realize their knack of always “knowing how to bring it” is a talent, as much a part of their job as doing the accounts. But it’s not the result of a business move, rather a charm born out of a genuine love for wanting to have a good time, which naturally extends onto their brand. They also tend to have a sense about what the city needs at the correct time. The now-shuttered Henry Thams – Colaba’s other iconic Chinese eatery – opened over a decade ago, positioning itself at the other extreme of Ling’s Pavilion’s pronounced kitsch. There were six-course menus, snazzy prices, a lack of red tassels and golden dragons for decoration, and a full-fledged

bar, which took over on the weekends, transforming the place into a trendy lounge. “We came back from studying in Australia after Henry Thams was launched, and decided we would take over the bar and give it a whole new feel.” It worked. They made Chinese food cooler than it already was, and Henry Thams became one of the first examples of the nowinescapable resto-bar. “This was before Insomnia, before most of the ‘it’ spaces had come up. We were the first to play house music and give it an international feel,” says Keenan. Their next project, Trilogy, was just the sort of extravagant nightclub Mumbai needed. “The sealink had just been constructed and the suburbs weren’t considered so out of the world. It was 5,500sqft, we had international DJs, it was the first of its kind,” Keenan says and continues sipping on hot matcha tea from Japan. They are natural hosts without being obsequious. They’ve ordered a sea of dishes that are now fighting for table space. Ryan enlists another table to place some of them on and casually asks me to make my picks. There is, among other things, salmon carpaccio, sweet peas, water chestnut & truffle dumpling, edamame & sweet corn soup, gonjons turnip cake, tofu with shichimi pepper salt and soft shell crab maki. The menu doesn’t rely on too many gimmicks or cutting-edge techniques, but just like them is good-naturedly comforting and feels on-trend. But like all their other ventures, including BKC’s The Good Wife, a Thams spot is about so much more than just the food; it’s the air of convivial excitement, the sexed-up shiny floors and the promise of a good night out.

location: koko, mumbai

LUNCH WITH GQ


HERMÈS BY NATURE


T

he history of Mumbai’s love affair with Chinese food has been written by a handful of prominent families. The Thams are one of them. Tham Mon Yiu was born in Kolkata to a family of hairdressers and moved to Mumbai about 60 years ago, where he started a salon with his wife. But his business acumen told him to turn to the restaurant business, so he bought an existing Chinese restaurant near the Gateway of India. Mandarin opened in 1968 and saw instant popularity. He also started Kamling with a partner, set up in 1969 at Churchgate to cater to Chinese merchants who visited or settled in the city. His son Henry, who was a partner at Olive, opened Henry Thams in place of Mandarin (where Pizza Express now stands). While the Lings still run Ling’s Pavilion and the Wangs have made China Garden, the Eighties hit, into a chain, the Thams are the only family who have been able to reinvent their offering entirely with changing times, embracing different formats and cuisines,

98 —

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building a veritable empire of good times. Soon, they plan to add another level to Koko with cocktails using ingredients found in Ayurveda. “I wouldn’t call it Ayurvedic, that’s off-brand,” says Ryan quickly. “We will be using interesting herbs,” Keenan continues. “Dimi will do it. Mixologists are like chefs now, fresh farm-to-table ingredients, the sort you would use in food.” Later this year or early in 2017 they’ll launch their next concept. “It will be an open-air lounge at the Sea Princess. Great cocktails, white cabanas, dining by the ocean. Very Nikki beach.” “Not sure what it would

Power

lunch

with

“Mixologists are like chefs now, they’ll use the same ingredients as food”

be called yet. I want to call it Khyma,” Keenan grins. “I don’t like it. I want to call it Trilogy Beach.” “It’s one of the few times we disagree. And on who’s the better dresser.” “I’m the better dresser,” Ryan lets me know, more awake now that it’s nearing the 4pm mark. Keenan points at his tailored linen jacket and then at Ryan’s pink shirt, with a gold chain underneath: “No comment.” They are wonderfully, almost eerily, in tune. While they both agree Ryan is the flashier of the two, they work together on each aspect of the business with minimal friction, and all non-sartorial arguments are arbitrated by their father Henry. “We feel good when he approves our ideas. It’s a three-person team.” They’ve moved from their Cuffe Parade residence to Bandra with their wives and live in the same building. “We’re a not-sojoint family,” says Ryan, who married actress Minissha Lamba last year. I ask about the difficulties – the restaurant business is after all notoriously tough, with discouraging survival rates. They look puzzled and then answer with the nonchalance of privileged third-generation restaurateurs who are late for their next work party. “No, it’s been good.” And for the Thams, it has.

location: koko, mumbai

LUNCH WITH GQ


HERMÈS BY NATURE


THE GOOD LIFE GETS BETTER

An urban utopia in Kolkata that promises luxuries unlike those you’ve seen before; Aurus – by the PS Group – presents a new level of magnificence that’s far from the ordinary

Aerial view of Aurus


T

here are some things that all luxury connoisseurs can appreciate; a mesmerizing view, beautiful condominiums with private terraces, spacious duplexes with exclusive swimming pools, innumerable amenities akin to a five-star hotel and, of course, an address that demands the respect of all. Designed for those who cherish life’s finer things, Aurus – an ultraluxurious project in Kolkata – gives you all this and more. The latest project from the prestigious PS Group and co-developed by Srijan Realty, Aurus tucks in affluence at every nook and corner, luring you into its opulent embrace and gently persuading you to leave the rest of the world far behind. Awe, desire and even envy are some of the many emotions you go through, when you first lay eyes on Aurus’s grand facade. But that’s the point. Exuding sophistication and excellence this 31-storey tower – that stands tall just off the famous EM Bypass – is sprawled across four vast acres and surpasses all expectations to meet your every need, making other residences look a tad bit paltry. Raising the benchmark of what luxurious living should stand for, its spacious south-facing 3, 4 and 5BHK apartments are open on three sides, with tall ceilings and stunning interiors that are designed to spoil you. Fitted with luxurious balconies that allow you to take in views of the verdant foliage, no detail is overlooked here. Created in collaboration with architects from Singapore, once you enter your abode here, you may never want to leave. And when you own a home here, what may have seemed unthinkable before now becomes a part of your daily life at Aura, The

Club. It’s got everything you need. Concierge service by Quintessentially that is designed to indulge your every need. A sky lounge at 330 feet where you enjoy sprawling views. A boardroom designed to take care of every business need. Valet service that pre-empts your every request. Housekeeping at your beck and call. The works. But wait, there’s more. Around the property you will find a state-of-the-art gymnasium, an exclusive aerobics and yoga area and a swimming pool that comes with a splash pool and a kid’s pool for you to unwind by. For sports lovers, Aurus has tennis, badminton and squash courts freckled on the property and a game room that’s equipped with pool tables, table tennis and more. And if you are worried about your young ones getting bored during the monsoons, they can spend some time in the indoor toddlers room. At Aurus, every last detail is thoroughly thought out to give you a home that meets your wildest imaginations.

Private Pool

For more information, please contact PS Sales at 033-22852285 or email sales@psgroup.in Corridor

Sky Lounge Lead Developer

Co-Developer


Where GQ has been eating this month

MASALA LIBRARY, Delhi

The Delhi outpost of Zorawar Kalra’s hit Mumbai fine-dine courts trickery and oomph on an even grander scale.

THE HOTEL

WAVERLY HOTEL AND RESIDENCES |

TASTE ALL THAT MATTERS THIS MONTH

Bengaluru

A uniquely British boutique stay in the city’s rising suburb of Whitefield, it pays homage to the area’s littleremembered colonial connection. Legend has it that Winston Churchill visited the city in 1896, and stayed at The Waverly Inn in the area, and fell in love with Rose, the daughter of its owner James Hamilton. Thus called Waverly, the 54-room property courts British grandeur with modern comforts: polished wood, brightly patterned wallpaper, white wicker chairs, Chesterfield sofas, contemporary art, a grandfather clock, LED TVs, free WiFi, a L’Occitane spa and, in true British fashion, a proper pub, The Whitefield Arms.

SHAMIANA, Mumbai Before Trattoria and the nightclub era, this was a popular spot for night-time revellers. Now it’s revamped and ironically back to its Seventies comfort food vibe.

VELVETEEN RABBIT, Chennai

A basement bar with finger food, a cosy atmosphere and that “falling down the rabbit hole” feeling.

102 —

OCTOBER 2016


THE RESTAURANT

PAOWALLA | New York

“Pao” is Portuguese for bread, and at Floyd Cardoz’s next, after the successful Bombay Canteen in Mumbai, it’s all about the Goan baked staple. The bread bar offers it fresh, baked, stuffed or as an accompaniment to many street-style dishes, such as vada pao, cheddar kulcha and chicken liver masala with pao. Cardoz, who has two decades of experience in New York’s hospitality scene (including the much-lauded Tabla) has also created “chota” plates like upma topped with mushrooms and kokum ceviche. It’s been a happy few months for Indian food in New York, which recently saw the opening of Manish Mehrotra’s Indian Accent outpost and the hugely successful Babuji, described as having done for Indian food what Momofuku did for ramen.

TASTE ALL THAT MATTERS THIS MONTH

3 NEW BEERS ON OUR RADAR

WHITE RHINO

Delhi-based Ishaan Puri has a diploma in brewing, a brewery in Gwalior and a clear plan in place to create an “international”grade beer. His Head Brewer, Londoner James Garstang’s CV boasts of brewing experience at some of the UK’s best craft addresses (including Camden Town Brewery, Partizan Brewing and The Kernel). The two current variants, a Munich-style lager and a Belgian wheat beer (with orange peel and coriander), are available in pints and on tap. Look for them at private retail stores and bars across the NCR. Goa, Chandigarh, Mumbai, Pune and Bengaluru are up next. PRICE: `150-160 per pint in Gurgaon

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OCTOBER 2016

DANKE

Brewed in Lithuania and “keeping the Indian palate and spices in mind”, Danke begs a comparison with that quirky beer monkey that’s overtaken most Indian markets. Delhi-based Pranav Kohli, along with three Dubai- and Spain-based partners, has conceptualized this venture, with a tagline that reads “Never Stay Dry”. Two variants – a lager and a Belgian wit–are first off the bottling line, available, in Mumbai and Delhi on tap for now. Another more orangedominated wheat beer will follow.

WHITE OWL

After being in the microbrewery space for a few years, Javed Murad and Kunjan Chikhlikar’s craft beer endeavour is going the retail way. White Owl will begin with its most loved brews – Diablo, an Irish red ale, and Spark, a Belgian wit. Along the way, seasonal brews and styles will be added. The beers will be bottled at a contract brewery in Madhya Pradesh and will launch mid-October. Maharashtra has dibs on the first pints, of course. PRICE: Diablo – `150; Spark – `100

PRICE: `150 a pint in Delhi —KARINA AGGARWAL


TRAVEL

OPEN TRACKS

Foyer of the W Bali; (above) Has Sidik and Damian Saint at the Sound Suite

On the tropical island of Bali, Nidhi Gupta discovers a new way to holiday. Have you tried the make-cation yet?

108 —

OCTOBER 2016

IMAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK (MAP)

think we have it,” exclaims Damian Saint, his nose stuck to the Mac screen, with a triumphant slam of the spacebar. “I might even sell this song!” It’s a summer afternoon in Bali, and W Seminyak’s music curator has taken it upon himself to squeeze some actual music out of us, a ragtag bunch of Asians and Australians who’ve signed up for his masterclass. We’re chilling inside the hotel’s brand new recording studio, the Sound Suite. Saint has handed us kalimbas, djembe drums, calungs, flutes. And instructed that we “just play with them” into a mic, one by one. Last up, he ordered me to the Monome – the 40H version – a milky white, minimalistic hardware controller. “Just hit some buttons, man,” Saint nudges. “We keep complicating stuff,” Saint continues in his clipped British accent, as he chops, loops and stitches samples of all that we’ve recorded. “But it’s the really simple notes that always work. It gives you space to mix things up.” With some digital wizardry, courtesy Ableton – a nifty piece of software – all those isolated twangs and bangs come


TRAVEL

IN BALI, YOU LAZE BY DAY AND STROBE THROUGH NIGHTS AT YOUR OWN TEMPO. ELECTRONIC MUSIC IS THE SOUNDTRACK TO LIFE ON THE ISLAND Masterclass at the Sound Suite

together and begin to sound like music. Part gamelan, part new-age electronica: Our song’s turned out pretty damn exotic. The Sound Suite is a professional-level recording studio. Three rooms, one each to record, write and relax in, with soundproofed walls and graffiti throwbacks to a Seventies Coca-Cola ad campaign. The equipment is drool-worthy: Native Instruments gear, Moog synths, Pioneer turntables (the DJ-spinning kind), percussion and wind instruments of all kinds. But why is all this here, inside this swanky resort in Bali’s posh expat outpost? “Why not?” says Paul Blair, aka DJ White Shadow, music director for W worldwide. We’re treating ourselves to Bintang beer and fresh oysters at W’s poolside open-air bar. Framed against a sky turning colours difficult to pronounce are an LA-based DJ duo called Classix, spinning some retro comfort music. Blair, who comes from Chicago and was nominated for a Grammy (for Lady Gaga’s Born This Way), works hard to make W’s hotels everywhere sound dope. “My initial idea was,” he says, tattooed fingers combing through a salt-and-pepper beard, “let’s turn some of these empty catering offices and business centres – you know, spaces in hotels that have kind of gone the way of dinosaurs – into something fun.” It’s trending: this idea of a hotel that “supports the arts”, or even caters exclusively to a certain type of creative person. In Berlin, nHow calls itself “Europe’s first music hotel”, aiming to leverage its location on the bank of the Spree, already quite the hub of a booming fashion, music and art scene. Over in Jamaica, the sprawling Geejam resort has already played host to Rihanna, Drake and Diplo. Music and commerce are familiar bedfellows, but no one’s stopping there. Stage, a boutique hotel located in the heritage district

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of Yau Ma Tei in Hong Kong, and the Swatch Art Peace Hotel in busy Shanghai, both host local and international artists, doubling as museums of contemporary art. The Wythe in Brooklyn, houses a film theatre in its basement, and does regular previews and screenings of the classics; the Standard in the East Village hosts writer residencies in partnership with The Paris Review. In this time of crowd-sourced, collaboration-fuelled creativity: Why not, indeed? W’s engagement with music is an essential part of its “design narrative”. “Music’s in our DNA; it’s our passion point,” says Blair. They’ve hosted a DJ Lab, a mentor programme that has seen the likes of James Lavelle, Daniel Avery and Sasha mix at their consoles in Thailand. This year, Blair’s also chalked up a partnership with Billboard US on a New Artist series of gigs across the country. His crew, which includes Saint and the Asia Pacific music director, Has Sidik, chose Bali for the first of four in-house recording suites – the others will come up in Seattle, Barcelona and Hollywood – because it’s the perfect retreat on “a very connected highway of musicians.” That is, it’s part the Asian leg of every musician’s world map, that now has mandatory pitstops at Singapore, Macau, the Phillippines and Tokyo. Bali is, obviously, the perfect setting for a break from being on the road. From hipster-central Ubud’s streets, lined with cafes, art galleries, boutiques and street shops hawking wooden dildos, to Canggu, the surfer retreat where you’ll find more bronzed Australians walking around with Bing boards than crabs on beaches, even the far more expensive, artsy Seminyak – everywhere, you laze by day, and strobe through nights at your own tempo. And electronic music has somehow become the soundtrack to life on the island. It’s a vibe not dissimilar to Goa, particularly Vagator in the north, where, at least once a year, EDM gods and their followers congregate for a rollicking good party. It’s also where W sets up shop this month. Anthony Ingram, W’s global brand leader, has heard of India’s annual debauched music festivals. He’s enthusiastic about the idea of a similar recording room at the new property. “Isn’t the vibe too trance?” he briefly wonders, over some “haute-cuisine degustation” paired with wine and music, all put together by Bali-based chef-DJ duo Edible Audio Works. Ingram calls the Sound Suite “today’s tech-savvy version of scribbling lyrics on a cocktail napkin.” “I don’t know where it’ll go,” he elaborates. “It’s a bit whimsical, to be honest, and we’re really not thinking about profits here. The idea was to just build this space, and let it take its own course.” It might be a flight of fancy, but it isn’t altruism at all: A four-hour jam session, with Saint conducting affairs, and a special riders menu, will set you back about `25,000. But hey, at least you’ll finally know how that DJ you’ve seen posing like Jesus on stage got there in the first place.


EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS MONTH

Ÿ MUSIC Ÿ TV Ÿ TECH Ÿ ART Ÿ SOCIAL MEDIA Ÿ STARTUPS

EDITED BY NIDHI GUPTA

BURNT BROWN Meet the Swet Shop Boys, a pair of reactionary rappers making the voice of the underdog cool as hell WRITTEN BY PAHULL BAINS

O  

IMAGE: EREZ AVISSAR (RIZ & HIMANSHU)

h no, we’re in trouble/ TSA always wanna burst my bubble/ Always get a random check when I rock the stubble/Terminal 5, Terminal 1/Think we’re termites, wanna terminate us.” It’s hard to define the Swet Shop Boys. Comprising Pakistani Brit Riz Ahmed, of the acclaimed HBO show The Night Of, and IndianAmerican Himanshu “Heems” Suri (ex-Das Racist), the rap duo is an unlikely product of historically sparring cultures. But it’s precisely this merging of their voices and frustrations that makes their music an adamant “fuck you” to preconceived constructs of identity. Whether they’re performing to a room packed with South Asians on a rainy night in Brooklyn or flooding the social media feeds

Riz Ahmed and Himanshu Suri; (Right and next page) Album art for Cashmere

OCTOBER 2016

— 113


MUSIC

“CASHMERE IS A CELEBRATION OF MONGRELIZATION. MONGREL BREEDS LAST LONGER; THEY ARE SURVIVORS” of minorities around the world, the Swet Shop Boys’ politically charged music feels universal in an increasingly xenophobic world. Just quote a line or two from their new single “T5” (about racial profiling at airports) to any adult brown male anywhere in the world to see for yourself. They’re rappers, but their lyrics aren’t loaded with sexual innuendo or misogyny. They’re not rebels, but they’re vocal against the status quo. Reminiscent of Soviet-era artist-driven agitprop, the Swet Shop Boys’ debut album Cashmere (following an EP in 2013) is incendiary, irreverent, raging, unifying. Produced by British artist Tom Calvert, aka Redinho, the music – bold rap beats layered with everything from sitar and tabla to the dholak and harmonium – pulses with angst. And damn, it’ll make you move. “The brown man’s burden” is a recurring theme in your music. HIMANSHU SURI: It’s a flip on [Rudyard] Kipling’s “white man’s burden”, which was to give the brown man Christianity, to give him railroads; because he didn’t know what these things were. For me the brown man’s burden now is educating the white man, and using art to do so. RIZ AHMED: When I flew back to London after my first film, The Road To Guantanamo, won at the Berlin Film Festival in 2006, the other actors and I were harassed by British intelligence services. We were asked questions like: “Did you become an actor to further the Muslim struggle?” I said, “No I became an actor to get girls.” You know, just a terrified kid trying to joke around. I remember thinking I don’t want the first time I’m on TV to be talking about being a victim. But I do feel a sense of responsibility to tell this story because this shit happens every day to people who look just like me. What else do you touch upon in Cashmere? HS: Islamophobia. Trump. Brexit. And the anxiety of all that looming like a black cloud. 114 —

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RA: For me it’s more about identity. What is my identity as a British Pakistani whose ancestry is Indian? In a time when everyone’s trying to force us into binaries, I see Cashmere as a celebration of mongrelization. Mongrel breeds last longer; they’re survivors. You’ve melded rap with the harmonium, sitar, tabla… TOM CALVERT: We’ve tried to embody the themes in the music as much as we can. Just the other day I was researching the harmonium, which you hear most overtly on “Tiger Hologram”. The instrument has such a controversial history. It was banned on All India Radio for 30 years around the time of the Independence movement… RA: —Because it was brought over there by the British. TC: When you use an instrument like that, you see that there’s conflict at the heart of it, and it embodies the identity issues we’re talking about in the album. HS: Cashmere’s kind of an ethnomusicology project. There’s also a nod to Punjabi poet Shiv Kumar Batalvi in there. I like these cult-y drunk guys. So you must love Manto. HS: Yeah, Guru Dutt, Manto and Batalvi are probably my favourites. Manto wrote a lot about prostitution, alcoholism and the underbelly. Rap being a genre that comes from the streets, they make sense to me.

And then there’s a song in there called “Zayn Malik”. RA: That one’s about brown man swag. It’s also about aspiration and role models, in a way. Tom put the beat on, and we just went in and freestyled it. HS: This is the first time I’ve worked with one producer on every song really. I think my toolbelt only has 3-4 things in it: “This song is about how racism is bad.” “This song is about how girls are cool” [laughs]. So it was cool to have Tom be like, “OK, what do you feel when you hear this?” How does the creative process work when you live in different countries? HS: We don’t do that internet thing. We record and write together. RA: We literally did this whole album in five days. Himanshu’s used to working a lot faster than Tom and I are. So we learned to be like, “Fuck it, let’s just go with our gut.” TC: It’s a bit of a punk project really. Heems kind of set the tone. He goes in and shoots from the hip, whereas Riz and I are a bit more… HS: British. TC: Yeah [all laugh]. But we had to represent the themes of the project. And not do it over some generic beats. HS: When talking about serious stuff, you need music to take it to the next level. And how many times can we just sample Bollywood and throw 808s under it? Cashmere is out on October 14 on the Swet Shop Boys’ new imprint Customs


C


LIVING THE

DREAM Pioneering a vision for luxury like never before, Kalpataru Avana offers an escape into indulgence right in the heart of Mumbai


You have the latest four-wheel luxury sedan and a plush corner office. You’re invited to join the most exclusive clubs. You travel the world in style. You find luxury wherever you go. Now, you can find it right at home. Because Kalpataru Avana is tailor-made for the connoisseur in you. A signature residential development coming up in the heart of Mumbai at Parel, Kalpataru Avana is for the discerning few who believe in the subtleness of luxury. Developed by Kalpataru, among the country’s foremost real-estate companies with a legacy of close to half a century in creating legendary homes, Avana is a glittering jewel in Kalpataru’s star-studded crown. In creating Avana, Kalpataru has brought together the best minds from across the worlds of design, construction and architecture. The team includes Hafeez Contractor, the country’s leading architect; Arup International, the renowned Hong Kong-based structural engineering firm; Orbit, the celebrated Bangkok-based multidisciplinary design firm for facades and interiors; and Burega Farnell, among the best-recognized names in landscape architecture for landscaping. Kalpataru Avana offers a choice of stunningly spacious five-bedroom duplex, as well as four-bedroom and threebedroom luxury residences. As you step over the threshold into the lavishly done up apartments, restricted to just two per floor, the impressive floor-to-ceiling height, abundant natural light, and warm wooden bedroom flooring induce a sense of calm

*1m = 3.28 feet *1 sq.m = 10.764 feet

grandeur. Avana comes with a fully equipped gym, a jogging track, a yoga deck and a spa to rejuvenate the senses and refresh the mind. At Avana, you get to indulge in everything – and more. It isn’t just a smart investment. It’s a lifetime lived in every moment. THE LUXE LIST • The exclusivity of 2 residences per floor • The first residential floor around 97ft* above ground level • 3- and 4-bedroom residences, 5-bedroom duplexes and signature residences • Palatial homes with 12ft 10in* floor-toceiling height • Observation deck approximately 640ft* above ground level • Sprawling sundecks with views of the Eastern seabord and approximately 21 acres of open green spaces. • Clubhouse with a pool, open-air Jacuzzi and exotic spa • Glass-enclosed gymnasium at the 41st level • Designer sky gardens with party lounge and landscaped walkways at the terrace level • Landscaped podium dedicated to leisure and recreational facilities

• A 5-tier advanced integrated safety and security system • Pre-certified platinum rating from IGBC (Indian Green Building Council) For more information, call Sumeet Kamath at 8879667464, email sumeet.kamath@ kalpataru.com or visit kalpataru.com


art

N

“the shopkeeper” (2008)

L

king in

For Milwaukee-born, Udaipur-based photographer Waswo X Waswo, sepia is the warmest colour

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Tell us about your photo studio in Varda. It’s a simple setup. I often refer to it as my cowshed; it is really that basic. Varda has a tremendous array of characters, and the villagers have been fully supportive of what we do. Most often, we plan well in advance for a photo shoot, but at times things have happened spontaneously. For instance, the man in the photograph “Shifting Homes” just happened to be walking by with his charpoy and a chicken tied to his donkey. It was my assistant Ganpat who spotted him and called him in for a portrait. The image we ended up using was made on the second click. It sounds like a complicated process: To stage, shoot and then hand‑paint photos. Why do you do this? People have become so used to expecting documentation in photography that they have difficulty viewing photographs purely as objects of beauty. I’ve never seen myself as a documentary photographer. For me, the use of the painted backdrop, and, later, the hand-colouring of a blackand-white image (that’s done by Rajesh Soni), conspires to insert a very

interview: nidhi gUpta. iMage: © waswo x waswo/coUrtesy tasveer

ot too far from rich, heritage-laden Udaipur is a tiny nondescript village called Varda. It’s where serial interloper and photographer Waswo X Waswo set up shop in 2006. In cahoots with local artists Rajesh Soni and R Vijay, he has built a thriving cottage industry around his photo studio, frequented by locals as well as a global audience. In every one of Waswo’s staged-and-shot, colouredby-hand images – everything from flower and vegetable sellers to the bad boys about town – is a song about an idyllic, pastoral life; evoking a simpler time, imbued with his gentle humour. After two photobooks and three globe-trotting photo exhibitions – the first called A Studio In Rajasthan, the last, Confessions Of An Evil Orientalist – Waswo’s love affair with India only grows stronger, despite accusations of “exoticization” from the “academic types”. Ahead of his new exhibition Photowallah, in collaboration with Bengaluru’s Tasveer Gallery, Waswo talks to GQ about his art, being an outsider and why “exotic” doesn’t have to be a dirty word.


REPUBLIC By Omar Farooq

/republicbyomarfarooq

republicbyomarfarooq

www.republicbespoke.com


art

may actually have been better than our current situation, and perhaps examining those things can help us shape our desires for the future. These can be hard to put a finger on: things like the slower experience of the hours of the day, unhurried travel, the taking of time for the enjoyment of the minute details of life.

“Bike Boys” (2015)

“To appreciaTe exoTicism is To appreciaTe The marvellous differences ThaT exisT wiThin our world” obvious level of fantasy or unreality. In the end, that’s what this series is about: The beauty of the individual, and the beauty of the image. It isn’t often that we find sepia-toned images of idyllic life passing for “bold” and “edgy” contemporary art. Most contemporary art these days is 120 —

october 2016

“Night Prowl” (2008)

highly political, either with an overtly leftist agenda or with more nuanced examinations of cultural biases. Art is expected to be grounded in what is current, with an eye towards a desired future. Any glance to the past that can be construed as sentimental is discouraged. But the idea of nostalgia recognizes that certain things about the past

Five years ago, you put up an exhibition with the cheeky title Confessions Of An Evil Orientalist. Do you still get seen as just another “white man taking photos of poor Indian people”? The character of the Evil Orientalist has been my means of personifying a presumed intruder on the Indian space, and a means of spoofing some of the criticisms levelled against him. I think everyone is aware of [Edward] Said these days. I have great respect for his writings, but I take issue with the ways his book [Orientalism] is now used to silence contemporary artists from the West. Calling out “Orientalism!” has just become a stock kind of dismissal for anyone not conforming to a prescribed artworld agenda, especially for artists who have crossed from the West into Asia. Do you, by now, have a stock response for anyone who claims you are “exoticizing” India? I tell people that exoticism is wonderful. Chicago may be very exotic to people who have never been there before. I would hope so. To appreciate exoticism is to appreciate the marvellous differences that exist within our world. I really fear our world is becoming much too homogenized. New York looks like Tokyo, and has all the same shops. If we ever lose our sense of the exotic, we have also lost the sweet and spicy experience of travel in foreign lands. Photowallah opens at Exhibit 320, Delhi on October 9

iNtErviEw: NiDhi guPta. imagE: waswO x waswO/ cOurtEsy tasvEEr

What small details of life do you get nostalgic for? I long for things like the village barbershop, which was a place where locals congregated to share the news and argue opinions. You can’t get that sense of community from an electric shaver at home. I long for shoemakers, from a time when we thought it worthwhile to fix shoes, rather than just toss and replace them. These things have been lost in the West. They were still here when I first came to India, but now India is rapidly losing them too.


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SOCIAL MEDIA

www.boybands.com

www.pottermore.com

www.fictionpress.com

www.wattpad.com 185

16

7

STRANGER THAN FACT

Wattpad’s army of enthusiast authors don’t just write – they predict popularity

2016’S OBSESSIONS The guys who’ve captured teen imaginations on Wattpad

5 Seconds of Summer

Share

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el Watson is a 25-year-old Chilean author with over 30 titles and 100 million readers – but you won’t find her on Amazon. She’s on Wattpad, an online writing platform popular for fan-written fiction (fanfic). More than half a million stories are uploaded daily to Wattpad; much of it “shipping” (fictional relationships between real people), or “imagines” (a second-person narrative genre that’s huge in fanfic), starring celebrities or social media stars. The numbers are massive: 13 billion minutes are spent reading on the platform every month. “According to Comscore, people are spending more minutes on Wattpad than on Candy Crush or Snapchat,” says Wattpad CEO and cofounder Allen Lau, 47. Its readers are generally young and three-quarters female, he adds. Founded in Toronto in 2006, Wattpad became vastly popular as fans began

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reading – and writing – stories on their smartphones. In 2014, Anna Todd’s series After – a One Direction fanfic – was picked up by Simon & Schuster and became a New York Times bestseller. A billion Wattpad reads later, it has been optioned by Paramount for a film. “And most of the content was written on a mobile phone,” says Lau. Wattpad is also expanding into story anthologies from its most popular authors while a TV series, Wattpad Presents, is showing in the Philippines. This huge volume of fan-created content also provides insights into the pop-culture hive mind, illuminating that most nebulous of data points – what teens actually like. For example, Lau’s team foresaw the rise of boyband 5 Seconds of Summer after an explosion of 5SOS stories. Now, 5SOS have entered a period of volatility, whereas K-pop is on a steady upward trend. “It’s a billboard for what’s popular – and what’s not,” Lau says.

SHAWN MENDES Almost 100,000 stories, including titles like “Being Shawn Mendes’ Sister” and “The Good Boy vs. The Bad Girl”

ONE DIRECTION Almost 1 million stories, including “The Accidental Skype Call”, “Sex Education” and Harry Styles as a vampire in “Fallen”

WORDS: OLIVER FRANKLIN-WALLIS. IMAGE: REX FEATURES (5SOS), GETTY IMAGES (BIEBER, MENDES, ONE DIRECTION)

JUSTIN BIEBER Over 100,000 posts, including titles like “Moving In With The Bully”, “He’s a Bad Boy” and “Daddy’s Girl”


MUSIC

That can take a long time between four men in a room who know every detail of the music, and without a captain to steer the ship. Working with Liam Howe [producer to Lana Del Ray, FKA Twigs and Ellie Goulding] was incredible. What did you talk about with Liam Howe outside of music? Liam’s connection with our label One Little Indian goes way back, so he had loads of stories about his time with Sneaker Pimps back in the Nineties. We traded tour stories; I think he probably won on that front.

Acquaint yourselves with Wild Palms, the indie band from London making their way to Shillong this month. Lead vocalist Lou Hill spills the beans on old names, their new album and the indie scene in London

nce you were called the Ex Lion Tamers, now you’re Wild Palms. What’s with all the jungle names, Lou? Never made the jungle connection! Ha! Basically, Ex Lion Tamers came around when a few members from a few different bands decided to get in the studio together, and the guy at the first session I booked asked, “What’s the name of the band?” I was listening to Wire’s Pink Flag at the time, so I just quickly scanned the back of the album and was like, “Ex Lion Tamers”. It was never supposed to stay, but we started playing gigs and got known under the name. Plus we also didn’t want to be constantly linked to Wire, 124 —

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LOU HILL’S THROWBACK PLAYLIST

as they weren’t a band any of the others were particularly into. And now, after five years in the studio, you’ve got a new album out. What’s been the coolest thing anyone’s said to you about Live Together, Eat Each Other? Mandy Parnell [who’s worked with Björk and Aphex Twin] mastered it. She said it sounds like nothing she’d heard before, which is obviously an amazing thing to hear from someone who must listen to so much music. We spent so long making this record and put so much of ourselves into it that it felt like it literally consumed us. We wanted to do the whole thing ourselves – recording, production, mixing.

TV ON THE RADIO: RETURN TO COOKIE MOUNTAIN

MY BLOODY VALENTINE: LOVELESS

MADVILLAIN: MADVILLAINY

Was it cooler a decade ago, when you guys were just banding up in the London suburb of Southgate? There were a couple places, like Waiting Rooms above Palmers Green station in Southgate. It was miniature; if we rocked up 20-strong, it was rammed. We spent a lot of time round mates’ houses listening to music, playing music, getting drunk, talking about music. We went to the studio on weekends – whoever was available out of about eight of us wannabe musicians – and just made music. We used to practise in the bell tower of the church my mum and dad got married in. We used to go into London a lot of the time anyway. At that time London was amazing, full of life and vitality. It made you feel like anything was possible when you were 17. Bacardi NH7 Weekender, Shillong is on October 21-22

INTERVIEW: NIDHI GUPTA

INTO THE WILD

Where does one go to discover good new indie music in London these days? The scene to me is non-existent; bands don’t stick around long enough to form a scene. Clubs are shutting down, promoters being pushed out, and for what? What of any worth replaces it? A “scene” is just a load of like-minded people going to the same places to hear the shit they want to hear, to be inspired by each other – but these places have to exist to create something special.


The iconic Logix City Center located in the heart of Noida

The atrium of the Logix City Center, Noida

The interiors of the IMAX theatre at the Logix City Center

AN UNPARALLELED VISION Based in Noida, the Logix Group has made its presence known across the city. thanks to its iconic IT parks, malls and residential projects


The facade of the Logix Cyber Park, Noida

The Logix Home residential project, Blossom County, Noida

When a leader from the world of commercial real estate, known for its topof-the-line developments in the IT sector, decides to venture into building residential properties, you can expect a home founded on professional expertise and meticulous design. Known for its cutting-edge facilities, the north India-based Logix Group has transformed the Noida skyline, redefining the way people live, work and play.

WORK

Since its inception in 1997, the company has delivered more than four million sqft of state-of-the-art IT parks and special economic zones (SEZ) across Noida. The brand has created over 25 such

structures, including software development centres, back offices, operations and call centres, providing comprehensive infrastructure, with sustainable solutions. Its impeccable reputation has ensured FDI investments from internationally renowned firms such as Apollo, Taib and ICICI Prudential.

PLAY

It’s the go-to destination for hospitality, retail and entertainment. The Logix City Center, one of the largest integrated malls in northern India, spreads across over 2,69,097sqft in the centre of Noida. The sprawling area is home to the largest Hypercity in the region, as well as brands such as Shoppers Stop and Reliance Trends. The

Gaming Vegas recreational centre is the place for kids, with bowling alleys, redemption games and PS3/ PS4 consoles. A five-star hotel by Westin, as well as offices and service apartments are located here.

LIVE

Extending its vision and bringing its exacting standards to residences through Logix Homes, the Group has set the tone with its trio of projects – Blossom County, Blossom Greens and Blossom Zest – as well as the world-class Sports City and an integrated township on the Yamuna Expressway. Elegantly designed and flawlessly executed, these projects will house about 15,000 units and offer the

finest luxuries for every kind of homeowner. You could be a young executive just starting out in life and in search of a compact contemporary studio apartment, or be on the lookout for that prefect home for a young family. Or it could be a lavish penthouse that is the epitome of opulence. Logix Homes will fulfil every desire. The company’s commitment to provide only the best is matched only by its ability to deliver on its promise. For more information, visit logixgroup.in


tech a still from “a Mumbai Summer”

Ready StRap dive •

Mumbai-based startup Meraki VR’s stunning 360-degree films are why you must invest in a headset, stat

I

n 2013, Parth Choksi did what any person does when they graduate from college: He went to holiday in Spain. On the football buff’s itinerary was, of course, Camp Nou, home of Barcelona FC. It was exhilarating, he remembers, to be in this space that was such an integral part of football history. Even better, on one of the museum tours, he was handed a VR headset. “It was a complete match day experience. I saw the game from the point of view of the players,” Choksi reminisces. He was hooked. Two years ago, virtual reality was still a bit of a curious novelty, if not a joke, in the international tech community. Films like The Lawnmower Man had made sure it was treated with a degree of suspicion; and very few people had heard of Palmer Luckey. So it was a bold, though timely, move when Choksi (along with IIT buddy Agam Garg and film-maker Sairam Sagiraju) set up Meraki VR in 2015, to create content using 360-degree cameras. Their goal? “Simply put,” says their website, “with virtual reality, you don’t watch Harry Potter. You are Harry Potter.” “VR has immediate appeal,” says Choksi, “it allows for a good mix of technology and creativity. Sairam had experience with this format in the real estate industry, which is where VR is still most popular. He thought of extending it to entertainment.” Their first projects came from Percept. “It was easy to pitch to them. They’d heard of VR before, since it had already been done at Tomorrowland.” After work on the Hardwell charity concert in Mumbai and Sunburn Music Festival last year, their biggest project came from Star Sports, to shoot the Asia Cup

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in Dhaka. “That was amazing; it was the first time in the history of cricket that it was being shot in 360-degree.” This year, they also created a travelogue on their hometown, called “A Mumbai Summer”; worked on a dance video project for Channel V and a journalistic piece with Firstpost on the city’s “no selfie zones”; covered their alma mater’s annual festival Mood Indigo; and shot that viral promo video for Pawan Kripalani’s psycho-thriller Phobia. “There was Radhika Apte, sitting in the middle of the room, and if you watched it in VR, you’d feel like you were right next to her. VR teleports you into experiences.” Immersion is the key word here. Which is why two industries, globally, have rushed to lay claim to the medium: Gaming and pornography. “Videogames brought VR into the mainstream: That’s still 50 per cent of the pie. But porn,” Choksi laughs, “It’s like, anyone who says the word is in the

at iit-Bombay’s Mood indigo

spotlight. It’s a big industry, with a large userbase. But it isn’t our userbase.” Instead, he thinks, there’s immense untapped potential in the realms of education, travel and cinema. “We’re working on a documentary for an NGO in the jungles of Odisha right now. When we’re doing a scripted film, we’re more in control, compared to when we shoot a live event. And it’s all smartphone-friendly content.” By that, Choksi means you don’t have to wait for an Oculus Rift or an HTC Vive to hit the market. “That’s all console VR, for serious gamers or heavy users. There’s a lot of good, cheaper models available, mostly Chinese of course,” he laughs. Sure, you can view pictures and videos in 360-degree on Facebook, but “it’s just not the same,” Choksi insists. So what does a dream gig for this VR enthusiast look like? “I’m a ManU fan,” he grins. “To film a match at Old Trafford in England: Now that would be epic.”

asia Cup, 2015

interview: nidhi gupta


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MANSKILLS

SOCIAL MEDIA

DON’TS

Never unlike an accidental deep like on Instagram, no matter how old the post. If your stalkee has push notifications set up, it only makes it worse.

Never send nudes, even to your bae, because they’re the ones who leak them.

Never post anything personal to your Facebook wall. Or anyone else’s for that matter. Only snitches and your superiors look at Facebook.

Never post something on your Snapchat story and also use it in a private message to someone you care about – it’s insulting.

Never post boring back-to-back selfies. Selfies to prove Virat Kohli was eating at your restaurant are admissible, as are vacation selfies if you’re travelling somewhere beautiful.

Never hold up your entire group of friends in real life trying to capture a perfect Instagram pose. Nobody cares.

Never ODR (open don’t reply) on Snapchat. Unless someone ODRs you first. If they ODR you first, wait double the length of time they ODR’d you before snapping them back.

Never double-snap anyone you’re interested in. It lacks chill.

Never post food on your Instagram. Nobody cares, and only old people do it. Food on Snapchat is OK though.

Never screengrab a Snapchat, especially not a private snap, because the app will tell the sender – and it’s awkward, or worse, shady.

Never like and comment on a bunch of old posts to show interest. It means you’re a total stalker and will have to be ignored. Only like or comment on their most recent post. Obviously.

Bonus rule: Never comment on your teen’s page without asking permission or else it will be deleted. Your kid will feel bad, but you will have had it coming.

130 —

OCTOBER 2016

WORDS: MARY HK CHOI. ILLUSTRATION: DAVID BISKUP

Avoid the hellscape of awkward behaviour and secondhand embarrassment by never, ever breaking these ironclad rules, drafted by those who know best: Teenagers


tv

watch the binge screenwriter and producer Stephen Falk presents a guide to navigating this era of peak tV

T

documentary now!

WATCH IF THE SHOW…

SKIP IF THE SHOW…

Has the reasonable possibility of Fred Armisen popping up at any minute. there are currently about eight shows where this is applicable.

Seems to be really swinging for the fences, as misguided as the attempt might be (hello, Vinyl and Billions!). i’d much rather watch something with some oomph and effort behind it, rather than a safe, tepid attempt that feels like you’ve seen it a million times before. (or a billion.)

documentary now!

horseman

the leftovers; BoJack

Has “Chicago” in the title. Is an adaptation of an Eighties movie. (But mostly just because i’m jealous i haven’t thought of one i wanted to remake yet.) Features a comedian who is clearly just trying to make their Louie.

Was created by Jenji Kohan, Michael Schur, Mike Judge, Kenya Barris, Vince Gilligan, Damon Lindelof, or Tina Fey and Robert Carlock.

Is a game show hosted by Alec Baldwin. yes, it looks like an easy, fun-as-shit job, and i would never begrudge him that, but many of us would die to write for him.

Black-ish, the good place

Is on FX or Netflix.

you’re the worst, atlanta, luke Cage

132 —

october 2016

Has punch-worthy couples demanding open-floor-plan everything. Always a hate-watchable good time.

fixer upper, permanent roommates (tVf)

Is British and features too-old/ lumpy/dentally anarchic detectives solving a brutal murder.

happy Valley, Broadchurch

Is on a pay channel and doesn’t feature copious swearing and nudity. C’mon. stop wasting our time.

words: anna peele. image: 2016 fox & its related entities (you’re the worst)

here’s a scene in Moscow On The Hudson in which a newly defected Russian, played by Robin Williams, collapses when faced with the overwhelming number of options at an American grocery store. I’m like that when I look at my DVR these days, except I’m not nearly as hairy, and my accent is believable. There are just too many shows. Who has time to read actual good, informed writing about television? No one. Which is why, here’s a handful of helpful shortcuts to quickly let you know if a show is worth watching or not.


PROMOTION


TECH

FEVER PITCH Startups we’re afraid we’ll see

F  

irst there was Uber for food. Then there was Uber for oil charges. Now there’s Uber for birth control. This pitch strategy was dumb five years ago; now it’s past absurdity and approaching

tragedy. And yet, on any given demo day, some joker still gets up and tells VCs he has a brilliant idea – that’s just an existing idea applied to a new thing. It has officially become satire. Here are five we fully expect to hear any day now.

UBER FOR WATER

“When people are thirsty, we bring them water. To their desk, treadmill, hiking trail, wherever. And for each bottle we deliver, we give a free one to Africa. But let me be clear: This is not a nonprofit. This is a business. We’ve already sold 175 bottles in Mumbai – and that’s just friends and family. When you buy one, you buy into our network. Everyone wins: you, us, Africa.” —H2U

NETFLIX FOR SLEEP

“I think we can all agree: Sleep is hard. It’s stressful. That’s why it’s a $30 billion industry. With our team of professional sleep practitioners, we’ve developed thousands of hours of original streaming content meant to put you, your kids, even your 1-month-old baby to sleep. Our integrated multiplatform, cloud-based subscription model offers tailored recommendations based on what you fall asleep to fastest – crashing waves, rainforest noises, your favourite shows on Netflix.” —SHEEP

AIRBNB FOR KIDS

1 LTR

SET DROP-OFF LOCATION

“I’m here to tell you that the process of having kids is broken. It’s risky, it’s inefficient and it’s expensive. Our app changes all that. It brings the sharing economy to parenting. We let you rent kids when you want them and return them when you’re done. No work, all play. This is still a prototype, but women love our app so much. We’ve seen so many women play with our product. Ladies, come find us afterwards, and we’ll give you a free test code.” —QUICKIDS

“LINKEDIN FOR DIVERSITY” H2O GO

136 —

H2O X (SPRING)

OCTOBER 2016

H2O DETOX (INFUSED)

AFRICA #FTW

“Hello, everybody, I’m Sid, this is Ajay, Raj, Rahul and Sameer. Guys, let’s get real: Diversity matters. We’re a B2B HR analytics solutions, and we’re revolutionizing how companies share knowledge and information. At the root, we’ll tell you the exact number of diversity candidates you need to interview and hire to be considered progressive. And because we’re constantly iterating, we’re now working on a way to actually find these people.” —DVRSFY

WORDS: JULIA GREENBERGH. IMAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK

FACEBOOK FOR ANONYMITY

“I’d like to share a quote with you from the French thought leader Jean-Paul Sartre. ‘Hell,’ he said, ‘is other people.’ [Laughs] I’ll be honest with you: At times, I feel the same, and I bet you do too. We’re a social network disrupting IRL interactions. Think Facebook, if Facebook pivoted away from people. If you connect us to your Facebook account, we’ll send you mobile alerts when a friend is nearby and then plot your fastest escape route. It’s that simple. We’re going to be bigger than Facebook.” —EVADR


STYLE EDITED BY VIJENDRA BHARDWAJ & SHIVANGI LOLAYEKAR

RED VELVET GQ

PHOTO: R BURMAN

ENDORSES

FOR YOUR FEET

You should have them in all colours and styles with sneaker culture reaching an all-time high. Now up the game with a knockout pair like Ermenegildo Zegna’s sumptuous oxblood kicks to bring out on occasion and wow everyone around you. Triple X Couture Sneakers by Ermenegildo Zegna, `50,000 OCTOBER 2016

— 141


the GUIDe

SNeAK UP ON YOUR

SUIt Pull off sneakers with sharp suits like a GQ pro

BLACK ON BLACK The same suit you wore to get a bank loan on Wednesday instantly becomes Saturday nightapproved the moment you put on these slick black kicks. SUIT by sAhiL ANejA, `38,500. SHIRT by rOBertO CAvALLi, PRICE ON REQUEST. POCKET SQUARE, `1,000, bOW TIE, `1,200; bOTH by the tie hUB. CUFFLINKS by the BrO CODe, `2,000. SNEAKERS by NiKe, `11,000

142 —

octoBER 2016

HAIR & mAKE-UP: mONA ANANd/bbLUNT. mOdEL: ANKUR RATHI/TFm

PHOTOGRAPHED by ARSH SAYED WRiTTEn by SHIVANGI LOLAYEKAR STylED by DESIRÉE FERNANDES


the GUIDe

FOUR SQUARE

A

Your first official act for party season: Ditch the serious shoes and dress your suit up with sneakers. There are plenty of colours and styles to choose from. Just remember to make sure your trousers fall correctly.

B

A SUIT bY CANALI, `1,40,000. JUMPER, `35,000, POCKET SQUARE, `6,900; bOTH bY PAUL SMITH. SNEAKERS bY ADIDAS, `12,000 B SUIT, `90,000, SHIRT, `17,000; bOTH bY PAUL SMITH. TIE, `2,000, POCKET SQUARE, `1,000; bOTH bY THE TIE HUB. SCARF bY CELIO, `800. SNEAKERS bY VANS, `8,000 C bLAZER, `68,500, TROUSERS, `18,500; bOTH bY ROHIT GANDHI + RAHUL KHANNA. TURTLENECK JUMPER bY ETRO, PRICE ON REQUEST. POCKET SQUARE bY THE BRO CODE, `1,000. SNEAKERS bY CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN, `46,500

C 144 —

octoBER 2016

D

HAIR & MAKE-UP: MONA ANAND/bbLUNT. MODELS: NEEL TOLANI/TFM, PRAbH UPPAL/INEgA

D SUIT bY CORNELIANI, `1,18,000. SHIRT bY LOUIS PHILIPPE, `8,000. TIE bY THE TIE HUB, `2,000. POCKET SQUARE bY LACQUER EMBASSY, `3,000. SHOES bY PUMA, `7,000


THE GUIDE

WHO WORE IT

DAVID BECKHAM

VARUN DHAWAN

STYLE DON’T SKIP THE POCKET SQUARE, TIE BAR AND SUNGLASSES

GREY MATTER

KANYE WEST

Invest in stylish gym shoes that you can repurpose with your grey suit. Not only will you give out the whole fitness vibe, your classic two-piece will look like it was made for 2016. SUIT BY CALVIN KLEIN, `41,000. SHIRT BY LOUIS PHILIPPE, `3,000. TIE BY SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, `14,000. POCKET SQUARE, `1,000, TIE BAR, `1,300; BOTH BY THE TIE HUB. SUNGLASSES BY RAY-BAN, `8,000. SNEAKERS BY NIKE, `12,000

FAWAD KHAN

146 —

OCTOBER 2016

HAIR & MAKE-UP: MONA ANAND/BBLUNT. MODEL: PRABH UPPAL/INEGA. IMAGE: FOTOCORP, GETTY IMAGES

TIP


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MR BRIGHTSIDE He’s the clown pimp in luxury fashion. Better yet, Justin O’Shea is putting men back into menswear WRITTEN BY RICHARD CLUNE

J  

ustin O’Shea is the physical embodiment of the egalitarianism that’s sweeping though the luxury houses. “Accessible luxury” – sure, it’s a buzzword. Hell, it’s arguably an oxymoron, but it’s also a sartorial concept central to the contemporary outlook of top-tier brands collectively pushing broader than ever before. 150 —

OCTOBER 2016

Look at Kenzo – which, in 2011, started to reposition (read: explore a wider range of price points) under the creative stewardship of Opening Ceremony cool kids Humberto Leon and Carol Lim. Then there’s Louis Vuitton’s installation of Kim Jones and his announcement of a new line of men’s denim a few months back.

And now Brioni, a once-staid Italian outfitter, which, under the creative direction of O’Shea (the suited and bearded Australian who walks with a pimp’s swagger and swears like a sailor), debuted a collection that featured, alongside $9,000 suits, the likes of “wife beaters” – his words. See, that’s the thing about this 37-yearold from Nhulunbuy in Australia – he’s real. Unaffected. The ultimate accessible gatekeeper to a luxury label; a wellestablished “street style star” with a marketable following far removed from the buttoned-up, designer Belgians who spend weekends espousing, at some considerable length, the importance of 17th century sculpture. Not O’Shea – he’s the man who, within minutes of talking to GQ, is outing a fondness for a solid night of beer and shenanigans with the “boys”; the same man who announced his arrival on the scene by unveiling rockers Metallica as the faces of Brioni’s new direction. “Look, we’re high suiting, [but] we should also have stuff that’s just fucking cool, things that anyone can buy – yeah, that’s what I wanted to bring to the brand,” chimes O’Shea, in elevated tones that belie his “slick biker” look. “You know, we’re at a level that’s more exclusive than a lot of other brands, but you also need to bring in more accessibility among the ultimate in luxury... “Modern guys, you know, with the digital age and e-commerce and social media, it’s given them the ability to know a lot more about fashion, to know what their style is and to know what’s available. And I know that modern guys can go and buy a $15 fucking Uniqlo or Bonds T-shirt and wear it with a $10,000 suit and that’s totally fucking awesome, because you don’t need expensive stuff with expensive stuff.” It plays into his use of Metallica – an unconventional move and one met by a mixed chorus of support and surprise, but again it delivers a broad slap. “There’s not one dude who doesn’t want to sit in a pub and have a beer with these guys, not one,” says O’Shea. “They’re the ultimate bad arses; they appeal to a 70-year-old who’s loved them since he was 40, and then there’s the 18-year-old who loves them because they’re fucking rock gods. There aren’t too many superstars who have that kind of appeal.” Talk of the Metallica campaign – which also displayed Brioni’s return to a Gothic font for its logo, something O’Shea dragged from the archives and which

PHOTO: RASMUS WENG KARLSEN. STYLIST: BRAD HOMES

THE INFLUENCER


THE INFLUENCER was used by the Italian tailors between the Fifties and Seventies – prompts a couple of questions. How the hell did he explain “wife beater” to his new bosses? “You’re right, the translation wasn’t too politically correct. I was just like, ‘Don’t fucking worry, it’s a fucking Australian thing, it’s a fucking tank top.’” And what was the initial response from François-Henri Pinault (CEO of Kering, which bought Brioni in 2012) about using Metallica to sell luxury fashion? “I presented [the campaign] in these big gold frames like you do gold records, and I remember thinking to myself, ‘Well, he’s either going to say two things – “You’re fired”, or “I love it”.’ And you know what? He was just like, ‘That’s awesome – what’s your favourite Metallica song? I need to start a new Spotify playlist.’ Oh, and then he said he needed to be sat next to them at the show.” O’Shea admits nerves ahead of his first collection in Paris in July this year. He also admits it wasn’t so much Metallica, as fellow Seventies rockers Boston, who helped him relax. “I was listening to them so much in the two weeks of show preparation. Every time I’d get in the car, I was so tired and so fucking stressed out. I’d play that and scream it fucking out, ‘It’s more than a feeeeeling – more than a FEEEEELING...’ Yeah, that got me through.” O’Shea was born in Toowoomba and raised, for the most part, in Nhulunbuy in the Northern Territory – a remote bauxite mining community, closer to Papua New Guinea than the key Australian capitals. Beyond riding dirt bikes and “getting drunk on the school oval”, teen years meant running about on varying sporting fields – O’Shea gifted at rugby league, AFL, hockey and basketball. Each offered a chance to travel – especially given he was, by his late teens, playing at a representative level. O’Shea admits there was never really a firm plan for life – and it’s an approach that’s worked. It saw him leave Perth, where he was chasing an Olympic hockey dream, for Amsterdam, at 23, to run a retail sports store. “Despite popular thinking, I’m not a pot head, so I wasn’t wasted all the time – it’s the one thing I didn’t do among all the other stuff. I still managed to find some good times and have some fun, but I also found a good set of Dutch friends, went to Dutch

searching for something to separate themselves in the market. No one’s applauding masculinity, [but] it’s cool to be a guy and it doesn’t matter if you’re straight, gay, bisexual or anything – who gives a shit? That’s what’s going to separate us from all the other brands at the moment.” A quick look elsewhere confirms such sentiment – key luxury houses such as Gucci, Burberry and Givenchy but three maintaining a certain androgynous output. That said, Brioni has a history with “traditional” masculinity – the label loved by men like John Wayne and Richard Burton. “Those guys who first bought into Brioni [in the Fifties, Sixties and Seventies] were such real men and that’s what I wanted to embody in the collection. But I also wanted to make it fun – I didn’t want guys drinking whisky out of a tumbler and smoking cigars and having beards and riding tricked-out motorcycles with brown seats, that’s not the path. It’s more about what defines a man, rather than the modern things dudes are into... And I mean every fucking [marketing] campaign has a dude with a beard in it now – they put dudes with beards in there because it’s trendy.” O’Shea scouted real boxers to model his debut collection, “fucking tough guys”, to convey his message, each working with designs that were overt and outlandish in their styling – each an extension of O’Shea’s personal style. Much like the man himself – a guy who may be peddling luxury, but equally a guy you can easily gravitate towards and understand. Someone for whom life is meant to be fun. “I love my job. I have a great time and I enjoy the business, fun and creative aspects of it but, at the end of the day, I’d hate to be one of those dudes who’s too serious. It seems a bit too try-hard – that’s not the way I am. I just want to do something that makes people enjoy it, and to have fun myself... You know, I’m from the fucking middle of the fucking Australian wilderness. I spend my life watching fucking Marvel films on planes. I reference Jerry Seinfeld and The Simpsons. Man, if I took myself too seriously, I’d feel like a bit of a wanker.”

152 —

OCTOBER 2016

language school and was doing OK at that and felt like I was actually living there. It was really cool to be part of another culture.” After a stint in the Middle East (with Kuwaiti retailer Al Ostoura) he returned to London and eventually moved to then-new e-commerce fashion start-up, My Theresa, as a buying director. There for seven years, O’Shea says it taught him about professionalism, work ethic and “looking at fashion in a different way; looking at everything that surrounds the industry and realizing it’s not only about the clothes – there are so many other tasks you need to do to make something successful.” Despite his ascent and achievement – My Theresa making $130 million a year by the time he left – O’Shea never lost the honest and raw sense of masculinity that framed his upbringing. His wardrobe may have evolved to favour three-piece Jake Mueser suits (prior to joining Brioni, that is) but he wore them with a hyper-masculine edge, as accessorized by his biker’s beard and tatts. And it’s that same essence of manliness that he wants to deliver at Brioni. “My vision is about bringing the word ‘men’ back into menswear, because it’s definitely gone down a path where everyone is trying to move away, wanting an image that’s the contrast to what a man represents,

GROOMING: PAWEL SOLIS/ATOMO MANAGEMENT. LOCATION: PENINSULA HOTEL, PARIS-PENINSULA.COM

“NO ONE CELEBRATES MASCULINITY, BUT IT’S COOL TO BE A GUY – WHOEVER YOU ARE”


THE ARTISTS OF

BESPOKE TAILORING The ultimate expression of sophistication is a custom-made suit. But instead of heading to Savile Row, let one of the tailors at Master Tailors’ Association (India) – a network of bespoke tailors from across India – take over

I

t is a long-forgotten luxury from the British rule in India, where Indian tailors dressed kings and lords in bespoke suits. Over time, this became lost or nonexistent, primarily due to the non-availability of skills and practitioners. However, that’s soon about to change. Aiming to bring together the best tailors in the country and to raise the standards of bespoke tailoring is Master Tailors’ Association (India). The brainchild of Anupama Sachdeva, Master Tailors’ Association (India) seeks to expand the market and persuade those jetsetting millennials to get their bespoke suits made in India. Once a private banker based in Singapore, Sachdeva first learned the art of tailoring from master tailor Thomas Wong, at the prestigious Lasalle College of Fine Arts. Once she gained all the necessary skills, she started her own brand, Pezalli. Soon, she set up Pezalli Bespoke in India as a niche brand for connoisseurs who appreciate craftsmanship, but have limited options available in the Indian

market. Working towards the rebirth of bespoke tailoring in the country, she realized that most tailors here are not exposed to formal schooling or intensive specialized training in this art. This is where Master Tailors’ Association (India) comes in. Launched earlier this year, it aims to make training from reputed foreign institutes easily accessible to Indian tailors, thereby providing a great opportunity to upgrade their skills. The first initiative of Master Tailors’ Association (India) was the first-ever Savile Row Academy summer course curated by professor Andrew Ramroop, OBE, director, MauriceSedwell, London and Savile Row Academy. Following this, the association participated in the 26th Federation of Asian Master Tailors Congress and was invited to the 37th World Federation of Master Tailors meet at Taipei & Taiyuan in 2017. And this was just the beginning. Let’s take a look at some of the core team and the best practitioners:

We cater to consumers who are connoisseurs of the finer things in life and who have limited options in the Indian market. This is where we come in. Pezalli’s USP lies in creating premium quality shirts and trousers. Our success lies in positioning ourselves as a unique offering in this space.

HIMANSHU PITHADIA, FITWELL DESIGN STUDIO

OWNER,

VINAYAK RAO, MN RAO

With an eye for detail and a desire to learn about the finer nuances of bespoke tailoring, Himanshu Pithadia has over 20 years of experience in fine tailoring. He believes, “There is nothing like a finely tailored, bespoke suit. We design garments by combining current trends with our rich heritage.”

A professional pattern-drafter for over 30 years, Vinayak Rao heads the prestigious brand, MN Rao. A Savile Row-certified master tailor, he gives the best fits to his customers, while giving back to the community. He is also a professor at SNDT College and was a judge at the Federation of Asian Master Tailors Congress.


SUDHIR DIWAN, DIWAN SAHEB

MANAGING DIRECTOR,

Driving his business with excellence and panache for more than 30 years, Sudhir Diwan combines his keen insight into fashion with his strategic acumen at Diwan Saheb. Bringing the same enthusiasm that he has for his brand to Master Tailors’ Association (India), he has taken up the challenge to

head the north Indian segment of the organization. Diwan Saheb has avidly contributed to the bespoke tailoring industry for more than 60 years and was recently felicitated with the Golden Years Award at the 26th Federation of Asian Master Tailors Congress award ceremony that was held in Thailand. Wishing to further the success of Master Tailors’ Association (India), he says, “We lack the exposure to specialized pattern-drafting skills and higher standards of craftsmanship. Therefore the vision is to expand the market, acquire new training skills and to have the globetrotters buy their suits in India. We want to attract more tourists to shop for bespoke tailoring and improve our exports in tailored garments.”

SHAANAWAZ CHANDIWALA, DIRECTOR, KINGS, MUMBAI Committed to providing you with a definitive bespoke tailoring experience, Shaanawaz Chandiwala is an active volunteer in Master Tailors’ Association (India). “For generations, our tailoring bloodline, through our current Savile Row certified bespoke process, has enabled us to create custom garments that epitomize the glory behind the tradition of pure bespoke and made-to-measure tailoring.” Chandiwala’s creations are an expression of the tradition and teachings of the Savile Row Academy.

DHRUVA BHASIN, BHASIN SONS, LUCKNOW A third-generation entrepreneur, Dhruv Bhasin explains, “Since I am located in the city of Nawabs, which has its own culture of dressing, it is important to revive the art of bespoke tailoring.” He supports the Master Tailors’ Association’s (India) skill development, along with undertaking the training of local karigars.

NAVEEN PISHE,

OWNER, PN RAO

“Through Master Tailors’ Association (India), we benefit as an industry. We collectively talk about opportunities, challenges, growth, how we

can train people and more. The idea is to expand the market and to acquire the training and the skills so as to capture the globetrotters. At PN Rao, we improve our product and customer service based on what is happening in the international market. Naturally, Master Tailors’ Association (India) is an extension of this strategy. Through it, we can work towards making India a destination for custom-made clothing, as we have the talent and the technology to do so,” says Naveen Pishe. India is poised for a new breed of fashion evangelists who will be more concerned with the science of style rahter than mere glamour. This is why bespoke tailoring has an inherent advantage over ready-to-wear. Explaining this, Pishe says, “Bespoke is crafted for your body, and you feel that the suit draped around your body is in tune with your body shape.”


THE LINE-UP MARKS & SPENCER, `6,000

TOMMY HILFIGER, `15,000

BOMBER JACKET BY SUPERDRY, `15,000. T-SHIRT BY ONLY & SONS AT KOOVS, `1,300. JEANS BY JACK & JONES, `4,000. SHOES BY CLARKS, `10,000

THE BIG THEORY

The bang-on trendy bombers that separate the men from the boys

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ARSH SAYED STYLED BY DESIRÉE FERNANDES

GAS, `26,000

156 —

NIKE, `5,500

OCTOBER 2016

HAIR & MAKE-UP: MONA ANAND/BBLUNT. MODELS: RAVI GULIA/INEGA, KRISHNA CHATURVEDI/TOABH TALENT

BOMB


THE TASTEMAKER

ATALE OFFEW CITIES

He's one of India's leading textile and product designers but Peter D'Ascoli's inspirations are seeped in nostalgia from all across the globe

The summer of ’79

“My grandparents came to America from Italy, through Ellis Island, and settled in Brooklyn. I was born there and we moved out to the South Shore of Long Island when I was five years old. It was an idyllic childhood. I grew up sailing in the Great South Bay and surfing on the beaches of Fire Island. I moved back to NYC to study design at the Fashion Institute of Technology. It 160

was the beginning of the Eighties and Manhattan was a very different place back then – Soho still had a bohemian arts scene and the AIDS epidemic had not yet decimated our creative community.”

India Inc.

“My first job – when I was 22 – was for the Indian government, where I spent almost two years travelling throughout India working with craft. This was 30 years ago and in those days one saw much more traditional clothing being worn by everyone, including young people.”

The Big Apple

“From India I returned to NYC and began working for Diane von Furstenberg who taught me about two worlds, one of sophisticated luxury and the other of commercial, big businesses. This was before the Internet, when people in New York still looked and acted as if they were in an episode of Mad Men. I remember the first time

WORDS: SHIVANNGI LOLAYEKAR. PHOTO: TARUN VISHWA (PORTRAIT)

P  

eter D’Ascoli speaks of his life with great animation. His face widens like a cartoon character to narrate his first tryst with India when he was 22, working in handicrafts and textiles for the government. He swipes the air horizontally like he’s setting a scene when he reminisces about his time in Manhattan as studio director for Diane von Furstenberg in the Eighties. The 54-year-old founder and director of textile and interior powerhouse D’Ascoli & Company has lived a colourful life. Here he shares his journey from being a Long Islander to becoming a Delhiite.


THE TASTEMAKER I met Diane. I was going to see her with a bag full of textiles from India. I wore a pair of jeans that I had made in India and a sweatshirt. I wasn’t trendy but I liked the idea of being classic with a twist. But you’re in Manhattan, working in fashion. Diane had a very glamorous office on 745 and 5th Avenue that’s now moved to the Meatpacking District. I was 24 years old and I had the corner office. I was in over my head. Diane was an incredible mentor and I learnt to be clever like a monkey, to see, observe, learn and how to dress. I realized then that if you’re well-presented you’ll always make a good impression.”

Global local

“At the beginning of the new millennium, manufacturing moved out of America and Europe. I started travelling all around the world on global sourcing trips: to China, Pakistan and I always came to Delhi. When globalization heated up with information, technology, logistics and shipping companies, I saw an opportunity to set up my business here. There are still ancient crafts and talented craftspeople, using techniques that have been lost all over the world. If we go back to the 15th century, India’s GDP, the wealth of the country, both materially and technologically was far superior to Europe; the best printed cottons were coming from here, transforming fashion in Europe. Now, the population is tremendously curious about the outside world. I’m actively trying to change the perception that all things coming from outside are better.”

Daily musings

“My work is inspired by two opposite but similar emotions described by Marcel Proust, who relates hunger or loneliness to his lost past, and Nabokov, who speaks of ‘Nostalgia in reverse’, a longing for an unknown, exotic land. My aesthetic is always about a mix of these two impulses, a desire for both the familiar and the mysterious. In terms of design, William Morris and Mariano Fortuny, who were both dedicated to small-batch, handcrafted products inspire me. I also agree with the aesthetic of Alessandro Michele at Gucci, who has made graphic decoration trendy again after years of minimalist-dominated fashion.”

The power of fashion

“When you put a Gucci suit on, with a great tie and great shoes, you feel like you can talk to anyone, hang out with 162 —

OCTOBER 2016

A 17-year-old Peter spearfishing in Puerto Rico

“India is tremendously curious about the outside world.. I’m actively trying to change the perception that all things coming from outside are better.” In Brooklyn with his father and older brother

anyone. Dressing up now is a lot like semiotics. Billionaires from Silicon Valley wear jeans and a T-shirt. In a certain period every investment banker on Wall Street was wearing a pinstripe suit and tie. If you see someone wearing Tod’s driving moccasins, you can club them into a certain set of people. I use clothing in that way. I can be dressed in a preppy style wearing ripped jeans and a block-printed shirt to exude my bohemian persona. But it depends on my mood, on the event and the audience. Clothes are a powerful tool.”

The future present

“Contemporary designers should look to the past to learn about the importance of patience, experience and expertise. All too often young designers want results immediately without investing the time and effort to cultivate technique and knowledge. And never sacrifice good taste to create something original; young designers often make this mistake.”


www.carolinaherrera.com/212

For Further details please contact Baccarose on 022-22817766 or E-mail carolinaherrera@bacarosse.com


Amidst the barren lands, vintage checks and the velvetty sandscapes, unravels an Epoch.. Fashion fades, style goes forever.

Autumn / Winter campaign

Available in all leading stores


Hallmark Suits

www.hallmarksuits.in


the edit 1

2

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money matters everyone at the table breaks out his preferred payment method – amex card, rubber-banded cash, venmo app – and side-eyed judgement ensues. shut them all down with a wallet that makes a statement before you even crack it open

166 —

octoBER 2016

photo: travis rathbone

4


1 VALENTINO GARAVANI, `30,000 2 GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI, `16,800 3 BERLUTI, `75,220 4 LOUIS VUITTON, PRICE ON REQUEST 5 DIOR HOMME, PRICE ON REQUEST 6 GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI DESIGN, `23,850 7 GUCCI, PRICE ON REQUEST 8 GUCCI, PRICE ON REQUEST 9 PS BY PAUL SMITH, `24,900 10 GOYARD, `68,510

5

6

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OCTOBER 2016

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THE BUZZ

UNCOMMONLY GREAT

SNEAKERS Common Projects sneakers are, simply put, a new classic. Conceived in New York, manufactured in Italy and worn by the most stylish men in the world, these are the pareddown kicks that sparked and continue to define the nowubiquitous luxury-sneaker movement

hen it comes to iconic product design, there’s Dieter Rams’ appliances. Philippe Starck’s seating. Steve Jobs’ hardware. So… Are you ready for the GirolamiPoopat sneaker? Because, at the risk of sounding hyperbolic, it’s beginning to look like the Common Projects Achilles will stand the test of time. In some ways, it already has. Flavio Girolami and Peter Poopat’s silhouettes are now as recognizable as the biggest styles from Nike or Adidas. And the duo’s cult following has grown into a full-blown religion thanks to high-wattage boosts from Kanye West, Drake, Alexander

168 —

OCTOBER 2016

Skarsgård and Aziz Ansari, among many others. “We’re always on the hunt for the perfect thing,” Poopat says. For the designers, that hunt has turned into a way of life that goes far beyond peerless sneaker-stitching. Girolami recently completed a search for a vintage watch – and humbly submits the Fifties Longines he just acquired. Both men also buy and work on motorcycles and are simultaneously renovating homes in New York – Poopat, a town house in Fort Greene, Brooklyn; Girolami, a loft in the West Village. “Most people would consider the work done,” Poopat says, “but we’re constantly tinkering.”

You could say the same thing about their luxury-shoe empire, which started with just one sneaker but now includes a crepe-soled Chelsea boot (which has a devoted following of its own), basketball-inspired sneaker shapes and new variations on the Achilles in soft, instantly identifiable colours like mint green and tan. All of the styles maintain that extraordinary and highly sought-after CP restraint. But back to those homes the friends are finishing up: “We took the two spaces and reduced them to what we thought was original, and then we built back on top of it,” Poopat says. It’s a design sensibility that’s as much about what hasn’t been done as what has, and not everybody gets it. Which is perfectly fine by the designers – and the hardcore fans of their brand. “When people walk in, they’re like, ‘Oh, when you renovate it, it’s gonna be great,’” Poopat says of his town house. “That makes me really happy.”

WORDS: NOAH JOHNSON

Flavio Girolami and Peter Poopat


PRINCE OF FESTIVITY Dapper has a new designation that’ll elevate your resume and put you on the throne of regal eleganc Think: royal, rich and utterly theatrical balanced w restraint (read: no bling). Anita Dongre’s bespoke o wear pieces are the shape-shifters of style, reserv for the most discerning (and bold) gents of today

MR SOPHISTICATION

l

y

STRIKING SHOWM N Make your grand entry wearing a classic bandhgala masterpiece crafted out of Anita Dongre atelier. From t fit to construction, colour to coordination, the design ex pure opulence and perfecti Paired with a traditional dh , not only should you expect turn heads, but own the fac you’ve lit the torch to sarto excellence.

THE DARK DUKE

LORD OF ELEGANCE

Dress unimpeachably stylish to your next festive shindig in Anita Dongre’s classy multi-kali kurta and churidaar. Subtle yet statement making, the grey kurta’s silhouette sits handsomely and is made for the man who embraces the extraordinary. A perfect showcase of old-world charm that meets new-age style sensibilities.

Armed with superstar swag, this dapper design of Anita Dongre’s cocktail sherwani presents a modern take on royal fashion. We’re talking about the richest brocade, the most sumptuous embroidery, the slickest silhouette in a luxe fabric and black hue. Pay attention to the details and throw in a bright orange pocket square.

S s s

etimes the most ghtforward looks are the est. This muted silk mustard by Anita Dongre, for mple is the very embodiment ss is more. Adding character he simple look, artistic broidery makes an impact. T the kurta with a beige daar and walk the walk in ort and style.


FASHION NIGHTS

OFF THE RUNWAY

OLD’S COOL

The codes of black tie are changing but a classic threepiece suit will always remain elegant. For a modern touch, bring in a little shine via your bow tie and blazer.

NEW AGE

If you’ve avoided going for black tie events because suits are too stiff for you, this is your lucky period, as designers break norms with alternative dressing. It’s all about the image you want to put out there so be careful not to give out the hippie stoner vibe. Or do.

172 —

OCTOBER 2016

RAJESH PRATAP SINGH

ANTAR-AGNI

As normcore becomes normal and millennials influence fashion, how do you do black tie today? VH + GQ Fashion Nights has you covered

Leo picked up his first Oscar looking like an elegant gent

PHOTO: SAGAR AHUJA (RAMP). IMAGE: REX FEATURES (WILLOW & JADEN), GETTY IMAGES (ZAYN, LEONARDO)

TUX REDUX

TROY COSTA

Zayn Malik at the 2016 Met Gala

VAN HEUSEN

Willow and Jaden Smith


FASHION NIGHTS

OFF THE RUNWAY

COLOUR PLAY

When black tie starts to feel a little stale, break out in sharp Indianwear. You won’t be doing the twinsies thing with the guy at the next table, and whether you opt for a sherwani or bandhgala, there’s no question that you’ll be the standout guy in the room.

Jeff Bezos poses for GQ

174 —

OCTOBER 2016

PHOTO: SAGAR AHUJA (RAMP), ARJUN MARK (JEFF). IMAGE: REX FEATURES (RAMI)

TROY COSTA

Rami Malek's got the blues

VAN HEUSEN

INDIAN ACCENT

RAGHAVENDRA RATHORE

SHANTANU & NIKHIL

Put on a coloured suit, as long as you stick to hues of the same family. Details like a pocket square or tie won’t overwhelm your look, but complement it.


THE LIST

EYE TOP PICKS FROM THE STYLE DESK

TIP

Bold checks add bulk, and are best for skinny frames.

TRAVEL DIARIES

Inspired by Christian Dior’s love of travelling, the French maison’s latest bag is the perfect accessory for the globetrotting gentleman. Mister Dior features two document holders and a messenger bag that your laptop or tablet can fit into. The buttery, soft-grained calfskin leather looks as slick as it feels soft. But the best part is that you can carry it to work or on a flight out and no one will question your boss status. dior.com

CHECK, PLEASE There are two ways you can step out this winter: in blacks and greys like the guy next to you, or in an eyecatching windowpane checked suit that’ll win you compliments. Lecoanet Hemant’s lush velvet suit is ideal for nippy garden parties in Delhi or rooftop bars in Mumbai. lecoanethemant.com 176 —

OCTOBER 2016

PHOTO: ARSH SAYED. HAIR & MAKE-UP: MONA ANAND/BBLUNT. MODEL: NEEL TOLANI/TFM. IMAGE: REX FEATURES (STEVE).

ROLL OVER

Steve McQueen, arguably one of Hollywood’s most rakish actors, gave stiff turtlenecks rock ’n’ roll appeal in Bullitt. The Rolling Stones’ original guitarist Brian Jones took it to stage and made it legit for musicians. In 2016, wear Hugo Boss’ ochre jumper to exude the same rockstar vibe with the slickness of a millennial. hugoboss.com

GQ

PACK YOUR BAR

Louis Vuitton’s known for many things: luxury travel goods, sumptuous leather accessories, Kim Jones’ edgy menswear. But raise the bar with LV’s case that keeps your hip flask, cocktail shaker, peg measure and glasses secure – for when you need those on-the-go pick-me-ups. louisvuitton.com


THE LION IS ON THE MOVE

CELEBRATING THE SECOND ANNIVERSARY OF MAKE IN INDIA

Make in India is a major national initiative designed to facilitate investment, foster innovation, enhance skill development, protect intellectual property and build best-in-class manufacturing infrastructure.

As Make in India turns two, there has been an unprecedented increase in confidence, collaboration and investment. This comprehensive report card showcases: • The beginning of Make in India and its presence around the world • Make in India Week 2016 in numbers • The impact of Ease of Doing Business in India • Initiatives like: Mittelstand, Startup India, IPR Policy, Industrial Corridors, Invest India • FDI achievements and India as the world’s most open economy • Make in India’s biggest achievements and milestones. The stage has been set. The world is watching.

A PROGRESS REPORT >>


THE LION’S FIRST FOOTPRINT

From the first speech that marked the beginning to the events that built the foundation of the revolutionary campaign, here’s a snapshot of how it all began...

MAKE IN INDIA THE BEGINNING AUGUST 15, 2014

In his Independence Day speech, Prime Minister Narendra Modi sounded a rallying cry to make in India

SEPTEMBER 25, 2014

The programme was launched at a high profile event staged at Vigyan Bhavan, New Delhi

DECEMBER 29, 2014

A workshop titled ‘Make in India – Sectorial perspective & initiatives’ was conducted, under which an action plan for one year and three years was prepared to boost investments in 25 sectors

MAKE IN INDIA AROUND THE WORLD

APRIL 13 – 17, 2015 GERMANY

India was awarded the coveted status of Partner Country at Hannover Messe, the world’s largest industrial fair. The fair paved the way for new avenues of investment and greater economic engagement between the two nations. The India Pavilion showcased India’s manufacturing capabilities across core sectors of the nation’s economy

SEPTEMBER 24, 2015 NEW YORK CITY

Make in India at the Fortune Global Forum’s Pre-conference Dinner. Prime Minister Narendra Modi led the discussion with Chief Editor of Fortune, Alan Murray. Each of the attending Fortune 500 CEOs were invited to express their views on the current opportunities for the future on Ease of Doing Business (EODB) in India

NOVEMBER 2 – 4, 2015 SAN FRANCISCO

Make in India at the 2015 Fortune Global Forum explored the implications of disruptive changes and emerging technology trends for corporations in the 21st century. The forum provided a focused and strategic programme with formats that stimulated an open exchange of new ideas and innovative concepts


MUMBAI

THE LION MAKES ITS MARK AT MAKE IN INDIA WEEK 2016

M

ake in India Week in Mumbai propelled the Indian economy by forging enormous global engagement in the form of investments and partnerships. The world’s best and brightest converged during the week of 13 – 18 February, 2016—industry leaders, policy makers, entrepreneurs, government officials—to deliberate on reforms and policy and create a progressive shift to the current industrial environment. All eyes were on Mumbai as the sheer scale and presentation of the conclave evoked enormous excitement in national and international media. A number of landmark MoUs were signed across major manufacturing sectors and states. The numbers speak louder than words...

215 EXHIBITORS

8,90,000 VISITORS

150 EVENTS

102 COUNTRIES


$226.9 BILLION IN INVESTMENTS COMMITTED

1245 2000+ 1000 65,500 NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL SPEAKERS

FOREIGN COMPANIES

CEOS & CXOS

PARTICIPANTS AT MAKE IN INDIA CENTRE


The Lion inviTes The WorLd To india ease of doinG Business in india

A major pillar of the Make in India initiative, Ease of Doing Business (EODB) is significant for a prospering industrial environment, especially for foreign investors. Emphasis has been on simplification and improvement of existing rules as well as introduction of IT to expedite processes for more effective governance. A series of 127 measures and reforms have elevated India’s ranking from 142 in 2014 to 130 in 2016, in a field of 189 nations, on the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business List (Doing Business Report, June 2016). Key reforms areas include: starting a business, construction permits, getting electricity, trading across borders, resolving insolvency, enforcing contracts and taxation. Some of the major developments under these categories are: a new online regime, single-window systems, improved clearance facilities, simplified and reduced documentation, common forms, number of procedures reduced, time for obtaining permits reduced, special bills passed to facilitate ease, digitalisation of records, online payments and much more. The Government of India has decided to rank states on the basis of ease of doing business. The move is intended at promoting competition among states to improve ease of doing business. The Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP) has circulated action points to state governments on creating an enabling framework for stimulating investments in manufacturing with specific timelines for each action. DIPP has launched an online portal to track real-time rankings of states on the basis of number of reforms undertaken by them. Currently, the portal tracks real-time implementation of 340-Point Business Reforms Action Plan to be considered for the 2016 rankings. >>

sTarTuP india

Launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in January 2016, this flagship initiative is aimed at building a strong ecosystem to foster entrepreneurship, promote innovation and in turn, generate large scale employment opportunities.

achievemenTs • Self-certification for certain compliances for Ministry of Labour and Employment and Ministry of Environment & Forests • ‘Twitter Seva’ has been launched to facilitate interaction between entrepreneurs • Startup India Portal and Mobile App are now operational to facilitate application for start-up recognition, verification of recognition certificate and also act as a source for regulatory information • A scheme for Startups IPR Protection for facilitating fast-track filing of Patents, Trademarks and Designs by start-ups has been launched • Tax incentives for start-up companies for a period of three years have been introduced in The Finance Act 2016

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2016 2014

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india’s GLoBaL ‘ease of doinG Business’ ranKinG

iPr PoLicy

It’s been made evident that a dynamic and balanced Intellectual Property Regime is imperative to encourage creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship. The Government of India has unveiled a National IPR policy to achieve the same. The focus is on enhancing access to health care, food security and environmental protection among other sectors of vital social, economic and technological importance.


maKe in india miTTeLsTand

Mittelstand companies form the backbone of the German economy. Most of them are family-owned and ‘small’, yet world market leaders in their domain with worldbeating technologies. Make in India Mittelstand (MIIM) serves as an innovative, integrated platform for market entry services that corresponds to the complex requirements of first-time investors. It is a one-stop source for companies requiring additional benefits of special workshops, networking and information exchange. >>

indusTriaL corridors

The Government of India is building a grid of industrial corridors across the country to provide developed land and quality infrastructure for industrial townships. Each industrial corridor stretches across major industrial regions and smart cities; aimed at expanding a manufacturing and services base to develop a global hub. >>

ProGress

$447.8 miLLion (`30,000 miLLion) committed investments by German Mittelstand organisations 56 companies expressed interest in the programme 134 Mittelstand companies approached MIIM 55 personal meetings conducted by the MIIM team to evaluate their participation in the programme 43 individuals and firms enrolled as official members of the MIIM programme 26 MIIM firms have concrete investment plans for India

ProGress

DMIC (DelhI MuMbaI InDustrIal CorrIDor) • The corridor runs 1504km long • Estimate investment of $1 billion • 24 Investment Regions/Industrial Areas will be developed • Economic potential: $720 billion in exports and output value of $3.3 trillion in the next nine years; 25.5 million jobs in the next seven years CbIC (ChennaI bengaluru InDustrIal CorrIDor) • The corridor runs 560km long • Perspective Planning is complete • Three nodes namely Tumkur, Ponneri and Krishnapatnam have been identified • Steps have been initiated for Detailed Master Planning and Preliminary Engineering • Infrastructure plans include: high-speed rail link and dedicated freight corridor aKIC (aMrItsar KolKata InDustrIal CorrIDor) • Project consultants for Preparation of Perspective Plan has been appointed • Perspective Planning will be completed by October 2016 • Steps have been initiated for Detailed Master Planning and Preliminary Engineering

Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) Chennai-Bengaluru Industrial Corridor (CBIC) Bengaluru-Mumbai Economic Corridor (BMEC) Vizag-Chennai Industrial Corridor (VCIC) Amritsar-Kolkata Industrial Corridor (AKIC)

bMeC (bengaluru MuMbaI eConoMIC CorrIDor) • The corridor runs 1000km long • Perspective Plan finalised. Dharwad node in Karnataka has been identified • Infrastructure plans include: Diamond quadrilateral high-speed rail link • Economic potential: 32 million jobs in the next 25 years; Exports to increase by $96 billion; An expected 50 percent increase in growth rate VCIC (VIzag ChennaI InDustrIal CorrIDor) • The corridor runs 800km long • ADB has initiated Master Planning for two nodes namely Vishakhapatnam and Srikalahasti-Yerpedu • Infrastructure plans include: 800km segment of National Highway 5 through Chennai; Vishakhapatnam to be the core spine connecting investment nodes


INVEST INDIA

Invest India is the official Investment Promotion and Facilitation Agency of the Government of India, mandated to facilitate investments into India. It is envisaged to be the first point of reference for potential investors. The team has domain and functional experts who provide sector-and state-specific inputs, and hand-holding support to investors through the entire investment cycle, from pre-investment decision-making to after-care. It assists with location identification; expediting regulatory approvals; facilitating meetings with relevant government and corporate officials; and also provides after-care services that include initiating remedial action on problems faced by investors. All facilitation and hand-holding support to investors under the Make in India programme is being provided by Invest India. Invest India is promoted by the Department of Industrial Policy & Promotion (DIPP), Ministry of Commerce and Industry (Government of India), the State Governments of India and the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce & Industry.

MOU/AGREEMENT SIGNED BY INVEST INDIA

• Japan - Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) • S Korea - Korea Trade Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA) • Saudi Arabia - Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) • Kazakhstan - KaznexInvest • USA - Invest In America • Czech Republic - Czechinvest • France - Invest In France Agency & UBI France • Italy - Invitalia • UK - UKTI, UKIBC • Mauritius - BOI Mauritius

WHAT’S MORE

• Responded to 23,124 queries on the Make in India portal (from September 25, 2014 to August 26, 2016) • Facilitation of global entities in establishing their business in the Indian market • Facilitation partner in the Make in India Mittelstand • Helped organise the Startup India event and Silicon Valley delegation interaction with the President of India • Launched uberEXCHANGE, a start-up mentorship programme in collaboration with Uber • Organised the QPrize Startup contest and DP World prize • Startup India hub contact centre operationalised at Invest India which has handled 20,000 queries since April 1, 2016 • Will be launching an interactive online learning and development module to educate start-ups and aspiring entrepreneurs, through various stages of their entrepreneurial journey

KEY AWARDS

• 2016 UNCTAD Investment Promotion Award for excellence in partnering for investment promotion. United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) recognised Invest India as one of the world’s best-practice investment promotion agencies (IPAs) for promoting FDI that contributes to sustainable development • Winner from the South, East Asia and Oceania region - Annual Investment Meeting (AIM) 2016 Investment Award for the best investment project • Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) Investment Awards 2016 for the best Investment Promotion Agency amongst the 21 member states

WORKSHOPS AND TRAINING • Invest India organised the “Workshop on Promoting FDI in Solar Energy Projects” in collaboration with UNCTAD on March 10, 2016 at New Delhi • World Bank organised group training programmes for officials of Invest India & DIPP on “Fundamentals of Investment Promotion” in February 2016


FDI IN INDIA - POLICY REFORMS (2015 - 2016)

With a liberalised foreign investment policy regime and multiple sectors opened up for 100 percent foreign direct investment, India is now the world’s most open economy.

100 percent FDI in the medical devices sector is permitted under the automatic route

100 percent FDI is permitted under the automatic route

INSURANCE & PENSION

RETAIL

11

The government has permitted up to 49 percent FDI in the sector under the automatic route

FDI IN INDIA ACHIEVEMENTS

55.7

46.6

45.1

41.9

FDI INFLOWS IN INDIA IN USD BILLION

37.8

34.8

34.9

34.3

36.1

2002-03

2003-04

6.1

9.0

2007-08

4.3

2006-07

5.0

2005-06

6.1

2004-05

4.0

2001-02

22.8

2000-01

Major initiatives and a slew of reforms have put India on the global industrial map as the fastest growing economy and the most attractive investment destination in the world. After the launch of Make in India, the growth in FDI has seen a significant surge, with 46 percent increase in FDI equity inflows during the period of October 2014 to May 2016, over the corresponding period before the launch. A favourable policy environment facilitated the highest ever FDI inflow of $55.7 billion in the financial year 2015-16.

12

Single brand retail trading FDI policy to provide that sourcing of 30 percent of the value of goods purchased would be reckoned from the opening of first store. 100 percent FDI is now permitted under the automatic route in Duty Free Shops located and operated in the Customs bonded areas

2015-16

10

The government opened a whole range of rail infrastructure to private participation as well as 100 percent FDI under the automatic route

9

CONSTRUCTION

MEDICAL DEVICES

2014-15

RAILWAYS

100 percent FDI will be allowed through FIPB route in the marketing of food products produced and manufactured in India

8

6

Regional Air Transport Service has been opened for foreign investment up to 49 percent under the automatic route

2013-14

FDI up to 100 percent is permissable under the government route

5

AVIATION

2012-13

4 DEFENCE 7

FOOD PROCESSING

3

100 percent foreign investment under automatic route for coffee, rubber, cardamom, palm oil tree, olive oil tree plantations

2011-12

Non-repatriable investments by NRIs, Persons of Indian origin and individuals with Overseas Citizenship of India will be treated as domestic investments and will not be subject to FDI caps

Foreign investment cap on Satellites establishment and operation has now been raised from 74 percent to 100 percent under the government route

2010-11

NRI INVESTMENT

2

2009-10

1

FDI relaxation for Cable Networks, DTH, Up-linking of TV Channels, terrestrial broadcasting, FMs, etc

AGRICULTURAL PLANTATIONS

SPACE

2008-09

BROADCASTING

Net FDI inflows hit an all-time high in early 2016, according to International Rating Agency Moody’s Source RBI


THE LION STRIDES AHEAD MAKE IN INDIA MILESTONES

Policy changes and reforms have underpinned foreign investments, making India the world’s most attractive investment destination. Here are landmark moments in Make in India’s 18-month journey to date

1ST CHOICE FOR TECH MNCS TO SET UP R&D CENTRES OUTSIDE THEIR HOME COUNTRIES

UP 15 SPOTS ON THE GLOBAL INNOVATION INDEX 2O16 SOURCE: CORNELL UNIVERSITY, INSEAD AND THE WORLD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ORGANISATION (WIPO)

1ST AMONG THE WORLD’S BEST COUNTRIES TO INVEST IN

SOURCE: ZINNOV MANAGEMENT CONSULTING REPORT

SOURCE: BEST COUNTRIES RANKINGS, 2016 -U.S. NEWS, BAV CONSULTING & WHARTON SCHOOL

AMONG THE TOP 10 FDI DESTINATIONS GLOBALLY

UP 12 PLACES ON THE EASE OF DOING BUSINESS 2O16 LIST

SOURCE: WORLD INVESTMENT REPORT 2015, UNCTAD

SOURCE: WORLD BANK

1ST AMONG THE WORLD’S MOST ATTRACTIVE INVESTMENT DESTINATIONS

SOURCE: ERNST & YOUNG – 2015 INDIA ATTRACTIVENESS SURVEY


1ST AMONG THE WORLD’S TOP MOST GREENFIELD FDI DESTINATIONS, JANUARY-JUNE 2O15

1ST AMONG 11O INVESTMENT DESTINATIONS POLLED GLOBALLY

SOURCE: FOREIGN POLICY MAGAZINE – BASELINE PROFITABILITY INDEX 2015

SOURCE: FINANCIAL TIMES – FDI MARKETS

1ST AMONG THE WORLD’S FASTEST GROWING ECONOMIES IN BOTH 2016 & 2017

1ST AMONG 1OO COUNTRIES ON THE GROWTH, INNOVATION AND LEADERSHIP INDEX SOURCE: FROST & SULLIVAN

SOURCE: WESP REPORT 2016, UN

7TH MOST VALUED NATION BRAND IN THE WORLD SOURCE: BRAND FINANCE

46 PERCENT GROWTH IN INDIA’S FDI EQUITY INFLOWS (OCT 2014-MAY 2016) FDI EQUITY INFLOW INCREASED FROM $46.72 BILLION IN 2012-2014 TO $70.93 BILLION IN 2014-2016. SOURCE: DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL POLICY & PROMOTION, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

1ST AMONG THE WORLD’S FASTEST GROWING ECONOMIES

SOURCE: INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND

$55.7 BILLION INDIA’S HIGHEST EVER RECORDED FDI INFLOWS (20152016) SOURCE: DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL POLICY & PROMOTION, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA


KOMAL + RATUL 43 Park Mansions, Park street, kolkata - 700016 eMail: ratsood@gMail.coM | tel: +919339803311 saville row acadeMY (london) certified

PhotograPher: indranil Mukherjee, Model: nick raMPal, MakeuP and hair: saurav Mitra, location: Park hotel, kolkata

BY


EDITED BY VARUN GODINHO

Cartier launches its all-new Drive collection Across the finish line with Tissot at the Tour de France Talking watches with Hrithik Roshan

THE LONG ROAD

Cartier’s stylish new men’sonly Drive watch collection has one foot on the throttle, finds Varun Godinho

itti Peacocks. That’s what they call the tribe of dandies who descend on Florence for the bi-annual menswear trade fair Pitti Uomo. Leaning against the doorframe of the Hotel Savoy that opens up onto the buzzy Piazza della Repubblica, I have a direct view of this eccentric species. With lava orange and sunflower yellow suits, socks even brighter, floral shirts and feather-heavy hats, their street style game is as easy to spot as Melania Trump at a Democratic Rally. All this hyperbolic fashion is in stark contrast to the reason I’m here: the understatedly elegant Drive watch collection from Cartier. If you’re wearing a watch, whatever the brand, you have Cartier to tip your hat to. That’s because it was the world’s first watchmaker to make a commercially available wristwatch, challenging others to follow suit. (Breguet and GirardPerregaux made wristwatches many years prior, but those were either one-off royal commissions or produced as military-only gear.) The inflection point was in 1904 when Louis Cartier designed a wristwatch for OCTOBER 2016

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Palazzo Gondi

Pitti Uomo, Florence

his Brazilian pilot friend, Alberto-Santos Dumont, who needed a way to tell the time without having to take his hands off the controls mid-air and dip into his pocket to pull out a pocket watch. The Santos-Dumont timepiece was revolutionary because it wasn’t a hatchet job of taking a pocket watch, soldering lugs into the case and fitting it with straps. This was instead a wristwatch designed ground-up, and by 1911 Cartier was selling these out of its Paris flagship. Given Cartier’s well-established reputation as a jewellery-maker at the beginning of the 20th century, fine design was foremost on Louis’ mind when he set out to create the Santos-Dumont. “There have always been two ways Cartier has approached watch design. One is looking at pure geometrical shapes – the Santos with its square-with-round-angles case – is an example. The second, ‘expressive design’, takes a certain inspiration and expresses it in a shape,” says Pierre Rainero, Image, Style and Heritage Director at Cartier, tasked with deciding what your next watch will look like. We’re sitting on the terrace of the Palazzo Gondi with a clear sight of the 190 —

OCTOBER 2016

“THERE ARE TWO WAYS CARTIER APPROACHES DESIGN. ONE IS LOOKING AT PURE GEOMETRICAL SHAPES, THE SECOND, ‘EXPRESSIVE DESIGN’, THAT TAKES A CERTAIN INSPIRATION AND EXPRESSES IT IN A SHAPE”

Drive Collection

massive Florence Cathedral dome not more than 500 metres away. Expressive design has given rise to some of the world’s most recognizable and ubiquitous timepieces over the last century: The Tank, whose parallel line case design is inspired by the tanks of World War I, or the Crash, whose mangled-case shape was directly influenced by the remains of a Cartier watch that survived a serious car crash in the Sixties. When retrieved from the flaming wreckage, the melted watch was brought to the Cartier store to be restored – it instead served as the foundation for a new collection. Cartier’s cushion-shaped Drive collection, Rainero tells me, is deliberately a quest for perfect geometry – here, a thin case that’s rounded and wide. It is not an expressive design (apart from the fact that it borrowed only the slightest hints from the auto world with a crown shaped like the bolts of a wheel), because the idea from which an expressive design is derived can sometimes be quite divisive – not everyone wants something on their wrist to remind them of war or a terrible real-life car accident. Look closely at the Drive collection and you’ll find codes that haven’t strayed from the Santos-Dumont: the cabochon on the crown, railway track indices and roman numerals.


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and the positioning of Cartier’s as a prestigious watchmaker took a beating. It wasn’t until a decade ago that a woman stepped in to dramatically alter and reclaim Cartier’s reputation as a true haute horologist. Carole Forestier-Kasapi

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Pierre Rainero

hat shifts this incredibly stylish collection into the realm of collectorworthy swag is what lies beneath that seductive dial – a completely in-house manufactured 1904MC calibre. It’s only been a little under a decade since Cartier got serious about creating its own movements, but how it got to that point is as gripping. In 1907, Louis signed a deal with Edmond Jaeger (one half of Jaeger-LeCoultre) to secure the rights to all its future complicated movements – thus allowing Cartier to begin selling its watches on a commercial scale in 1911. It also allowed Cartier to innovate with several mono-pusher chronographs, tourbillons, mystery clocks and minute repeaters through the Thirties. Over the next few decades, the Parisian brand also collaborated with other renowned watch manufacturers to secure their movements. “In the Fifties and Sixties we had suppliers like Vacheron, Rolex and even Patek,” says Rainero. Cartier would also retail watches from these brands, like the Submariner 1680 and Patek 2499, out of its boutiques in Paris and with the Cartier name co-signed on the dial. These specific ultra-collectible timepieces today always shoot the lights out at auctions. The Eighties and Nineties saw a glut of quartz and ETA-powered Cartier watches, mass-produced with everyman movements,

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n 2005, Paris-born, Swiss-trained Carole Forestier-Kasapi was appointed Director of Movement Creation, and set up a skunkworks department called the Fine Watchmaking division in Cartier’s 40,000sqft Swiss manufacture in La Chaux-de-Fonds. She’s designed some of the most fascinatingly complex movements since. These include gems found within the Astrotourbillon, the Astroregulateur and the fantastically ambitious one-off not-for-sale ID One and ID Two concept watches – does a mechanical watch that is theoretically adjustment- and lubricant-free, giving it an infinite power reserve, convince you of the audacity of Carole’s genius? “She looks over every single [movement] development, and not just the complicated ones. But she also has one eye on aesthetics

THE 1904 MC CALIBRE IN THE DRIVE COLLECTION IS ANOTHER THUMPING MISSION STATEMENT FROM THE HOUSE OF KASAPI

and she’s very sensitive to that. That’s why she is so relevant to the Cartier maison,” says Rainero. Which brings us to the automatic 1904 MC calibre, another thumping mission statement from the house of Kasapi. When it first broke cover in 2010, it became Cartier’s first calibre to be completely conceived, developed and manufactured in-house – a monumentally significant achievement reiterated by the fact it was christened after the most significant year in the brand’s horological history. It gave Kasapi the ability to innovate with a few men’s-only tool watches, like the Calibre Diver and Calibre Chronograph over the last few years. Now, that same base calibre has been modded and used across all the steel and gold versions of the Drive collection – the petite seconds timepiece features the 1904-PS MC movement, while the second-time zone and day/night indicator versions feature the 1904-FU MC movement (only the Flying Tourbillon Drive watch necessitated another in-house manual winding calibre, the 9452MC).

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he slick dress-watch vibe of Cartier’s Drive collection straddles a fine balance, staying within the brand’s jewellery aesthetics while still looking masculine. “Cartier is a jewellery maison and a watchmaker that makes watches for men. Many men have to fight against the idea that jewellery equals women,” says Rainero. Not unlike the many prejudices that the Pitti Peacocks are furiously fending off.

WORDS: VARUN GODINHO. IMAGE: REX FEATURES (PITTI STREET STYLE)

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Crafting Masterpieces Since 1850 Phoenix Market City, Kurla I High Street Phoenix, Lower Parel I 710--Kala Kunj, Linking Road, Khar West


Chris Froome, wearing a yellow jersey for a historic third time, rides across the final finish line for the 2016 Tour de France with his Sky Team mates

PERFECT

TIMING

When timing a global sporting event like the Tour de France, there’s zero room for error

Cyclist Peter Sagan races over the finish line at Stage 16 in Bern

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WORDS: VRITTI RASHI GOEL

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he smallest winning margin ever recorded in the history of the 21-stage, 3-week, 3,500km-long Tour de France is 8 seconds, in 1989. The 2016 race’s margin: 4 minutes 5 seconds for winner Chris Froome (his third Grand Tour win). For a sport like cycling, and for a multi-race event like the 103-yearold Tour de France, keeping track of milliseconds at each race is crucial. Enter Tissot, which timed the TdF between 1988-1992 – yep, it calculated that 8-second aggregate difference – and then returned this year for a five-year partnership with the event. Since timing its first sport, downhill skiing, in 1938 (apt, for the Jura Valley-based Swiss watchmaker), Tissot has been associated with several sports over the years – the Hunt-Lauda era of F1, motorcycle, superbike and auto racing, ice hockey, fencing, rugby, football, cycling and basketball. Brand ambassadors range from MotoGP legends like Nicky Hayden and Jorge Lorenzo to b-baller Tony Parker and cricket ace Virat Kohli. To time the TdF this year, 8 coffee-fuelled technicians managed the insane amount of data (usually time and speed) coming in from sensors attached to each cycle during the race, as well as 2,000 frame-per-second cameras sending images from the start and


OPENING SOON IN DUBAI


The warehouse at Tissot’s HQ, called The Beast, houses 32,000 boxes’ worth of watches and components

1930 A ntimagnétique; 1999 T issot T-Touch

Tissot’s firsts include the 24-timezone, plastic, wood and granite watches

finish lines of each stage. Precision is everything. These are the guys who analyze and calculate and double check the measurements, in almost real-time, and let the world know who wins each stage. And gets the coveted yellow jersey – a symbol of having the lowest aggregate time at the end of each stage, and, therefore, of being the leader of the event.

(Above) The cameras are set up and tested hours before each stage begins; (right) Tissot’s pocketwatches were coveted for their precision and aesthetics

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WORDS: VRITTI RASHI GOEL

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he proprietary system Tissot uses is tailor-made for the TdF, and one of the most advanced technological systems for timing a large-scale sporting event. Not surprising when you consider Tissot’s history of firsts: the first scientifically antimagnetic wristwatch in 1930, the first 24-time zone wristwatch, the first tactile wristwatch – that precedes today’s smartwatch. In an industry with an intimate relationship with technology, the pedigreed watchmaker takes things a step further, with a fully mechanized HQ to organize its 4-million-andcounting annual inventory: Robots speed in and out of a supermachine called “The Beast” to manage its tens of thousands of timepieces and components efficiently. Like with sports, in Tissot’s world, there is no room for error.


And your earliest memory of a Rado? When I was around eight or nine years old, I remember my dad used to have this really tough, thick wrist and on it this thick rectangular Rado Ceramica. It was a very expensive watch, at least for my dad at that point in time, and it symbolized that he had made some money and found some success. I thought then that when I grow up, I want to have a watch and a wrist like that. My wrist didn’t grow to that size, but the second part came true.

Were there others who shaped your opinion of luxury watches? All the men in my family. My uncle, my dad, my grandfather. In fact watches became a predetermined birthday or anniversary gift. It’s one of my staple gifts too. A watch to me signifies dignity, elegance, makes a statement and also says that I value you.

Which are some of the other luxury watches you own? I remember being gifted a Cartier. I was also given a Jaeger-LeCoultre and a Rolex. My dad has a lot more watches – he’s got most of the big brands. Those and lots of sunglasses and shoes.

Things you love as well as can’t stand in a watch? I love ones that fit well – watches with a little weight on them, but not too weighty. The one I’m wearing shouldn’t be too fussy, just elegant and strong. So, just like me – does the job, does it well.

How did you learn about the complex world of horology?

TALKING WATCHES WITH

HRITHIK ROSHAN A thick wrist, a plastic watch and his father are what it took to get the actor hooked on luxury timepieces

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Thankfully I became what I became with my first film only. So then late or not, they forgave me. My dad though is very strict with punctuality. He actually says that there is no such thing as “on time” – you’re either late or a little early.

If you could rewind time to give your 30-yearold self some advice, what would it be?

OCTOBER 2016

Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph Limited Edition

That you’re never allowed to say “I don’t have enough time”. Time is a bit of an illusion, and the moment you set out to do the things you want, you see there’s more than enough time. It’s just a shift of your belief system. You can’t have that excuse in your life, it’s just not allowed.

INTERVIEW: VARUN GODINHO. PHOTO: DABBOO RATNANI

Have you ever paid for not being punctual in your career?

Remember your first watch?

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You love high-performance machines like mechanical watches. You probably love cars and bikes too. I own a Rolls-Royce that I presented myself for my birthday, and also a Mercedes-Maybach. As for bikes, I was gifted a Harley by a friend. I loved riding it, but even with the helmet people recognized me. So I gave it up, paid it forward and gifted it to another friend.

here’s a wall of humans that include bodyguards, publicists and hangers-on separating me from my subject at a fivestar hotel in Juhu. Hrithik Roshan is behind that swell, keenly scoping out those around him while simultaneously appearing disinterested and nonchalantly humming a tune – a play celebrities pull off like a second skin. When the room clears and we get started on our interview, we aren’t talking films, but watches. It’s impossible to tell whether the animated vigour with which Roshan answers is a part of the character he slipped into when entering that room. That he does have a history with watches even before signing on Rado is beyond doubt.

I do. My first one was a transparent Swatch, where I could see and hear the mechanism. I wore it to school. I’m very curious about how things work, so I used to love watching how it does its job.

I’m still learning. I haven’t really been taught about watches, until Rado happened in my life. Now every time a new watch launches, I read about what is possible. This particular watch [points to the HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph Limited Edition on his wrist] has a dial that changes its shade according to the light. I think that’s pretty amazing. 


*This image is used for representational purposes only


ADDRESSES 2017

DISCOVER THE NEW MEANING OF LUXURIOUS LIVING An exclusive look inside India’s most beautiful homes, featuring the most renowned architects, celebrated interior decorators and discerning experts to create the GQ man’s dream home. Plus, a handpicked listing of the country’s top stores and retailers to make your home a space of envy. All this and so much more For more information, write to gqluxeaddresses@condenast.in Complimentary Supplement with the GQ December Issue

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THE A R T OF THE

The ghostwriter of Trump’s best-selling memoir says the business mogul is unfit to lead

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ast June, as dusk fell outside Tony Schwartz’s sprawling house, on a leafy back road in Riverdale, New York, he pulled out his laptop and caught up with the day’s big news: Donald J Trump had declared his candidacy for President of the United States. As Schwartz watched a video of the speech, he began to feel personally implicated. Trump, facing a crowd that had gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue, laid out his qualifications, saying, “We need a leader that wrote The Art Of The Deal.” If that was so, Schwartz thought, then he, not Trump, should be running. Schwartz dashed off a tweet: “Many thanks Donald Trump for suggesting I run for President, based on the fact that I wrote The Art Of The Deal.”  Schwartz had ghostwritten Trump’s 1987 breakthrough memoir, earning a joint byline on the cover, half of the book’s

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five-hundred-thousand-dollar advance and half of the royalties. The book was a phenomenal success, spending 48 weeks on the Times best-seller list, 13 of them at No 1. More than a million copies have been bought, generating several million dollars in royalties. The book expanded Trump’s renown far beyond New York City, making him an emblem of the successful tycoon. Edward Kosner, the former editor and publisher of New York, where Schwartz worked as a writer at the time, says, “Tony created Trump. He’s Dr Frankenstein.” Starting in late 1985, Schwartz spent 18 months with Trump – camping out in his office, joining him on his helicopter, tagging along at meetings and spending weekends with him at his Manhattan apartment and his Florida estate. During that period, Schwartz felt, he had got to know him better than almost anyone else outside the Trump family. Until Schwartz posted the tweet,

IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES

W R I T T E N B Y J A N E M AY E R


“I GENUINELY BELIEVE THAT IF TRUMP WINS AND GETS THE NUCLEAR CODES, THERE’S AN EXCELLENT POSSIBILITY IT WILL LEAD TO THE END OF CIVILIZATION”

him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is.” He went on, “I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes, there’s an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.” If he were writing The Art Of The Deal today, Schwartz said, it would be a very different book with a very different title. Asked what he would call it, he answered, “The Sociopath.” The idea of Trump writing an autobiography didn’t originate with either Trump or Schwartz. It began with Si Newhouse, the media magnate whose company, Advance Publications, owned Random House at the time and continues to own Condé Nast, the parent company of this magazine’s American siblings. “It was very definitely, and almost uniquely, Si Newhouse’s idea,” Peter Osnos, who edited the book, recalls. GQ US, which Condé Nast also owns, had published a cover story on Trump, and Newhouse noticed that newsstand sales had been unusually strong. Newhouse called Trump about the project, then visited him to discuss it. Random House continued the pursuit with a series of meetings. At one point, Howard Kaminsky, who ran Random House then, wrapped a thick Russian novel in a dummy cover that featured a photograph of Trump looking like a conquering hero; at the top was Trump’s name, in large gold block lettering. Kaminsky recalls that Trump was pleased by the mockup, but had one suggestion: “Please make my name much bigger.” After securing the half-million-dollar advance, Trump signed a contract.

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IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES (SCHWARTZ)

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though, he had not spoken publicly about Trump for decades. It round this time, Schwartz, who was one of the leading had never been his ambition to be a ghostwriter, and he had been young magazine writers of the day, stopped by Trump’s glad to move on. But, as he watched a replay of the new candidate office, in Trump Tower. Schwartz had written about holding forth for 45 minutes, he noticed something strange: Over Trump before. In 1985, he’d published a piece in New the decades, Trump appeared to have convinced himself that he York called “A Different Kind Of Donald Trump Story” had written the book. Schwartz recalls thinking, “If he could lie which portrayed him not as a brilliant mogul but as a ham-fisted about that on Day One – when it was so easily refuted – he’s likely thug who had unsuccessfully tried to evict rent-controlled and rentto lie about anything.” stabilized tenants from a building that he had bought on Central It seemed improbable that Trump’s campaign would succeed, so Park South. Trump’s efforts – which included a plan to house Schwartz told himself that he needn’t worry much. But, as Trump homeless people in the building in order to harass the tenants – denounced Mexican immigrants as “rapists” near the end of the became what Schwartz described as a “fugue of failure, a farce of speech, Schwartz felt anxious. He had spent hundreds of hours fumbling and bumbling.” An accompanying cover portrait depicted observing Trump firsthand, and felt that he had an unusually deep Trump as unshaven, unpleasant-looking and shiny with sweat. Yet, understanding of what he regarded as Trump’s beguiling strengths to Schwartz’s amazement, Trump loved the article. He hung the and disqualifying weaknesses. Many Americans, however, saw cover on a wall of his office and sent a fan note to Schwartz, on his Trump as a charmingly brash entrepreneur with an unfailing knack gold-embossed personal stationery. “Everybody seems to have read for business – a mythical image that Schwartz had helped create. “It it,” Trump enthused in the note, which Schwartz has kept. pays to trust your instincts,” Trump says in the book, adding that he “I was shocked,” Schwartz told me. “Trump didn’t fit any model was set to make hundreds of millions of dollars after buying a hotel of human being I’d ever met. He was obsessed with publicity, and that he hadn’t even walked through. he didn’t care what you wrote.” He went on, “Trump only takes two In the subsequent months, as Trump defied predictions by positions. Either you’re a scummy loser, liar, whatever, or you’re the establishing himself as the front-runner for the Republican greatest. I became the greatest. He wanted to be seen as a tough nomination, Schwartz’s desire to set the record straight grew. guy, and he loved being on the cover.” Schwartz wrote him back, He had long since left journalism to launch the Energy Project, a saying, “Of all the people I’ve written about over the years, you are consulting firm that promises to improve employees’ productivity certainly the best sport.” by helping them boost their “physical, emotional, mental, and And so Schwartz had returned for more, this time to conduct spiritual” morale. It was a successful company, with clients an interview for Playboy. But to his frustration, Trump kept THE such as Facebook, and Schwartz’s colleagues urged him making cryptic, monosyllabic statements. “He mysteriously to avoid the political fray. But the prospect of President wouldn’t answer my questions,” Schwartz said. After 20 ART OF Trump terrified him. It wasn’t because of Trump’s ideology – minutes, he said, Trump explained that he didn’t want to THE Schwartz doubted that he had one. The problem was Trump’s reveal anything new about himself – he had just signed a personality, which he considered pathologically impulsive REVE AL lucrative book deal and needed to save his best material. and self-centred. “What kind of book?” Schwartz said. Schwartz thought about publishing an article describing “My autobiography,” Trump replied. his reservations about Trump, but he hesitated, knowing that since “You’re only 38 – you don’t have one yet!” Schwartz joked. he’d cashed in on the flattering Art Of The Deal, his credibility and “Yeah, I know,” Trump said. his motives would be seen as suspect. Yet watching the campaign “If I were you,” Schwartz recalls telling him, “I’d write a book was excruciating. Schwartz decided that if he kept mum and Trump called ‘The Art Of The Deal’. That’s something people would be was elected he’d never forgive himself. In June, he agreed to break interested in.” his silence and give his first candid interview about the Trump he “You’re right,” Trump agreed. “Do you want to write it?” got to know while acting as his Boswell. Schwartz thought it over for several weeks. He knew that he “I put lipstick on a pig,” he said. “I feel a deep sense of remorse would be making a Faustian bargain. A lifelong liberal, he was that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought hardly an admirer of Trump’s ruthless and single-minded pursuit


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of profit. “It was one of a number of times in my life when I Trump became impatient and irritable. He looked fidgety, THE was divided between the Devil and the higher side,” he told Schwartz recalls, “like a kindergartener who can’t sit still ART OF me. He had grown up in a bourgeois, intellectual family in in a classroom.” Even when Schwartz pressed him, Trump Manhattan and had attended elite private schools, but he seemed to remember almost nothing of his youth and made THE was not as wealthy as some of his classmates – and, unlike it clear that he was bored. Far more quickly than Schwartz REVE AL many of them, he had no trust fund. “I grew up privileged,” had expected, Trump ended the meeting. he said. “But my parents made it clear: ‘You’re on your own.’” Week after week, the pattern repeated itself. Schwartz Around the time Trump made his offer, Schwartz’s wife, Deborah tried to limit the sessions to smaller increments of time, but Trump’s Pines, became pregnant with their second daughter, and he contributions remained oddly truncated and superficial. worried that the family wouldn’t fit into their Manhattan apartment, “Trump has been written about a thousand ways from Sunday, whose mortgage was already too high. “I was overly worried about but this fundamental aspect of who he is doesn’t seem to be fully money,” Schwartz said. “I thought money would keep me safe understood,” Schwartz told me. “It’s implicit in a lot of what people and secure – or that was my rationalization.” At the same time, he write, but it’s never explicit – or, at least, I haven’t seen it. And that knew that if he took Trump’s money and adopted Trump’s voice his is that it’s impossible to keep him focused on any topic, other than journalism career would be badly damaged. In the end, though, his own self-aggrandizement, for more than a few minutes, and Schwartz had his price. He told Trump that if he would give him even then... ” Schwartz trailed off, shaking his head in amazement. half the advance and half the book’s royalties he’d take the job. He regards Trump’s inability to concentrate as alarming in a Presidential candidate. “If he had to be briefed on a crisis in the Situation Room, it’s impossible to imagine him paying attention uch terms are unusually generous for a ghostwriter. over a long period of time,” he said. Trump, despite having a reputation as a tough In a recent phone interview, Trump told me that, to the contrary, negotiator, agreed on the spot. “It was a huge windfall,” he has the skill that matters most in a crisis: the ability to forge Schwartz recalls. “But I knew I was selling out. Literally, compromises. The reason he touted The Art Of The Deal in his the term was invented to describe what I did.” Soon Spy announcement, he explained, was that he believes that recent was calling him “former journalist Tony Schwartz.” Presidents have lacked his toughness and finesse: “Look at the Schwartz thought that The Art Of The Deal would be an easy trade deficit with China. Look at the Iran deal. I’ve made a fortune project. The book’s structure would be simple: He’d chronicle half by making deals. I do that. I do that well. That’s what I do.” a dozen or so of Trump’s biggest real-estate deals, dispense some Growing desperate, Schwartz devised a strategy for trapping bromides about how to succeed in business and fill in Trump’s life Trump into giving more material. He made plans to spend the story. For research, he planned to interview Trump on a series of weekend with Trump at Mar-a-Lago, his mansion in Palm Beach, Saturday mornings. The first session didn’t go as planned, however. where there would be fewer distractions. As they chatted in the After Trump gave him a tour of his marble-and-gilt apartment atop garden, Ivana icily walked by, clearly annoyed that Schwartz Trump Tower – which, to Schwartz, looked unlived-in, like the lobby was competing for her husband’s limited free time. Trump again of a hotel – they began to talk. But the discussion was soon hobbled grew impatient. Long before lunch on Saturday, Schwartz recalls, by what Schwartz regards as one of Trump’s most essential Trump “essentially threw a fit.” He stood up and announced that he characteristics: “He has no attention span.” couldn’t stand any more questions. In those days, Schwartz recalls, Trump was generally affable Schwartz went to his room, called his literary agent, Kathy with reporters, offering short, amusingly immodest quotes on Robbins, and told her that he couldn’t do the book. (Robbins demand. Trump had been forthcoming with him during the New confirms this.) As Schwartz headed back to New York, though, York interview, but it hadn’t required much time or deep reflection. he came up with another plan. He would propose eavesdropping For the book, though, Trump needed to provide him with sustained, on Trump’s life by following him around on the job and, more thoughtful recollections. He asked Trump to describe his childhood important, by listening in on his office phone calls. That way, in detail. After sitting for only a few minutes in his suit and tie, extracting extended reflections from Trump would not be required. 206 —

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IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES

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avesdropping solved the interview problem, but it presented a new one. After hearing Trump’s discussions about business on the phone, Schwartz asked him brief follow-up questions. He then tried to amplify the material he got from Trump by calling others involved in the deals. But their accounts often directly conflicted with Trump’s. “Lying is second nature to him,” Schwartz said. “More than anyone else I’ve ever met, Trump has the ability to convince himself that whatever he is saying at any given moment is true, or sort of true, or at least ought to be true.” Often, Schwartz said, the lies that Trump told him were about money – “how much he had paid for something, or what a building he owned was worth, or how much one of his casinos was earning when it was actually on its way to bankruptcy.” Trump bragged that he paid only eight million dollars for Mar-a-Lago, but omitted that he bought a nearby strip of beach for a record sum. After gossip columns reported, erroneously, that Prince Charles was considering buying several apartments in Trump Tower, Trump implied that he had no idea where the rumour had started. (“It certainly didn’t hurt us,” he says, in The Art Of The Deal.) Wayne Barrett, a reporter for the Village Voice, later revealed that Trump himself had planted the story with journalists. Schwartz also suspected that Trump engaged in such media tricks, and asked him about a story making the rounds – that Trump often called up news outlets using a pseudonym. Trump didn’t deny it. As Schwartz recalls, he smirked and said, “You like that, do you?” Schwartz says of Trump, “He lied strategically. He had a complete lack of conscience about it.” Since most people are “constrained by the truth,” Trump’s indifference to it “gave him a strange advantage.” When challenged about the facts, Schwartz says, Trump would often double down, repeat himself and grow belligerent. This quality was most recently on display after Trump posted on Twitter a derogatory image of Hillary Clinton that contained a six-pointed star lifted from a white-supremacist website. Campaign staffers took the image down, but two days later Trump angrily defended it, insisting that there was no antiSemitic implication. Whenever “the thin veneer of Trump’s vanity is challenged,” Schwartz says, he overreacts – not an ideal quality in a head of state. When Schwartz began writing The Art Of The Deal, he realized that he needed to put an acceptable face on Trump’s loose relationship with the truth. So he concocted an artful euphemism. Writing in Trump’s voice, he explained to the reader, “I play to people’s fantasies... People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. I call it truthful hyperbole. It’s an innocent form of 208 —

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exaggeration – and it’s a very effective form of promotion.” Schwartz now disavows the passage. “Deceit,” he told me, is never “innocent.” He added, “‘Truthful hyperbole’ is a contradiction in terms. It’s a way of saying, ‘It’s a lie, but who cares?’.” Trump, he said, loved the phrase. In his journal, Schwartz wrote, “Trump stands for many of the things I abhor: his willingness to run over people, the gaudy, tacky, gigantic obsessions, the absolute lack of interest in anything beyond power and money.” Looking back at the text now, Schwartz says, “I created a character far more winning than Trump actually is.” The first line of the book is an example. “I don’t do it for the money,” Trump declares. “I’ve got enough, much more than I’ll ever need. I do it to do it. Deals are my art form. Other people paint beautifully on canvas or write wonderful poetry. I like making deals, preferably big deals. That’s how I get my kicks.” Schwartz now laughs at this depiction of Trump as a devoted artisan. “Of course he’s in it for the money,” he said. “One of the most deep and basic needs he has is to prove that ‘I’m richer than you.’” As for the idea that making deals is a form of poetry, Schwartz says, “He was incapable of saying something like that – it wouldn’t even be in his vocabulary.” He saw Trump as driven not by a pure love of dealmaking but by an insatiable hunger for “money, praise, and celebrity.” Often, after spending the day with Trump and watching him pile one hugely expensive project atop the next, like a circus performer spinning plates, Schwartz would go home and tell his wife, “He’s a living black hole!” Schwartz reminded himself that he was being paid to tell Trump’s story, not his own, but the more he worked on the project the more disturbing he found it. Rhetorically, Schwartz’s aim in The Art Of The Deal was to present Trump as the hero of every chapter, but, after looking into some of his supposedly brilliant deals, Schwartz concluded that there were cases in which there was no way to make Trump look good. So he sidestepped unflattering incidents and details. “I didn’t consider it my job to investigate,” he says. Schwartz also tried to avoid the strong whiff of cronyism that hovered over some deals. In his 1986 journal, he describes what a challenge it was to “put his best foot forward” in writing about one of Trump’s first triumphs: his development, starting in 1975, of the Grand Hyatt Hotel, on the site of the former Commodore Hotel, next to Grand Central Terminal. In order to afford the hotel, Trump required an extremely large tax abatement. Richard Ravitch, who was then in charge of the agency that had the authority to grant such tax breaks to developers, recalls that he declined to grant the abatement, and Trump got “so unpleasant I had to tell him to get out.” Trump got it anyway, largely because key city officials had received years of donations from his father, Fred Trump, who was a major real-estate developer in Queens. Wayne Barrett, whose reporting for the Voice informed his

“THE NOTION THAT HE’S A SELF-MADE MAN IS A JOKE.BUT I GUESS THEY COULDN’T CALL THE BOOK ‘THE ART OF MY FATHER’S DEALS ’”

IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES

When Schwartz presented the idea to Trump, he loved it. Almost every day from then on, Schwartz sat about eight feet away from him in the Trump Tower office, listening on an extension of Trump’s phone line. Schwartz says that none of the bankers, lawyers, brokers and reporters who called Trump realized that they were being monitored. The calls usually didn’t last long, and Trump’s assistant facilitated the conversationhopping. While he was talking with someone, she often came in with a Post-it note informing him of the next caller on hold. “He was playing people,” Schwartz recalls. On the phone with business associates, Trump would flatter, bully and occasionally get mad, but always in a calculated way. Before the discussion ended, Trump would “share the news of his latest success,” Schwartz says. Instead of saying goodbye at the end of a call, Trump customarily signed off with “You’re the greatest!” There was not a single call that Trump deemed too private for Schwartz to hear. “He loved the attention,” Schwartz recalls. “If he could’ve had 300,000 people listening in, he would have been even happier.”

THE ART OF THE REVE AL


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THE ART OF THE REVE AL

some of their father’s real-estate holdings for half a billion dollars. In The Art Of The Deal, Trump cites his father as “the most important influence on me”, but in his telling his father’s main legacy was teaching him the importance of “toughness”. Beyond that, Schwartz says, Trump “barely talked about his father – he didn’t want his success to be seen as having anything to do with him.” But when Barrett investigated he found that Trump’s father was instrumental in his son’s rise, financially and politically. In the book, Trump says that “my energy and my enthusiasm” explain how, as a 29-year-old with few accomplishments, he acquired the Grand Hyatt Hotel. Barrett reports, however, that Trump’s father had to co-sign the many contracts that the deal required. He also lent Trump seven-anda-half million dollars to get started as a casino owner in Atlantic City; at one point, when Trump couldn’t meet payments on other loans, his father tried to tide him over by sending a lawyer to buy some three million dollars’ worth of gambling chips. Barrett told me, “Donald did make some smart moves himself, particularly in assembling the site for the Trump Tower. That was a stroke of genius.” Nonetheless, he said, “The notion that he’s a self-made man is a joke. But I guess they couldn’t call the book ‘The Art of My Father’s Deals’.”

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IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES (TAJ), AFP (THE APPRENTICE)

definitive 1991 book, Trump: The Deals And The Downfall, says, “It was all Fred’s political connections that created the abatement.” In addition, Trump snookered rivals into believing that he had an exclusive option from the city on the project, when he didn’t. Trump also deceived his partner in the deal, Jay Pritzker, the head of the Hyatt Hotel chain. Pritzker had rejected an unfavourable term proposed by Trump, but at the closing Trump forced it through, knowing that Pritzker was on a mountain in Nepal and couldn’t be reached. Schwartz wrote in his journal that “almost everything” about the hotel deal had “an immoral cast.” But as the ghostwriter he was “trying hard to find my way around” behaviour that he considered “if not reprehensible, at least morally questionable.” Schwartz tamped down some of Trump’s swagger, but plenty of it remained. The manuscript that Random House published was, depending on your perspective, either entertainingly insightful or shamelessly self-aggrandizing. To borrow a title from Norman Mailer, who frequently attended prizefights at Trump’s Atlantic City hotels, the book could’ve been called Advertisements For Myself. Some of the falsehoods in The Art Of The Deal are minor. Spy upended Trump’s claims that Ivana had been a “top model” and an alternate on the Czech Olympic ski team. Barrett notes that in The Art Of The Deal Trump describes his father as having been born in New Jersey to Swedish parents; in fact, he was born in the Bronx to German parents. (Decades later, Trump spread falsehoods about Obama’s origins, claiming it was possible that the President was born in Africa.) According to Barrett, among the most misleading aspects of The Art Of The Deal was the idea that Trump made it largely on his own, with only minimal help from his father, Fred. Barrett, in his book, notes that Trump once declared, “The working man likes me because he knows I didn’t inherit what I’ve built,” and that in The Art Of The Deal he derides wealthy heirs as members of “the Lucky Sperm Club.” Trump’s self-portrayal as a Horatio Alger figure has buttressed his populist appeal in 2016. But his origins were hardly humble. Fred’s fortune, based on his ownership of middle-income properties, wasn’t glamorous, but it was sizeable: in 2003, a few years after Fred died, Trump and his siblings reportedly sold

he other key myth perpetuated by The Art Of The Deal was that Trump’s intuitions about business were almost flawless. “The book helped fuel the notion that he couldn’t fail,” Barrett said. But, unbeknown to Schwartz and the public, by late 1987, when the book came out, Trump was heading toward what Barrett calls “simultaneous personal and professional self-destruction.” Timothy L O’Brien – an award-winning journalist who is currently the executive editor of Bloomberg View, and published Trump Nation, a meticulous investigative biography, in 2005 – agrees that during the next several years Trump’s life unravelled. The divorce from Ivana reportedly cost him $25 million. Meanwhile, he was in the midst of what O’Brien calls “a crazy shopping spree that resulted in unmanageable debt.” He was buying the Plaza Hotel and also planning to erect “the tallest building in the world” on the former rail yards that he had bought on the West Side. In 1987, the city denied him permission to construct such a tall skyscraper, but in The Art Of The Deal he brushed off this failure with a one-liner: “I can afford to wait.” O’Brien says, “The reality is that he couldn’t afford to wait. He was telling the media that the carrying costs were three million dollars, when in fact they were more like 20 million.” Trump was also building a third casino in Atlantic City, the Taj, which he promised would be “the biggest casino in history.” He bought the Eastern Air Lines shuttle that operated out of New York, Boston and Washington, rechristening it the Trump Shuttle, and acquired a giant yacht, the Trump Princess. “He was on a total run of complete and utter self-absorption,” Barrett says, adding, “It’s kind of like now.” Schwartz said that when he was writing the book “the greatest percentage of Trump’s assets was in casinos, and he made it sound like each casino was more successful than the last. But every one of them was failing.” He went on, “I think he was just spinning. I don’t think he could’ve believed it at the time. He was losing millions of dollars a day. He had to have been terrified.” But in The Art Of The Deal, O’Brien told me, “Trump shrewdly and unabashedly promoted an image of himself as a dealmaker nonpareil who could always get the best out of every situation – and who can now deliver America from its malaise.” This idealized version was presented to an exponentially larger audience, O’Brien noted, when Mark Burnett, the reality-television producer, read The Art Of The Deal and decided to base a new show on it, The Apprentice, with Trump as the star. The first season of the show,


Power Plaid Going by trend reports from around the world, pinstripes are surrendering their status as the pattern of power to squares. This double-breasted grey suit from Van Heusen’s Fashion Formals collection, featuring windowpane checks, radiates authority. Team it with flat front trousers, a crisp-white dress shirt and a shepherdplaid tie. Throw in a contrasting pocket square for good measure and get ready to dominate the boardroom.


IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES (PARTY), REUTERS (CAMPAIGN)

which premiered in 2004, opens with Trump in the back of a THE limousine, boasting, “I’ve mastered the art of the deal, and I’ve turned the name Trump into the highest-quality brand.” An ART OF image of the book’s cover flashes onscreen as Trump explains THE that, as the “master”, he’s now seeking an apprentice. O’Brien REVE AL said, “The Apprentice is mythmaking on steroids. There’s a straight line from the book to the show to the 2016 campaign.” It took Schwartz a little more than a year to write The Art Of The Deal. In the spring of 1987, he sent the manuscript to Trump, who returned it to him shortly afterward. There were a few red marks made with a fat-tipped Magic Marker, most of which deleted criticisms that Trump had made of powerful individuals he no longer wanted to offend, such as Lee Iacocca. Otherwise, Schwartz says, Trump changed almost nothing. In my phone interview with Trump, he initially said of Schwartz, “Tony was very good. He was the co-author.” But he dismissed Schwartz’s account of the writing process. “He didn’t write the book,” Trump told me. “I wrote the book. I wrote the book. It was my book. And it was a No 1 best-seller, and one of the bestselling business books of all time. Some say it was the best-selling business book ever.” (It is not.) Howard Kaminsky, the former Random House head, laughed and said, “Trump didn’t write a postcard for us!” Trump but to a charity of Schwartz’s choosing. It was a page out of Trump was far more involved in the book’s promotion. Trump’s playbook. He wooed booksellers and made one television appearance Not long after the discussion of the party bills, Trump after another. He publicly promised to donate his cut of the approached Schwartz about writing a sequel, for which Trump had book’s royalties to charity. He even made a surprise trip to New been offered a seven-figure advance. This time, however, he offered Hampshire, where he stirred additional publicity by floating the Schwartz only a third of the profits. But Schwartz said no. possibility that he might run for President. Schwartz told me that he has decided to pledge all royalties from In December of 1987, a month after the book was published, sales of The Art Of The Deal in 2016 to pointedly chosen charities: Trump hosted an extravagant book party in the pink marble the National Immigration Law Center, Human Rights Watch, atrium of Trump Tower. Klieg lights lit a red carpet outside the the Center for the Victims of Torture, the National Immigration building. Inside, nearly a thousand guests, in black tie, were served Forum and the Tahirih Justice Center. He doesn’t feel that the champagne and fed slices of a giant cake replica of Trump Tower, gesture absolves him. “I’ll carry this until the end of my life,” he which was wheeled in by a parade of women waving red sparklers. said. “There’s no righting it. But I like the idea that, the more copies The boxing promoter Don King greeted the crowd in a floor-length that The Art Of The Deal sells, the more money I can donate to the mink coat, and the comedian Jackie Mason introduced Donald and people whose rights Trump seeks to abridge.” Ivana with the words “Here comes the king and queen!” Trump Schwartz expected Trump to attack him for speaking out, and toasted Schwartz, saying teasingly that he had at least tried to teach he was correct. Informed that Schwartz had made critical remarks him how to make money. about him, and wouldn’t be voting for him, Trump said, “He’s Schwartz got more of an education the next day, when he and probably just doing it for the publicity.” He also said, “Wow. That’s Trump spoke on the phone. After chatting briefly about the party, great disloyalty, because I made Tony rich. He owes a lot to me. I Trump informed Schwartz that, as his ghostwriter, he owed him helped him when he didn’t have two cents in his pocket. It’s great for half the event’s cost, which was in the six figures. Schwartz was disloyalty. I guess he thinks it’s good for him – but he’ll find out it’s dumbfounded. “He wanted me to split the cost of entertaining his not good for him.” list of 900 second-rate celebrities?” Schwartz had, in fact, learned Minutes after Trump got off the phone with me, Schwartz’s cell a few things from watching Trump. He drastically negotiated phone rang. “I hear you’re not voting for me,” Trump said. down the amount that he agreed to pay, to a few thousand dollars, “You’re running for President,” Schwartz said. “I disagree with a and then wrote Trump a letter promising to write a cheque not to lot of what you’re saying.” “That’s your right, but then you should have just remained silent. I just want to tell you that I think you’re very disloyal… I had a lot of choice of who to have write the book, and I chose you, and I was very generous with you. I know that you gave a lot of speeches and lectures using The Art Of The Deal. I could’ve sued you, but I didn’t.” “My business has nothing to do with The Art Of The Deal.” “That’s not what I’ve been told.” “You’re running for President of the United States. The stakes here are high.” “Yeah, they are,” he said. “Have a nice life.” Trump hung up. Schwartz can understand why Trump feels stung, but he felt that he had to speak up before it was too late. As for Trump’s anger toward him, he said, “I don’t take it personally, because the truth is he didn’t mean it personally. People are dispensable and disposable in Trump’s world.” If Trump is elected President, he warned, “the millions of people who voted for him and believe that he represents their interests will learn what anyone who deals closely with him already knows – that he couldn’t care less about them.” 


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YOUTH ICON


EDITED BY VARUN GODINHO

Meet the son of the Veyron

A track day with Aston Martin for company

Jaguar’s F-Pace SUV driven in Sweden

BUGATTI

The Chiron is the multimillion-dollar successor to the wild Veyron. Nicolas Stecher gets behind the scenes at the manufacturer’s estate in France to check out the nuts and bolts behind the new hypercar

W

hen you’re preparing to follow up the most groundbreaking automobile of the 21st century, you leave no stone unturned. Such was the thinking behind Bugatti SAS when it began blueprinting the Chiron – the much-whispered-about successor to the Veyron, the one-time fastest car in the world. The first 1,000hp production vehicle, the Veyron heralded a seismic change in the automotive space.

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BUGATTI

But the one thing that the Veyron was not was commercially sensible. Bugatti proprietors Volkswagen Group saw the project as a money-noobject testament of its group’s engineering acumen. Just build the fastest car the planet has ever seen – never mind the speculated $6 million loss incurred on every Veyron sold.

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he Chiron is set to right that equation. “On this project, we get back in the black,” Bugatti’s Head of Production Christophe Piochon told me. The development of the Veyron’s complex systems over its lifetime, which laid the solid engineering foundation for the Chiron, resulted in $1.62 billion

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in investment costs. “By the end of the Chiron’s run, we’ll be profitable,” Piochon promised. This dedication to price-bedamned apex engineering is something you’ll gain a deep-seated appreciation for should you ever visit the automaker’s gilded headquarters in Molsheim, France. This is not an experience you can book as a casual enthusiast; no, you must be invited within the gates of the Château St Jean – and that will most likely only happen as a potential customer of the $3 million Chiron. The ancestral home of founder Ettore Bugatti, the Alsatian palace

and its bucolic grounds were completely renovated as the French automaker prepared to welcome the Chiron to the world. Here, from 1909 to 1939, Ettore built the finest cars on the planet. The landmark Type 35 alone won over a thousand victories, many against Bugatti’s arch nemeses the Bentley Boys – making it the most decorated machine in racecar history. When Ettore’s son Jean took over, he designed the art deco Type 57, heralding a new apex for the brand. The ultra-rare Type 57SC Atlantic is not only one of the most beautiful cars ever made, it’s also one of the most valuable: one sold at auction for a reported $40 million in 2010. At the time it was the most expensive car ever sold; Ralph Lauren owns its twin. When Jean died test-driving a rare Type 57C Tank prototype near this very estate in 1939, the rudderless company soon faded. After a couple of failed attempts at relaunching, VW/Audi bought the rights to the brand and the Château in 1998, and attempted a return to glory by creating the watershed vehicle known as the Veyron.


BUGATTI

nvitees to the estate are welcomed with a robust indoctrination of the brand that includes detailed historical lessons, a visit to the private museum and a guided tour through the “Atelier” – the aluminiumwalled workshop wherein these rare automotive unicorns are assembled. Featuring a pristine white floor and floor-to-ceiling windows looking out onto open meadows, the Atelier appears more like a room where Steve Jobs might have brainstormed the next iPhone rather than a manufacturing floor. Here you will be informed in great detail about the all-new W16 engines that breathe fire into the carbon-fibre beasts. Featuring four turbochargers each, the 8-litre power plants require 11 radiators to keep the 16-cylinders running cool. You will be shown a skeleton of the all-new carbon fibre monocoque, so fortified that the chassis is now as rigid as an LMP1 Le Mans racecar. Each Chiron has so much carbon weave that if you tied the material end-to-end it would reach the moon nine times. After the Atelier you will be allowed to slip into the cabin of this engineering marvel and test out its celestial capabilities. No, it is unlikely you will even tease its 1,600Nm of torque, never mind its 463kph top speed. But unless you’re

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EACH CHIRON HAS SO MUCH CARBON WEAVE ON IT, THAT IF YOU TIED THE MATERIAL END-TO-END IT WOULD REACH THE MOON NINE TIMES comatose, you will surely experience a fleeting taste of its explosiveness – a petroleum-fuelled 1,500hp time warp that can slingshot the Chiron from a standstill to 200kph in a mindboggling 6.5 seconds. That’s faster than most cars will ever reach in their lifetimes, quicker than it would take them to reach half that velocity. Wooded lanes will turn into blurs of emerald; kilometre straightaways will disappear in the blink of an eye. When the test-drive is over you will be ushered into the Bugatti Customer Lounge, an elegantly furnished room featuring a leathertopped table, carbon fibre chairs plucked from the set of Star Wars and a massive high-definition screen. Here you will configure

BUGATTI CHIRON ENGINE 8-LITRE, 16-CYLINDERS HORSEPOWER 1,500HP TORQUE 1,600NM TOP SPEED 463KPH PRICE $3 MILLION (EXPECTED)

your own supercar – select wheel designs, hack through a forest of colour swatches and peruse through more leather samples than a saddler. With iPad in hand, the advisor will display the options you are selecting, writ large on that billboard-sized screen. In this sunny, airy A-frame building buyers can also flip through the notebooks of designers Frank Heyl, Sasha Selipanov and Etienne Salomé, which are protected like a scroll of Ayurvedic recipes. Inside these leather-bound tomes you will find beautifully drawn details, blueprints and panel designs. From something as mundane as an air vent to fascinatingly ingenious as those bestial “8-Eye Face” LED headlamps, all are rendered in beautifully sketched jolts of pencil and ink. When you are done and have signed the papers, it will take about five months for your Chiron to be hand-built and delivered. Of course, if you selected a custom paint hue to match your wife’s nail polish or the iris of your newborn child (which you can), then that timeframe could be extended by months. A Chiron is ultimately an heirloom – like a Patek Philippe watch you do not own, but rather temporarily possess until you pass it along to your offspring. It is meant to be ancestral, like the Château St Jean itself passed along the Bugatti bloodline. Don’t be surprised to see one in the near future going full lick across the Mumbai-Pune Expressway – while three Veyrons have found homes in India, Bugatti has already sold four Chirons in India that should be here by next year. Of course, if they’re moving anywhere close to their top speed, you might only feel their wind on your face.


HACKETT X ASTON MARTIN

BORN BRITISH Two English powerhouses – Hackett London and Aston Martin – team up to make an explosive team on a track in Bedford WRITTEN BY VARUN GODINHO

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ho would imagine that mercilessly flipping an Aston Martin over several times would land a Guinness Record? That’s what happened in 2006 when Casino Royale bagged a record for most cannon rolls in a car, when the stunt team barrel-rolled a DBS through the air seven times. I’m behind the wheel of a monstrous Vanquish V12 on the exact stretch on which that happened, within the Millbrook Proving Grounds near Luton (not in Montenegro, as indicated in the film). Nicknamed the “Alpine route”, it’s full of blind corners, steep gradients and frighteningly obtuse dips. The six-litre 12-cylinder Vanquish with 568 horses at attention is the most powerful GT production engine Aston has ever built. In my case it won’t take expert stunt driving, but a rather ham-handed belowcompetent level of high-speed driving to flip it over – and so I restrain myself. There’s a drone hovering above, but it isn’t filming me. Instead it’s spooling in feed for a promotional video featuring the all-new DB11 about half a kilometre ahead with menswear titan Jeremy Hackett inside. In a collab that couldn’t have been a stronger salute to the Union Jack, Hackett London partnered with Aston Martin Racing in 2005 – a natural synergy given the menswear giant’s sporting aesthetic and the luxury carmaker’s spirited racing heritage. Hackett London was consequently announced as the official clothing partner. Now, the menswear label’s extended its association to Aston Martin’s road-going division with the launch of a capsule collection to coincide with the launch of the DB11.

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THE COLLABORATION

Jeremy Hackett

s the DB11 isn’t officially launched on the track day organized by Hackett London, I’m instead handed the keys to the one it’s replacing – the DB9 GT. Top car manufacturers and even Britain’s elite special forces, SAS, use the Millbrook Proving Ground for vehicle testing. That’s why this facility has a range of different terrains like the “Alpine route”; the curvy-but-flat “City Handling” route; the “Outer Handling route” for high-speed highway-like driving; the “Mile Straight” for flat-out speed and the banked “Speed Bowl” that tests vehicle dynamics. I take the DB9 GT out to the “Speed Bowl” with an AM Racing instructor riding along. The bowl is a three-kilometre banked circuit where you’ll have an actual “look ma, no hands” moment. On his instructions, I take the car up to about 90kph and then steer with my feet – if I squeeze the throttle, the car moves towards the top of the bowl; I ease up and it slides back down. If you’ve got good footwork, you’ll stay in a single lane with your hand completely off the wheel. After a while he tells me to go faster, but to also grip the wheel and this time steer with my eyes. As he explains, just as you would in a sport like squash, your hands follow where your eyes are at. Initially, I make the mistake of looking only 200 metres ahead of me. As I soon realize, that’s


HACKETT X ASTON MARTIN

HACKETT LONDON X ASTON MARTIN

a trifling distance for a 540hp ride with 620Nm of torque to devour. By the time I get to that point, I have to readjust and make rapid steering corrections to cover the next 200m. Instead, he tells me to watch the farthest point – known as the vanishing point – on the horizon of the circuit. That’s what proper race drivers do. Now, I’m barely making any steering corrections. Even at 210kph, the DB9 GT is looping perfectly.

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ver lunch at the carmaker's lounge, the AM team is only too enthusiastic to share stories about when it broke into competitive racing in the Twenties and Thirties, and it’s most heady racing days in the Fifties with champions like Stirling Moss at the wheel of its racecars. It suffered a slow fade from the racing scene until in 2005 when Aston Martin Racing was founded to bring the marque back into motorsports – which is also when Hackett London came on board as a partner. AMR has had several podium finishes across classes since at top-shelf events including the Le Mans and the World Endurance Championship. The recently unveiled AM-RB 001 hypercar concept, made in

The Mile Straight, Millbrook Proving Ground

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“An F1 driver will experience about 4g, a Le Mans driver about 2g and here we’re clocking about 1g”

Aston Martin by Hackett is a stylish petrol head’s wet dream. The 14-piece capsule collection could make up your entire wardrobe – sumptuous leather bombers to utility field jackets and fitted polos to slim-fit trousers. Each piece is designed with Hackett London’s razor-sharp tailoring and sports luxe aesthetic and is wearable not just for those singular late night drives but even to the gymkhana or a weekend getaway. Available at thecollective.in

THE COLLABORATION

partnership with Aston Martin and the Red Bull F1 team, is expected to, upon production, be crowned the world’s fastest car and the quickest road-legal car ever to lap a circuit. How’s that for life goals?

have time for one last car and one last experience in Millbrook. And so it is only fitting to take the wheel of the Vanquish V12 once again and head to the “Mile Straight”. I wait while a military truck finishes a test run, then it’s time for me to go. Hand white-knuckling the steering, eye on the vanishing point that’s just over a mile from the starting line, bonnet pointed arrow straight, I smash the throttle. I ask my instructor to keep an eye on the speedo for me, as I’m not about to take my eyes off the road. 100kph comes up very, very quickly, but the Vanquish forges on to display just what’s made this marque a revered name in and beyond motorsports. I hit a personal record of 260kph and begin to bring it down – not because the car can’t continue go up all the way to its top speed 323kph, but because I’m out of track. I’ve reached my vanishing point.

WORDS: VARUN GODINHO

n F1 driver will experience about 4g, a Le Mans driver about 2g and here we’re clocking about 1g,” says 14-times Le Mans participant, former McLaren Formula One test driver and now AMR pro, Darren Turner, as he goes nuts at the wheel of a Vantage GT4 on the “Outer Handling course”. I’m riding shotgun, kitted in a helmet and fire retardant suit, my head pinned to the headrest and organs being mashed to a pulp. Only the slightest mistake and the roll-cagereinforced GT4 will likely beat Casino Royale’s record – but with Turner, there are no errors. He overtakes a C63AMG, a Carrera GTS and even a bus that’s testing on the same track. It’s more crowded than the M25, and Turner who’s going hell for leather is making driving this animal look embarrassingly easy. It isn’t. I need a few minutes after I step outside the GT4 to let my stomach return south of my heart. But there are more Astons and courses to demolish. So I slip off my racing suit and helmet and jump into the V8 Vantage S Roadster to head to “City Handling”. It’s the brilliant choice of ride for this specific course with relatively low-speed driving and sharp apexes that require a nimble ride with great body control and one that’s dynamically rich. The short-wheelbase Roadster with its very reactive steering and firm suspension ticks those boxes, and then some. As I carve apex after sharp apex, it hits each corner at the exact point I wish it to. There’s no need to slam the brakes, just keep at a constant speed, with light taps on the brake right before entering an apex.


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JAGUAR

L E TH ECIA NE O SP

The Jaguar F-Pace is a true crossover champion. GQ joins another ice-cold icon – José Mourinho – in Sweden to talk torque, power-sliding and keeping control in testing conditions

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remember playing a match in Russia,” José Mourinho says. “It must have been -10C, so cold that some of the players were crying. We thought that one of the linesmen had died...” GQ is in Arjeplog, a one-horse town in the far north of Sweden whose horses swell in number every winter when the car industry decamps to inflict a brutal coldweather testing regimen on stillsecret new models. The last time we were here, the temperature plunged to a bracing -27º C; today it’s a positively balmy -4º C. Jaguar is signing off its new “crossover”, the F-Pace, and Mourinho is here to try it. He has one of the most high-profile jobs in football – managing Manchester United. Here though, he’s just part of the team, and a Finnish ex-rally driver called Tommi is the coach that really matters. Jaguar’s frozen 226 —

OCTOBER 2016

test process doesn’t begin until the ice is 50cm thick, and most of the work is gruellingly repetitive and necessarily empirical. But it’s also fun: there’s a lake nearby that’s roughly the size of the area bound by the Mumbai-Pune Expressway, and a chunk of it has been sequestered for test duty. GQ immediately finds itself powersliding the F-Pace at wild angles and serious speeds, wondering how the hell a vehicle with a higher-than-usual centre of gravity can feel so alert. There are various reasons for this. Firstly, although Jaguar needs to enter this territory to meet its ambitious profit targets, no one wants a lumbering, dead-eyed behemoth. So the F-Pace is blessed with the same aluminium chassis as the XE and XF saloons, making it the only crossover so equipped (although its front suspension

WRITTEN BY JASON BARLOW

turrets have been reworked for extra ground clearance and the front cross-members have been enlarged). Strong as it is light, it delivers the sort of sports car handling most SUVs could only fantasize about. Its all-wheel drive uses a control system called Intelligent Driveline Dynamics, which ensures rear-drive poise unless the conditions demand extra grip, at which point 50 per cent of the torque is sent through the front wheels. There’s also an electronic chassis system, Adaptive Surface Response, that accurately meters out grip even when it’s slippery. The F-Pace groans with so much engineering detail that it’s impossible to list it all, but if you want geeky, how about bonded bushes on the tubular anti-roll bar? This technique reduces noise, but also makes it difficult for dirt to work its way in. This stuff matters on a 4x4. Not that anyone is ever


JAGUAR

Jaguar engineers point out that almost 90 per cent of the F-Pace’s components are brand new ENGINE

2,995CC SUPERCHARGED V6

PERFORMANCE

José Mourinho

“YOU ARE IN A SPORT TO COMPETE, YOU WANT TO WIN, YOU HATE TO LOSE… WHEN YOU ARE TIRED YOU CAN GO HOME AND GIVE UP YOUR PLACE TO SOMEONE ELSE” 228 —

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seriously going to scale an Alp in an F-Pace, but you can order it on huge 22-inch alloys. The version we’re driving features the same 3.0-litre, 380bhp supercharged V6 as the F-Type roadster and coupé. Jaguar’s design team has sweated the details so intensely that it really does look like a jacked-up F-Type – the body sides are formed from a single piece of aluminium – and it has a similar dynamism. Inside, it has Jaguar’s latest touchscreen infotainment system, and there’s emphasis on connectivity. Not all of it works perfectly, though, and as with the saloons, there’s a sense that most of the budget went on the shiny hard bits underneath. Watching Mourinho on the ice, it’s fair to say that this is a

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man unprepared to relinquish control. For the uninitiated, getting a car sideways is a leap of faith. “It responds very well to every situation. Great responses, very stable, great fun,” he says succinctly afterwards. “I once hit a patch of ice in Milan, and didn’t like the experience. I think I would deal with it better now.” How does he cope with the pressure? “Football is not pressure for me – it is a privilege. I cope because it’s easy to cope with something you like very, very much. That is why I don’t understand when players don’t enjoy their professional life. This is the kind of job where you are very well paid, but, at the same time, you live the dreams you had as a kid. It’s why I sometimes have conflicts with people who don’t share the same philosophy. You are in a sport to compete, you want to win, you hate to lose, you win once, so you want to win twice… When you are tired you can go home and give up your place to someone else.” Has he learnt everything there is to learn in football? “No! I always have to learn. Even in football, which is an area in which I feel I am an expert, I am never perfect and I will always learn. Sometimes in my work, and also in my private life, maybe people think I am not humble. But I am so humble and I am always ready to learn from people who know more than me.” Indeed. And Tommi is waiting.


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DIEGO FUGA


ZENZI THE

MOVEMENT

It continues to be the hippest, trendiest neighbourhood in India, and it’s only getting more complex. But Bandra’s explosion into cosmopolitanism can be traced, largely, to a single legendary, folkloric location

Around 1am on October 9, 2011, 200-odd people stumbled out of Bandra’s iconic lounge-bar, Zenzi, shouting obscenities at the top of their voices. At least until the police arrived to disperse them. The target of their booze-fuelled ire was the resident of a second-floor flat in the same building: a man who had spent the past two years running a campaign to shut the place down, and finally succeeded. During its seven-year run, the bar – along with Zenzi Mills, its short-lived outpost in Lower Parel – acted as ground zero for Mumbai’s alternative music and arts scene. Set amid the boutique shops and posh restaurants of Bandra’s tree-lined Waterfield Road, it was a haven for the suburb’s creative community, at a time when everyone else was falling over themselves to attract the Bollywood and socialite crowd. Diners sampled the bar’s Euro-Indian fusion while occasionally gawking at the stoned, black T-shirted teens trooping in and out of the small cube that served as a performance space. The al fresco patio was an informal gallery of sorts, displaying the works of the artists and photographers who hung out there. Every night, the venue’s resident DJs would spin some of the most cuttingedge electronica in the country, while many of the country’s biggest indie acts cut their teeth playing to 50-odd people in its intimate inner room. Zenzi was abuzz as Manchester in the early Nineties, that legendary scene that gave the world Oasis, James and The Stone Roses, just all condensed to one cramped space, in India. But it also hosted poetry readings, musicals and dance performances. Zenzi was, to quote music journalist and NH7 co-founder Arjun Singh Ravi, “the heart and soul of anything experimental that was happening in the city.” It was as close as we were going to get to being 24-hour Party People. And now it was gone.

I 232 —

t all started one drunken evening,” says 53-yearold Anil Kably, one of Zenzi’s founding partners, over a glass of single malt at his breezy seaside flat in Bandra. A short, wiry man, perpetually dressed in shorts and a faded band T-shirt, this old punk survived Bandra’s opioid Eighties and OCTOBER 2016

narcotic Nineties, and by the early Noughties was running a textile business with two Israeli partners. One night, over drinks “at this great bar in Tel Aviv,” he says he suggested it would be “interesting to start something like this in India.” Anil had forgotten about the conversation the next morning, or possibly afternoon, and didn’t think of it again until he got an unexpected phone call a few months later. “On New Year’s Day 2004, I got a call from [his textile partner] Avi Cabili, asking me to put on my lipstick and eyeliner and go meet my future partners at the Taj [Land’s End].” Shaking off his hangover, Kably headed over to meet brothers Georgy and Philip Bedier de Prarie, who owned the popular Amsterdam bar, Vazkuid, and were in Mumbai looking to expand. Things fell in place quickly. Vazkuid sous chef Shahaf Shabtay was brought in as executive chef and his friend Matan Schabracq came to manage the new space. Doors opened that July, with a launch party that immediately put Zenzi at odds with Mumbai’s established party scene, “a mix of B-grade Bollywood choots and Page 3 celebrities that had no clue,” says Kably. “And Matan kind of weirded it up by asking Bobby Darling to come and be the door bitch, with the boa and everything.” Mumbai’s bar and club scene at the time was in limbo: Many of the big post-liberalization clubs were either struggling or closing down, due to lack of profits and/or police harassment. Fire ’N’ Ice, Mikanos and the massive 15,000sqft Velocity all tanked in 2004, and the clubs that survived did so by sticking squarely to Top 40 hits and Bollywood remixes. Largely centred around South Mumbai, and inspired by the UK’s elitist, fashionobsessed techno clubs, they were also stiff, formal affairs that made partygoers negotiate several barriers to get on the dance floor. Meanwhile, Bandra was undergoing its transformation from a sleepy suburb with a global village feel to an actual global village. Its liberal atmosphere and Westernized aesthetic made it an attractive destination for Mumbai’s emerging creative class, as well as the expats and returning NRIs that were then only trickling into the city. This influx, coupled with rising real estate prices and the loosening of rent controls under the Maharashtra

IMAGE: ZENZI

WRITTEN BY BHANUJ KAPPAL


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Rent Control Act (1999), is why a 1BHK apartment in Bandra now costs an arm, a leg and your first-born. And that’s not counting the security deposit. “It was a magnet for a certain creative type of people,” says writer, musician and longtime Bandra resident Jeet Thayil, who now lives in Delhi. “You’d find them in Brooklyn, you’d find them in Berlin, and you’d find them in Bandra.” Amid the demographic churn, it was Schabracq, Kably and their partners’ vision to make Zenzi into “Bandra’s Living Room”, a laid-back space that allowed people to be themselves, not feign hip, with obnoxious door policies – none of the shoes-shirts-couples nonsense that dominated the city’s upmarket venues at the time, and still does. “The nightlife scene then was very corporate, and we were targeting the more creative people – the musicians, the artists, the advertising people,” explains Schabracq over the phone from Amsterdam. “And basically they don’t like to dress up for nobody.” Schabracq was insistent that Zenzi wouldn’t be a place that went out of its way to cater to Bollywood celebrities and socialites. It didn’t matter if you were a struggling copywriter or a name that guaranteed a hit film. You’d get the same service if you ordered an Old Monk or a bottle of champagne. “Of course,” laughs Schabracq, “we never did sell a bottle of champagne. “Once some Bollywood star entered with their sunglasses on at night and we started laughing at him,” he remembers. “You look like an idiot, get out! You don’t belong here.” In between repeated spins of his newest acquisition, a first-press vinyl of The Jesus And Mary Chain’s Munki, Kably tells me of the time Kareena Kapoor walked in and stood around for 15 minutes, waiting for someone to escort her to a table. “Finally, I realized who it was and asked Matan what to do,” he says. “He said ‘Fuck it, let her wait’.” Eventually, she turned around and left. After a couple months’ PR buzz, the novelty wore off for Mumbai’s party elite, who went back to their old, comfortable, ego-friendly haunts. But it was exactly this laid-back, nofucks-given attitude that endeared Zenzi to its core patrons. By the end of 2004, many of Zenzi’s regulars had already moved in and made it their home. You had what Schabracq calls the “been there, done that crowd”, a group of grizzled nightlife veterans, including Jeet Thayil, actor and producer Denzil Smith, former Indus Creed drummer Bobby Duggal and Kably himself. At the same time, there were up-and-coming musicians like Pentagram guitarist and producer Randolph Correia, as well as Bhavishyavani Future Soundz crew DJs Mathieu Josso and Charles Nuez. Film editor Vivek Subaya would pop in every week, as would designer and Xtrathin design agency head Karthikeyan Ramachandran. As these regulars took 234 —

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THE

ZENZI MOVEMENT

“It was a magnet for a certain creative type of people. You’d find them in Brooklyn, you’d find them in Berlin, and you’d find them in Bandra”

over Zenzi’s bar and smoking section, they also brought in other people from their respective scenes. And at the centre of it all was Schabracq himself, the bar manager (and now also a partner at the club, having bought out a founding partner) who knew everybody, partied with everybody and would regularly end up at the after-parties as well. “He was just a guy who wanted to know you, it didn’t matter who you were,” says Kably. “He was also a good-looking boy and women loved him. And I loved the fact that women loved him because it brought people in.” Zenzi’s other secret weapon was Kris Correya, brought in by Schabracq to be the bar’s resident DJ and music programmer. A veteran of Mumbai’s underground electronica scene, Correya had already held wildly popular residencies at J49 and Razzberry Rhinoceros, but by 2004 had grown disillusioned with both the dated techno and progressive house scenes (the tired ubiquity he calls “big room sounds”) and the constant pressure from venue owners to play the pre-digested mush that masqueraded as “commercial dance music”. Zenzi, with its strict “no Bollywood, no commercial music” policy, was the perfect fit. Correya put his wealth of musical knowledge to full use, playing some of the freshest tunes across the drum & bass, breakbeats, funk and dub spectrum. “Kris knew how to work a crowd, educate them and make them have fun at the same time,” says music journalist Abhimanyu Meer, who also moonlights as a DJ. “He was one of the few real messengers bringing in new sounds.” As head tastemaker for Zenzi, Correya constantly pushed the other resident DJs – including Mikhail D’Souza and Gordon Fernandes – to break out of their comfort zones and dig deeper. More importantly, he acted as a mentor for the younger DJs passing through, thanks to his policy of letting anyone with a good demo, recommendation or occasionally even a CD pack they’d brought to the bar take the decks for a spin. Amul Lokanathan, who started his DJ career at Zenzi under Correya, calls him “the Wikipedia of music” and says that “he gave me a proper education in both music and the music industry.” Reji Ravindran, aka DJ Reji, credits Correya for pushing him to drop the boring house and techno he was playing and return to his roots as a turntablist. Correya’s uncanny eye for talent is best exemplified by the story of how Candy D’Souza became one of the city’s first female DJs. D’Souza was a singer, with no experience as a DJ, who regularly collected underground music on her travels. Noticing her potential, Correya called her out of the blue and asked her to DJ at Zenzi. “Kris saw me as a DJ before even I did,” she says. D’Souza soon became a resident at the club, spinning underground hip-hop, soul and neo-soul. Lipstick Nights, which she helmed


along with another debutant DJ – Ishani Mazumdar – were one of the venue’s most popular nights until it shut down in a blaze of cuss words in 2011. It wasn’t just the DJs who benefited from Zenzi’s opendoor policy to music programming. In 2005, when Zenzi was still struggling to pull the crowds in, Correya suggested that they open the place up to live venues. “I said ‘Live?! Where is the space?’” laughs Kably, as he pours the two of us another shot of whisky. It’s getting a bit warm and fuzzy, though I’m not sure if that’s the alcohol or the obvious warmth in Kably’s voice as he talks about his partners in crime. “But Kris just wanted things to happen, and we also wanted some attention, so we decided to give it a try.” Correya roped in electro-rock band Pentagram to play in the inner room. It was Pentagram’s first ever club gig, and in Kably’s words, it was “absolutely crazy”. Soon, Zenzi was programming a live gig almost every week, giving lots of current indie stars their first shot at the limelight. Randolph Correia met NYC exile, musician, wannabe actress and failed “high art project” curator Monica Dogra at Zenzi, and the two hit it off. In 2006 their band Shaa’ir + Func played its first set there. That set inspired Jeet Thayil and Suman Sridhar to start their own experimental music project Sridhar/Thayil, which also made its debut performance at Zenzi. By 2007-08, “it was a lab,” says Thayil. “There were experiments taking place and we never knew how they would turn out. We were trying things for the first time.” And then there’s the legendary story of Raghu Dixit who had quit his job as an engineer to try a career in music. After three months of trying and failing to even get a meeting with a record label, he was ready to pack it in and head back to Bengaluru when a friend suggested he play a last-minute gig at Zenzi. In the audience were Vishal Dadlani and Shekhar Ravjiani, who had just launched a new music label.

“There’s this mythical thing called A&R, having your finger on the pulse of what could be cool in two or three years, and Zenzi used to do it, time and time again” THE

ZENZI MOVEMENT

The two quickly signed Dixit, and the rest is history. “There’s this mythical thing called A&R, which is basically talent scouting and having your finger on the pulse of what could be cool in two or three years,” says Arjun S Ravi. “And Zenzi used to do it, time and time again.” He’s not exaggerating. Denzil Smith started organizing jazz poetry readings and book launches, reciting new poetry by poets like Dom Moraes, CP Surendran and Ranjit Hoskote to the rhythms of jazz music. There were performance art nights with artists in weird costumes stalking through the dining area, classical dance performances, play readings, vinyl club meetups and even an exhibition curated by Smith and Naresh Fernandes on Mumbai’s jazz history. There was the Open Mind Night, giving a stage to the city’s budding spoken word poets, comedians and singer-songwriters. One of the weirdest experiments would be Thayil’s Art of Noise event, which had half the crowd walk out in disgust. “I got together a bunch of musicians and the brief to the musicians was: no rehearsals, and try to have no melodies,” remembers Thayil. “There were five or six of us on stage and we were playing together for the first time. It was as much a revelation to us as it was to the audience. That kind of thing happened very regularly at Zenzi. There was an element of edge at Zenzi that I don’t think any other establishment or nightclub has ever been able to replicate.” Kably says that the ready audience of regulars emboldened them to do weirder and weirder things. “We could throw stuff at them and see how it went. They lapped it up, the more experimental it was, the more they loved it.” Schabracq puts it best when he says, “We thought, why not? Who’s going to stop us?” before adding, ruefully, “well, they did stop us in the end.”

A

s person after person I spoke to talked about Zenzi as a “movement”, or a “family” space, where strangers would meet and be friends by the end of the night, I realized that this sounded exactly like British music journalist Simon Reynolds’ description of the early E bliss of UK rave culture. And in the early Noughties, Bandra was awash with drugs, especially Ecstasy. “This is not a drug story,” Kably insists, but admits that “it was there. It fuelled not only the music, it fuelled the scene. You reached behind the console and there was a 50/50 chance you’d find something.” Thayil is a bit more open. “There was a lot of E at the time, some acid, lots of cocaine. Basically the kind of drugs that would fuel long nights. Because those nights were long. There were afterafter-after parties. There were innumerable nights when we saw the sun come up.” But the thing with E subcultures is that there will inevitably be a comedown. In 2008, the first hints were already there. Their nemesis, a second-floor resident annoyed by the sound and the constant partying, had begun his campaign to close down the venue. “His problem wasn’t just inconvenience,” remembers Correya, 236 —

OCTOBER 2016


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as he drains his fourth pint of beer at The Den, a regular DJ-friendly haunt for many Zenzi “orphans”. He laughs as he tells me about many evenings spent playing hide and seek with the resident, who would be waiting near the entrance to unload his litany of whingey complaints on any unfortunate member of Zenzi’s management he managed to corner. “If I saw him near the front entrance, I’d go around to sneak in from the back. I think he was also a little jealous. He kept on creating problems every day, over years. I was arrested twice or thrice. The last time, I was at Khar police station, with that guy screaming outside.” But with the Zenzi Movement in full flow, the owners brushed him off as a minor annoyance. With their eyes set on expanding the Zenzi brand, they treated the occasional police raid as the price of doing business rather than a harbinger of things to come.

I

n 2008, the Zenzi partners – Kably, Schabracq, Sharad Mathur and newcomer Vishal Thakker, who had bought out the Dutch partners the year before – launched Zenzi Mills, a grimy, garage-y two-room club in Lower Parel’s Mathuradas Mills Compound, which wasn’t the mill-based simulacrum of Hauz Khas Village it is now. Inspired by New Order’s hit song “Crystal”, which Kably saw as the epitome of dance music, and boasting a stateof-the-art Funktion One soundsystem imported from the UK, the brief for Zenzi Mills was to be a “cutting-edge nightclub”. And it set out to do just that, programming highly successful nights featuring some of the hottest DJs from India and abroad. Regulars included bass music maestro DJ Uri, house/techno exponent Kini Rao, East London drum & bass collective Shiva Soundsystem and Delhi’s audio-visual pioneers BLOT!. Correya and French VJ Viktor Furiani also organized Mumbai’s first VJ festival, Wall of the VJs, which was instrumental in the art form’s subsequent popularity in the city. The upstairs room, reserved for the more avant-garde acts, hosted live music, experimental electronica and one legendary 22-minute reading of Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” by Denzil Smith. But Zenzi Mills, short-lived as it was, will be best remembered as the home base for the dubstep and bass music scene that began its takeover of India’s nightlife. “That’s where that whole dubstep thing crystallized,” says Kably. “By the time Zenzi Mills came along, it had all become a movement,” adds Sahil Arora, former Skincold vocalist and sometime Zenzi DJ. “It was when we realized that bass music was going to be huge.” Kably, Arora and Correya got together to form Bay Beat Collective,

THE

ZENZI MOVEMENT

“That’s where the whole dubstep thing crystallized. By the time Zenzi Mills came along, it had all become a movement” 238 —

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Mumbai’s pioneering dubstep and D&B outfit, and they started bringing down DJs from other cities who were also dabbling in the new sounds. By the time other clubs picked up on dubstep, Zenzi Mills was already its undisputed headquarters. It further cemented that reputation when Arora used it as the venue for his new property Bass Camp, India’s first music festival dedicated to bass music. Today, bass artists like Nucleya draw thousands of fans to their live shows. None of that would be possible without Zenzi – along with co-pioneers in Delhi and Bengaluru – aggressively pushing the sound into the mainstream. But even as the bass scene took over the country in 2010, Zenzi Mills was in trouble. By the end of the year, the owners were forced to sell it off due to low turnout on the weekdays. Meanwhile, Zenzi Bandra’s struggles with its second-floor neighbour, who had by then filed a court case and regularly complained to the police and the BMC, had become the symbol of the larger fight between Bandra residents and its new crop of bars and nightclubs. Waterfield Road now had so many clubs and bars alongside Zenzi that Denzil Smith called it “the Golden Mile”. Similar developments had taken place in residential neighbourhoods all over Bandra, like Linking Road (On Toes, Hawaiian Shack) and Union Park (a constantly rotating cast of eateries), and residents had had enough. When a big local daily ran a front page piece saying that Zenzi was surviving because of ties to then-Maharashtra Home Minister RR Patil – which Kably and the rest deny absolutely – it was the beginning of the end. Fearing a backlash from angry residents, the police and the BMC issued show-cause notices to the bar. Then, in February 2010, the Bombay High Court ordered the demolition of Zenzi’s much-loved outside section. “That tore the soul out of Zenzi,” says Kably, staring out at the sea from his balcony. “I resigned as director and got out.” Schabracq had already returned to Amsterdam after six years in India by then, frustrated with the corruption and the daily hassle of dealing with the cops and the BMC. Correya had also quit because of health issues. The remaining partners – Mathur and Thakker – says Kably, “didn’t have a clue.” “We all knew the end was near,” Amul Lokanathan, who remained on as resident DJ till the very end, says over the phone. “The cops and the BMC were raiding us regularly and the business was being affected.” After a few months punctuated by periodic shut-downs, the Zenzi story finally came to an end in October 2011 with a flurry of swear words and at least one rendition of Mumbai’s infamous BC/MC chant. “It changed the people who hung out there,” says Smith. “It contributed to so much dialogue, there was a lot of exchange across different disciplines.” “There was a real sense that we were part of a happening, of a peak moment in all our lives,” adds Thayil. “If Zenzi were to re-open today, I might move back to Bandra.”


There are 1.2 billion people in India. Which means, statistically, we should be producing an inordinate amount of skill and innovation. And we are. But so much depth in the talent pool makes their staying afloat all the more fraught. And with the ever-increasing pace of development in tech, infrastructure and the arts, it makes our job all the more difficult. But it is incumbent upon us to compile a list to complement the ever-increasing breadth of India’s skill sector, a list as diverse as India itself. Whatever it is they do, whether it’s philanthropy, film or fashion design, they’re not simply great, nor exceptional. Up from the throngs, they’ve risen to become the best of the best this country has to offer the world.


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

THE LEGEND

Amitabh Bachchan

For five decades, he’s towered over Indian cinema, and its most distinguished doyenne, epitomizing class, elegance and dignity only the way he can. He’s morphed from the Angry Young Man to a benevolent patriarch to a passionate advocate of women’s empowerment, staying relevant across generations. It’s why he’s an institution in his own right – and is still making the rules. PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

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MENSWEAR by TOM FORD (ARchivES)

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PHILANTHROPIST

Adar Poonawalla

On the surface of things, he’s your average billionaire – with a flamboyant car collection, an extraordinary art stash including old European masters and a stud farm. And yet the CEO of Asia’s largest vaccine manufacturer, Serum Institute of India, is anything but, as he undertakes the largest private-public drive this country’s ever seen to clean up its streets. Starting with his hometown, Pune, he’s marshalling his not-so-meagre resources, to the tune of a cool `100 crore, to process thousands of tonnes of waste in a green manner, clearing more than 80 football fields’ worth of garbage so far. His organization is also planning to treat sewage water to supply three million litres of drinking water to Pune everyday – making this guy the epitome of clean living. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ARSH SAYED

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

SPORTSMAN

Devendra Jhajharia His second gold medal at the 2016 Paralympics brought widespread cheer across the country. What’s made his journey from a Rajasthan village to Rio even more remarkable is the host of challenges he’s had to overcome. And having brought glory to the country, he’s now paving the way for a new generation of Indian athletes. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ADIL HASAN

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

JACKET BY EMPORIO ARMANI. JEANS BY CALVIN KLEIN. WATCH BY BVLGARI. SUNGLASSES, STYLIST’S OWN

ACTOR OF THE YEAR

Ranveer Singh

He isolates himself in a room for weeks to prepare for a role, he approaches condom brands and writes ads for them, he transforms himself into a Maratha warrior and weaves characters that are operatic and fierce. In fact, everything Singh creates is on steroids. When he broke into the movie world five years ago, he was the quintessential lover boy, and now, as he basks in the glory of his most successful year so far, he seems to exclusively court magnum opuses. He’s flamboyant and cheerfully irreverent, and yet his work manages to have texture and depth. He’s Hindi cinema’s most opulent artist, and his new-age sensibility will likely drive the future. PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA 246 —

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T-SHIRT, SHEER SHIRT, TROUSERS; ALL BY GIVENCHY. WATCH BY BVLGARI. SHOES BY OLIVER SWEENEY

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

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DIGITAL DONS

Arunabh Kumar & Biswapati Sarkar

How many IITians does it take to break the internet? Only two – if they’re the guys who run TVF, India’s most popular original content web channel. After five years of sharpening punchlines, welding together pitch-perfect web series and being, quite literally, the voice of the nation, Kumar and Sarkar have established themselves at the top of the digital entertainment food chain – a nut that even the biggest production houses and networks are still trying to crack. PHOTOGRAPHED BY PRABHAT SHETTY

ON ARUNABH: SUIT BY KENNETH COLE. SHIRT BY EMPORIO ARMANI. TIE, POCKET SQUARE; BOTH BY THE BRO CODE ON BISWAPATI: SUIT BY BROOKS BROTHERS. SHIRT BY DIOR HOMME. TIE, TIE BAR, POCKET SQUARE; ALL BY THE TIE HUB


ARTIST

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Sudarshan Shetty

He has a thing for scale and a knack for elevating the mundane to the monumental through unlikely juxtapositions that burn themselves into your brain, whether it’s a 9,000kg double-decker bus kitted out with metallic wings or a life-sized steel dinosaur having sex with a car. In 2016, one of India’s foremost conceptual artists is ruling the art world with his stellar solo show Shunya Ghar at the National Gallery of Modern Art in Delhi. And eyes will also soon be on Shetty as curator of the third edition of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, the largest event of its kind in South Asia, where he’ll be orchestrating an expected 90 artists working across diverse media including sound, video and performance art this December. Shetty’s set to prove that Kerala can be a bona fide mecca for art lovers from India – and across the world. PHOTOGRAPHED BY PRABHAT SHETTY

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suit, shirt; both by kenneth cole. knit tie, pocket square; both by the tie hub. scarf by ermenegildo zegna

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OPPOSITE PAGE: TRENCH COAT BY BURBERRY. JUMPER BY VERSACE. TROUSERS BY SHAHAB DURAZI. SHOES BY ADIDAS

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OCTOBER 2016


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Tiger Shroff YOUTH ICON

Everything about Tiger Shroff defies gravity – his aerial roundhouse kicks, his hewn-from-rock abdominal muscles and his acting career. When he first arrived on the scene in 2014’s Heropanti, it would have been easy to dismiss Shroff as just another star kid. Except his first movie made over 50 crores on a `15 crore budget, the kind of math that makes producers deliriously happy. Online, over 10 million fans devour every little byte Shroff throws their way. Make the mistake of sending out a snarky tweet and you’ll quickly learn what it’s like to be chased by hungry bloodhounds. But what most defines this unsettling package of whirling limbs and porcelain skin is a trait not often associated with millennials: Discipline. You don’t get to dancing like Michael Jackson, leaping like Vince Carter and fighting like Bruce Lee without busting your ass for at least 20 out of your 26 years on this planet. It takes a lot of hard work to make it look this easy... PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA OCTOBER 2016

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

KURTA, TROUSERS; BOTH BY SHANTANU & NIKHIL. WATCH BY PANERAI. SHOES BY ROSSO BRUNELLO OCTOBER 2016

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suit by philipp plein. jumper by kenneth cole

BREAKTHROuGH TALEnT

Vicky Kaushal

In two short years, Vicky Kaushal’s scored a hat-trick. He was heart-breaking as Masaan’s Deepak, evocative as Zubaan’s Dilsher, and deliciously psychotic as Raghavan, holding his own to Nawazuddin Siddiqui’s monstrous Raman. He doesn’t act; he blazes, pouring himself into every character with conviction, to the point where you can’t tell the difference between fiction and reality. All of which – his hard work, due diligence and method-in-madness – make him the freshest face coasting the Indian New Wave PHOTOGRAPHED BY suREsH nATARAjAn 258 —

OCTOBER 2016


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

BLAZER BY CANALI. SHIRT BY PHILIPP PLEIN. BOW TIE BY SS HOMME

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

SUIT BY PHILIPP PLEIN. JUMPER BY KENNETH COLE. WATCH BY OMEGA. SHOES BY GIVENCHY

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INSPIRATION

Raghu Rai PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

For 50 years, Raghu Rai has captured India – deftly, poignantly, impulsively, compulsively. Since his first job at The Statesman in 1965, the Padmashree awardee has trained his energy on collecting “the facts of life”. Mentored by the great Henri Carter Bresson, who appointed him to Magnum in 1971, Rai casts a kind, cool eye upon the world. His hefty oeuvre is saturated with powerful, candid shots: Photos that frame Saint Teresa’s private, extraordinary piety; immortalize the victims of the Bhopal gas tragedy; elevate a stray donkey to an icon. Forever ready to experiment with new technology, he’s putting his phone camera to good use. His go-to filter? The moment. OCTOBER 2016

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

WOMAN OF THE YEAR

Kangana Ranaut In a game legendary for being as cut-throat as it is nepotistic, you’d think a girl from Himachal wouldn’t stand a chance. Yet, she’s made it to the top of the film industry and proved to be the girl in the bulletproof corset, who isn’t going anywhere. And she’s doing it on her own terms. PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

LACE CORSET BY L’AGENT BY AGENT PROVOCATEUR

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OCTOBER 2016


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

LINGERIE BY L’AGENT BY AGENT PROVOCATEUR. CAPE BY GAURAV GUPTA. CUFF BY HERMÈS. HEELS BY CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

OPPOSITE PAGE: LACE DRESS BY EMILIO DE LA MORENA. HEELS BY JIMMY CHOO. FUR PIECE BY HERMÈS

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lingerie by L’AGENT BY AGENT provocATEur. CUFF by HErMÈS. heels by cHrISTIAN LouBouTIN

opposite page: seqUin dress by BArruS. heels by cHrISTIAN LouBouTIN

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

OCTOBER 2016

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SUIT, ShIrT; boTh by corneliani. bow TIe by the tie hub

Global indian

Ruchir Sharma

For the past 25 years, Sharma has traversed the globe engaging in conversations with commoners and kings – gleaning from these exchanges a series of insights so revealing that he is widely viewed as one of the world’s leading thinkers on the global political economy. Sharma is the Head of Emerging Markets and Chief Global Strategist for Morgan Stanley Investment Management, a contributor to some of the most prestigious publications on the planet, and the author of several highly regarded books, including this year’s The Rise And Fall Of Nations, where he outlines 10 rules that will determine the fate of countries in the post-crisis world. And in case you’re wondering, he’s bullish on India. PHoToGRaPHEd bY PRabHaT sHETTY

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BUSINESSMAN

Vijay Shekhar Sharma

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

The unconventional genius behind one of the country’s most valued startups, he radicalized the e-commerce world with Paytm. Now with a licence from RBI to set up a payments bank, he’s working on taking his financial services to almost half the country’s population in five years. But not long ago, Sharma was a self-effacing student from Aligarh, learning English from engineering textbooks and setting up his company with business cards touting the neighbourhood grocer’s phone as his office number. His is a story of incredible audacity and blue-sky manoeuvres that marks the rise of a new breed of first-generation businessmen who have no patience for rules. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ADIL HASAN

SHIRT BY CORNELIANI. TIE BY DIOR HOMME. TIE BAR, POCKET SQUARE; BOTH BY THE TIE HUB

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On bOth: menswear by shantanu & nikhil

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OCTOBER 2016


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

DESIGNERS

Shantanu & Nikhil Mehra

The clothes themselves are refreshingly progressive – draped and deconstructed silhouettes inspired by vintage India that play to the current codes of alternative style. But what really puts Shantanu & Nikhil ahead of the curve is their unabashed approach to menswear, opening four men’s-only stores across the country from Kolkata to Hyderabad. Behind the scenes, Nikhil brings expert tailoring and craftsmanship while Shantanu has business savvy and vision. Together they’ve engendered a powerhouse of creative and commercial proficiency. In other words, the brothers are heralding a menswear revolution in India. PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

OCTOBER 2016

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

DIRECTOR

Abhishek Chaubey

There are two kinds of Bollywood films: One comforts, providing escapism and catharsis; the other disconcerts, demanding that its audience participate in its inquisition of life and society. Abhishek Chaubey is that rare kind of director who does both at once. Udta Punjab is inarguably 2016’s most important film; because it took its subject seriously, rampant heroin addiction, without being heavy-handed. This has always been Chaubey’s special gift: To strike a balance between lampooning and lambasting, caricature and criticism. The result? Honest, potent cinema that refuses to be immured. PHOTOGRAPHED BY PRABHAT SHETTY

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SUIT by BROOKS BROTHERS. SHIRT by THOMAS PINK. TIE by THE BRO CODE. CUFFLINKS by TROY COSTA. SOCKS by HAPPY SOCKS. SHOES by DIOR HOMME. CUbE by CHIvAS

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SUIT BY TAILORMAN. TURTLENECK JUMPER BY TOMMY HILFIGER. POCKET SQUARE BY THE TIE HUB

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

MOST STYLISH

Saif Ali Khan

He’s a blue-blooded Nawab who’s always perfectly turned out. A rare movie star who doesn’t need a stylist. Topped off with swagger and classic charm that will never go out of fashion. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ERRIKOS ANDREOU

BLAZER BY HARDY AMIES. TROUSERS BY TAILORMAN. TURTLENECK JUMPER BY TOMMY HILFIGER. POCKET SQUARE BY THE TIE HUB. WATCH BY ROLEX. SHOES BY CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

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THE CREDITS

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

WOMAN OF THE YEAR

Kangana Ranaut

THE LEGEND

Amitabh Bachchan

In a game legendary for being as cut-throat as it is nepotistic, you’d think a girl from Himachal wouldn’t stand a chance. Yet, she’s made it to the top of the film industry and proved to be the girl in the bulletproof corset, who isn’t going anywhere. And she’s doing it on her own terms. PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

For five decades, he’s towered over Indian cinema, and its most distinguished doyenne, epitomizing class, elegance and dignity only the way he can. He’s morphed from the Angry Young Man to a benevolent patriarch to a passionate advocate of women’s empowerment, staying relevant across generations. It’s why he’s an institution in his own right – and is still making the rules. PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA MENSWEAR BY TOM FORD (ARCHIVES)

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LACE CORSET BY L’AGENT BY AGENT PROVOCATEUR

OCTOBER 2016

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OCTOBER 2016

AMITABH BACHCHAN

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KANGANA RANAUT

PHOTOGRAPHER: Tarun Vishwa STYLIST: Vijendra Bhardwaj HAIR & MAKE-UP: Deepak Sawant ASSISTANT STYLIST: Tanya Vohra PRODUCTION: Gizelle Cordo, Temple Road Productions PRODUCTION ASSISTANT: Vasundhara Sharma

PHOTOGRAPHER: Tarun Vishwa STYLIST: Vijendra Bhardwaj HAIR & MAKE-UP: Deepa Verma ASSISTANT STYLIST: Tanya Vohra FASHION ASSISTANT: Desirée Fernandes PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta, Hybrid 09

SHIRT BY DIOR HOMME. TIE BY GIORGIO ARMANI. TIE BAR, POCKET SQUARE; BOTH BY THE TIE HUB

CHIVAS PRESENTS

PHILANTHROPIST

Adar Poonawalla

SUIT, ShIrT; boTh by corneliani. bow TIe by the tie hub

On the surface of things, he’s your average billionaire – with a flamboyant car collection, an extraordinary art stash including old European masters and a stud farm. And yet the CEO of Asia’s largest vaccine manufacturer, Serum Institute of India, is anything but, as he undertakes the largest private-public drive this country’s ever seen to clean up its streets. Starting with his hometown, Pune, he’s marshalling his not-so-meagre resources, to the tune of a cool `100 crore, to process thousands of tonnes of waste in a green manner, clearing more than 80 football fields’ worth of garbage so far. His organization is also planning to treat sewage water to supply three million litres of drinking water to Pune everyday – making this guy the epitome of clean living.

Global indian

Ruchir Sharma

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ARSH SAYED

244 —

For the past 25 years, Sharma has traversed the globe engaging in conversations with commoners and kings – gleaning from these exchanges a series of insights so revealing that he is widely viewed as one of the world’s leading thinkers on the global political economy. Sharma is the Head of Emerging Markets and Chief Global Strategist for Morgan Stanley Investment Management, a contributor to some of the most prestigious publications on the planet, and the author of several highly regarded books, including this year’s The Rise And Fall Of Nations, where he outlines 10 rules that will determine the fate of countries in the post-crisis world. And in case you’re wondering, he’s bullish on India.

OCTOBER 2016

ADAR POONAWALLA

PHoToGRaPHEd bY PRabHaT sHETTY

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OCTOBER 2016

RUCHIR SHARMA

PHOTOGRAPHER: Arsh Sayed STYLIST: Desirée Fernandes HAIR: Sagar V Rahurkar MAKE-UP: Devika Heroor PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta

PHOTOGRAPHER: Prabhat Shetty STYLIST: Desirée Fernandes PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta

BUSINESSMAN

Vijay Shekhar Sharma

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

The unconventional genius behind one of the country’s most valued startups, he radicalized the e-commerce world with Paytm. Now with a licence from RBI to set up a payments bank, he’s working on taking his financial services to almost half the country’s population in five years. But not long ago, Sharma was a self-effacing student from Aligarh, learning English from engineering textbooks and setting up his company with business cards touting the neighbourhood grocer’s phone as his office number. His is a story of incredible audacity and blue-sky manoeuvres that marks the rise of a new breed of first-generation businessmen who have no patience for rules.

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ADIL HASAN

SPORTSMAN

Devendra Jhajharia His second gold medal at the 2016 Paralympics brought widespread cheer across the country. What’s made his journey from a Rajasthan village to Rio even more remarkable is the host of challenges he’s had to overcome. And having brought glory to the country, he’s now paving the way for a new generation of Indian athletes. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ADIL HASAN

SHIRT BY CORNELIANI. TIE BY DIOR HOMME. TIE BAR, POCKET SQUARE; BOTH BY THE TIE HUB

OCTOBER 2016

SUIT BY PAUL SMITH. SHIRT BY CORNELIANI. TIE BY SS HOMME . TIE BAR BY THE TIE HUB. SHOES BY ALBERTO TORRESI

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VIJAY SHEKHAR SHARMA

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DEVENDRA JHAJHARIA

PHOTOGRAPHER: Adil Hasan STYLIST: Desirée Fernandes HAIR & MAKE-UP: Amanender Sidhu PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta

PHOTOGRAPHER: Adil Hasan STYLIST: Desirée Fernandes HAIR & MAKE-UP: Sonam Kapoor PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

DESIGNERS

Shantanu & Nikhil Mehra

OPPOSITE PAGE: TRENCH COAT BY BURBERRY. JUMPER BY VERSACE. TROUSERS BY SHAHAB DURAZI. SHOES BY ADIDAS

JACKET BY EMPORIO ARMANI. JEANS BY CALVIN KLEIN. WATCH BY BVLGARI. SUNGLASSES, STYLIST’S OWN

The clothes themselves are refreshingly progressive – draped and deconstructed silhouettes inspired by vintage India that play to the current codes of alternative style. But what really puts Shantanu & Nikhil ahead of the curve is their unabashed approach to menswear, opening four men’s-only stores across the country from Kolkata to Hyderabad. Behind the scenes, Nikhil brings expert tailoring and craftsmanship while Shantanu has business savvy and vision. Together they’ve engendered a powerhouse of creative and commercial proficiency. In other words, the brothers are heralding a menswear revolution in India.

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

ACTOR OF THE YEAR

Ranveer Singh

PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

Tiger Shroff

PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA 246 —

OCTOBER 2016

OCTOBER 2016

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RANVEER SINGH PHOTOGRAPHER: Tarun Vishwa STYLIST: Vijendra Bhardwaj HAIR: Darshan Yewalekar MAKE-UP: Mahadev Naik ASSISTANT STYLIST: Tanya Vohra FASHION ASSISTANT: Desirée Fernandes PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta, Hybrid 09

DIGITAL DONS

Arunabh Kumar & Biswapati Sarkar

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

ON BOTH: MENSWEAR BY SHANTANU & NIKHIL

YOUTH ICON

He isolates himself in a room for weeks to prepare for a role, he approaches condom brands and writes ads for them, he transforms himself into a Maratha warrior and weaves characters that are operatic and fierce. In fact, everything Singh creates is on steroids. When he broke into the movie world five years ago, he was the quintessential lover boy, and now, as he basks in the glory of his most successful year so far, he seems to exclusively court magnum opuses. He’s flamboyant and cheerfully irreverent, and yet his work manages to have texture and depth. He’s Hindi cinema’s most opulent artist, and his new-age sensibility will likely drive the future.

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA OCTOBER 2016

OCTOBER 2016

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SHANTANU & NIKHIL

Everything about Tiger Shroff defies gravity – his aerial roundhouse kicks, his hewn-from-rock abdominal muscles and his acting career. When he first arrived on the scene in 2014’s Heropanti, it would have been easy to dismiss Shroff as just another star kid. Except his first movie made over 50 crores on a `15 crore budget, the kind of math that makes producers deliriously happy. Online, over 10 million fans devour every little byte Shroff throws their way. Make the mistake of sending out a snarky tweet and you’ll quickly learn what it’s like to be chased by hungry bloodhounds. But what most defines this unsettling package of whirling limbs and porcelain skin is a trait not often associated with millennials: Discipline. You don’t get to dancing like Michael Jackson, leaping like Vince Carter and fighting like Bruce Lee without busting your ass for at least 20 out of your 26 years on this planet. It takes a lot of hard work to make it look this easy...

254 —

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OCTOBER 2016

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TIGER SHROFF PHOTOGRAPHER: Tarun Vishwa STYLIST: Vijendra Bhardwaj HAIR: Amit Yadav/Haakim Aalim Hair Lounge MAKE-UP: Rahul Kothavale ASSISTANT STYLIST: Tanya Vohra FASHION ASSISTANT: Desirée Fernandes PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta, Hybrid 09

PHOTOGRAPHER: Tarun Vishwa STYLIST: Tanya Vohra HAIR & MAKE-UP: Naima Rahimtulla ASSISTANT STYLIST: Desirée Fernandes PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta, Hybrid09

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

DIRECTOR

Abhishek Chaubey

There are two kinds of Bollywood films: One comforts, providing escapism and catharsis; the other disconcerts, demanding that its audience participate in its inquisition of life and society. Abhishek Chaubey is that rare kind of director who does both at once. Udta Punjab is inarguably 2016’s most important film; because it took its subject seriously, rampant heroin addiction, without being heavy-handed. This has always been Chaubey’s special gift: To strike a balance between lampooning and lambasting, caricature and criticism. The result? Honest, potent cinema that refuses to be immured.

How many IITians does it take to break the internet? Only two – if they’re the guys who run TVF, India’s most popular original content web channel. After five years of sharpening punchlines, welding together pitch-perfect web series and being, quite literally, the voice of the nation, Kumar and Sarkar have established themselves at the top of the digital entertainment food chain – a nut that even the biggest production houses and networks are still trying to crack.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY PRABHAT SHETTY

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SUIT BY BROOKS BROTHERS. SHIRT BY THOMAS PINK. TIE BY THE BRO CODE. CUFFLINKS BY TROY COSTA. SOCKS BY HAPPY SOCKS. SHOES BY DIOR HOMME. CUBE BY CHIVAS

OCTOBER 2016

OCTOBER 2016

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY PRABHAT SHETTY

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

ON ARUNABH: SUIT BY KENNETH COLE. SHIRT BY EMPORIO ARMANI. TIE, POCKET SQUARE; BOTH BY THE BRO CODE

ABHISHEK CHAUBEY

ON BISWAPATI: SUIT BY BROOKS BROTHERS. SHIRT BY DIOR HOMME. TIE, TIE BAR, POCKET SQUARE; ALL BY THE TIE HUB

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ARUNABH KUMAR & BISWAPATI SARKAR PHOTOGRAPHER: Prabhat Shetty STYLIST: Desirée Fernandes HAIR & MAKE-UP: Tenzin Kyizom PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta PROPS: Hybrid 09

ARTIST

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Sudarshan Shetty

SUIT, SHIRT; BOTH BY KENNETH COLE. KNIT TIE, POCKET SQUARE; BOTH BY THE TIE HUB. SCARF BY ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA

SUIT BY PHILIPP PLEIN. JUMPER BY KENNETH COLE

BREAKTHROUGH TALENT

Vicky Kaushal

In two short years, Vicky Kaushal’s scored a hat-trick. He was heart-breaking as Masaan’s Deepak, evocative as Zubaan’s Dilsher, and deliciously psychotic as Raghavan, holding his own to Nawazuddin Siddiqui’s monstrous Raman. He doesn’t act; he blazes, pouring himself into every character with conviction, to the point where you can’t tell the difference between fiction and reality. All of which – his hard work, due diligence and method-in-madness – make him the freshest face coasting the Indian New Wave

BLAZER BY CANALI. SHIRT BY PHILIPP PLEIN. BOW TIE BY SS HOMME

PHOTOGRAPHED BY SURESH NATARAJAN 258 —

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VICKY KAUSHAL PHOTOGRAPHER: Suresh Natarajan STYLIST: Tanya Vohra HAIR & MAKE-UP: Tenzin Kyizom ASSISTANT STYLIST: Desirée Fernandes PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta, Hybrid 09

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INSPIRATION

Raghu Rai PHOTOGRAPHED BY TARUN VISHWA

PHOTOGRAPHER: Prabhat Shetty STYLIST: Tanya Vohra HAIR & MAKE-UP: Naima Rahimtulla ASSISTANT STYLIST: Desirée Fernandes PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta PROPS: Hybrid 09

OCTOBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPHED BY ERRIKOS ANDREOU

OCTOBER 2016

BLAZER BY HARDY AMIES. TROUSERS BY TAILORMAN. TURTLENECK JUMPER BY TOMMY HILFIGER. POCKET SQUARE BY THE TIE HUB. WATCH BY ROLEX. SHOES BY CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

OCTOBER 2016

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SAIF ALI KHAN OCTOBER 2016

SUDARSHAN SHETTY

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He’s a blue-blooded Nawab who’s always perfectly turned out. A rare movie star who doesn’t need a stylist. Topped off with swagger and classic charm that will never go out of fashion.

274 —

PHOTOGRAPHED BY PRABHAT SHETTY

OCTOBER 2016

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

MOST STYLISH

Saif Ali Khan SUIT BY TAILORMAN. TURTLENECK JUMPER BY TOMMY HILFIGER. POCKET SQUARE BY THE TIE HUB

He has a thing for scale and a knack for elevating the mundane to the monumental through unlikely juxtapositions that burn themselves into your brain, whether it’s a 9,000kg double-decker bus kitted out with metallic wings or a life-sized steel dinosaur having sex with a car. In 2016, one of India’s foremost conceptual artists is ruling the art world with his stellar solo show Shunya Ghar at the National Gallery of Modern Art in Delhi. And eyes will also soon be on Shetty as curator of the third edition of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, the largest event of its kind in South Asia, where he’ll be orchestrating an expected 90 artists working across diverse media including sound, video and performance art this December. Shetty’s set to prove that Kerala can be a bona fide mecca for art lovers from India – and across the world.

252 —

PHOTOGRAPHER: Prabhat Shetty STYLIST: Desirée Fernandes HAIR & MAKE-UP: Tenzin Kyizom PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta PROPS: Hybrid 09

For 50 years, Raghu Rai has captured India – deftly, poignantly, impulsively, compulsively. Since his first job at The Statesman in 1965, the Padmashree awardee has trained his energy on collecting “the facts of life”. Mentored by the great Henri Carter Bresson, who appointed him to Magnum in 1971, Rai casts a kind, cool eye upon the world. His hefty oeuvre is saturated with powerful, candid shots: Photos that frame Saint Teresa’s private, extraordinary piety; immortalize the victims of the Bhopal gas tragedy; elevate a stray donkey to an icon. Forever ready to experiment with new technology, he’s putting his phone camera to good use. His go-to filter? The moment. OCTOBER 2016

— 261

RAGHU RAI PHOTOGRAPHER: Tarun Vishwa STYLIST: Tanya Vohra PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta

PHOTOGRAPHER: Errikos Andreou PHOTOGRAPHER AGENCY: DEU: Creative Management STYLIST: Vijendra Bhardwaj HAIR: Sagar V Rahurkar MAKE-UP: Nilesh C Kothavale ASSISTANT STYLIST: Tanya Vohra FASHION ASSISTANT: Desirée Fernandes PRODUCTION: Megha Mehta, Temple Road Productions


UNIVERSAL SOLDIER First recruited into the British Army in the early 19th century, this fierce band of Nepalis remains legendary for fighting skills and fearlessness. But in a globalized, post-Empire world, where will these Gurkhas rest their rifles? WRIT TEN BY A ARTI BETIGERI PHOTOGR APHED BY ABHISHEK BALI

W  

ell before even a hint of sunlight beams over the Himalayan peaks that frame the Nepalese city of Pokhara, hundreds of teenage boys and young men are gathered outside the British Army camp. The gates will open at 3:30am and then, aspirants will stream into the beautifully maintained grounds to undergo rigorous trials. In the space of a month, around 9,500 will try out, but this year just 240 will be selected to win a highly coveted place in the Gurkha Rifles. A fearless unit of hearty Nepali mountainfolk drafted into the British army – and often considered its fittest and finest soldiers – the Gurkha story is as thrilling as it is Orientalist: two centuries of villagers plucked from an obscure life of goat tending and subsistence farming and, under the watchful eyes of their British military masters, moulded into some of the fiercest warriors on the planet. Tales of the Gurkhas’ superhuman courage are legend, one of countless examples being that of Bhanbhagta Gurung, in Burma during World War II. As part of a unit under heavy fire, Gurung first managed to take out a sniper that had been shooting at his group, then rushed a succession of foxholes, killing all the Japanese occupants, before proceeding to a separate source of enemy gunfire, where he killed three more Japanese with his kukri knife – the signature curved blade that serves as the Gurkhas’ emblem as well as weapon of choice. For this, Gurung was

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awarded a Victoria Cross, and when he died in 2008, British newspapers carried his obituary. More recently, while the numbers of Gurkhas being recruited into the British Army has dwindled, there are strong numbers going into the Indian Army, a modest number being recruited into the Singapore Police Force, and numerous others – either retired Gurkha soldiers or those who have trained but didn’t make the cut – heading overseas to work in private security, mainly in the Middle East, Afghanistan and Malaysia. Thanks to remittances and tourism, the Pokhara region is relatively better off compared with the rest of Nepal, which has a per-capita GDP of about $2,500. That’s not to say it’s wealthy. Seventy per cent of Nepalis still work in agriculture, mostly subsistence, so the quest to become a Gurkha is a serious one. “All the boys really want this,” says Hemant Gauchan, a former Gurkha and British Army recruiter. It’s just after sunrise at Rangsala, a vast athletics and sports centre in Pokhara that prepares candidates for the army trials. This one comprises a series of wide fields and athletic facilities, including a football stadium. “They think it will bring them a better life, a better salary, more prestige. It’s very difficult to become a Gurkha. You have to be the best.” “Why do people from this region make such good soldiers?” I ask, and Gauchan shrugs. “Maybe it’s in the blood,” he says. A couple of onlookers to our conversation interject, older men in trainers who appear to be out for a morning constitutional before breakfast. It turns out they’re both former soldiers and fathers of boys who are training under Gauchan. “When it comes to war, Gurkhas think, ‘If I die, I might as well not spare him. I’ll kill

“Good teeth, good eyes and ears. They must be at least 160cm tall, over 50kg and chest measurement of at least 79cm. If not they’re out straight away”

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him’,” says one man, accessorizing his words with a violent stabbing action. “Other people would be too scared.” The Pokhara Valley is home to around 35 Gurkha training schools, each of them taking in up to 300 students for a jam-packed three-month semester. Students train twice a day for a total of four or five hours, and at all times can be seen at Rangsala or other parks around town running laps, or with baskets strapped to their back, practising for the punishing doko (basket) race, in which they’re required to carry 35kg of rocks on their backs for a twomile course. Enormous billboards promoting the schools dot the town, usually accentuated by a photo of a handsome, smiling soldier in a smart uniform. At Rangsala, every day sees up to a thousand young men training for the British military tryouts, usually clad in brightly coloured shirts indicating which school they belong to. Gauchan’s institute wears purple, and beyond him are about a hundred of his students doing drills. As the clouds part above, the snow-capped Fishtail Peak becomes visible, towering over the city like an icy sentry, as other hopeful recruits – in yellow, green, olive, blue or white shirts – stretch, do sit-ups and chin-ups. Gauchan’s career trajectory is a somewhat uncommon one: After 17 years in the Gurkha Rifles, he worked as a security guard in Brunei for 12 years, after which he returned to Nepal and spent seven years working for the British Army as a recruiter before launching Pokhara United. He knows better than most what’s involved in making the cut. He reels off some of the criteria: “Good teeth, good eyes and ears. All are checked. They should have passed class 10. They must be at least 160cm tall, over 50kg and chest measurement of at least 79cm. If they don’t have these, they’re out straight away.  At the first stage, they must be able to do eight beams [chin-ups], in which their chest touches the bar. They must run 800 metres within 2 minutes 40 seconds. They must do 70 or more sit-ups within 2 minutes. Then they must do chin-ups again, this time 12 without stopping. They can’t be colour blind. They should have good vision that is clear for 6 metres.”  The UK Ministry of Defence’s website is a little more expansive: No more than two fillings or one false tooth or a gap. False front teeth will not be accepted. Physical abnormality will not


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be accepted. An individual who is suffering from transferable diseases will not be accepted. Glasses/contact lenses/laser surgery will not be accepted. Failure to read Devanagari could affect your chance of success.

T

he Gurkha motto goes, “It is better to die than to be a coward”, and it is written in large type on the wall as you enter the Gurkha Museum. A three-storey building a short walk from the British Army camp, the museum contains dusty memorabilia and historical facts and details about the Gurkhas, in some cases accompanied by audio-visuals, such as the sounds of gunfire and cannons on an unspecified battlefield. Among the various uniforms on mannequins, military paraphernalia behind glass, photo exhibits and murals is a section relating the fantastical tales of Gurkhas in battle. The superior fighting abilities of Nepali hillsmen were first noticed by the British in 1814, when the East India Company was trying to expand its colonies and launched the Anglo-Nepalese war. While the British were victorious, they were impressed by the bravery shown by the Nepali soldiers, and by the honour and respect they showed to their fallen British counterparts. Soon, a unit of about 5,000 men from various Himalayan regions was established and assimilated into the British Army, called Gurkhas after a nearby hill fort. Gurkhas fought against Indians in the First War of Independence – sometimes referred to as the Sepoy Mutiny of 1857 – and later, were brought into active service in countries ringing India and Nepal: Myanmar, Afghanistan, Malaya, China, Tibet, even as far as Malta and Cyprus during the Russo-Turkish war of the 1870s. Around 200,000 Gurkhas fought 282 —

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for Britain in World War I, of which one-tenth died. World War II also saw numerous regiments deployed abroad – in total, more than 250,000 Gurkhas took part in combat and non-combat roles. More recently, Gurkhas have been deployed as peacekeepers in various conflicts around the world, including East Timor, Kosovo, Bosnia, Sierra Leone and most recently in Afghanistan, where there are still large numbers working in private security after their mission ended in 2013. There are no firm figures, but former Gurkhas tell me that four foreign embassies in Kabul employ them as guards: Britain, Australia, Canada and the US, who have up to 900 working for them at any given time.  “Americans are able to sleep at night in Afghanistan because of the Gurkhas,” declares Surendra Kumar Gurung, a retired Indian Army soldier who spent almost five years working for the US Embassy in Kabul. He is now back in Pokhara, where he lives with his wife and two children in a modern, doublestorey house in a peaceful part of town. Here we all sit, sipping tea and eating chiura, a roasted beaten corn snack, surrounded by vivid green rice paddies on all sides. It is a relaxing retirement for Gurung, who spends his days socializing and tending to the small vegetable patch in his front garden. Nevertheless, he still bears the straight-backed gait of a soldier, and wears his hair closely cropped. In Afghanistan, he was paid $1,200 per month, and 12-hour shifts would regularly stretch to 16 or 17


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hours, with no overtime. “Once there was a Taliban attack on the embassy, on our unit,” he says of an incident in 2011 that left seven people dead. “I was on duty at the time and not allowed to fire back. I just remained on post for three days while we were continuously attacked by rocket launchers. Finally the US launched a counter-attack with helicopters.” For this, he received no bonus, but was awarded a medal of appreciation. Others have not been so lucky. In June this year, 13 Gurkhas guarding the Canadian embassy in Kabul were killed, along with two Indian contractors, when a suicide bomber attacked the guards’ bus just after it had picked them up from their quarters to ferry them to work. Long vexed about inferior pay and conditions compared to their Western counterparts, the guards said they had repeatedly requested armoured cars rather than the ordinary minibuses used to shuttle them around the Afghan capital. In Malaysia, having Gurkha security guards is a selling point, and in some gated communities in Johor Bahru, a newly built town on the border with

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The Singapore Police Force has recruited Gurkhas since 1949, but still, they don’t quite make the cut when it comes to Singapore’s stringent citizenship requirements Singapore for those who want more space for their dollar and don’t mind the extra commute into the city, they’re a vital drawcard, and real estate ads trumpet their presence. The Singapore Police Force has recruited Gurkhas since 1949. Considered neutral outsiders during the race riots of the Sixties and numbering around 2,000, they were pivotal in quelling the violence, but still, they don’t quite make the cut when it comes to Singapore’s stringent citizenship requirements. While they are permitted to bring their wives and children to Singapore for the duration of their service, children must leave once they reach 21, and neither wives nor children have the right to work.  “My son got accepted into the Singapore Police Force in the very first round,” says Jhak Bahadur Pun proudly. He is another former Indian army soldier and a friend of Gurung’s, and has joined us for another round of tea in Gurung’s tranquil courtyard. And despite the restrictions, “I’m happy he’s there. It’s quite an achievement.”


Pun walks with the help of a walking frame, slowly and laboriously, swinging one leg forward, then the other. In 1971, three years after joining the Indian Army, he took shrapnel in his hip, during the bloody war between India and what is now Bangladesh, and at age 21, his shattered left thighbone was replaced by a steel rod. He spent another 12 years in the military before returning to life on the farm, as well as fathering five children. “I was one of the lucky ones,” he says.

T  

he Lahure Ambition Training Centre is dark when we visit, and the area wears a desolate air. One among many in a row of shopfronts, we climb a set of stairs to a floor lined with small rooms. One is a traditional kitchen with a dining table, a plastic banner serving as a tablecloth, while others are small bedrooms full of bunk beds, housing at least six boys to each room. Upstairs is another, larger bedroom, which doubles as a classroom. Here, six boys, still in their exercise gear and fresh from training, are seated on plastic chairs hunched over notebooks, while a teacher at the front patiently explains mathematical equations. The stench of sweat and socks is overwhelming. The boys mostly hail from rural areas and small towns near Pokhara, and are all either from the Gurung or Magar tribes, which are some of the main contributors of Gurkha soldiers. Most are the children of soldiers or farmers. One, however, belongs to a solidly middle-class professional family. All say they want to become soldiers to either maintain or lift their family’s prestige and wealth. One of them is Roshan Thapa, 19, who hails from the small village of Baya in Tanahun district, 75km 286 —

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from Pokhara. “I grew up working on the farm. Going to the fields, planting the crops, rearing the cattle, helping to carry water,” says Thapa, who is dressed in a longsleeved white football jersey. His village was on the top of a small mountain, while the fields were at the bottom, between one and two kilometres apart. “I’d travel between the two once a day, sometimes twice or three times.” Good training for the Gurkha tryouts? He smiles shyly. “Maybe.” I ask him if being a soldier makes it easier to get a girlfriend, and he looks away, embarrassed, while the room erupts in laughter. “That’s exactly it!” exclaims Arjun Thapa Chhetri, who works here as a phy.ed trainer. “You get into the British Army, you have your pick of the girls.” Chhetri, who is from Gorkha region – the area hardest hit by last year’s earthquake – is also going to be competing for a spot this year. He relates the story of a friend who was selected last year and is coming home for a visit along with his British nurse girlfriend, planning a big party at a restaurant at Lakeside. “Girls are attracted to British Army soldiers,” he says excitedly, because “they have money and status, and also a good attitude.” Fortuitously, I had arrived in Pokhara to discover that the annual British Army selections were to start the next day, and try to get access to the trials. After signing in to the British camp, we wait in a small rotunda in a lush garden, staring up at the surrounding mountains and hearing nothing but the sound of bird calls. A short time later, a British soldier approaches – a captain. When I explain that we hoped to photograph today’s tryouts, he shakes his head, however perks up at the name of the magazine. “GQ? It would be great to get in GQ,” he says, his voice lifting in anticipation, a rare unguarded moment. Still, there’s no chance we could get anywhere near the trials, he explains, it’s too sensitive and the cause of too great an issue between Britain and Nepal. This is, after all, still the army of a very rich country enlisting soldiers from a very poor one, in a very different political world than when the Gurkha Rifles were first formed. “I’m sure you can understand, we’re keen to keep our relationships on an even keel,” he says.  No one spells it out, but I can’t help but think back to the campaign, featuring actress Joanna Lumley, to allow former Gurkhas to settle in the UK. After much resistance, in 2009 the British government finally caved in. At the same time, while there is significant pride, there are also some Nepali voices lamenting that their people prop up foreign militaries. “Imagine if we could keep them all at home,” said one Pokhara local ruefully. “We would have the best army in the world.”


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Ta lk

ILLUSTRATION: KASHMIRA SARODE

Festivals: Sandip Roy NEW City: Alisha Sadikot Music: Lindsay Pereira Sport: Aditya Iyer

EDITED BY SHIKHA SETHI

291

BY SANDIP ROY

THE GODDESS INSIDE BENGAL’S MOST IS PRESENT RAUCOUS FESTIVAL 291


FESTIVALS

TALK The Invocation The poets know the harbingers of Durga Puja. The monsoon gives way to the season of Sharat, with fields of feathery white kaash plants and yellow-tipped shiuli flowers. But I grew up in a bustling Kolkata neighbourhood, with a vegetable market outside our window and raucous crows everywhere. There was no kaash for miles. For us, the first real sign of Durga Puja came on the radio, as it has done since the Thirties: at 4:30am, on the morning of Mahalaya, the beginning of Devipaksha, or the countdown to the festival. The rich baritone of broadcaster Birendra Krishna Bhadra echoing through the breaking dawn as he intoned those old hymns welcoming the Goddess home, his “Ya devi sarvabhuteshu” reverberating through the sleepy morning light. I would lie in bed swaddled in my blanket, determined to stay awake and listen to the whole broadcast. But every year I would fall asleep, lulled by the rhythms of those voices, secure in the knowledge that there was always next year. As the refrain on the last day of pujas goes as the Goddess is immersed in the river, “Aashchey bochhor aabaar hobey”. Next year, once again. I rarely hear the Mahalaya broadcast any more. We don’t listen to the radio the way we once did. But that was the first miracle of Durga Puja: those voices, most of them long dead, bringing a city to life, radio by radio, like a lamplighter running from house to house, touching us with the spirit of Durga Puja.

Act 2  

The Celebration Here’s a guilty secret about Durga Puja. It’s the biggest Bengali festival around. But it is also the time for the puja vacation, when Bengalis flee the insanity of the city en masse for hill stations and beach towns. With over 2,000 Durga Pujas all over Kolkata, the city, brightly lit, gaudy and loud, becomes Las Vegas on steroids. Here’s another guilty secret about Durga Puja. If you ask a Bengali 292 —

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Kolkata, where Kartik and Ganesh, what their favourite festive the two sons of Durga, do not wear recipe from home is, they will their usual pleated dhotis. They squirm. This is the season for are in glittering gem-encrusted “eating out”, when Bengalis trousers instead, a pantalooned embrace all that’s holy and all salute to the English masters who that’s oily with equal devotion. ruled the land. Stalls selling biryani, kathi It’s just that in socialist India rolls, fish butter fry and chicken we frowned on displays of excess. lollipops mushroom all over the Durga Puja in Bengal, and Diwali city, which smells as if it has been in the rest of India, were our dunked in a deep fryer. season of socially sanctioned Every year people complain excess, laden with sweets and about how over-the-top the pujas ghee, of a time of gambling and have become, and the enormous fireworks, bumper sales and great waste of money. Every year the feasts. But this is a new India, hoardings of sponsors like Royal where it’s always the season for Stag (“Make it Large”) and Pitty saris conspicuous consumption. Durga grow bigger. A couple of years ago, Puja didn’t get blingier. We did, thousands lined up around the block and the Puja is keeping up with to see the Goddess and her family the Joneses.  in real gold ornaments, sponsored by a famous jewellery company. It came with its own round-the-clock   armed guards, a sad testimonial to the waning powers of The Repentance the ten-armed Goddess But there’s no free IF THE GODDESS COMES ARMED who slew the demonic lunch, not even during WITH 10 WEAPONS TO SLAY THE Mahishasura. For a while, Durga Puja. All across DEMON MAHISHASURA, WE IN BENGAL there was a great fad of India, there’s a kind SALLY FORTH TO MEET HER, ARMED WITH making the image out of hush as the postof anything but clay, the Diwali bills arrive. In OUR HOLY TRINITY OF DIGESTIVES: more esoteric the better. Bengal, we also hear GELUSIL, ZINTAC AND THAT Bottle caps, matchboxes, our stomachs rumbling. QUINTESSENTIALLY BENGALI nails, Jurassic Park pujas, After days of gorging, the TONIC, CARMOZYME Hogwarts pujas – nothing was Bengali stomach, never the off limits in the battle for eyeballs. most sturdy of organs, finally This year, as Mother Teresa attains gives in. The sales of antacids sainthood, there will surely be a go through the roof. Everyone Durga Puja or two with the sainted compares notes about his ambol, Mother guarding the Mother or indigestion, versus her choa Goddess. Bengalis can never have dhekur, or eggy burp. If the too many mothers. Or a mother Goddess comes armed with too big. ten weapons to slay the demon Last year, one puja promised Mahishasura, we in Bengal sally to build the tallest Durga ever. It forth to meet her, armed with our came with such an advertising holy trinity of digestives: Gelusil, blitz, the 88-foot idol caused a Zintac and that quintessentially stampede even before the festival Bengali homeopathic tonic, officially began, and the police shut Carmozyme. If there is a down the entire thing. Old-timers Great Splurge, can The Great complain that the puja spirit has Purge be far behind? been ruined. It’s all about excess, As we grumpily struggle all about neighbourhoods vying back to jobs and gyms after with each other not in devotion but Durga Puja, we look at in expenditure, competing to win each other and sigh and awards from TV stations. “Aashchey say, “Too much. Next year bochhor aabar hobey”, bigger and we will not indulge quite better than ever. so much. Moderation is Yet Durga Puja was always about the key.” excess and competition. Once, the But in our hearts we old Bengali babus competed with know, aaschey bochhor each other to impress the English aabaar hobey. sahibs. I’ve been to old house pujas Sandip Roy is the author of Don’t in the stately mansions of North Let Him Know

Act 3

ILLUSTRATION: KASHMIRA SARODE

Act 1


CITY

TALK

294 LITTLE STORIES

BY ALISHA SADIKOT

BYCULLA IS BECOMING COOL AGAIN. BUT WHO HAS ACCESS?

 T

o walk through Byculla today is to be in two places at once – Mumbai in its past, and its future. Congested, grimy and still largely working class, but increasingly crowded in by residential high-rises, Byculla seems an unlikely contender for Mumbai’s top cultural hotspot. Yet, as a heritage guide leading historic walks around Mumbai’s neighbourhoods, I can’t seem to keep people away. Even on early Sunday mornings, in the pouring rain. In fact, it’s precisely in its chaos, its enormous contrasts and its transformation, that Byculla’s attraction lies, in a city seemingly weary of more familiar haunts. South Mumbai’s tony Colaba area? Hipster favourite Bandra? Been there, done that. Byculla on the other hand has – ironically – become new again. The area is no stranger to change. Once a low-lying swamp submerged during high tide, Byculla benefitted from crucial reclamation work in the early 19th century. It grew into a wealthy 294 —

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residential suburb which attracted the richest of Bombay’s citizens and, with them, its most sophisticated infrastructure: including a church, a synagogue and the city’s first racecourse. In contrast to the walled, congested town centre to its south – the Fort – Byculla was clean, green and open. (Let that sink in for a minute.) Next time you’re stuck in traffic in the area, try and imagine Dr Ambedkar Road in its earlier avatar as Parel Road, as the route of the Governor’s commute to Government House in Parel, when it used to be among the widest, most prominent streets in Bombay. There is much to imagine in Byculla today. Look closely at the nondescript Masina Hospital, with its circular driveway, flat grounds and decorative ironwork painted an inexplicable green and gold, and you might see a palatial mansion set within landscaped gardens, the opulent 19th century home of Jewish businessman and trader David Sassoon. The house, lyrically named Sans Souci, “without care”, was one of many landmarks Sassoon gave Bombay. An immigrant from Baghdad who swiftly became one of the city’s leading businessmen, it was said in the 1850s, “silver and gold, silks, gums and spices, opium and cotton, wool and wheat – whatever moves over sea or land feels the hand or bears the mark of Sassoon and Co.” A brilliant man, Sassoon understood the value of culture; among his many philanthropic projects, he contributed to the Victoria And Albert Museum (the city’s first, now the Dr Bhau Daji Lad) right next door to his Byculla home. The Jewish Star of David across the museum’s ceiling continues to mark his contribution. For Sassoon’s English neighbours, the exclusive Byculla Club made life just a little sweeter, literally. The first of Bombay’s


CITY

TALK left out? As Byculla becomes residential clubs, the Byculla was IT’S PRECISELY IN ITS CHAOS, ITS more gentrified every day, as known for its signature soufflé, a cold ENORMOUS CONTRASTS AND TRANSFORMATION, THAT its high-rises literally look down “fluffy delight” heavy on the liqueurs; BYCULLA’S ATTRACTION LIES, IN A CITY SEEMINGLY upon and overwhelm its chawls, a particular treat since ice at this time WEARY OF ITS MORE FAMILIAR HAUNTS. SOUTH as new cultural hotspots capitalize was imported to Bombay – all the way on its distinct past for rich new MUMBAI’S TONY COLABA AREA? HIPSTER FAVOURITE from Boston. audiences, is there any space It was the first railway line, BANDRA? BEEN THERE, DONE THAT or thought for its working connecting Bombay with Thane class residents? in 1853, that changed everything. And what, in the face of all Byculla’s open spaces attracted this unstoppable progress, will go next? The few chimneys that the mills and workers that would transform the port city into an continue to stand – without context? The chawls? The covered industrial, urban centre; the rich would leave, following the sea fruit and vegetable market, one of the city’s oldest, which is breeze westward for the next fresh, green, open area. In 1862, earmarked for development into a multi-use, multi-storey Bombay’s then-governor Sir Bartle Frere ordered the demolition of building? Would nobody miss the spot where Dr Ambedkar the now-redundant Fort walls. With the Town Hall (Asiatic Society) was married, after wedding venues in the city denied entry to a as focal point and anchor, the old cotton trading green at the heart Dalit couple? Then again, without any kind of official recognition of the Fort was transformed into the city’s first planned business or signage, you’d walk past it today without an inkling of the district, today’s Horniman Circle. Beyond the old boundary of the amazing bit of history you were missing. What about the Irani walls, Gothic Bombay would gradually emerge, as all attention cafes, local institutions for decades but almost unknown outside shifted firmly south to “India’s first city”, constructed in the latter Byculla? Could the S-bridge, a one-of-its-kind bit of infrastructure 19th century on the back of the very industry left behind in Byculla. connecting east and west over the central rail line, go the way Recently, the opening of Magazine Street Kitchen, an of other historic bridges being demolished as the railways experimental restaurant in a refurbished warehouse in Byculla, modernize? created considerable buzz. The heritage buff in me finds much to If Byculla, in this moment, is fascinating in its contrasts, its celebrate in the Kitchen’s intelligent recovery of an abandoned mixings, its diversity, shouldn’t we fight to spare it the fate of industrial unit; one that, in its form, previous life (named for a Lower Parel? Will we even notice when Byculla, Worli, Parel and gunpowder factory that once operated there) and location holds everywhere else look exactly the same? Which neighbourhood important histories. In this, the Kitchen joins other initiatives like will we turn to next, for the unique character, stories and the upmarket Great Eastern Home store and Nine Fish art gallery, inspiration we seek? As local histories disappear, every day, housed in spaces once part of a textile mill, in setting an example of across the city, the only people who lose is everybody. creative re-use in the midst of so much neglect. But if – or rather when – their tribe multiplies, critical questions Alisha Sadikot is a heritage tour guide who spends her time trying to convince remain. Who is all this for? Who’s invited? And, by extension, who’s people that museums are the coolest places on the planet

IMAGE: SUDHIR PATWARDHAN

Lower Parel (2001), Acrylic on canvas, 48” x 96”, Sudhir Patwardhan

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The perfecT escape The Lalit Mangar – it’s where sylvan milieus of the sacred Mangar Bani forest conspire with contemporary luxury to offer respite to tired urban souls

City life is pretty great: It’s fast paced, it’s exciting, and everything you want is usually available within a five-kilometre radius. But let’s be honest. While we love its conveniences, we often dream of escaping to a more verdant environment that’s not too far away from home. The Lalit Mangar is just an hour’s drive away from Delhi and is located amidst the thickets of the Mangar Bani Valley that’s flanked by the Aravalli Mountains. An experiential all-suite five star resort that’s perfect for leisurely getaways, it lets you reconnect with nature while ensuring that contemporary luxuries are always at your beck and call. Working with the natural contours of the site, the resort has been designed as a continuously cascading village street, moving from courtyard to courtyard in an informal, organic manner. Without interfering with the eco-system, it is built with rammed earth, gravel,

earth chalk and other natural materials that allow it to be well-insulated and noncombustible. When you arrive, check into one of the 34 opulently designed suites. With beautiful sit-out areas that offer spectacular views of the valley. Each one of them

is equipped with state-ofthe-art amenities so that all your comforts are close at hand. Begin your day at Alfresco – a restaurant that serves you delicious gourmet delights as you savour the spectacle of nature in all her glory. Then head to

Rejuve – The Spa and indulge in natural therapies that make the stress of urban living melt away. But if you prefer the outdoors, the hotel will organize rock climbing, cycling trips and picnics. For a unique cultural experience, you can even hop down to the village and indulge in rustic activities like eating food that’s cooked on a chulha or perhaps even have someone show you how to milk a cow. As the sun sets and disappears behind the Aravallis, The Lalit Mangar springs to life. As you sip on your favourite tipple, bards and dancers will take you back in time with folklores and dance performances. So, if you’re looking to escape the city lights, the traffic and hectic schedule, consider a weekend or more at The Lalit Mangar. For reservations visit www.thelalit.com, email mangar@thelalit.com or +91 129 715 77 77


music

TALK

298

Stranger thingS

By Lindsay Pereira

When YeezY met BeezY

C

an old Bach and Young Buck possibly have something in common? Not many of my Facebook friends – who number around 800 and who, sociologists say, aren’t really my friends at all – would know who either was. Bach is the kind of name that gets bandied about mostly in old-age homes for Parsis, while Young Buck’s real name is David Darnell Brown and who, at 35, really is rather young and unknown outside America. And yet, this is a question that occupies me when I’m not thinking about literature, my dubious career choices or sex, in that order. I have spent the better part of the last two decades listening to Western classical

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music and hip-hop. To put this obsession into perspective, my love for these diverse genres is the literary equivalent of reading The Merchant Of Venice before jumping into Trainspotting. It’s like staring at Raphael’s Sistine Madonna before choosing to dwell upon Rothko’s Orange, Red, Yellow. I had almost no exposure to either genre as a child in the Seventies, because the only people in my Bombay neighbourhood listening to the former were those forced by their parents to study an instrument. Rap made an entry into my life only in the Nineties, two decades after it first emerged from the mouths of emcees in New York City, thanks largely to MTV Asia’s willingness to put LL Cool J’s “Mama Said Knock You Out” and Dr Dre’s “Nuthin’ But A G Thang” on heavy rotation. Nothing about either kind of music ought to have made sense to me as a teenager. And yet, the strange and subtle beauty of classical music soon became as important to the daily soundtrack of my life as the gritty rhymes about hustlers and racism that sprung from the mouths of rapperpoets like Rakim and Talib Kweli. This may have had something to do with the fact that

I had, by then, spent the better part of a decade studying English literature. By day, papers on linguistics would require me to focus on prosody – patterns of rhythm, sound, stress and intonation. By night, I would sometimes sit up in wonder after recognizing those same tricks deployed by rappers who, I haughtily assumed, knew nothing about terms like consonance (similar sounding consonants), assonance (rhyming stressed vowels) and alliteration (the same letter or sound repeated). As Exhibit A, I would like present this opening from Rakim’s “I Ain’t No Joke”, off his seminal album Paid In Full in 1987: “I ain’t no joke, I used to let the mic smoke/Now I slam it when it’s done and make sure it’s broke/When I’m gone, no one gets on ’cause I won’t let/Nobody press up and mess up the scene I set.” The sheer number of lyrical tricks squeezed into these lines astounded me when I first chanced upon them. It’s what someone like Eminem takes to a whole other level, if you care to run through some of his hits and look beyond the violence or surface misogyny. While classical music is often liturgical, rap is firmly rooted in the argot of the

image: fly art productions, shutterstock (music notes & instruments)

the model and the mannequin (1873), giovanni Boldini/ “too good”, drake ft rihanna


MUSIC

TALK

streets. What they have in common though is how they emerged and evolved as reactions to more staid, sometimes stodgy forms of music. I say this despite the commonly held belief in our time that classical music is staid too. In its early years, towards the latter half of the 16th century, classical music was actually a radical step away from the obsession with polyphony – combining a number of vocal parts that harmonize with each other, so common among church choirs – that had been the norm for over three centuries. It was also, in a sense, a reaction against music created specifically for religious purposes,

and a move towards music for pleasure. In that sense, like rap, it was the underdogs getting back at people who had silenced them for far too long. As for rap, it was an underground urban movement that was born in the Bronx to give a voice to inner-city youth who, until then, had no presence in the mainstream music industry. Mashing up the two doesn’t seem as far-fetched to musicians or rappers either. Young Buck does something rather radical on the track “Say It To My Face”, off his 2007 album Buck The World. He samples the “Introitus”, from Mozart’s rousing Requiem. As a traditional mass for the dead, the contrast between what Mozart’s music is saying – “Requiem aeternam dona ets, Domine, et lux perpetua luceat ets” (“Grant them eternal rest, O Lord, and may perpetual light shine on them”) – and Young Buck’s misogynistic threats towards gold-digging women – “I’m sick and tired of these same ol’ broke bitches, No job, all they wanna do is smoke swishers” – ought not to work, but does, possibly because the original that is supposed to absolve can also be interpreted as menacing. There are a number of things that make the Requiem so compelling. Its strange and troubled history, for one, beginning with a commission from a mysterious count who wanted to pass it off as his own composition on the death of his wife. There’s Mozart’s death, at 35, during its creation, and the fact that the last words he set to music were from the “Lacrimosa” (Latin for “weeping”): “that day of tears and mourning”. And then there’s the music itself, at times so serene it makes you comfortable with the idea of

At Home (1897), Julius LeBlanc Stewart/ “Panda”, Desiigner

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NOTHING ABOUT EITHER KIND OF MUSIC OUGHT TO HAVE MADE SENSE TO ME AS A TEENAGER. AND YET, THE STRANGE AND SUBTLE BEAUTY OF CLASSICAL MUSIC SOON BECAME AS IMPORTANT TO THE DAILY SOUNDTRACK OF MY LIFE AS THE GRITTY RHYMES ABOUT HUSTLERS AND RACISM THAT SPRUNG FROM THE MOUTHS OF RAPPER-POETS LIKE RAKIM AND TALIB KWELI

death; at other times so beautiful it makes you want to stay alive. It’s probably why so many conductors, from Karl Böhm and Claudio Abbado to Zubin Mehta, John Eliot Gardiner, Neville Marriner and Herbert von Karajan have all attempted their own interpretations of this mysterious masterpiece, and why I own five copies of it performed by different conductors in different eras. I think my fascination for these disparate genres of music has a lot to do with how they affect audiences. Both try to evoke an emotion in the listener, or convey a particular emotion. This is why there is so much bombast as well as tenderness; the latter coming through with the use of strings or solo piano, or in the form of verses rapped by Tupac Shakur on “Dear Mama”. Classical music, like rap, can also be genuinely provocative. Dmitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No 7 In C Major, titled Leningrad, was as powerful an indictment of the totalitarianism of Joseph Stalin in 1941 as Public Enemy’s It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back was a political statement against white supremacy in 1988. Beethoven’s Symphony No 3, Eroica, turned tradition on its head in 1805 and changed the way audiences as well as composers approached the symphony. The track “Fuck Tha Police”, by NWA in 1988, initiated a conversation about racial profiling and police brutality that continues to this day. 225 years after his passing, Mozart is not an unwelcome presence in the hip-hop studio. Or on my iTunes playlist, rubbing shoulders with Kendrick Lamar in a manner that feels as if it was always meant to be. Lindsay Pereira is a freelance writer who spends an inordinate amount of time and money importing classical CDs and reading hip-hop histories

IMAGE: FLY ART

The Admiring Glance (1868), Auguste Toulmouche/ “I Love Kanye”, Kanye West


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By AdityA iyer

The big momenT of The 2016 The Underdog US open had liTTle To do & The Champ wiTh iTS evenTUal winner

T

hank you,” sighs the chair umpire. “The players are ready.” The crowd, however, ostensibly, is not. Ten thousand voices are chanting in hair-raising unison, each subsequent chant louder by that extra decibel. “Oleeeey! Ole-ole-oleeey! Delpoooo, Delpo!” Stan Wawrinka, two sets to one up and leading 5-2 in the fourth, is taking stance and has long been ready to serve for the match – for a place in the US Open semifinals. On any other day Wawrinka, dressed like a human crayon, head-to-toe in fuschia (including his wristwatch, socks and sneakers), would’ve been the centre of our attention. Not today. Not tonight. Standing at the other end of the net is a visibly overwhelmed Juan Martín del Potro. “Delpo”, as he’s called by those who love

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him – and there are many of us here in New York City who do – is far from ready to receive serve. He isn’t hunched by the baseline and gently swinging his posterior from side to side, no. Del Potro’s spine is upright, stretching him to his full height of 6’6’’ – he’s beside the linesmen and women, with his back to the fence of the tennis court.    Six minutes have passed since the players rose from their respective chairs to commence this game, to conclude this match. Not a point has been played. Now Wawrinka is clapping as well. Look at the chair umpire, he’s grinning from ear to ear too.  Del Potro, though, is not grinning. The ferocity of this dose from the crowd is about to take effect. He drops his racket and covers his face with his palms. They say there’s no place to hide on a tennis court. Arthur Ashe Stadium, the largest tennis theatre in the world, amplifies that adage – and Delpo’s face – on four giant screens.  He tries to gate the flood, blink back those tears. But his eyelids never did stand a chance against such emotion. It’s 1:18am in New York City, and everyone’s eyes are bloodshot.

Across sports, and especially in tennis, New Yorkers are known for celebrating champions and rooting for underdogs with the same quantum of passion. Here at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, home to the US Open, the crowd has traditionally adopted one of each every year, getting right behind both for the course of the fortnight.  In del Potro, though, they got two for the price of one. He is, incredibly, both at the same time. A (former) champion and a (current) underdog.   In 2009, when he won his first and only Grand Slam on this very court, del Potro had achieved the near impossible – breaking Roger Federer and Rafa Nadal’s choking grip on the majors (he, in fact, claimed that US Open title the hard way by beating the two in the Final and Semifinal, respectively).  The affable Argentine was then 20, and had the tennis world at his feet. The feet remained firm, but just a year on, his right wrist fell under the knife. When he returned to the sport in 2011, his lofty designation of “chief challenger” had been handed over to Novak Djokovic (who had by now managed to supplement his talent with consistency) and Andy Murray (who had by now begun to believe that he, despite being a Brit, could win). By 2013, del Potro’s left wrist snapped under the excess burden and his career was put on the back burner for three years – a period in which he underwent as many as three surgeries.    

Del Potro’s big-stage return was at Wimbledon this year, but the del Potro on show was remarkably different from his earlier avatar. The del Potro of old was a force to reckon with on both sides of the court, and he used to cane his backhands with both fists wrapped around the handle. Del Potro 2.0, on the other hand, had nearly transformed into a single-handed backhand player.  “It’s not easy for my mind to play free now and I don’t have a good backhand now,” he said in London during the Championships. “But to make up for it, I am playing smarter than I did in the past. I’m coming ahead to the net more with my slices and that is surprising to my game.” It was “surprising” to Wawrinka too, who lost to a quasi backhandless del Potro in the second round of Wimbledon in four sets. The Argentine, though, had greater upsets in store. 

image: getty images

an emotional Juan martín del potro congratulates stan Wawrinka at the 2016 Us open quarterfinals


sport

TALK At the Rio Olympics in August, just a month before this US Open, the 27-year old beat both Djokovic and Nadal to clinch silver for his country. At about this time, his colleagues on the circuit began to sit up and take notice of a man who had recently risen, career-wise, from the dead.  And about the same time, the United States Tennis Association had made up its mind to give this 142nd ranked player a wildcard (only the top 100 qualify directly) to participate in the tournament he loves more than the rest.

aditya iyer is a freelance writer based in Delhi

image: getty images

Not all Americans were happy. Steve Johnson, USA’s top-ranked singles player (22nd in the world), believed that the USTA should distribute its wildcards among either low-ranked or rising Americans, to look out for its own. Just as the other three Grand Slams in Melbourne, Paris and London do.  “It [giving del Potro a backdoor entry] could make a lot of American fans upset,” Johnson was quoted as saying. As fate would have it, the draw ensured that Johnson would run into del Potro in the second round. The match was played at Ashe, under the noses of 23,400 cheering Americans.  A cannon of sound nearly brought the new roof of the arena down when the Argentine

del potro tries to gate the flood, blink back those tears. but his eyelids never did stand a chance against such emotion. it’s 1:18am in new york city, and everyone’s eyes are bloodshot

won, and a disbelieving del Potro had to scream over them: “Argentina is my home, but New York is also my home. For your support I am very touched. Gracias.” After his wins over 11th seeded David Ferrer and 8th seeded Dominic Thiem over the next two rounds, del Potro had to find new ways to express just how grateful he was in his second language. “I didn’t expect to go far in this tournament. Because of these fans, I’m surprising with my level, I’m surprising with my colleagues, I’m even surprising with me.” A day before his quarterfinal match-up against Wawrinka, he was asked just why New York loved him so much. Del Potro gave it some thought and said: “I think they understand what I had to go through to come here, to come back to tennis. I think New Yorkers understood.” They really did. So much so that when Wawrinka was about to put a full stop to his magical run, New York, not so subtly, replaced the punctuation with a coma. “Oleeeey! Ole-ole-oleeey! Delpoooo, Delpo!” The chanting finally stopped. And three minutes later, so did del Potro. “It’s a little difficult to describe in words…,” he said at the press conference, still shaken by the power of what he had experienced. “I mean, I lost the match, and I don’t mind that. The score, nothing important. But this, I will never forget this.”

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PROMOTION


ALL IN THE FAMILY MEET

l a e B l a H did With 18-year-old LA native Bella Hadid’s entry into the game, she joins her sister Gigi (and all those other sisters – Jenner, Delevingne, Waterhouse, et al) in the coolest, sexiest model #squad since Seymour, Crawford and Campbell WRITTEN BY sarah Ball

PHOTO: WILL DAvIDSON/TRuNk ARCHIvE

P H O T O G R A P H E D B Y W i l l Dav i D s o n

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top BY t by alexander wang. Bikini BY charlie by matthew zink. necklace BY tenthousandthings

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y

You can’t sit with them! Because membership in the world’s most exclusive model squad – that crew stalking into tough-ticket parties, hair flying, elbows linked, thumbs supportively double-tapping out “likes” – is closed. Fin. Not since the days of original model crew Seymour, Crawford & Campbell LLC has one sisterhood so thoroughly owned hotness – and this time, they’re all actually sisters. Inventory runs to Jenners (two) Delevingnes (two) and Hadids (two), not to mention soul sisters like Hailey Baldwin (daughter of Stephen). Getting in is “kind of a mutualfriends thing,” says Bella Hadid – at 18, a freshman in this class. “And there’s no secret handshake. Although that’s a really good idea.” Bella is the olive-skinned theatre kid to big sis Gigi’s swimsuit-model prom queen. She shoots artsy photos (even lying down on the red carpet at the Met Gala to get the perfect edgy angle of her #ladies) and is linked to dreadlocked crooner The Weeknd. Right now she’s sitting with half-wet hair, a teensy cropped T-shirt and a leather jacket the colour of chain mail, looking off the edge of a rooftop at the melty horizon. The cliché cracks her up. “I’m, like, looking, into the sunset, all ‘Wow, what am I going to do with my life?!’” The answer?  “Um! Take a road trip to all the best places to eat in the country – like Diners, Drive-Ins And Dives? On a bus? And eat a lot of food. And gain 500 pounds. And be totally happy and content with myself.” This seat taken?

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BIKINI TOP BY MISSONI

OPPOSITE PAGE: SHIRT BY MARC JACOBS. BIKINI BOTOM BY CHARLIE BY MATTHEW ZINK HAIR: BlAKE ERIK/JET ROOT MAKE-up: PEP GAY MANICuRE: ANAMARIA/DIOR VERNIS SET DESIgN: MIcHAEl BEDNARK

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THE LAST DAYS OF

The death of Sumner Redstone will be a mirror of his life: controversial, bizarre and of seismic importance to the media. As the 93-year-old’s children, lovers and executives vie for his legacy (and a $40 billion fortune), GQ examines the chaos defining the decline of the ‘immortal’ mogul

n the Twenties, Michael Rothstein was a theatre and nightclub owner in Boston who, struggling in a street-level, tough-guy industry, became an even-tougher, son-of-a-bitch himself. When his son, Sumner, who in an age of new wealth went to Harvard Law School, assumed the family business and changed the family name to Redstone, he was already as much of a difficult, bullying, pitiless businessman, husband and father as his own father had ever been. By most accounts, he only became more so during his years building the family theatre company, National

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ILLUSTRATED BY ANDRÉ CARRILHO

Amusements, into one of the world’s largest owners of media companies, including CBS, Viacom and Paramount Pictures, with an estimated worth of $40 billion. At 93 and, according to many court filings, a physical wreck in the dwindling days of his life, he remains no less a shit. Having sued, abused, fired and humiliated almost everybody, he, in his last days of limited awareness – according to some, total obliviousness – has, if anything, ramped up the turmoil, betrayal and operatic conflicts that have been his constant companions.

IMAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK (TV NOISE)

WRITTEN BY MICHAEL WOLFF


THE MALT OF THE MOMENT

THE MALT FESTIVAL The heady aroma; the complex flavours. Each Scotch has a unique and distinctive character that is precious. And helping you discover a wide range of drams is Mumbai Duty Free, with its exclusive pop-up festival that celebrated the gentleman’s favourite They can be smoky and peaty, rich and rounded, fruity and spicy or floral and delicate. Each Scotch has its own notes and nuances that are waiting to be explored. But if you don’t know where to go to discover the vast variety available, then head to Mumbai Duty Free – the ultimate duty free shopping destination. Last month, it curated a special selection of these true gems with the intention of introducing aficionados to some fine, rare and world-class names. To do so, it set up a dedicated festive space – the only one in India – to highlight the best from the world of malts. HERE’S WHAT WENT DOWN AT MDF: Didn’t make it to the festival? Well, here’s what you missed: • Over 100 plus brands from across the globe. • A plethora of premium single malts and blended Scotch, along with American, Japanese and Taiwanese brands. • Names like Hibiki Select Limited Edition, Akashi Black blended, Kav Solist Sherry, Mars Maltage Cosmo, Glenmorangie The Original, The Glenlivet Master Distiller’s Reserve, Gentleman Jack, Laphroaig and more. • An opportunity to win an exclusive helicopter ride over the beautiful city of Mumbai. • Exclusive brand ambassador visits to help you hone your skills.

Mellowed for 12 years and aptly called the Golden Dram, Aberfeldy’s 12 Year Old single malt is one you don’t want to miss. Using timehonoured techniques like long fermentation to conjure rare honeyed notes, it draws water from the Pitilie Burn stream, that is renowned for its quality and promise of gold to give a smooth, sweet dram that is admired by all.


become a structure adopted by tech companies. Hence, Mark Zuckerberg owns a minority of Facebook but, through a special class of stock, maintains absolute control over the place and will, theoretically, for evermore. Now, there have always been egomaniac capitalist titans, building and controlling companies that were dominant and often bullying in their fields. But traditionally those bullies were the majority owners. It was their money, for better or worse. They controlled what they could afford to own. But the effect of the dual-class structure is that the last generation of moguls has been allowed to keep buying companies and amassing assets with other people’s money and yet still control like kings. Indeed, Murdoch’s disproportionate power and influence in Britain is not the result of his media power but of his disproportionate and inequitable voting advantage at the public companies that “employee” him. This is a kind of pure power which, with little logic in how it was acquired, offers little logic for how it is inherited or dispersed or shared or ultimately ended. It is nearly 18th century in its complications and in the transparently cockamamie pretences that have to be militantly maintained to support it – and, as well, in its potential for plot turns and great drama, tragic or farcical. Indeed, as with the madness of King George III, nobody knows quite what to do with the raging, mostly non compos mentis 93-year-old man in the home hospital bed in Beverly Hills – or how to take power from him.

And now it seems likely that death will only continue, or even exacerbate, the perpetual Redstone legal, strategic and emotional battles. This kind of Herculean, irascible, sonof-a-bitchness and need to dominate is of course not limited to the media industry, Sumner Redstone but media, for better or worse, is one of and Sydney Holland its most fertile environments. This is no doubt because media and ego (the “me” in media) are so closely related. But it is also because of a corporate anomaly in the media business. In an ownership structure that for most public companies would seem irregular and dubious and that would probably not pass muster on most stock exchanges, various media companies have been allowed to have two classes of stock, voting and non-voting. In this, most of the ownership of a media company may have little or no say in its future. Sumner Redstone’s family holding company, National Amusements, of which he owns 80 per cent, owns less than 20 per cent of Viacom and CBS, but owns 100 per cent of its voting shares (actually it owns 80 per cent but an 80 per cent majority dictates the will of 100 per cent). Similarly, Rupert Murdoch actually owns a small portion of News Corp and of 21st Century Fox, but controls the class of stock that casts all the votes. This dual-class system was a practice that first gained respectability in the US when it was employed by the New York Times in the Sixties as a structure to protect the paper’s editorial freedom from the pressures of Wall Street in a public offering. But then somehow the notion of editorial freedom was extended into what might be called mogul freedom. That is, there were figures so unique and indomitable – such as Redstone and Murdoch and, for a while, Ted Turner – that they were given a sort of inalienable primacy, a kind of “let them be them”. Most recently, this has 314 —

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edstone, famous for having hung from a window ledge in the Seventies while his hotel room (and his hand) burned, has long said he would never die. And indeed he seems, after a bitter divorce from a wife of 52 years, and then another from a wife of seven years, to have entered an existential realm of unrestrained life. This now includes the corporate PR nightmare of a top executive’s emails and voicemails detailing his sex life, his relationships with two girlfriends (who have elicited hundreds of millions of dollars from him) and a succession of legal actions that have made everything public. This particularly unrestrained phase of his life is, it might seem, not so much a coda or instance of mental impairment but just a further stage of a temperament enabled by his two tiers of stock. As such, he has rebelled at any interference with his personal desires or any efforts to accommodate them. This has included his family. Of his two children, his son, Brent, 65, has been irremediably estranged from his father for nearly 20 years and sued for, and settled for, his piece of the estate. The other, Shari, his 62-year-old daughter, has been in and out of her father’s favour, variously anointed by him and fired by him. One document that has become public specifically barred both of Redstone’s children from attending his funeral. Having also settled some years ago for her part of the estate – a settlement that included a place on the trust that will administer the Redstone estate – Shari now runs a venture capital firm and is the family member most actively trying to protect her father’s financial legacy, which goes to his five grandchildren (that is, her and her brother’s children). This drama extends to his executives. The curious thing about Redstone is that he never much managed his companies. He was a dealmaker and stock-price watcher who, unlike Murdoch, had little actual interest in the media business. (Murdoch once did an imitation for me of Redstone walking into walls.) He left that in the hands of an eager court and set of courtiers, men who had two

IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES

Sumner Redstone (L) and his wife Paula Fortunato leave a synagogue following their wedding in 2003


is slide into obliviousness together with his suddenly uninhibited sexual enthusiasms (threesomes without, apparently, strict gender requirements) left the girlfriends in charge. That is, he was yet expressive enough and vituperative enough for them to at least somewhat credibly speak in his name and to mostly ban everybody else from seeing him. What’s more, they both reportedly scooped up a reported $70 million (£48m), with the promise of near-doubling that on his death. But then, little more than a year ago, Redstone learned that Holland was two-timing him and, with an additional pay-out, ousted her from his home, leaving Herzer in charge. Herzer, mostly, did not threaten Philippe Dauman’s position, and, in fact, kept his potential rival Shari Redstone – long resentful over Dauman’s access to her father and rightly concerned over the lagging fortunes of Viacom – at bay. But as Redstone sank further into oblivion it became increasingly clear that Herzer, acting in Redstone’s name, could wreak real havoc for the careful but 316 —

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Shari Redstone

always tenuous plan of how control of the Redstone fortune and assets would pass upon his death. In this, a seven-person trust was created, a finely drawn acknowledgement of which way Redstone leaned between Dauman, his loyalist, and his daughter, who he often saw as disloyal. Dauman chaired the trust, with four seats on his side; Shari sat with her son, Tyler Korff, on the trust, and with likely one more vote – a four to three arrangement that could yet be undone or recalibrated by Redstone at any moment. Hence, the danger of Herzer’s ability to use her access to Redstone and influence over him, ever-increasing as his facilities deteriorated, led Dauman and Shari Redstone to join forces and oust Herzer earlier this year. That is, they maintained that Redstone had communicated his desires to live apart from her and to cancel all the agreements he had made with her. Hence, security guards were called and Herzer was effectively put on the street. In such cat-and-mouse games, victory often goes to whoever acts first – that is, to who is audacious and shameless enough to act first. Of course, she sued. Not unreasonably, her position was that Redstone could not have made the decision abrogating the provisions and bequests he had made for her, nor could he eject her from the home they shared, because he was, obviously, gaga. On this point much depended. In fact, Dauman and Shari Redstone on their part might have argued just as Herzer was arguing, that Redstone could not have made any deals precisely because he had long been out of it. But, in fact, almost everything related to Dauman or Shari ultimately taking control rested on Redstone’s continued ability to exercise, or appear to exercise, the control he possessed. After all, he was still chairman of Viacom and CBS, both public companies. That was the catch: The two-tier stock structure, with Redstone controlling the voting shares and, through that control, sitting as the ultimate executive of both companies, was a representation to shareholders that Redstone was in fact in control. If he wasn’t personally in control, if he was a mere puppet for other people acting in his stead, that would be misleading shareholders – and quite illegal. It would invite shareholder suits or even the possibility that the two-tier structure could be invalidated and control lost. Dauman and Shari had to oppose Herzer’s claim that Redstone was incompetent. Accordingly, to prove the point, Herzer’s suit contained vivid details of the most extreme and humiliating incompetence. And, indeed, faced with a court-ordered medical exam, Redstone, theoretically by his own decision and with a signature wildly careening down the page, resigned in February as chairman of CBS and Viacom. Now, by the terms of prior agreements with her father – including the settlement that gave her 20 per cent of the family holding company, National Amusements (which in 2014 her father had offered

THEY WERE IN ULTIMATE CONFLICT OVER THE FUTURE OF VIACOM, AND, MORE TO THE POINT, OVER WHO CONTROLLED THE MAN WHO HAD CONTROL

IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES

imperatives, to make his stock rise and to humour him (that is, to anticipate what he wanted and when he wanted it). The difficulty of doing both has meant that the turmoil in his office matched the turmoil in his home. And yet, perhaps to his credit, if he had to be humoured like an indulged monarch, he would also need financial return, hence, usually, he fired the mere sycophants and replaced them with sycophants who could make him money too. (Of course, sometimes he fired people who could make him money, but who weren’t sycophantic enough.) That is, until the music stopped. That’s the sudden silence, followed by vast commotion, of being in control when you can’t exercise control. Powerless and yet still powerful. In effect, you become merely the idea of control, wrestled over by everyone else. Or at least by the people close enough to you to say that, although you are mute and immobile and to all appearances out of it, they know what you want. Those people in close proximity have variously included Redstone’s two caretakers, former girlfriends Sydney Holland and Manuela Herzer, his daughter, Shari, and his long-time friend, hatchet man, executive and, Redstone often said, son he would have preferred to have, Philippe Dauman, the CEO of Viacom. The past two years have been in effect a war among his lovers, his daughter and his closest business associate to each speak in Redstone’s name, often against each other.


a greater extent than he turned out to be, might have sent a similar notice in Redstone’s name to Shari. But too late. Dauman was forced to reverse the position he had taken in the Herzer suit and insist that Redstone was unable to make these decisions for himself and that he had obviously been manipulated by his daughter.

to back for $1 billion) – if, for any reason, her father no longer wanted to or was able to serve as chairman of the two companies, that gave Shari the right to replace him. But joining management might have put her in conflict with her own interests regarding the future of these companies, hence, she declined at CBS, where, instead, as a board member she voted to appoint Leslie Moonves, the CEO, as chairman. Moonves is one of the most vaunted executives in the entertainment business, able to humour both Redstone and build CBS profits. At Viacom, where she also declined the chairman’s job, the board voted to elevate Dauman to chairman – with one vote against, Shari’s. Even as they were aligned in the battle against Herzer, Shari was announcing that they were in ultimate conflict over the future of Viacom and, more to the point, over who controlled the man who had control. A glimpse at the larger picture. The issue is not just who controls the Redstone companies but what happens to them. Their fate could potentially alter the balance of power in the media industry. Shari Redstone, acting in the interest of her children, niece and nephew, might reasonably want to diversify out of an overwhelmingly media-focused portfolio, selling Viacom or CBS or both. That, many observers believe, will set off a massive round of consolidation in the media business. Dauman, on his part, were he to maintain control of the trust after Redstone’s death – giving him control through the Redstone voting shares of CBS as well as Viacom – would, arguably next to Murdoch, be the most powerful man in the media industry. Moonves, on his part, might, if Shari Redstone gains ultimate control, take over Viacom and begin his own acquistion march (Time Warner is said to be a favoured Moonves target). Meanwhile, Herzer’s lawsuit arrived in court in early May and, to some extent, Sumner Redstone rose to the occasion. That is, an expletive-filled, mostly incoherent video deposition in which he was unable to state his original name (Rothstein), he yet appeared to reject Herzer as his caregiver and express, however monosyllabically, his preference for his daughter. On this basis, Herzer’s suit was dismissed and Redstone’s cancellation of bequests to her allowed to stand. Redstone, in other words, was not found incompetent. That said, on the other hand, he could hardly be pronounced in full possession of his faculties either. Control of one of the world’s biggest media companies clearly rested in a nether world beyond normal sense and sensibility. Shortly after the ruling, the Viacom board, controlled by Dauman, decided to stop paying Redstone his multimillion-dollar salary. Days later, Redstone, by written notice, dismissed Dauman and one of Dauman’s chief allies from the trust, effectively giving Shari Redstone control of all the trust, and hence, of everything on Redstone’s death or in the event he might be deemed incompetent. Curiously, Dauman, were he faster on the draw and shameless to 318 —

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Sumner Redstone honoured with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES (GROUP), REX FEATURES (WALK OF FAME)

Power players: Redstone, Bruce Willis, Dwayne Johnson & Brad Grey, 13 March 2013

y the time you read this, Shari Redstone might have figured out how to fire Dauman before his case to have her reconstitution of the trust undone proceeds. But this is hardly straightforward. She needs the Viacom board to oust Dauman but that board, once loyal to her father, is now loyal to her father’s greatest loyalist, Dauman. For this, Humpty Dumpty has to be credibly enough put back together again to call a special shareholders’ meeting and, before a Massachusetts court, demonstrate his ability to fire the sitting directors and appoint new ones. Curiously, there is a certain sort of logical way this may end. Unlike in the 18th century, modern power has a certain financial price. And it may be that Shari Redstone’s manoeuvres are just an effort to get it. In this, CBS and Viacom, or both, might merely pay a premium for National Amusements’ controlling tier of stock. Many believe CBS, which has been stockpiling cash, is already on its way to doing this. Dauman, seemingly more sanguine about his ultimate control, has not appeared to be so strategic. That may be why he, in early spring, in an apparent sudden effort to raise cash, put Paramount on the block, against, according to Shari Redstone, her father’s wishes – if he has wishes. Or, those theoretical wishes might just be another element of the negotiation to force Dauman to pay the maximum price to be rid of those “wishes”. And, indeed, this would be the logical, if expensive, way to retire the anomalous and inequitable Redstone legacy of control and bring a bit more sensible governance to the corporate world. But then again, absolute power creates an absolute power vacuum, in which the quick and the ruthless, and often the unexpected, rather than the logical, generally prevail.


zayn's nEW

›››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››› PhotograPhed by Anders OvergAArd

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Be a Blue collar man

usually a pillar of Milan-after-dark elegance, Prada is borrowing the dusty clay colour, reinforced material and hard-nosed manual-labour spirit of workwear pants.

‹‹

sweater, jeans; BotH BY prada. Boots BY giuseppe zanotti design. Bracelet BY david yurman. rIng BY john hardy. guItar BY fender

direction

››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››› It isn’t easy leaving a tween-adored boy band. But when Zayn

Malik broke off, he immediately started dating supermodels and making hit records of his own. Here he shows us how to wear the pants (specifically the new tricked-out, slimmed-down utility kind)

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MOTOCROSS MEETS THE FRENCH

Think of it this way: Either you can buy pristine Balmain pants and then cry when the first speck of dirt graces your shapely calves, or you can buy grimy-on-purpose Balmain pants and never worry about a damn thing.

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JACKET BY LOUIS VUITTON. VEST BY DOLCE & GABBANA. JEANS BY BALMAIN. SNEAKERS BY GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI DESIGN. NECKLACES BY MIANSAI (TOP), DEGS & SAL (BOTTOM). BRACELET BY GEORGE FROST

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GO AHEAD, PUT YOUR FEET UP

Utility pants should be tough enough for work but comfortable enough for lounging. See how these have the same stretchy cuffs as your favourite sweatpants? That’s the idea. Stuff a snack in your cargo pockets and you’ll never need to get up.

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SWEATSHIRT BY GUCCI. JEANS BY ARMANI EXCHANGE. VEST BY JOHN ELLIOTT. SNEAKERS BY GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI DESIGN. RING BY DAVID YURMAN. SOCKS BY UNIQLO


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SOLID METAL GEAR

The beauty of these pants is that they can look streetwise or sophisticated (or both at once). To class up those punky metal zippers, pull on the kind of fitted sweater you’d wear to dinner with your girlfriend’s parents.

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SWEATER BY DIOR HOMME. TROUSERS BY NAUTICA. BOOTS BY GIUSEPPE FOR ZAYN. LINK BRACELET BY GEORGE FROST

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jacket BY bottega veneta. t-shirt BY icons. jeans BY versace. link Bracelet BY george frost. ring BY david yurman. sneakers BY giuseppe for zayn grooming: larrY king/ streeters set design: roxY Walton production: ragi Dholakia ProDuctions

Coming Soon to Your Feet

giuseppe for zayn

›››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››››› last summer, giuseppe Zanotti – the italian shoemaker whose flashy footwear has lured superstars like Beyoncé and kanye for collaborations – came across scores of young women in central Park losing their bananas at a one Direction show. “When you see another generation, another kind of lifestyle, it’s another world,” he tells us. Wanting a piece of that world, he asked Zayn – whom he’d hit it off with at Paris Fashion Week – to help design a line of dressy sneakers (as seen here) that are more like minimalist soft-bottomed boots: much simpler than the studded and flame-embellished sneaks Zanotti is known for. (“it doesn’t have to be fireworks,” he says.) Zanotti, who was a radio deejay in his 20s, sees his new collaborator as not just a talent but a talisman. “My work is to be a shoe designer, but also to understand what this generation likes to wear. the music helps me understand.”

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The

guide To

parenting

Kids are master manipulators. They play up their charms, pit adults against each other and can make you feel inadequate almost instantly. But you can read better than them, and as such can learn from our tips in their intrusive presence. Breathe. It’s all going to be OK ILLUSTRATED BY raMi nieMi

children are

EVIL

Tam e Th em w iTh Jedi m ind T ri c ks .

By the time most of us have kids, we will have aged enough to be conscious of lacking energy on a regular basis. But now you have kids, and it’s your job to keep up with them. Carnegie Mellon’s Kevin Zollman’s new book, The Game Theorist’s Guide To Parenting – written with journalist Paul Raeburn – explains how. —Chelsea leu » Force cooperation

For siblings who refuse to work together, Zollman recommends a version of the prisoner’s dilemma. Assign them a task they can do jointly, like picking up the toys, then give them each the same reward or punishment based on their performance as a team: If one kid slacks off, the next time around the other one is likely to refuse to cooperate, and both will lose out. Over time, this setup compels teamwork. » Make theM pay

Who gets the bigger room? Who gets to name the cat? It’s the old King Solomon problem: Some things you just can’t cut in half. So have kids bid with chores or 330 —

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their allowance. If one of them wants to name the cat Macaroni & Cheese, he’ll have to pay for it. » threaten theM – For real

Screaming “Don’t make me turn this car around!” never works. That’s what Zollman calls a non-credible threat – kids see through it, because they know it means you’ll suffer too. So pick punishments that benefit you. Like: “Stop punching your sister or we’re going to Grandma’s instead of the movies.” » Make theM lie

If you suspect your kids haven’t done their homework, nail them with specific

questions: Which subject? What did you learn? How long did it take? Hardest part? Even if they manage convincing answers, the act of sustaining an elaborate lie exerts psychological discomfort. Eventually they’ll figure out that being honest is just easier. » Don’t bail theM out

To make all these lessons stick, you have to buckle down. If your kid’s in a bit of trouble and sobbing pitifully, resist the urge to swoop in and save her by remembering something economists call moral hazard. Corporate bailouts incentivize bad behaviour – avoid this fate by establishing clear rules and meting out punishment when necessary.


QUICK FIXES social

E AS Y W A Y S TO B LOC K O U T C RE E P S . By a certain age, kids hang out on social media, and you can’t be there to fight off every creep. So speak to them openly: “I tell them why these apps can be dangerous,” says Christopher Hadnagy, CEO of consulting site Social-Engineer. Then toggle some safety settings (on their apps as well as yours). —MEAGHEN BROWN SNAPCHAT

WHISPER

Despite the self-destruct function, sexts still end up online. Quick fix: Minimize risks by restricting “Who Can Contact Me” to “My Friends” and blocking strangers. INSTAGRAM

Even people without an account can view all your photos. Quick fix: Switch on “Private Account” in “Options”. KIK

Though Kik is meant to be anonymous, kids post their usernames on other social media (#kikme), making it easy for weirdos to contact them. Quick fix: Don’t share usernames. Also, disable “Notify for New People” in “Notifications” so messages from strangers end up in a separate list.

YOU CAN BE THE

FUN UNCLE 332 —

OCTOBER 2016

Used to post confessions or personal thoughts, Whisper claims to be anonymous, but geotagging gives away your whereabouts to undesirables. Quick fix: In your iPhone settings, change location access to “Never”. ASKFM

The question-and-answer service attracts cyberbullying (some incidents have been linked to suicides). Quick fix: Stay anonymous yourself but uncheck “Allow Anonymous Questions” in the privacy settings. OMEGLE

Predators lurk in the shadows of this video-chatting service – which isn’t so anonymous once you link it to Facebook. Quick fix: Too gross. Don’t allow!

SHOULD I LET MY KID EAT HER

BOOGERS? You may want to repress this knowledge as soon as you read it, but we all ingest about a litre of boogers each day through the nasal cavity. Your daughter is just consuming them via a different route – albeit one that’s less socially acceptable. We can assure you that it’s quite harmless. Boogers are more than 80 per cent water, plus some proteins, salts and antibodies. The main function of boogers is to trap airborne dirt, dust and other grime. Although nose goblins do ensnare pathogens, your stomach can handle them. “Our bodies have been built to digest snot, since we swallow it all the time,” says Scott Rickert, associate director of pediatric otolaryngology at New York University. The worst that can happen is a nosebleed from exuberant mining.

—IAN FRISCH

I can’t say I love kids. They’re kinda gross. But my sister has three, and they think I’m awesome. Why? Because I’ve never yelled at them about their homework. Never given a time-out. Never said “No more chicken fingers.” I am Fun Uncle, and my Curated Child-Rearing Experience® might just be the most powerful kid-hacking tool around. So if you want your nieces or your friends’ kids to love you, listen up. When you’re Fun Uncle or Aunt, you’re a child’s first, best look at adulthood. That’s because you treat kids not like kids, but like human beings with agency. So instead of bringing them a toy when you visit, take them to the bookstore and let them choose anything they want. Be a conspirator: Curse every now and then, but wink at them while feigning contrition to their parents. Let them know that language is fun: Spin fantastic lies with an unwavering poker face, then guffaw at their made-up riddles. Be vulnerable: Tell them embarrassing stories about their mom, but even more embarrassing stories about yourself. Be the shot of Undiluted Adult Perspective when dating starts, with a stiff chaser of Don’t Try This Until You’re Older. Most important, though, be even sillier than they are – because growing up doesn’t have to mean growing boring. —PETER RUBIN


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sit back and

imagination Store-bought toys put kids in the role of consumers. When they build their own playthings, they’re creators and makers.

be lazy Your kids are overscheduled. And that’s bad, because messing around and having fun is how they learn best. In fact, research shows that free play fosters creativity, resilience and openness to new ideas – the very traits they’ll need most in a fastchanging world. So ease up! Relax, do less. For their sake. —JonAthon KeAtS

critical thinking What we see: a big mess. What they see: an experiment in how disparate substances combine.

reSponSibility Every game has rules – just like the grown-up world. Children’s games are a rehearsal for social interactions.

Self-Sufficiency Having some private space is an important first step in developing independence. 334 —

october 2016

curioSity Instead of explaining something, letting a kid figure it out teaches them the joy of discovery.


Empathy Games of pretend are good practice in seeing the world from another perspective, a prerequisite for empathy.

InnovatIon Once kids master something like dressing themselves, they naturally start riffing, inventing new paradigms like... sweater-pants.

sELf-KnowLEdgE Imaginary friends aren’t always a sign of loneliness. They’re often alter egos that children use to sort out their impulses. pErCEptIvEnEss Every parent says it: “Must you touch everything?!” The answer is yes. It’s how kids study the world.

ConfIdEnCE By challenging themselves physically (and skinning knees), kids gain self-assurance and a willingness to take risks. pErsIstEnCE If it’s fun, once is never enough. When kids play, they’ll keep doing something until they perfect it. It’s not OCD, it’s practice at practising.

CoopEratIon Roughhousing imparts social skills. By learning to stop short of hurting – or even by taking a dive – kids develop standards of fairness and altruism.

LEadErshIp Kids can learn a lot from an older sibling, and the education is mutual – the sibling gets hands-on leadership training. october 2016

��� 335


NEW SEASON A/W 2016-17

JUMPER, TROUSERS; BOTH BY BURBERRY. SHOES BY DIOR HOMME

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THE

NEXT

EPISODE

We’ve entered a maximal moment in menswear where rules are meant to be broken and fashion’s a canvas on which to play up your kinks. Take one statement piece or a whole look – shine is suitable; prints are preferred – and wear your devilmay-care attitude as the loudest label on your sleeve PHOTOGRAPHED BY R BURMAN STYLED BY VIJENDRA BHARDWA J

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loud and proud

GRAPHIC PRINTS ARE ubIquITouS. doN’T GET INTIMIdATEd; KEEP EvERyTHING ElSE NEuTRAl. looSE TRouSERS (RATHER THAN SKINNy JEANS) MAKE IT HERE-ANd-NoW. BLAZER BY RobERTo CAvAllI. JUMPER BY EMPoRIo ARMANI. TROUSERS BY ETRo. BELT BY GIoRGIo ARMANI. WATCH BY IWC

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OCTOBER 2016


JUMPER, TROUSERS; BOTH BY MISSONI. SHOES BY ADIDAS

NEW SEASON

A/W 2016-17

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step forward

Think of fashion as you would arT. frEnCh PainTEr roBErT dallET’s siGnaTurE lEoPard Prowls on your hErMÈs sliPPEr. SHOES BY hErMÈs. SOCKS BY haPPy soCks

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SUIT BY ROBERTO CAVALLI. TURTLENECK JUMPER BY ETRO. WATCH BY LONGINES

NEW SEASON

A/W 2016-17

OCTOBER 2016

— 341


NEW SEASON A/W 2016-17

BLAZER BY DOLCE & GABBANA. JEANS BY G-STAR RAW. WATCH BY PANERAI


RINGS BY GUCCI. SHIRT BY BALLY. WATCH BY PANERAI.

LORD OF THE RINGS

PACK A PUNCH WITH REGAL KNUCKLE HARDWARE. DON’T WORRY ABOUT MATCHING METALS. DON’T WORRY ABOUT WHAT LOOKS GOOD WITH THE WATCH. IN FACT, DON’T WORRY AT ALL – JUST BUY THE RINGS THAT CATCH YOUR EYE, AND WEAR HOWEVER MANY FEEL RIGHT. OCTOBER 2016

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LIFE’S A BROOCH BLACK TIE AND VELVET JUST GOT BUMPED UP TO BOSS CLASS. TOP THEM UP WITH A BROOCH – OR FIVE.

SUIT, SHOES; BOTH BY GIVENCHY. SHIRT BY GIORGIO ARMANI. BOW TIE BY SS HOMME. WATCH BY LONGINES. FLOWER BROOCH BY DIOR HOMME

344 —

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NEW SEASON

A/W 2016-17

JACKET, TROUSERS; BOTH BY GIORGIO ARMANI. BROOCHES BY PHILIPP PLEIN photographer agency: TAp/THE ART pROJECT grooMIng: DEEpA VERMA aSSIStant StyLISt: TANYA VOHRA ModeLS: JAi ANAND, DOMiNiC LEE AMUNDSON/ iNEgA MODELS, RAVi gOSwAMi/iNEgA MODELS, LAKSHYA LATHAR/TOABH TALENT MANAgEMENT, pRiNCETON CHRiSTiAN AgUOCHA/iNEgA MODELS, AKSHiT BRAR/TOABH TALENT MANAgEMENT, DAViN/iNEgA MODELS, ANKUR RATHEE/TFM iNDiA prodUctIon: MEgHA MEHTA, HYBRiD 09 FaShIon aSSIStant: DESiRéE FERNANDES

OCTOBER 2016

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OCTOBER 2016

IndIa

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THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

All The World’s A sTAge THE CINEMA ISSUE

Starring Irrfan Khan ★ Alia Bhatt ★ Karan Johar ★ Rahul Khanna ★ Naomi watts

This month, Architectural Digest gives you a glimpse inside the world of cinema. Step into the personal spaces of your favorite stars and discover the stylish lifestyles of Alia Bhatt, Irrfan Khan, Karan Johar and Rahul Khanna.


OCTOBER 2016

IndIa

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THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

AT HOME WITH ALIA THE CINEMA ISSUE

Starring Alia Bhatt ★ Irrfan Khan ★ Karan Johar ★ Rahul Khanna ★ Naomi watts

2 SPECIAL COVERS. PICK YOUR FAVOURITE ONE! OCTOBER ISSUE. ON STANDS NOW


T

i

of

m

your life

Haute horlogerie scales new heights with these intricate pieces that do more than measure time PHOTOGRAPHED BY Edward UrrUtia

JaegerLeCouLtre

Geophysic Universal Time

This watch displays the time in the 24 cities noted on the dial all at once – because there’s nothing to beat the feeling of doing business in Hong Kong while dreaming up images of what’s going down that very minute in St Barth.

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october 2016

e


5-6 April 2017

Muscat, Oman

Navigating the New Silk Routes Hosted by Suzy Menkes, International Vogue Editor, the premier event for luxury creative and business leaders takes place in the lush and calming retreat of Muscat in 2017.

“The Condé Nast International Luxury Conference 2017 will explore the vast reach

of 21st-Century luxury. Oman stands at the nexus of this global trade, offering a unique perspective that encompasses India to the Far East, Europe to Arabia. Today, from its unique vantage point over three seas, Muscat is still the perfect location from which to explore the new silk routes.”

Tickets available now at cniluxury.com / +44 20 7152 3472 Read Suzy Menkes’s articles at suzymenkesvogue.com

@CNILuxury / @SuzyMenkesVogue


Louis Vuitton

Tambour VVV Chronograph

Kim Jones has been spreading the triple V (“Volez, Voguez, Voyagez”) message across LV’s clothing and accessories. Now it’s made its way to the centre of the dial of the iconic Tambour timepiece.

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october 2016


Eternity Lifestyles Pvt. Ltd. +91.22.4340.2222 info@eternitylifestyles.com


Omega

SpeedmaSter dark Side of the moon

Forty-seven years in, our fascination for that mankind-defining moment isn’t waning – and neither is our interest in the watchmaker whose timepiece went to the moon and back.

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october 2016


Hublot

ClassiC Fusion aeroFusion Moonphase

The first timepiece from Hublot to feature this celestial complication, the proprietary “king gold” case – a mix of titanium and red gold – is guaranteed to shine brilliantly under a full moon.

354 —

october 2016


Longines

Conquest ClassiC Moonphase

With an annual calendar, moonphase and second time zone all packed into a 42mm buffed stainless steel case, this sports watch sure’s got game.

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october 2016


Rolex

YachtMaster II

This flyback regatta timer – a complication that counts down (here a 10-minute interval) to the start of an event – is for the competitive bent of mind and is definitely worth its weight in solid yellow gold.

358 —

october 2016


PUNE SESSIONS

Whether it’s the princes of Jaipur, the petrolheads of Madras, the bankers of Bombay – many of India’s cities are known for the distinct characteristics of their denizens. Not Pune. A manufacturing hub, a rising IT centre, ground zero for Osho devotees, a Mumbai satellite – there is no one way to pigeonhole the place. But to try and absorb at least a few vibes from the secondmost successful “pensioner’s paradise” in the Deccan, we hit up the four men who could get us in the know. Sagar Chordia’s construction company, Panchshil, is mostly responsible for the city’s rising edifices; Umeed Kothavala heads one of the more notable IT firms this side of Silicon Valley; as MD of Kinetic World, Ajinkya Firodia makes sure Pune’s newly minted bikers have access to the most exclusive motorcycles; and Khodu Irani, whether at High Spirits Café or Olive, gives everyone a place to celebrate Pune’s coming of age in the New India Photographed by MANISH MANSINH Interviewed by DAVE BESSELING

In association with Every time I hear about Pune, I hear something different. How would you describe this city to someone who’s come for the first time? CHORDIA: It’s been changing

a lot these past 15 years. Pune’s total size is 285sqkm, five times bigger than Mumbai. We have 15 international schools, with 200,000 people graduating every year. And 72 per cent of our population is very young, below 28.

IRANI: A far cry from Pune being known as a

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OCTOBER 2016

pensioner’s paradise. FIRODIA: In terms of industry, there’s auto, and now there’s IT, which is huge.

That was a surprise for me. When I hear IT, I think Bengaluru, and now Hyderabad.

KOTHAVALA: You get a lot of diversity here. The largest German population in India is in Pune – 4,000 Germans. There are 1,000 Koreans in Pune. CHORDIA: In 2011, Pune’s exports brought


location: bar 101/jw marriott, pune

From leFt: KHoDu irani, ajinKYa FiroDia, umeeD KotHaVala, SaGar cHorDia

october 2016

— 363


”Pune is very diverse, but historically, we have lived in Bombay’s shadow“ in `30,000 crores. In 2015, it was `63,000 crores. The city’s growing at 27 per cent per annum, and in banking, there’s Deustche Bank, HSBC, Barclay’s, Citibank – banks with more than 50,000 people working for them.  IranI: And don’t forget our Osho ashram. It all started here. FIrodIa: When Osho was alive, 20,000 foreigners used to visit him. Lots of Japanese people, because Osho spoke a lot about Buddhism… IranI: Yeah, I mean, the Japanese were the ones that stitched all of Osho’s crazy outfits. Kothavala: It’s very diverse, but not quite as much as Bombay. Historically, we’ve lived in Bombay’s shadow. ChordIa: But if you’re not living in South Bombay, near the Queen’s Necklace, then it doesn’t matter. There’s no charm. IranI: In Pune, we’re very forward thinking. That makes a big difference to the city.

ChordIa: That’s the thing about Pune. If you have to make that effort to compete, then you’ve already lost.  Kothavala: We are happy where we are.  FIrodIa: What happens when a Bombay guy comes is this: He meets you for the first time, he gets all competitive, we relax, and by the end of it, they’re like us.

So Pune’s got the good things of Mumbai without the ostentation and the bullshit? [Laughs] OK OK. What do you like least about Pune? I mean, let’s bitch for a bit.  Kothavala: Traffic. IranI: That’s all this city is. But that’s not exclusive to Pune.

ChordIa: The problem is with the government – they don’t think about the future. They resolve problems for today.  IranI: Lack of infrastructure is the biggest problem for us. I’d travel much more if we had an airport here. It’s four hours going to Bombay, four hours coming back. FIrodIa: Ours is a defence airport, so it’s not so well-connected. We have to go to Bombay every time. Which actually affects the whole culture because it takes away ambition from people.

364 —

october 2016

KHoDu irani

At least the Pune-Mumbai Expressway—

Kothavala: That’s no reason for us not to have an airport. IranI: Things like ad agencies aren’t setting up here, and I’ve got a lot of musician friends who come here and they’re like, “You know, we’d love to settle here but it’s just not happening for us.”

Is it a case of having a brain drain to Mumbai?

Kothavala: There’s actually a huge influx, in fact, into Pune. A lot of people end up coming here to get jobs. This is the first time we’re seeing a generation of Indians who are relatively mobile about getting out of their home cities or states. FIrodIa: Most of the NRIs, when they come back they end up first in Bengaluru, and second, Pune – and Pune is connected to Bombay. That makes a big difference.  IranI: Plus we’re very inclusive. You tend to make new friends easily here. And talking about international students, we’ve got Middle Eastern students, and half of Palestine was here at one point. I’m not exaggerating. Kothavala: Yeah, and during the Iran-Iraq war, every Iranian student was here. FIrodIa: We had a huge Jewish community at

location: bar 101/jw marriott, pune

I get that impression. Do you guys get combative about status?


”I remember when Osho died, something like 500 bottles of champagne were sold that night... As Osho always said, you’re supposed to enjoy death“ something like 500 bottles of champagne were sold that night.

He may have been a guru, but he wasn’t exactly an abstemious mendicant.

Through all its changes, has Pune always been a fun-loving city? irani: I love riding, I’ve been

riding since I was 12 years old. My first bike was an Enfield.  Kothavala: You’re Parsi, you don’t need to say it. [Laughs] irani: You can’t ride anymore though, you know what I mean? Like, I miss those open roads we had when I was 18 and 19, and now you’re like, fuck. The bikes are there but where are the roads? It’s really sad. I’m telling you, Ajinkya, let’s collaborate, let’s do everything from demolition to drag racing to… Firodia: I’ll do it in a second. But we need land and we need money. Chennai has a proper track, we don’t. So we need to get people excited about the culture first.

With Osho sunglasses?

irani: Trust me, it was crazy. I was 14 or so at that point, and to see these women dress in that manner and parade down the road...

Osho’s the one name that comes to mind when people who haven’t been here think of Pune. Is that frustrating for you guys?

Chordia: No. He’s actually made the culture nice, because Koregaon Park is beautiful, and they have the best places to eat.

But there’s a bit of a moment happening right now with the music scene here.

irani: You know, the first proper psy party ever happened at Pyramids, a two-day party...

I would have thought the first psy party would have been in Goa. 

irani: It all started in ’89 and shut down here in ’94. But I still remember when Osho died,

366 —

october 2016

Umeed Kothavala and sagar chordia

location: bar 101/jw marriott, pUne

one point of time, an African community.  Chordia: Wadia, Symbiosis and Spicer were the first three, I think. ajinKya firodia Pune University was called “the Oxford of the East”.  Firodia: And now, 50 per cent of the population is below 25.

Kothavala: As Osho always said, you’re supposed to enjoy death. irani: So every year on his death anniversary for the first three years we did this carnival, Rio de Janeiro-style, and when I mean Rio de Janeirostyle, I mean people were wearing those kinds of costumes…


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370 —

OCTOBER 2016


ENCYCLOPAEDIA PHOTOGRAPHED BY SEBASTIAN KIM

WRITTEN BY GQ EDITORS

MATT DAMON As Matt Damon returns to the Bourne franchise, we decided to assemble this handy guide to the habits, quirks and inner life of an honest-to-god screen legend, as told by George Clooney, Martin Scorsese, Ben Affleck and the other titans who know him best

OCTOBER 2016

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MATT DAMON

M

att Damon is, scientifically, the most liked man in Hollywood. He is serious, and he is funny. He is approachable-seeming and often jacked. He has been in six of your ten favourite movies in the past 20 years, and he’s met a bunch of people along the way who like him a whole lot. But for all his familiarity, he’s still elusive (which is how he likes it). So instead of asking Matt Damon dumb questions about the new Jason Bourne movie, we got Damon and those people who like him a lot – George Clooney, Julia Roberts, Tina Fey, Ben Affleck, Martin Scorsese and Co – to tell all the stories about him that you haven’t heard.

accent, Boston matt Damon: I was sitting at George Clooney’s pool in Lake Como, and Brad Pitt walked in, sat down next to me and said, “Do you want to do a Martin Scorsese movie in Boston?” [Brad] was a producer on The Departed, and he felt like he had gotten too old for those roles. It’s one of the most absurd things that’s ever happened in my life. martin SCorSeSe (director, The Departed): He comes from Boston; he’s familiar with that world. When we were cutting The Departed, my editor, Thelma Schoonmaker, used a term to describe Matt’s presence onscreen that’s stayed with me: He’s seated as an actor. He enters a movie grounded and at ease in his character and in the world of the story. Sarah Silverman (co-star, I’m Fucking Matt Damon): We are all Boston-area people. I don’t know how Matt talks so pretty.

artist, the Julia StileS (co-star, Bourne films): After The Bourne Ultimatum came out, there was a premiere in London. Prince actually came to it, then got tickets for the cast to come see him [perform]. We were summoned into a room to meet him [after the show]. Matt said, “So you live in Minnesota? I hear you live in Minnesota.”

amazing gift about Matt’s physical appearance is that he can walk into the hair and make-up trailer looking like someone who slept directly on his face for seven hours and emerge a bona fide movie star. He has a great make-up artist.

Damon: Prince said, “I live inside my own heart, Matt Damon.”

Damon: I always thought the goal was William Holden. To just be in a lot of good movies. miChael DouGlaS (co-star, Behind The Candelabra): [Matt] reminds me of me a lot, in terms of the kind of range of parts and things that he does. He always looks to what’s the best script, what’s going to make the best movie and what isn’t. He has a real sense of what it takes to make a good movie. Having the best part in a bad movie doesn’t help you.

Face, Matt’s SCarlett JohanSSon (co-star, We Bought A Zoo): The most 372 —

OCTOBER 2016

GeorGe Clooney (co-star, Ocean’s Eleven, Twelve and Thirteen; director, Syriana, Confessions Of A Dangerous Mind, The Monuments Men): He looks swell in a Speedo.

Face, Pitt’s Damon: I don’t look like Marlon Brando. I remember Ben and I having a realization early on. Like, we were watching Brad [Pitt] in a movie, and one of us turned to the other and said, “I haven’t heard a thing that guy said in five minutes. I’m just looking at him.” And we realized there’s a good and a bad [that comes with that]. It’ll mask one of your lesser performances, but it also detracts from your best performances. Because Brad has been legitimately brilliant in some of the things he’s done, and he doesn’t get the credit as an actor that I think he deserves. I never had to carry that water.

illustration: Joe McKendry

career Precedent


suit, shirt, tie; all by giorgio armani. tie bar by the tie bar. pocket square by paul stuart

Friend, Best Ben Affleck (co-writer, Good Will Hunting; best friend): The quality that has allowed Matt to maintain the illusion that he is Mr Nice Guy is that he found a young TV actor who was just a pretty face and made friends with him so he would always look good by comparison. Matt is very media-savvy and manipulative in that way. He’s like a mix of [OJ Simpson defense-team members] Bob Shapiro and Alan Dershowitz. kevin Smith (writer and director, Dogma, Jay And Silent Bob Strike Back; co-executive producer, Good Will Hunting): Matt made pretty thoughtful choices about what roles he wanted to play and the directors he wanted to work with after Good Will Hunting, which made Ben’s more commercial choices easier to put down for some folks. The assignation was that Matt chose to be a serious actor in films, while Ben chose to star in movies. That script flipped when Matt was Bourne and Ben became a film-maker. OCTOBER 2016

— 373


MATT DAMON Damon: Harvey [Weinstein] hadn’t seen it – somebody lower down the ladder [at Miramax] had passed. And we were fucked. We had made a deal with Castle Rock where we had to sell it for a million dollars and whoever we sold it to had to allow us to star in it. If we didn’t, it was gonna go back to Castle Rock and we were out of the movie. We asked [Kevin Smith] to direct it, and Kevin wouldn’t. He goes, “I’m not a good enough director.” SmiTh: I asked Ben to FedEx a copy of the script and hit it in the bathroom, intending to read a few pages while on the bowl. Two hours later, I came out of the bathroom crying [because] it was so good. [Co-executive producer] Scott Mosier said, “You were in the bathroom for two hours, and now you’re crying. Should I call an ambulance?” I said, “No. We gotta call Harvey.” And we gave it to Harvey and said, “Remember when you picked up the Pulp Fiction script from TriStar in turnaround? This is like that. Especially the Oscars part.” WeinSTein: Kevin Smith gave it to Jon Gordon in my office. Jon Gordon gave it to me. I loved it.

Grimm, Brothers Brian Koppelman (co-writer, Rounders, Ocean’s Thirteen): The nose [in Ocean’s Thirteen] originated because we had heard this rumour that Matt had wanted to wear a weird nose in Brothers Grimm. He wasn’t able to, so we decided we were going to give him an even bigger, uglier nose. Terry gilliam (director, The Brothers Grimm, The Zero Theorem): He’s got that cute little retroussé nose and a big bony head, and I thought his head needed something stronger. So we put the bump on, and he suddenly became like Marlon Brando – he was sexy, he walked different. And then we had a huge fight with the Weinsteins and they threatened to close the movie down if I put that bump on his nose.

Friend, Brother oF Best Damon: Casey [Affleck, Ben’s younger brother] moved in with us [when he was 19]. He would walk in the room, and I’m like, “Is that my shirt?” It got so bad with the Affleck brothers that I was at the point where I wanted to label all of my stuff, ’cause it would just fucking show up in Casey’s drawer. And if it’s there long enough, then it’s like some version of squatters’ rights, where suddenly he’s like, “No, dude, this is mine. You saw me. I’ve been wearing this since December.” Like, that doesn’t mean it’s yours! Just because you washed it doesn’t mean it’s yours.

Good Will Billy BoB ThornTon (director, All The Pretty Horses): I did Armageddon with Ben, and I knew ’em before they made Good Will Hunting. They talked to me about it: “Hey, we got this script.” And I’m like, “Yeah, yeah, whatever.” Wish I hadn’t have said that. STeven SoDerBergh (director, The Informant!, Ocean’s Eleven, Twelve and Thirteen, Contagion, Behind The Candelabra): I was looking for rewrite work, and one of the open assignments was for Good Will Hunting. I said, “What’s it about?” And they said, “Math.” And I said, “Well, I’m terrible at math, so I’m the wrong guy.” Let’s put it this way: Word was out on Reservoir Dogs at the script stage – I remember hearing, “There’s this fucking great script out there written by this guy.” There wasn’t that kind of thing about [Good Will Hunting]. 374 —

OCTOBER 2016

WeinSTein: Oh, my God. Matt and Heath Ledger, may he rest in peace, just on bended knees said, “Can you finance this movie?” And my brother said, “It’s Terry Gilliam – let’s just do it.” Damon: I remember the night that Terry shattered a wineglass in his hand because he was in an argument with one of the producers. He said, “I’m not gonna fucking…,” and snapped the wineglass in his hand, and then went storming out. And Heath [Ledger] and I just immediately got up to follow our fearless leader. Terry goes, “I think that went well! Where are we going for dinner?” He was deciding whether to refuse to shoot over the nose issue. And he came into the make-up room at five in the morning and said, “They gave me the money that I need to make the movie, but we have to not do the nose. What do you think?” And Chrissie Beveridge, who still does my make-up, pulled out the nose and put it on the table. And we literally looked at it and just started laughing. ChriSSie BeveriDge (make-up artist): Terry [said], “Would you talk to Bob Weinstein?” I didn’t. Damon: It was a $3 million nose. WeinSTein: Ironically, it’s Terry Gilliam’s highest-grossing movie he ever had in the United States. [Editors’ note: Actually, 12 Monkeys is.]


suit, shirt, tie; all by giorgio armani. tie bar by the tie bar. pocket square by paul stuart OCTOBER 2016

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MATT DAMON

suit, shirt, tie; all by giorgio armani. tie bar by the tie bar. pocket square by paul stuart

376 —

OCTOBER 2016


Ledger, HeatH Gilliam: Matt is mathematical at times, and that’s both a strength and sometimes… I think that’s what it maybe was between him and Heath. Because [Heath’s] heart was on his sleeve, and that opened up a lot in Matt. Damon: He was too bright for this world. Coming off [The Brothers Grimm, I was] telling everybody that I just worked with the best actor I’ve ever seen. And people were like, “What are you talking about? The guy from A Knight’s Tale?” And I was like, “You just wait. And wait until you see what kind of a director he’s gonna be.” There were things that he did where I couldn’t have got there in three lifetimes. And there were ways in which he was like a puppy dog. You wanted to protect him. [His death was] just fucking pointless. I called Terry when I found out, and he was like, “I’m sitting here in Vancouver. I’m looking out the window, and it’s a beautiful sunny day, and the lights are turning red, and the lights are turning green, and cars are stopping, and cars are driving. I am surrounded by mediocrity. And he’s gone.”

Maaaaaatt daaaaaMon

illustration: Joe McKendry

Damon: The most common headshot that I’m asked to sign is pictures of that fucking puppet [from Team America: World Police]. And they always say, “Will you write ‘Maaaaaatt Daaaaamon’?” I’m like, “Okay. Matt, with, like, 16 a’s in it.” [Trey Parker and Matt Stone] are legitimate geniuses. But when that came out, I thought, Wow, is that what people think of me? That I’m really dumb? So I remember asking friends of mine, and they all told me that it didn’t really make sense that I was dumb. I was like, “Are you just saying that?” And then [my wife] Lucy heard an interview with [Matt and Trey] where they said the puppet showed up the day before they were supposed to shoot with it, and it looked like it had special needs, and they didn’t have time to change it with the budget. I don’t know if they made that up subsequently. GroominG: david cox/Kevin Murphy Set deSiGn: steve halterMan/stevehalterManstudio.coM Production: tricia sherMan/Bauie productions

OCTOBER 2016

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MATT DAMON SODERBERGH: One of the first thoughts I had when I met Matt was, Okay. This guy was very well-raised. I don’t mean that in a pejorative sense. I was just like, “He’s a good kid.” Like, “They raised a good kid.” Which is what you would want anybody to say about your child. JULIA ROBERTS (co-star, Ocean’s Eleven and Twelve): Matty’s a good boy.

SCHEDULING CONFLICT DOUGLAS: [When I first heard about Behind The Candelabra,] I was recovering from a Stage IV cancer bout and was so unbelievably fortunate to look at this Richard LaGravenese script and go, “My God.” And Soderbergh’s involved, and then Matt, who wanted to do the other part. And then when we were getting ready to go do it, both of them – both Steven and Matt individually – said, “You know, we’ve got conflicting schedules right now. So let’s put this off for a year.” And my heart sunk. I thought, Oh shit, it ain’t ever going to happen. The truth be told, I was so happy to be alive that I didn’t recognize the fact of just how underweight I was. And I think both of them looked at me and said, “He’s not ready to do Liberace.” And rather than in any way make me feel like it was a problem, they simply lied and said, “We have other projects,” and waited a year, until I got back on my feet and my strength was there. DAMON: I’ll take it, but I did have a scheduling conflict. I think that Steven certainly knew that more time on the mend would not hurt at all. They replaced Michael from the neck down with a concert pianist, but Michael’s arms had to be at the right place at all times or it didn’t work. The amount of hours [that took], I don’t even know. It was this virtuoso performance. And he said to me the last night [of shooting], “I couldn’t have done this last year.”

TEETH ROBERTS: He does have nice teeth. JIMMY KIMMEL (late show host): I mean, they can’t be real, right? They’re so perfect. They’re obviously something that some Hollywood witch doctor put into his head somewhere along the line, possibly on one of his jaunts to China where he disappears for six months and suddenly has a whole new look. One day he’s Jason Bourne. The next day he’s Liberace’s fiancé. DAMON: True.

THING, BEST I’VE EVER BEEN A PART OF DAMON: [The 2000 Cormac McCarthy novel adaptation All The Pretty Horses] failed the critics and failed to find the audience. I’m not over it 18 years later or whatever it is, so I’m just clearly never gonna get over it. It really fucking depresses me. I only saw Billy [Bob Thornton]’s cut once, and I just remember feeling like, “Oh, my God, this is the best thing I’ve ever been a part of.” It was Daniel Lanois’s music that did it – it was all Daniel on this old guitar.

“Am I going to put a four-hour movie out?” DAMON: I was in Paris working on The Bourne Identity, and every night after work, I’d come home and I’d have a conference call with Harvey and Billy Bob. I would pace in this living room in this apartment I’d rented as I was talking to them. Billy’s heart was fucking breaking. [When] he relented, he said, “Harvey, I have a chance to do four, maybe five great things before I die. And what I’m hearing you say to me is this isn’t gonna be one of them.” And my knees literally buckled. THORNTON: You live with it. They did offer us the opportunity to put [my cut] out on DVD with the original music. But Dan felt like, “If my music wasn’t good enough for them to put in the movie, then I don’t know if I wanna put it in there on the DVD,” so I stood by him. I’m not gonna ever go side against an artist. WEINSTEIN: I’ve said to Matt, “I’ll put up a million dollars any day of the week to restore it. I don’t even care if I get the money back.” And I’m happy to sit down with Matt and Billy and do that. We’ve tried to resurrect that on a number of occasions, but the composer didn’t want to let us do it, and he has strong rights. I understand. But time softens everyone. It’s time to re-approach him. THORNTON: I think maybe one of these days I’m gonna just have a party over at my house to show it to 20 or 30 people. DAMON: I would love it if he did.

WORSHIP CHRIS HEMSWORTH (friend; Norse god): [I was going to be on the cover of GQ, and] I was like, “Shit, what do we do [for the story]?” Matt goes, “You should go bike riding! You can use mine.” So the next morning, I didn’t want to bring the writer [into Matt’s home because] I didn’t want Matt to be uncomfortable. And Matt was like, “No, bring him in!” Matt’s cooking pancakes and telling all kinds of interesting stories and quoting all sorts of interesting people. And I was sitting there going, “I just lost myself the cover. I can just see the cover turning into Matt’s cover. This is the worst thing I could have done with this thing, introduce the writer to Matt.” I felt like I had a new girlfriend and I had introduced her to my cooler friend or something. JESSICA CHASTAIN (co-star, Interstellar, The Martian): When I was going to go work on The Martian, everyone was going on and on about what a great person he was. You always wonder, like, “Okay, is the reputation accurate?” And with him, it was. MATTHEW MCCONAUGHEY (co-star, Interstellar): I remember a late night in Laurel Canyon after A Time To Kill came out. Matt shared a genuine excitement for the success the film and I were having. He’s always been like that, as far as I know – confident and self-assured enough to appreciate a peer’s success while still paving his own path.

THORNTON: The studio made us take Dan’s score out.

SODERBERGH: You could walk around town with a chequebook offering to pay people a million dollars to say something bad about Matt, feeling secure you’d never have to write a check.

WEINSTEIN: It’s great, but there were studio executives who fell asleep during the screening. The movie cost $48 million. You [ask],

Reported by Zach Baron, Lauren Larson, Anna Peele, Clay Skipper and Caity Weaver

378 —

OCTOBER 2016

ILLUSTRATION: JOE MCKENDRY

PARENTING


And your FASHIon FInAlIStS Are… The judges have made their selection. So are you ready to meet the new faces of fashion? Here’s what the top five fashion designers at Vogue India Fashion Fund 2016 have to say about their brands

“Lovebirds is all about striking a balance between efficiency and expression, by combining structure with fluidity.”

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AmrITA KHAnnA And GurSI SInGH

PrAnAV mISHrA And SHymA SHeTTy

“rArA Avis has an intrinsic design philosophy that redefines immortal design.”

“KANiKA GoyAL LAbeL is provocatively minimal, ever-evolving, practically tailored, democratically designed and intrinsically independent.”

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Back in its fourth edition, the AD DESIGN HANDBOOK serves as a comprehensive guide for all your interior needs, showcasing a variety of Indian and international home products and decorative elements, across the country. Be seen by India’s leading architects and interior designers in this exclusive standalone issue. ON STANDS DECEMBER 2016 Book your space by 15th November 2016 Write to us on handbook@condenast.in


Groomng EDITED BY SH IKH A SETH I

+ CHARCOAL is tHe COOLest tRiCk; 10 RULes tO LOOkiNG GReAt

the 18 mightiest

hAir gods

who’ve ever lived

Some men get their hair cut; other men are their haircut. From Dylan and James Dean to Harry Styles’ hairstyle, we humbly bow before their flowing locks 382 —

october 2016


BOB

Dylan The Full Bohemian

IMAGE: REX FEATURES

As he morphed from earnest folkie to counterculture prophet, his hair grew from a tufted thatch to a mushroom cloud. And he was gloriously, characteristically weirdo-poetic about it.

All this talk about long hair is just a trick,” he said in 1966. “It’s been thought up by men and women who look like cigars – the anti-happiness committee. They’re all freeloaders and cops. You can tell who they are: They’re always carrying calendars, guns, or scissors.”

OCTOBER 2016

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HAIR GODS

Groomng

SHIA LABEOUF IS A FLAT CIRCLE • Nearly 20 years ago,

John F Kennedy Jr The Virile Offspring

when I started working in magazines, John F Kennedy Jr – No, not John-John; nobody who knew him called him that – was the editor-in-chief of George, and I was an intern. There was no time to be starstruck, and besides, John had no patience for sycophants. But once in a while I’d catch an angle and see him almost the way a stranger did: I’d see that squared-off jawline, that leonine profile and that shampoo-commercial hair. Kennedy hair. Heir

hair. Monumental in volume and wave, it looked like it should have a constellation named for it. I remember that John loved hats, and looking back I wonder if he wore them to appear more like the rest of us – to hide that beautiful mane. There were baseball caps, beanies, even berets. He wore them out in the city, riding his bike or walking his dog. I don’t know if they provided him any anonymity, really. What could?

One man’s infinite hair odyssey from fame to infamy to fame to…

Fame 2009

—CATHERINE GUNDERSEN

Fame 2012

Infamy 2015

UNEXPECTED HAIR GODS “The bald man is the better lover. First, you have the appreciation factor. The bald man is so thrilled to be in bed with a woman that he’ll do anything and everything, and all with tremendous gusto. And, of course, there’s the testosterone. We’ve got it in spades. That’s why we went bald in the first place.” 384 —

OCTOBER 2016

— LARRY DAVID The Power Doughnut

PHOTO: ERRIKOS ANDREOU (SHAHID). IMAGE: GETTY IMAGES (KENNEDY, LARRY, MORRISSEY), REX FEATURES (DEAN). ILLUSTRATION: ANDREW COLIN BECK

Infamy 2011


get the look THE POMPADOUR

A Pain in the Ass (but Worth It) The ultimate high-risk, high-reward haircut requires a lot of product and a lot of patience. Fortunately, you have David Lynch, Alex Turner, Morrissey and James Dean as role models THE CUT: Ask your barber to go shorter on the sides and leave layered length on top. (Don’t worry, he’ll know what that means.) THE STYLING: On wet hair, comb gel or a light pomade back from your forehead – all the way through to the roots. Blow-dry back and up, creating height from roots to tips. THE FINISHING TOUCH: Once your hair dries, use your fingers and some more product to define individual pieces as you like. Finish with hair spray. Let no one touch it. *ADVICE FROM MASTER HAIRSTYLIST

JON REYMAN

NICE COMBOVER, MAN Said no one ever

I do maintain that if your hair is wrong, your entire life is wrong.” —MORRISSEY

You’re eating right, exercising regularly and quit smoking like you said you would. But you’re still shedding more hair than your 13-year-old dog, and have noticed deforested expanses of scalp where your hair once grew, lush and plentiful. You’re not alone. Kérastase’s Densifique Homme range addresses the problem of thinning locks through a threepronged attack: Its shampoo contains texturizing polymers to add instant volume to your mane, as well as biotin to strengthen the environment around the hair bulb. The styling paste has arginine, an amino acid that boosts hair growth and the treatment programme comes with stemoxydine 5% as well as complex glycan, to improve thickness. Pair your recovery programme with a Fusio Dose treatment at a Kérastase salon from time to time – a 15-minute indulgence that involves a booster shot of concentrated active ingredients applied to hair to address its primary and secondary needs (for example, dryness and thinning). Your therapist will use a special camera that zooms 200X into your scalp and 600X into your hair to diagnose what it requires and then blend the right cocktail for you. A shampoo, blow dry and looking like a hair god for a day? We’re in.

OCTOBER 2016

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hair gods

Groomng

Michael

Jordan the Mr Clean

Karl An Open letter from GQ to tiger Woods

lagerfeld the Dangerous liaison

Dear Tiger,

• when karl lagerfeld

You’ll never win another major with that hair. We know it’s usually hidden under your Nike cap, which we assume you are contractually obligated to wear even while sleeping, but still. You are pulling a giant hair bogey. See Michael Jordan down there? He had the right idea. Be like Mike. Thanks, gQ

seemed determined to make his personal style as evocative of the 18th century as possible. and so he swept his silver hair into a beautiful low ponytail straight out of dangerous liaisons. note its smooth adherence to his head, characteristic of ponytails pictured in the oddly two-dimensional portraits of colonial

america. observe its shortened sideburns, which might have been cut by the steel pivoted scissors invented by Robert Hinchliffe in 1761. it is a ponytail of sleek modernity and a ponytail of the rarefied past, the coiffure equivalent of a tweed chanel iPhone sleeve. —rebeCCa Harrington

unexpecTeD HAir GoDS

“If I were to start taking care of my grooming, I would no longer be my own self.”

—Albert einstein the Finger in the socket

386 —

october 2016

get the look TreAT Your ScAlp To A SpA DAY • Unless you’re cool with a crosshatch of head scars, do not

just grab an electric razor and let it rip. Remember, your scalp is made of skin – like your face. Find a professional who’ll give you the full-service treatment: shave, shampoo (to clean your newly shorn scalp), head massage, hot towel, moisturizer. For at-home touch-ups, use an electric trimmer and leave a tiny bit of stubble – and don’t walk out the door without sunscreen. —jeff vrabel

image: getty images (lageRFeld, einstein, joRdan). illUstRation: andRew colin beck

was seven years old, his mother presented him with an oil painting of Voltaire meeting Frederick the great of Prussia. Fascinated by this image of elaborately bewigged aristocrats, he kept it into adulthood, hanging it outside the exact reproduction of his childhood bedroom he assembled in his Parisian mansion. once he became creative director of chanel and completely transformed the staid French prêt-à-porter into the global juggernaut it is today – an insouciant mash-up of goth streetwear and frilly couture – he

Every man under 50 who is purposely bald has been touched by the long arm of Michael Jordan. Rather than attempt to pass off his filmy shadow of vellus as real hair, Jordan accepted Mother Nature’s will – then he shoved it back in her face, shaving his head clean. Suddenly he looked even more athletic. Veins rippled backward when he strained. The curves of his smooth dome mirrored those of his biceps. The effect was greatest when he sweated, which made him look as if he had been carved from marble and polished to a high sheen. Gatorade executives beheld that glistening head and saw valuable advertising space; they coloured Jordan’s perspiration fluorescent orange and turned it into a marketing campaign. With the swipe of a razor, Jordan not only created an iconic silhouette for himself; he shaved the way for generations of premature baldies. —Caity Weaver


MANOLO YLLERA

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOMES IN THE WORLD

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HAIR GODS

Groomng Sly Stone The Radical Natural

JOHN TRAVOLTA IS ALSO A FLAT CIRCLE Another man’s infinite hair odyssey from fame to infamy to fame to…

Fame 1976

388 —

OCTOBER 2016

Infamy 1989

Fame 1991

Infamy 2013

PHOTO: HERB GREENE. ILLUSTRATION: ANDREW COLIN BECK

If you wanted to politicize your hair in the Seventies, you grew it into long, straight, face-framing curtains that spilled down your shoulders and back. Unless you were a black guy – then the Morticia Addams look was tough to pull off. So you did what Sly Stone did: Instead of growing down, you grew wide, in every direction, like the rays of the sun, allowing the kinks and curls of your natural hair to dictate its shape, gloriously unrestrained. Sly was already a musical prodigy when he made his first foray into the business, as a clean-cut teenager singing doo-wop. But it wasn’t until he grew out his hair into a perpetual black halo that he transformed into a pioneer of psychedelic soul. —CW


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hair gods

Groomng

UnexPected haiR Gods “Look at me – I couldn’t be anything other than a rock singer with this hair.” — Rod StewaRt the Peacock

The Slick At 71, the Miami Heat president (and two-time GQ cover star) reflects on his signature hairstyle gq: when did you first start wearing your famous look?

BoB

the

Marley & Weeknd The Past and Future Dreads

• All hair is faith – you comb it, shave it, style it, point it in a direction, and pray that others will believe as you do. But dreadlocks are different, more literal. The Bible says, “He shall be holy, and shall let the locks of the hair of his head grow.” So there’s Bob Marley – still young, newly returned from America and the Chrysler plant in which he worked, back in Jamaica, devoting himself to reggae and Rastafarianism. He let the locks of the hair of his head grow. He was saying: I am a believer. He was saying: Look at God. Then there was The Weeknd, still young, coming out of anonymity and the Toronto shadows, finally ready to put a face to his name, wearing his hair like a crown made from coral. “I want to be remembered as iconic and different,” he told Rolling Stone last year. “So I was like, ‘Fuck it – I’m gonna let my hair just be what it wants.’” This, too, was an act of faith, if a more secular one. He was saying: Look at me. —ZAcH BAron

390 —

october 2016

Pat Riley: I was in between jobs – I’d just retired as a player – and I spent a couple of weeks on the beach. And during that time, I started to comb it back while it was wet. It’s been that way since I was 35, so a long time now. what’s your routine? First you’ve gotta get the cut right. It’s gotta be a layered cut, done by somebody who

really knows what he’s doing. It can’t be more than three-and-a-half inches long. Then you shower, shampoo, spend very little time with a dryer. You put whatever goop you like through it and then finger-comb it. I rarely use a brush or a comb. You’ll know you’ve got the right haircut when you can finger-comb it and it stays back. did the players ever give you shit about being in gq? When I was on the cover in ’89, Mychal Thompson told me, “Coach, you can get too many of those things and make the players jealous.” I said, “Don’t worry, there won’t be many.” —nick MArino

IM Age: geTTY IMAges (MArleY, sTeWArT, rIleY)

Pat Riley


hair gods

Groomng

Harry Styles The Wave Runner

The Dos and Don’ts of Harry’s ’Do do: Have it trimmed every three months (yes, even if you’re growing it out). When your hair is this long, the ends can get dry and damaged. if your hair is thick, ask for subtle layers to remove weight and density. Otherwise you’ll look all bushy. don’t: shampoo every day. try every three days instead. You want that touch of grunge.

image: rex features

do: Double-dip on products. style with a grooming cream (which you may already have) and seasalt spray (which you don’t already have, but which is a real thing).

392 —

october 2016


CHARCOAL KIT

Groomng

DARK Activated charcoal is the new ‘it’ ingredient that actually works, drawing out deep seated impurities from your skin. It’s been traditionally used to purify water, and can even make your teeth look whiter – just ask the folks at Morgenstern’s parlour in NYC who a make a quick-selling coconut charcoal ice cream P H O T O G R A P H E D B Y J I G N E S H J H AV E R I

THE MAN BAR: DAILY BATH SOAP WITH ACTIVATED CHARCOAL BY NEEMLI NATURALS X FILTER

Made in small batches, with pure natural ingredients, including cold-pressed clove and olive oils, this is the bar for a mighty scrub. The slick typography and all-black packaging will look sharp on your bathroom shelf too. ` 1,200 for 300g

BY CLINIQUE

Urban warriors: It’ll suck out the dirt and excess oil from your mug like a super vacuum cleaner. Keep a tube handy in your office drawer. ` 2,000 for 150ml

394 —

OCTOBER 2016

PHOTO AGENCY: PHOTOLINK

CITY BLOCK PURIFYING CHARCOAL CLEANSING GEL


charcoal kit

Groomng

CharCoal SlIMSoFT TooThbruSh & Deep Clean TooThpaSTe by Colgate

It feels counterinuitive to use grey stuff to make your teeth whiter, but then so does drinking booze to cure yourself of a hangover. Both still work. `70 for the toothbrush; `112 for the toothpaste

hIMalayan CharCoal boDy Clay by tHe boDy sHoP

Charcoal can absorb impurities up to 1,000 times its own mass. Which means if you make the effort to use this purifying mask, your body could be cleaner than a Himalayan glacial lake. `1,895 for 200ml

aCTIvaTeD CharCoal FaCe & boDy Wrap by Neemli Naturals

All that sweat and muck thanks to your daily commute means dull skin and frequent breakouts. A bentonite clay and charcoal mask will clear up clogged pores, exfoliate dead cells and soothe irritated skin. `550

396 —

october 2016


clinique Sonic SyStem puriFyinG cleAnSinG BruSh with chArcoAl BruSh heAD by CLINIQUE

Washing your face with soap and water is the grooming equivalent of listening to a mixtape: it’s cool, but inefficient. In 30 seconds, this charcoal face brush will cleanse your skin much more effectively than regular washing would. `12,500 for the brush; `2,500 for the brush head

Deep cleAnSinG FAciAl FoAm by POND’S

It looks like gruel, but it’ll make your face shine brighter than a torchlight in a coal mine. Almost. `99 for 50g

chArcoAl reScue mASque by DErMALOgICA

The paste in this nondescript tube packs a serious punch, with activated Japanese charcoal to absorb impurities, white sulphur to promote cell turnover and Chilean wild mint to refine pores. Use to look like a Photoshopped version of yourself. `1,172 for 22ml

city Block puriFyinG chArcoAl clAy mASk+ ScruB by CLINIQUE

It looks like metallic war paint, and changes colour too. Leave on for five minutes, avoiding the eye area, until the mask turns light blue. Then wash off for clean, soft and immaculately polished skin. `3,250 for 100ml

Active cleAn 3-in-1 Shower Gel by NIVEA MEN

It’s inexpensive, fuss-free, smells great and you can use it on your face, body and hair. Yor gym kit should never be without it. `195 for 250ml

october 2016

— 397


10 rules

Groomng

tHe Find a signatuRe scent. That could mean having more than one. Your scent is an integral part of your look and image. The fragrance you gravitate towards often changes according to the time of day, your mood and, of course, what you’re wearing. It can really enhance your attitude. Rule

01

Match youR scent to the season. You wear lighter clothes in the summer and heavier layers in the winter, so why not change up your scent? My Artisan Aqua scent has citrus notes that work great when it’s warm and you’re wearing cotton and linen, while Dark Rebel Rider has both woodsy and amber notes that work well when paired with your favourite worn-in leather jacket. Rule

02

Find a key pRoduct and stick with it. It’s all about simplifying your routine, which leaves more time for what’s really important. Rule

03

get a lot oF Rest and dRink wateR. You’ll look and feel better even if you’ve been out all night. Rule

04

eat a balanced diet. With so many fad diets around, it’s smart to just eat healthy, fresh food. Your diet goes a long way towards improving your mood and appearance. Rule

05

398 —

october 2016

Rules

to looKING YouR

Find a gReat baRbeR. Someone you trust to advise you on what looks best, and to keep you looking good.

John varvatos is rock ’n’ roll’s biggest fashion fan, channelling everyone from Iggy Pop and Kiss to David Bowie and Pink Floyd for his edgy menswear. But even he knows there’s no point in dressing like a rockstar without being groomed like one

take caRe oF youR hands and Feet. Your feet may not be on show all the time, but women notice a man’s shoes. In the summer when you might be wearing sandals, make sure your feet look good. Get a manicure. Same for hands – make sure your nails are trimmed and hands are moisturized.

Best

Rule

06

Rule

07

use pRoducts with spF. An easy, simple way to protect your skin. More and more grooming products include SPF, so there’s no reason not to find products you like that offer protection. Rule

08

get a Facial. It’s OK for guys to take care of their skin, and a monthly facial is a great way to undo a lot of the damage living in an urban environment can do. Rule

09

don’t be aFRaid to ask oR seek advice. Guys are now more aware of the importance and benefits of looking well-groomed. It’s easy to find tips online, or just ask your friends what they do. Rule

10


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where to buy ThE mERChANdISE fEATUREd EdITORIALLy hAS BEEN ORdEREd fROm ThE fOLLOwINg STORES. SOmE ShOPS mAy CARRy A SELECTION ONLy. PRICES ANd AvAILABILITy wERE ChECKEd AT ThE TImE Of gOINg TO PRESS, BUT wE CANNOT gUARANTEE ThAT PRICES wILL NOT ChANgE, OR ThAT SPECIfIC ITEmS wILL BE IN STOCK whEN ThE mAgAZINE IS PUBLIShEd. wE SUggEST ThAT, BEfORE vISITINg A STORE, yOU CALL TO mAKE SURE ThEy hAvE yOUR SIZE

Emporio Armani mumbai, Palladium, 022-4347 3211; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4604 0783; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4146 9333 Ermenegildo Zegna mumbai, 022-2285 7000; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4606 0999; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8805 Etro etro.com

F Ferrari mumbai, 022-6171 6171; delhi, 99113 32203

A Adidas mumbai, 022-2282 2737; delhi, Pacific mall, 0114573 4261; Bengaluru, 080-4091 5678 Antar Agni ujjawaldubey.com Armani Exchange mumbai, Palladium, 022-4347 3211; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4604 0783; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4146 9333 Aston Martin mumbai, 022-6581 1007

B Bally mumbai, Palladium, 022-4347 0544; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4053 4149 Balmain balmain.com Barrus fashionscout.co.uk Berluti berluti.com Bottega Veneta mumbai, Palladium, 022-6615 2291; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4609 8262; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8932

Brooks Brothers mumbai, Palladium, 022-4347 0926; delhi, Ambience mall, 011-4087 0787; Bengaluru, 080-4208 8717 Bugatti delhi, 011-2412 1616 Burberry mumbai, Palladium, 022-4080 1990; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4652 9850; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8826 Bvlgari mumbai, Rose The

watch Bar, 022-2362 0275; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4150 5010; Bengaluru, Rodeo drive, 080-4124 8471

C Calvin Klein Jeans mumbai, Palladium, 022-6639 1467; delhi, 011-4108 9582; Bengaluru, 080-4098 6229 Canali mumbai, Palladium, 022-4009 8685; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4604 0731; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8997 Cartier mumbai, Art of Time, 022-7950 5003; delhi, Kapoor watch Co, 011-4134 5688; Bengaluru, Rodeo drive, 080-4124 8471 Celio mumbai, Palladium, 022-4080 2301; delhi, dLf Promenade, 011-4601 6018; Bengaluru, Phoenix marketcity, 080-672 66252

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Common Projects commonprojects.com Corneliani mumbai, 022-6631 1303/4; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4604 0722; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8170

D David Yurman davidyurman.com Degs & Sal degsandsal.com

Deepa Gurnani deepagurnani.com Diesel mumbai, 022-2661 8282; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4052 3915; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8004 Dior Homme delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4600 5900

Dolce & Gabbana dolcegabbana.com

E Emilio De La Morena emiliodelamorena.com

G G-Star RAW mumbai, Palladium, 022-4266 0013 Gas mumbai, 022-6671 2950; delhi, Ambience mall, 98114 03555; Bengaluru, Phoenix marketcity, 98866 92405 Gaurav Gupta mumbai, 022-2269 3433; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4104 2989; Bengaluru, 080-4112 1088 George Frost lulufrost.com Giorgio Armani delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4102 7122 Giuseppe Zanotti giuseppezanottidesign.com Givenchy givenchy.com Gucci mumbai, Palladium, 022-6749 9493; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4647 1111

H Hackett London mumbai, Palladium, 022-4347 2888; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4108 7388; Bengaluru, UB City, 97316 00994

Happy Socks Available at The Collective Hardy Amies hardyamies.com Hermès mumbai, 022-2271 7400; delhi, 011-4360 7780 Hublot mumbai, Rose, 022-2362 0275; delhi, 011-2469 3712; Bengaluru, 080-4098 2100 Hugo Boss mumbai, Palladium, 022-2491 2210; delhi dLf Emporio, 011-4604 0773; Bengaluru, 080-2520 7200

I IWC mumbai, Time Avenue, 022-2651 5757; delhi, Johnson watch Co, 011-4151 3121; Bengaluru, Ethos Summit, 080-4099 9621

J Jack & Jones mumbai, Palladium, 022-4347 3301; delhi, Ambience mall, 011-4087 0007; Bengaluru, 080-6569 0030 Jaeger-LeCoultre mumbai, Rose The watch Bar, 022-2362 0275; delhi, Kapoor watch Co, 011-4134 5678; Bengaluru, Zimson, 080-4098 2100 Jaguar mumbai, 022-6747 8080; delhi, 011-4692 2222; Bengaluru, 080-4309 9999 Jimmy Choo mumbai, 022-3027 7070; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4660 9069; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8404

PhOTO: R BURmAN

John Varvatos

Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8882/3

lacquerembassy.com

Lecoanet Hemant lecoanethemant.com Longines mumbai, watches of Switzerland, 022-2640 2511; delhi, 011-4359 2848; Bengaluru, Ethos, 080-4113 0611

Louis Leeman louisleemanparis.com Louis Philippe mumbai, 022-2386 5338; delhi, dLf Promenade, 011-4609 8275; Bengaluru, 080-4207 4426 Louis Vuitton mumbai, 022-6664 4134; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4669 0000; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4246 0000

L’Agent by Agent Provocateur agentprovocateur.com

M Marc Jacobs marcjacobs.com Marks & Spencer mumbai, 022-6666 9807; delhi, 011-4579 5449; Bengaluru, 080-2208 6525 Miansai miansai.com Missoni missoni.com

N Nike mumbai, 022-2656 1696; delhi, 011-4150 2012; Bengaluru, 080-6726 6080 Nautica mumbai, Phoenix marketcity, 86637 64184; delhi, Pacific mall, 011-4513 6701; Bengaluru, Phoenix marketcity, 080-4165 8260

O Oliver Sweeney oliversweeney.com Omega mumbai, 022-6655 0351; delhi, 011-4151 3255; Bengaluru, 080-4098 2106 Only & Sons koovs.com

P Panerai mumbai, 022-2288 5052; delhi, Johnson watch Co, 011-3231 5645; Bengaluru, Ethos westminster, 080-4163 6912 Paul Smith mumbai, Palladium, 022-6658 9960; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4604 0744; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8882/3 Philipp Plein plein.com Polaroid polaroid.com Prada prada.com Puma mumbai, 022-6671 0973; delhi, 011-4056 6907; Bengaluru, 080-4092 5357

R Rado mumbai, 022-6743 9856; delhi, 011-4357 5253; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4098 2107

Raghavendra Rathore mumbai, 022-6749 9481; delhi, dLf Emporio, 93111 12844 Rajesh Pratap Singh mumbai, 022-6638 5480; delhi, 011-2463 8788 Ralph Lauren ralphlauren.com Ray-Ban ray-ban.com

Roberto Cavalli robertocavalli.com

Rohit Gandhi + Rahul Khanna mumbai, 022-2648

K Kenneth Cole mumbai,

5622; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4654 7462 Rolex mumbai, diA, 022-2204 2299; delhi, Kapoor watch Co, 011-4134 5678; Bengaluru, 080-2211 3976

Palladium, 022-4347 4094; delhi, 98914 77456; Bengaluru, 080-4340 0400

mumbai, Palladium, 022-6658 9960; delhi, 011-4604 0744;

Available at The Collective John Elliott johnelliott.co John Hardy johnhardy.com

BLAZER By ETRO. TROUSERS By PHILIPP PLEIN. NECKPIECE By DIOR HOMME

L Lacquer Embassy

Rosso Brunello

S Sahil Aneja sahilaneja.com Salvatore Ferragamo mumbai 022-3062 1018; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4660 9084; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-3004 1854 Shahab Durazi mumbai, 022-6529 5895

Shantanu & Nikhil mumbai, 022-2605 8057; delhi, 011-4168 6805 SS Homme mumbai, 022-2651 1738 Sunil Mehra mumbai, 022-2826 1011; delhi, 011-4163 4788 Superdry mumbai, Phoenix marketcity, 022-6180 1581; delhi, Select Citywalk, 011-4130 6126

T T by Alexander Wang alexanderwang.com Tailorman tailorman.com

TENTHOUSANDTHINGS tenthousandthingsnyc.com The Bro Code jabong.com The Collective mumbai, Palladium, 022-4343 8888; delhi, Ambience mall, 011-4087 8888; Bengaluru, 080-4936 8888 The Tie Hub thetiehub.com Tom Ford delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4103 3059 Thomas Pink mumbai, Palladium, 022-4023 6090; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4606 0999 Tissot mumbai, Ethos, 022-6615 0351; delhi, ganga Ram gallery, 011-2241 2241; Bengaluru, Just In vogue, 080-6693 0104 Tod’s mumbai, Palladium, 022-4242 1818, delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4103 3059; Bengaluru, 080-4280 0000 Tommy Hilfiger mumbai, Palladium, 022-3072 8807; delhi, Ambience mall, 011-4087 0041; Bengaluru, Brigade Orion mall, 080-2268 2091 Troy Costa mumbai, 98200 71069

U Uniqlo uniqlo.com V Valentino Garavani valentino.com Van Heusen mumbai, Palladium, 022-6615 2898; delhi, 011-4265 8322; Bengaluru, 080-4162 7077 Vans mumbai, Phoenix Skyzone, 022-6615 3152; delhi, Ambience mall, 011-4087 0151; Bengaluru, Phoenix marketcity, ww080-6726 6158 Versace mumbai, 022-3027 7040; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4660 9064

Vivienne Westwood Available at The Collective

Z Z Zegna mumbai, Palladium, 022-2285 7000; delhi, dLf Emporio, 011-4606 0999; Bengaluru, UB City, 080-4173 8805 Zara mumbai, Palladium, 022-4347 3850; delhi, dLf Promenade, 011-4513 7124; Bengaluru, Phoenix marketcity, 080-6726 6121

october 2016

— 403


LUXURY, FASHION AND TECHNOLOGY IN STANDOUT STYLE

Foot Fashion

Designed in California and made in Spain, Scentra – a fashion accessories brand – is the love child of the American free spirit and effortless European elegance. And their shoes are to die for. Made with a certified orthopedic sole for comfort, a scented insole that makes them smell as good as they look and a breathable, eco-friendly fabric, each pair will effortlessly take you from a Sunday brunch to a boys’ night out in style. Priced between `2,000 and `3,000. Shop online

Living it up

Embassy ONE, India’s first Four Seasons Hotel and Private Residences, will be Bengaluru’s landmark destination. Blending high-profile real estate with luxury living, it offers sophisticated residences with hotelinspired amenities and unparalleled services. Think direct access to Four Seasons services, valet parking, housekeeping services, 24-hour on-call maintenance, property-wide Wi-Fi, central air conditioning, world-class security, restricted elevator access and more. For a private appointment, call +91 8880050000 or visit embassyoneresidences.com

Scent of a man

at scentra.com

Inspired by the world of extreme sailing, Prada Luna Rossa Sport is a masculine fragrance that explores the human skill, technical precision and nature’s element, which are part of this sporting endeavour. While the top notes of ginger, juniper berry and the tobacco-inflected notes of Tonka and vanilla reveal a virile lavender heart, an elegant scent unfolds over time. Available at Parcos and selected outlets in India

Throw some shade

Tommy Hilfiger brings you a whole-new funky range of aviators with varying coloured lenses, including ombré, along with intriguing rims as part of its Autumn/Winter 2016-17 collection. Other than the classic tear drop shape and its variations, the leading fashion label brings you stylish double rimmed frames in square silhouettes that complement almost anything you wear. Priced between `5,000 and `9,000. Available soon at leading departmental stores and opticians

404 —

OCTOBER 2016

Back up

The new Samsonite Garde is an innovative range of backpacks designed for work and travel. Each bag from this collection has a streamlined look, integrates premium components and offers maximum comfort. It even won the prestigious Red Dot Award for outstanding design. So, whether you’re taking off on a short trip or need a work bag to hold your essentials, get a Samsonite Garde and you’re good to go. `8,500. Available at Samsonite Airport Outlets and exclusive Samsonite stores across India


Precious time

The Grande Seconde Off-Centered Onyx by Jaquet Droz is all about graphic simplicity with a stylish black dial that draws you into the heart of the brand’s history. The creative concept underlying this model was born in the 18th century, when Pierre Jaquet-Droz introduced the Grande Seconde. Featuring two superimposed dials, one of them off-centered at 6 o’clock with an extra-fine hand marking the seconds, this watch perfectly embodies the concept of timeless sophistication. Price on Request. Available Johnson Watches in D

High on luxury

Aurus by PS Group is a 31-storey luxury residential tower in Kolkata that brings you the best of luxury living. Each home comes with 20ft-high ceilings and offers south-facing views of Kolkata’s wetlands. Better still, they are open on three sides for better ventilation and natural light. Designed by architects from Singapore and located in one of the city’s finest neighbourhoods – right behind ITC Sonar – life doesn’t get better than this.

Say, “cheese”

F1 Plus by OPPO Mobiles is an upgraded version of the Selfie Expert F1. Taking selfies to a new level with a 16MP front camera and a 13MP rear camera, this 5.5-inch, all-metal unibody 4G device runs fast with a powerful Octa-core processor. With the all-new ColorOS 3.0 system, it also features an intelligent fingerprint sensor and OPPO’s patented VOOC flash charge. `26,990. For more information,

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Towering luxury

Living in style

Kalpataru Avana – a swanky new residential property in Mumbai, behind Hotel ITC Grand Central – is the epitome of luxury. Featuring two residences per floor with five bedroom duplexes and 3 and 4BHK apartments in a thoughtful east-west layout, Avana is designed for those who appreciate fine living. With majestic views of Mumbai’s eastern shores, it’s Kalpataru’s most exclusive property. For an exclusive preview, call 022 30643065

Adjacent to the soon-to-open JW Marriott in Kolkata, Vivara is a spanking-new, serviced residential tower with 52 beautifully designed 4BHK units. It comes with the promise of select Marriott services and state-ofthe-art amenities. Aeon, the club on the second floor podium level, has indoor and outdoor recreational facilities like two swimming pools – including a kid’s pool – and a Jacuzzi to soak in. 4A, JBS Haldane Avenue, (EM Bypass), Kolkata 700105. For more information, call +91 9831841169

OCTOBER 2016

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OPEN LETTER

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406 —

OCTOBER 2016

WORDS: OVERRATED OUTCAST. IMAGE: SHUTTERSTOCK

Easy Cons,

Dear Gullible Target of



Gq tiger