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THE

STYLE MANUAL

THAT

STARTED IT ALL

Big

TH

THE

EDITION

Book

FALL/WINTER 2016


A N D R E W L AU R E N FILMMAKER


R ALPHL AUREN.COM/PURPLEL ABEL


Rod Paradot

See the ⇒lm DIOR.COM/HeartsAndMind


HERMÈS BY NATURE


JACK HUSTON


800-457-TODS


K I T A N D A C E . C O M

N E V E R S T O P B E I N G A N AT H L E T E

T H I S I S T E C H N I C A L A P PA R E L FOR YOUR REAL LIFE

VAN C OUV E R


Š 2016 Hunter Douglas Ž and TM are trademarks of Hunter Douglas


“Sleep tight, everyone,” said the window treatments as they lowered themselves for the night.

PowerView™ Motorization from Hunter Douglas. A remarkable system that automatically moves your shades throughout the day so you don’t have to. Just program your daily personalized settings with your smartphone or tablet. You can even activate a pre-programmed setting with a touch of our brilliantly designed Pebble™ Scene Controller, available in seven perfect pops of color. How smart—intelligent shades that simplify your life. To see PowerView™ in motion, visit HunterDouglas.com


The

BIG BLACK BOOK

The Portfolios No. 1

What, This Old Thing? Every vintage item tells a story. We asked eight well-dressed men to let their favorite heirloom pieces do the talking. 98

No. 2

Street Fighting Man Newly minted pop sensation BØRNS presents a compelling visual argument for dressing with the not-so-quiet confidence of a rock star. 112

No. 3

Ciao Napoli! Naples, Italy—the birthplace of modern tailoring—is still a hotbed of culture, culinary delights, and unrivaled style. 142

The Information V I N TA G E S T Y L E

THE BEST OF

NAPLES

The best vintage stores in the world, editors’ picks, essential tips for buying on eBay, and the one book you must own if you’re in the market for a French World War I flight suit.

Ten years of the Big Black Book, ten years of damn good advice: How to sew a button, tie your shoes with a Windsor knot, compliment a woman, greet a colleague, cure a hangover, sear a steak, and everything in between.

Adopt a Neapolitan way of life on your next trip to Italy: Navigate the city like a local, avoid a common coffee-related faux pas, seek out the best dress shirts in Europe, and—trust us on this one—try the deep-fried pizza.

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132

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The

Mag n u m

L et t er f rom

FORCE

THE EDITOR

Aldo Sohm, wine director at Manhattan’s bar, crushes the grape game.

58

Hau li n g

CLASS Guys who demand the best in automotive luxury are finding it in the back of a pickup truck.

62 The topcoat is the new sport coat. Discuss.

Only If It

SUITS YOU The secret to buying a Savile Row suit is knowing that, much as at Burger King, you can have it your way.

E T ERNALS

76

W hat I’ve Le ar n e d:

10-YE A R EDITIO N A dozen tastemakers share life lessons from the past decade— give or take a few years.

Everything you’ll want to wear in the DGAF era.

82

36

Fresh

O n e To u g h

M U DD E R

FACES

Esquire fashion director Nick Sullivan gets down and dirty in a classic car.

The six standout watches of the season.

86

48

Sacre d How not to freeze your face off this winter, courtesy of three cold-weather kings.

72

T h e Peaks of

PERFECTION Those who know their way around the slopes ski Cortina d’Ampezzo. Plus: How to be the best-dressed man in the lift line.

54

SPACES From Frédéric Malle’s New York City apartment to Olivier Zahm’s Parisian penthouse, the places that inspire creative people.

126

Hardware Update Is

AVAILAB LE

My Favor i t e

TH IN G

The DSLR camera, short-throw projector, and wireless home speaker you need now—and the smart football you had no idea existed.

Fashion designer Brunello Cucinelli on the perfect writing utensil.

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162

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

BELOW, TOP TO BOTTOM: A leather motorcycle helmet from Hanmi; a Finn Juhl chair and Ralph Lauren Home cocktail table; a photograph of Chevy Chase by Harry Benson—just a few of the elements that inspire me in my office.

A DECADE USED TO BE AN ETERNITY, but these last ten years—as chronicled in Esquire’s Big Black Book, the original style bible—have seen more variations on the theme of what it means to be coolly turned out than the previous century. Just think of the term bespoke. What was once a rather weirdsounding adjective used by the likes of Prince Charles has become as much a part of what we talk about when it comes to good clothes as designer sneakers or Japanese denim or quality American classics or the kind of genuinely exciting novelty best described with the f-word of fashion. The previous sentence used to describe at least four different types of guys; today, it describes a fifth—one who isn’t into the dogma of any single school of men’s style, but who has the confidence to move among them all, buying what he likes and making it his own. What this guy says when he gets dressed in the morning is not “What rules should I follow?” but “What rules should I break?” This was the initial idea that gave birth to the Big Black Book in 2006, when Esquire fashion director Nick Sullivan noticed this new breed of guy, who was starting to dress not to blend in but to stand out. Take some of the stories from this edition as proof of this continued evolution: Alex Bilmes (my counterpart at UK Esquire) brings us the latest in redefinition from Savile Row, the home of the traditional suit, and relates how the vaunted Kilgour is shaking up the street by offering its customers—blasphemy!—

No.

the option to order off the menu. You’ll also see this maverick streak in our story on the make-yourown-rules way of dressing of eight eBay addicts who pair current-season clothes with treasured, one-of-a-kind vintage pieces. And you see it in the rebellious, on-the-verge fashion sense of the musician BØRNS, whose song “Electric Love” was dubbed an “instant classic” by Taylor Swift. Esquire, and by extension the Big Black Book, believes style is defined not simply by what you wear but by your command of the world and everything in it—in short, by how you live, which includes, of course, what you live in. In that spirit, we also put together a portfolio of private spaces that express the completely original personalities of their owners. Good design, like good style, is best when it’s unapologetically itself. How does a taste for an old Barbour jacket with a denim suit find further expression in an ashtray from Bar Hemingway and a pair of Finn Juhl chairs in an office on the 21st floor of a building by Norman Foster? I’m not entirely sure, but, as I said, I’m not one to apologize about such things. And I doubt you are, either.

JA Y F I E L D E N Editor in Chief

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I N T E R I O R D E S I G N B Y C A R R I E R A N D C O M PA N Y; P H OTO G R A P H S B Y S U S A N P I T TA R D

THE BIG TEN


TAG HEUER CARRERA CALIBRE HEUER 01 Chris Hemsworth works hard and chooses his roles carefully. He handles pressure by taming it, and turning it to his advantage. #DontCrackUnderPressure was coined with him in mind. TAGHeuer.com


E IN

RE CY CLI

NG

REMOV

THE BIG BLACK BOOK

SE

EDITOR IN CHIEF

NE

PL E

A ZI AG

AS E

LE CYC THIS M RE

RT SO

Jay Fielden

FO RS A M P L E S BE

RE

Nick Sullivan • E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R O F E D I T O R I A L Michael Hainey E D I T O R I A L D I R E C T O R Helene F. Rubinstein • D E S I G N D I R E C T O R David Curcurito • S E N I O R E D I T O R David Walters M A N A G I N G E D I T O R John Kenney • D I R E C T O R O F P H O T O G R A P H Y Michael Norseng E D I T O R , S T Y L E Jason Chen • C U L T U R E A N D L I F E S T Y L E E D I T O R Kevin Sintumuang • C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I T O R Jon Roth EDITOR

ART ART DIRECTOR

Jessica Musumeci •

A S S O C I AT E A R T D I R E C TO R

Tito Jones •

D I G I TA L I M AG I N G S P E C I A L I S T

Leonardo R. Celestino

PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTO EDITOR

Stacey Pittman •

A S S I S TA N T P H OTO E D I TO R

Larisa Kline •

PHOTO RESEARCHER

Alison Unterreiner

FAS H I O N

Matthew Marden • M A R K E T E D I T O R Michael Stefanov Benjamin Liong Setiawan • F A S H I O N A S S I S T A N T Alfonso Fernández Navas

FAS H I O N D I REC TO R MARKET EDITOR

COPY AND RESEARCH

Robert Scheff ler Alisa Cohen Barney, Christine A. Leddy • A S S I S T A N T R E S E A R C H RESEARCH EDITOR

COPY EDITORS

EDITOR

Ambrose Martos

E S Q U I R E I N T E R N AT I O N A L E D I T I O N S

Bulgaria • China • Colombia • Czech Republic • Greece • Hong Kong • Indonesia • Kazakhstan • Korea • Latin America • Malaysia • Middle East • Netherlands Philippines • Poland • Romania • Russia • Serbia • Singapore • Spain • Taiwan • Thailand • Turkey • United Kingdom • Vietnam S V P/ I N T E R N AT I O N A L E D I TO R I A L D I R E C TO R

Kim St. Clair Bodden

SVP / PUBLISHING DIRECTOR & CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER

Jack Essig

Marcia Kline • A S S O C I A T E P U B L I S H E R / G R O U P M A R K E T I N G D I R E C T O R Jill Meenaghan G E N E R A L M A N A G E R , H E A R S T M E N ’ S G R O U P Samantha Irwin • E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R , D I G I T A L , H E A R S T M E N ’ S G R O U P Deidre Daly-Markowski E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R O F L U X U R Y G O O D S Caryn Kesler • E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R O F F A S H I O N John Wattiker A M E R I C A N F A S H I O N , R E T A I L & G R O O M I N G D I R E C T O R Marcus Reynaga • S P I R I T S , T R A V E L & E N T E R T A I N M E N T D I R E C T O R David Coker I N T E G R A T E D A U T O M O T I V E D I R E C T O R Mark Fikany • M I D W E S T D I R E C T O R Justin Harris I N T E G R A T E D A C C O U N T D I R E C T O R , S O U T H W E S T Anthony P. Imperato • W E S T C O A S T D I R E C T O R Sandy Adamski M I D W E S T A C C O U N T M A N A G E R , D E T R O I T Bryce A. Vredevoogd • A C C O U N T D I R E C T O R & N E W E N G L A N D Brian Kantor S A L E S A S S O C I A T E John V. Cipolla A S S O C I AT E P U B L I S H E R /A DV E R T I S I N G

Pacific Northwest Andrea Wiener, Athena Media Partners 415-828-0908 Texas and Arkansas Barbara Crittenden, Wisdom Media 214-526-3800 Italy Robert Schoenmaker (011) 39-02-6619-2788

Sherlyn Robinson Gina Azzolini, Mary Jane Boscia, Jake Fried, Caitlin Morton, Michael Okubo, Toni Starrs, Yvonne Villareal

E X E C U T I V E A S S I S TA N T TO T H E G R O U P P U B L I S H I N G D I R E C TO R & B U S I N E S S C O O R D I N ATO R I N T E G R AT I O N A S S O C I AT E S

MARKETING SOLUTIONS

Jason Graham Scott Lehmann E X E C U T I V E C R E A T I V E D I R E C T O R , G R O U P M A R K E T I N G Jana Nesbitt Gale D I R E C T O R S , I N T E G R A T E D M A R K E T I N G William Upton, Colin H. Stayton • A S S O C I A T E D I R E C T O R , I N T E G R A T E D M A R K E T I N G Drew Amer S E N I O R M A N A G E R , I N T E G R A T E D M A R K E T I N G Amanda Kaye • R E S E A R C H M A N A G E R Peter Davis • C O N S U M E R M A R K E T I N G D I R E C T O R William Carter E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R , I N T E G R AT E D M A R K E T I N G

E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R , S T R AT E G I C P A R T N E R S H I P S A N D E V E N T S

A D M I N I S T R AT I O N A N D P R O D U C T I O N

Terry Giella • G R O U P P R O D U C T I O N D I R E C T O R Chuck Lodato Diane Arlotta • P R E M E D I A A C C O U N T M A N A G E R Deidra Robinson

ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER O P E R AT I O N S A C C O U N T M A N A G E R

P U B L I S H E D BY H E A R S T C O M M U N I C AT I O N S , I N C .

Steven R. Swartz William R. Hearst III • E X E C U T I V E V I C E C H A I R M A N Frank A. Bennack, Jr. S E C R E T A R Y Catherine A. Bostron • T R E A S U R E R Carlton Charles PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

CHAIRMAN

HEARST MAGAZINES DIVISION

David Carey • P R E S I D E N T , M A R K E T I N G & P U B L I S H I N G D I R E C T O R Michael Clinton D I G I T A L M E D I A Troy Young • S V P / C H I E F F I N A N C I A L O F F I C E R Debi Chirichella • E D I T O R I A L D I R E C T O R Ellen Levine P U B L I S H I N G C O N S U L T A N T Gilbert C. Maurer • P U B L I S H I N G C O N S U L T A N T Mark F. Miller PRESIDENT

P R E S I D E N T,

Published at 300 West Fifty-seventh Street, New York, NY 10019-3797. Editorial offices: (212) 649-4020. Advertising offices: (212) 649-4050 ® www.esquire.com. For subscription or customer-service questions, please visit service.esquire.com or write to Esquire, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. Printed in the U.S.A.

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AG ADRIANO GOLDSCHMIED

AGJE ANS.COM


The Code

PERMANENT COLLECTION

The

New

E T E R NA L S We seem to live in a DGAF age—in which personal style has upended long-held rules. Suits at work? No, thanks. T-shirts with ties? Yes! So what is the key to looking great in this new era? Realizing quality and taste will always endure. By Nick Sullivan PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAVID PRINCE

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New Balance I N T H E PAST , we built our wardrobes as a musician might compose

a piece of music: along recognized lines, with recurrent motifs, consistent rhythms, and occasional dissonance underlying an overall harmony. But style isn’t Vivaldi anymore. Unique one-off pieces such as Gucci’s poison-apple-green snake-decorated leather tote and Valentino’s classic derbies, with their gold-studded soles, epitomize the why-not tendency in men’s fashion right now. What to pair with these totems of badassery? A classic outerwear staple, naturally, such as Joseph Abboud’s grainy herringbone topcoat. Coat ($1,195) by Joseph Abboud; josephabboud.com. Tote bag ($1,980) by Gucci; gucci.com. Studded derby shoes ($1,395) by Valentino Garavani; 212-355-5811. Lounge chair (price upon request) by Matter Made; mattermatters.com.


The Code

PERMANENT COLLECTION

Tr e n d - P r o o f IN FASH ION, we used to get bogged down in the

future of the tie. Now we’re all seeking out failsafe pieces that will forever be impervious to the vagaries of the season—such as Berluti’s supple gray shearling bomber. Shearling bomber ($5,450) by Berluti; 212-4396400. Runwell chronograph ($800) by Shinola; shinola.com. Desk lamp ($9,950) by Hermès; hermes.com. X1D camera ($8,995) by Hasselblad; hasselblad.com. Sunglasses ($590) by Dior Homme; dior.com. Notebook ($60), wallet ($300), and fountain pen ($870) by Montblanc; montblanc. com. Play Green fragrance ($110) by Commes des Garçons; 212-604-0013.

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The Code

PERMANENT COLLECTION

Bright Idea W H I L E OU R C LO SETS still,

for the most part, stick to that always tasteful palette of blues and grays and browns, sometimes you just have to land with both feet outside your comfort zone. Bright knits (like Etro’s distressed-hem pink cashmere sweater) and bold plaids (like Gucci’s wool robe) put zip into the most unexpected elements of your outfit. Robe ($1,170) by Gucci; gucci.com. Turtleneck sweater ($1,782) by Etro; etro.com. Shoes (price upon request) by Salvatore Ferragamo; tramezza. ferragamo.com. Briefcase ($1,675) by Boglioli; boglioli.it.

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The Code

PERMANENT COLLECTION

Dressy Casual B ASI C I S A LL F INE and dandy, but why shouldn’t our most laid-back clothes do as much for us as our most formal ones? More and more, they do. The revolution does not mean that our clothes have become plain—rather, it means that what we once termed streetwear has become luxurious, as shown by the guys from Public School, who practically created the category of premium joggers. These days, as much thought goes into the cloth and cut of a pair of DSquared2 chinos or a Tomas Maier leather jacket as goes into a silk tuxedo. Sneakers, like these by Greats, are no longer mere throwaway kicks. The hallmarks of great design—the materials, attention, and care—now apply just as strongly to the weekend uniform. Sneakers ($49) by Greats; greats.com. Jacket ($2,900) by Tomas Maier; tomasmaier.com. Trousers ($590) by DSquared2; dsquared2.com. Notebook ($75) by Smythson; smythson.com. Classic Fusion Berluti watch ($14,600) by Hublot; 646-582-9813. 1899 fragrance ($185) by Histoires de Parfums; odinnewyork.com. Shaving brush ($156) by Mühle; muehleusa.com. Wallet ($55) and key chain ($35) by J. W. Hulme Co.; jwhulmeco.com. Candle ($62) by Diptyque; nordstrom.com.

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The Code

PERMANENT COLLECTION

R o u g h L u xe HOUNDSTOOTH IS AS OLD as the Scottish hills from which it came, a jazzy clash of dark and light that once camouflaged huntsmen and ghillies for the deer stalk or the pheasant shoot. In natural color, those rustic references are pretty hard to shake. But shift the color palette toward the darker end of the spectrum—as with this Canali jacket—and things get interesting: an urban camouflage texture playing off against heavy suede work boots, like these by Japanese label Visvim, or J. Crew’s roomy take—pleats, anyone?—on classic Donegal tweed. Boots ($1,030) by Visvim; visvim.tv. Trousers ($250) by J. Crew; jcrew.com. Two-button jacket ($2,895) by Canali; canali.com. Socks ($32) by Smart Turnout; smartturnout.com. Trunk ($9,900) and wallet ($1,020) by Goyard; goyard.com.

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The Code

PERMANENT COLLECTION

Fair Skin

SET DESIGN BY GLEN PROEBSTEL FOR EDGE REPS.

LEAT H ER JAC KET S US E D to be heavy things—thick, unyielding, and robust—designed to suit rugged lifestyles. Now they’re the outerwear of choice for officejob-to-downtown-dinner types like Jack Dorsey, who’s virtually become a walking billboard for the buttery leather moto. That’s how far the material and construction of leather jackets have come. At Tod’s, craftsmen hand-color and then polish the finest glover’s leather to give the label’s new capsule range of Pash jackets a lived-in feel. At Bottega Veneta, meanwhile, 50 years of experience are behind the brand’s trademark intrecciato (woven) leather. The supplest calfskin is cut into strips and then hand-woven to create bags, clothing, even shoes. ≥ Jacket ($2,825) by Tod’s; tods.com. Bag ($3,400) by Bottega Veneta; 800-845-6790. Wallet ($245) by Smythson; smythson.com. Large candle holder ($1,200), small candle holder ($1,050), and horsehead puzzle ($940) by Hermès; hermes.com. Sculpture (price upon request) by Sofie Oesterby; olivergustav.com.

No.

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E S Q U I R E ’ S B I G B L A C K B O O K — FA L L 2 0 1 6


Porsche Design SOUND

SPACE ONE – Active Noise Cancelling Headphones INSPIRED BY OUR PASSION FOR DESIGN

Rodeo Drive | Ala Moana Center | The Shops at Crystals | South Coast Plaza Madison Avenue | Aventura Mall | The Galleria Houston | City Creek Center www.porsche-design.com


The Code ADVENTURE

One Tough

MUDDER The Flying Scotsman, a three-day, 700-mile rally from England to Scotland, is half Downton Abbey, half Mad Max: Fury Road—an endurance test for classic cars and their adventurous owners. Esquire fashion director Nick Sullivan braved the slop, snow, and periodappropriate attire to satisfy his need for vintage speed. PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHRIS FLOYD

No.

In its eighth year, the Flying Scotsman—named for a steam locomotive that once ran from London to Edinburgh—draws more than 100 two-man teams looking to put their otherwise lovingly maintained motorcars through hell. • CL OCKWISE FROM TOP : Sullivan and Simon Arscott, owner of Churchill Classics, beside Arscott’s 1928 Bentley 4 ½ Litre; the driver and the navigator of a 1936 Riley Bigley Special; a 1930 Bentley Speed Six negotiates water near Caydale Mill, Old Byland.

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E S Q U I R E ’ S B I G B L A C K B O O K — FA L L 2 0 1 6


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The Code ADVENTURE

• CL O CK W I S E F R O M T O P : Arscott (driving) and Sullivan on day one at Belvoir Castle; a team makes final preparations near the starting line; local bikers push Arscott and Sullivan’s stalled Bentley outside the Railway Inn in Acklington, Northumberland, England; two uninterested spectators graze in North York Moors National Park.

POSTCARDS FROM HELL From the manly to the masochistic, four other ways to eliminate rest and relaxation from your next getaway By Jon Roth Train Like a SEAL

Mountain-Bike the Death Road

The Extreme SEAL Experience, a one-week course led by a former senior chief in Chesapeake, Virginia, welcomes both enlisted men training for certification and adventurous civilians looking to be whipped into shape. On offer: tactical shooting, rappelling courses, endless push-ups, and a 24-hour survival exercise ominously called “Hell Night.” Prepare to be screamed at. extremesealexperience.com

Stretching from La Paz to Coroico, Bolivia’s Camino a Los Yungas has been called the world’s most dangerous road—a narrow dirt path precariously notched into the side of a mountain. Guardrails? No. Two-way traffic? You betcha. Yungas has become a popular and sometimes final destination for extreme mountain bikers, claiming one to two cyclists per year. gravitybolivia.com

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The Code ADVENTURE

S U I T A N D RA L LY How a grown man plays dress-up (and avoids freezing his ass off )

SWEATER SCARF ($235) by Drake’s; drakes.com.

($215) by North Sea Clothing London; northseaclothing.com.

GOGGLES ($47) by Halcyon; classicpartsltd.com.

WORLD WA R I I RAF AV I AT O R HELMET ebay.com.

COAT ($5,790) by Dunhill; dunhill.com.

DRIVING GLOVES ($395) by Dunhill; dunhill.com.

BOOTS JUMPSUIT ($312) by Private White V. C.; privatewhitevc.com.

• CL O CK W I S E F R O M T O P LE F T : Arscott and Sullivan barrel down a dirt road on their way to a respectable 44th-place finish (out of 106); a flying-goddess hood ornament on a 1937 Cadillac 60 Series coupe; a mud-splattered 1936 Alvis Speed 25; the well-dressed driver of a 1928 Bentley 4 ½ Litre.

POSTCARDS FROM HELL

(CONT’D.)

Ta k e a D a y T r i p t o C h e r n o b y l

C h a s e S t o r m s i n To r n a d o A l l e y

It’s been 30 years since the largest nuclear disaster in history—enough time for the radioactive dust to settle and a fledgling tourism industry to emerge. Take photos beside the ill-fated reactor’s concrete sarcophagus, meet locals who never left, and try not to worry about exposure, estimated at four to six microsieverts (roughly the equivalent of a dental X-ray). You’ll be issued a Geiger counter just in case, which is comforting. chernobylwel.com

Led by a seasoned veteran of storm-chasing, the holder of the Guinness World Record for the most tornadoes ever witnessed (more than 650!), Silver Lining Tours offers participants a positively breezy proximity to supercells, funnel clouds, and pummeling hailstorms. “Feel the wind, smell the tornado, and see debris flying around,” encourages its website. Or maybe just catch a rerun of Twister on TBS. silverliningtours.com

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($425) by Grenson; grenson.com.


Pioneering since 1906. For the pioneer in you. Inspired by an era of technical awakening, the Montblanc 4810 Chronograph Automatic embodies absolute precision with its self-winding Calibre MB 25.07. Discover the full story at montblanc.com/pioneering. Crafted for New Heights.


The Code T R AV E L

The Peaks of

PERFECTION Understated elegance and world-class skiing have long been the hallmarks of Italy’s Cortina d’Ampezzo—the Alpine alternative to Europe’s overcrowded, overhyped ski resorts By Jen Murphy

“BEWARE OF AVALANCHES , Bedazzled Helmets, and Metallic Jimmy Choo Moon Boots.” Maybe you won’t encounter this warning sign at trendy ski resorts such as Courchevel in the French Alps and St. Moritz in Switzerland, but that doesn’t mean these dangers aren’t lurking. With celebrities, royalty, and Russian billionaires clogging some of Europe’s most pristine slopes—resulting in lift lines overrun by stick-wielding selfie poseurs and abominably dressed snow men—a long weekend in Lech, Austria, can start to feel more like a bad episode of The Real Housewives of Vorarlberg. No.

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Local suckling pig, romaine lettuce, smoked ricotta cheese, and juniper fog at St. Hubertus.

HOW TO DO THE DOLOMITES Four experiences you can have only in the Italian Alps Ski the Sella Ronda

ABOVE: The view from the Pomedes chairlift, which shuttles skiers to Cortina d’Ampezzo’s Tofana ski area and to elevations above 7,500 feet. RIGHT: Cortina’s annual Christmas market.

That’s why the preferred destination of glitzaverse skiers has long been Cortina d’Ampezzo, the timeless town in northern Italy once favored by Ernest Hemingway and Frank Sinatra, and frequented today by George Clooney. Geographically, not much separates the mountain range from its better-known Alpine neighbors; technically, the Dolomites are the Alps. Psychographically, however, the range’s 18 limestone peaks are a world away—a winter paradise operating improbably on island time. Cortina hosted the 1956 Winter Olympics and boasts one of the range’s steepest slopes—the vertigo-inducing 64-percent-gradient Forcella Staunies—but you won’t find any first-to-last-chair bravado here. Many Italians don’t even set foot on the slopes until 11:30 A.M., and even then it’s generally for a wine-fueled lunch at one of 48 rifugios, high-elevation lodges that serve remarkably delicious food, considering their remote setting. (And menus feature as much spaetzle as spaghetti, thanks to Italy’s acquisition of the region from Austria in 1918.) For locals, a perfect bluebird day entails sitting on the terrace of the Michelin-starred El Camineto and filling up on casunziei, the region’s beet-filled ravioli, while taking in the view below. What’s left for the rest of us: quiet, uncrowded pistes throughout Cortina’s three main ski areas. In fact, crowds seem to form only at the local hockey games, played on the Olympic ice rink where Brigitte Bardot once took skating lessons, and along Corso Italia, Cortina’s pedestrian-only cobbled main street, which turns into a lively scene every day around 4:00 P.M. But rather than clubs touting celebrity DJs or bars full of blokes dancing on tables to oompah music, nightlife centers on restaurants such as Aga—a four-table hot spot run by Alessandra Del Favero and Noma alum Oliver Piras, who serve foraging-based tasting menus—and intimate old-school wine bars such as Enoteca Cortina.

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The Sella Ronda circumnavigates the flat-topped Sella Massif Ridge, creating a merry-go-round of lifts and downhill runs suitable for intermediate skiers. Start the 25-mile circuit by 10:00 A.M . and make a lunch reservation at Rifugio Emilio Comici in Val Gardena. (You’ll smell the garlic as you reach the top of the Comici lift.) alpineadventures.net; rifugiocomici.com

Ta k e t h e G r e a t - W a r S k i To u r Often referred to as an open-air history museum, this 50-mile circuit winds around Col di Lana, the epicenter of the battles between Italian troops and German and Austrian forces during World War I. Between ski runs, take in bunkers, trenches, and artillery emplacements. dolomitemountains.com

Eat at Restaurant St. Hubertus Named for the patron saint of hunters, St. Hubertus sets the stage for chef Norbert Niederkofler’s transformation of simple mountain ingredients into elevated dishes, such as beetroot gnocchi with beer soil and daikon cream. rosalpina.it

To b o g g a n b y M o o n l i g h t If Clark Griswold taught us anything, it’s that sledding is not a pastime solely for children. Tackle five unique runs—some as long as four miles—after a meal at Chalet Alpenrose or Chalet Resciesa. A snowmobile gets you to dinner; a shot of schnapps gets you back down. chaletalpenrose.it; resciesa.com


The Code T R AV E L

SLOPE STYLE

Cortina’s elevation at the town’s center (equivalent to 4,016 feet); the Alta Badia ski area.

Ski helmet ($230) and

Turtleneck ($2,425) by Hermès; hermes.com.

by Moncler; moncler.com.

Even if your agenda is more “après” than “ski,” it’s worth waking up early to take on Mount Lagazuoi’s legendary Hidden Valley. Stretching nearly five miles, the valley’s storied ski run, the Armentarola, is considered one of the world’s most beautiful, and the relatively relaxed terrain means you can actually look up and enjoy the scenery without fearing for your life. But be warned: Accessing the Dolomites’ best slopes does require some maneuvering. You’ll have to take a 25-minute bus ride to the neighboring Lagazuoi lift, but from there, you’re whisked to 9,300 feet within three minutes. Before you descend, wander over to the adjacent Rifugio Lagazuoi to snap a photo on its terrace, which offers a 360 degree panorama of peaks. And just this once, take a guilt-free selfie in front of the valley’s frozen waterfalls. Eventually, the run deposits you into a flat river valley above the hamlet of Armentarola, on the outskirts of the Alta Badia ski area. At any other resort in the world, you’d have to traverse the final mile, but Cortina offers a uniquely primitive take on the classic T-bar: the horse tow. Grab the thick rope attached to a sleigh, pulled by an honest-to-god equine, and white-knuckle it with up to 50 of your fellow skiers. (Try not to be the guy who catches an edge and topples everyone like bowling pins.)

Ski gloves ($180) by Hestra; hestragloves.com.

Sunglasses ($600)

Parka ($6,295) by Bally; bally.com.

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The Code DRINKING

Magnum Force ALDO SOHM BRINGS AN ARSENAL OF KNOWLEDGE— AND A REFRESHINGLY MODERN SENSIBILITY—TO HIS ROLE AS LE BERNARDIN’S IN-HOUSE WINE GURU BY MARK BYRNE Photograph by Dustin Aksland

“I TAKE THE JACKET OFF WHEN I come in here,” says Aldo Sohm, sitting in the glowing dining room of the midtown Manhattan wine bar that bears his name. Just west of here, at Le Bernardin—the upscale seafood-heavy French restaurant, widely considered one of the world’s best, where Sohm also serves as wine director—entering the dining room without the proper attire might result in a few raised eyebrows and a stern GTFO from chef Eric Ripert. But the 50 or so feet of concrete that separates Sohm’s places of business allows just enough distance for a Clark Kent– style personality change: jacket off, mood lighter—but palate still switched on. Sohm remembers the day his palate first got switched on, in 1990, in the Tyrolean Alps of his native Austria. He wasn’t always a wine drinker; as a teenager, he favored Bacardi and Coke. But one day, his father took a 19-year-old Aldo for a drive across the border into the Alto Adige region of Italy to purchase a bottle of wine. “An ’83 Darmagi, produced by Angelo Gaja,” says Sohm, now 45. That drive changed the course of his life. Seeing his fabric-salesman father shell out for a bottle of fine wine piqued his curiosity; he wanted to know more, to understand the depth of what made that bottle—any bottle— special. So Sohm began reading up. He never

Sohm, popping bottles outside a wineshop in midtown Manhattan.

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The Code DRINKING

stopped. He went to tourism school in Austria and studied Italian in Florence. In 2002, while working at Robinson Select Alpenkönig in Austria, he was named best sommelier in the country (a title he would win three subsequent times). In 2004, he moved to New York and landed at chef Kurt Gutenbrunner’s Wallsé and Blaue Gans, then at the Neue Galerie’s Vienna-inspired Café Sabarsky. But it wasn’t until 2007, when he was recruited by Chef Ripert as wine director of Le Bernardin, that his passion for wine intersected with an even nobler purpose: hospitality. “Serving people is one of the purest forms of doing something good,” he explains. “You take care of someone. Life is fair. If you treat other people well, at one point it will come back to you.” Sohm is a hand-shaker and a table-reader as much as he is a glass-noser. He’s proficient in the fine art of making people comfortable—no small feat when they’re about to drop four figures on a dinner bill, and exceedingly more difficult when you’re speaking the sometimes foreign language of wine.

“As a sommelier, you have a 10- to 20-second window to read the client,” explains Sohm. “What does he want?” The sommelier is working against ignorance and accidental misdirection. “Sometimes people tell you they want fruity wine,” he says, shaking

Serving people is one of the purest forms of doing something good. Yo u t a k e c a r e o f s o m e o n e . L i f e i s f a i r. If you treat other people well, at one point it will come back to you. his head. “But fruity is a very mushy term.” Sohm estimates price points when diners aren’t confident enough to clarify; he looks for hints as to what kind of experience they have with different varieties, complex flavors, and ancient vintages, if any; most of all,

he searches for a way to relate. “Sometimes you have people who saved money for a year just to afford this dinner,” says Sohm. “I love working with those people.” While Le Bernardin gives him his fill of once-in-a-lifetime food tourists and anniversary celebrators, Aldo Sohm Wine Bar offers something much more elusive: the opportunity to provide instant, uncompromised comfort. “Look, the idea of the wine bar is you’re coming into my living room,” says Sohm. High tables and stools circle a giant couch in the center of the room; a bar at the back features seating on both sides. The lunchtime crowd draws from the nearby office buildings, but there are no hushed tones here. Sohm wants people to chill, talk, laugh. Now in shirtsleeves, he takes the opportunity to do the same. “We have an interesting situation here, because we often get referenced with Le Bernardin,” says Sohm. “But this is a wine bar, right? I told my staff, ‘Sometimes people see sommeliers as being arrogant. Be relaxed, be easy, make people feel good.’ ” Sohm grins, shrugs, considers the room, his chosen profession, the industry at large. “That’s the only trick we have.” ≥

W H AT A S O M M E L I E R D R I N K S AT H O M E

Laherte Frères Champagne Grand Brut Ultradition ($39)

Goisot 2013 Bourgogne Côtes d ’A u x e r r e G u e u l e s de Loup ($26)

“Small and biodynamical, it’s a richer style of Champagne with lots of freshness.”

“If this winemaker had holdings in Chablis, the wines would cost double! Very focused and mineral-driven wine.”

Peter Lauer 2015 S a a r Ay l e r Ku p p F a s s 6 Senior Riesling ($29)

Clos Puy Arnaud 2011 Côtes de Bordeaux Castillon ($24)

Vietti 2013 Langhe Perbacco Nebbiolo ($24)

“Florian Lauer is in a league of his own these days. The wine has a touch of fruitiness, but it’s so inviting to sip.”

“[The vineyard is] seven miles east of St.-Émilion and on the same limestone plateau. This wine is a true bargain.”

“The perfect everyday wine from ‘declassified’ Barolo grapes.”

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The Code AUTO

2017 Ford F-150 Raptor

Hauling Class ONCE THE VEHICLES OF BLUE-COLLAR GUYS AND BACKWOODS ADVENTURERS, PICKUPS NOW HAVE TRACTION AMONG LUXURY-MINDED CITY FOLK. LOGGERS AND LAGERFELDS WELCOME. BY JOSH CONDON

CAR CHOICE BEING A TRIBAL THING, driving a pickup casts you as one of a few likely types: proud coal-rolling redneck, professional contractor, SoCal surf bro, or Man with a Boat. But there’s a new guy embracing the Tao of truck: Fashion-savvy, white-collar, and surprisingly citified men are ditching their sleek sports cars and stately sedans for headstone-sized grilles and old-school leaf springs—even in a claustrophobic automotive no-man’s-land like New York City. (While a food or fashion trend’s appearance in New York signifies its debut, an automotive trend’s emergence here means it’s already in progress elsewhere, the most distinguishing feature of the city’s car culture being its absence.) “For the last 20 years, I’ve owned only sports cars,” says Michael Prichinello, co-

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owner of Classic Car Club Manhattan, which makes available to members a rotating roster of achingly beautiful vintage and modern supercars. Last year, Prichinello jettisoned his 1974 Euro-spec Porsche 911 Carrera RS in favor of a black-on-black 2016 Chevy Silverado. He hasn’t looked back. “It’s one of my two favorite possessions,” he says. “My dog and my truck. Every day I get out of Lamborghinis and Ferraris, and at the end of the day I say, ‘Okay, where’s my truck?’” Stephen Elmer Caison, a real estate broker for the Corcoran Group, chose his highperformance 2010 Ford Raptor in large part because it matched his personal style. Caison is a self-described “flashy guy” and a member of the Deth Killers motorcycle club. He’s the type of person who buys the vintage


Timberlands made in Tennessee and who rattles off his preferred denim by brand, fit, rinse, and selvage weight, in that order. “I found the Ford interior a lot cleaner,” Caison says. “Just black, square, not a lot of curves or light colors. The knobs and switchgear are

THREE FOR THE ROAD Tough yet refined—the way all pickups (and their owners) should be

design; it looks like my old Crown hi-fi.”

lex Submariner, a truck always looks better with a bit of life beaten into it. Plus, the American pickup market is a particular kind of high-stakes blood sport. Full-sized models from Chevy and Dodge are endlessly pursuing the Ford F-Series, the country’s best-selling vehicle, so manufacturers are constantly battling for performance, refinement, and value bragging rights. That means basically every modern pickup is both affordable and bulletproof,

and because they’re work vehicles first and foremost, they’re also full of useful features, such as 115-volt electrical outlets, an Ikea’s worth of integrated storage, and top-of-theline infotainment systems. At a time when speed is cheap and Hyundai sedans offer reclining rear seats, a good pickup truck has become a luxury proposition of sorts. (The “cowboy Cadillac” trend traffics

$30,375

MANLIEST ENGINE:

3.5-liter V-6

BRAGGING RIGHTS:

Sprints to 60 mph faster than a Lexus RC200t F Sport. 

LUXE UPGRADE:

In-bed audio system with an output of up to 540 watts.

2017 Chev y Silverado 1500 S TA R T I N G PRICE:

$35,935

MANLIEST ENGINE:

6.2-liter V-8

BRAGGING RIGHTS:

More horsepower than a Ferrari 360 Modena.

LUXE UPGRADE:

Leather-covered steering wheel with a heating element.

I d r i v e a B e n t l e y, b u t my Silverado is more luxurious. Everything i n s i d e i s r e a l l e a t h e r, the seats are airconditioned and heated, I have WiFi, and road noise is nil because the c a b i n i s s o s o u n d p r o o f. —Michael Prichinello

S TA R T I N G PRICE:

$33,730

6.7-liter diesel V-8 925 lb-ft of torque enables it to tow nine Smart cars.

Front massage seats.

in oversized, overchromed, and overoptioned six-figure monstrosities that give wealthy ranchers a way to peacock, but the less said about those, the better.) Many modern pickups, such as the Silverado and the Dodge Ram, offer smooth-riding air suspension and a seamless eight-speed transmission, and pretty much all of them can be upgraded with the sort of niceties you would expect only of an imported Autobahn annihilator. “I drive a Bentley,” Prichinello says, “but my Silverado is more luxurious. Everything inside is real leather, the seats are air-condi-

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tioned and heated, I have WiFi, and road noise is nil because the cabin is so soundproof.” Or look at it this way: For an extra $10,000, you could equip your new Bentley Mulsanne with a tiny refrigerator that chills a bottle of Champagne, or you could toss an entire case of bubbly, on ice, into the cooler that’s hidden in the bed of a $30,000 Honda Ridgeline. The truck’s luxury comes from its freewheeling lifestyle, not the other way around. (Just ask Mr. Ralph Lauren, pickup-truck driver.) Plus—and this is scientific fact—women love a man in a truck. ≥


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The Code BESPOKE

Only If It

SUITS YOU For years, Savile Row has offered exactly two choices when it comes to suits: Take it or leave it, sir. But times and tastes change. As Alex Bilmes discovers, the secret to getting a world-class suit made is knowing you can, in fact, order off the menu. SAVILE ROW: a fog-shrouded, gaslit London thoroughfare along which liver-spotted English gents of the old school—the really old school—stagger tipsily from late lunch to early bed, held aloft by ancient umbrellas and reinforced pinstripes and dreams of empire, stopping only to get their creases ironed in by tailors who haven’t seen sunshine since before the Blitz. But I exaggerate: Savile Row isn’t gaslit anymore. It is, however, still the physical and spiritual home of formal men’s tailoring, where for centuries the world’s sharpest-dressed playboys, politicos, and plutocrats have

Actor James Mason in 1966, drinking a Guinness and wearing a double-breasted worsted dinner jacket by Kilgour, French and Stanbury, London.

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come to have their backs straightened, their chests broadened, and their limbs lengthened. It’s where any man with a taste for high living would wish to one day make the Men’s-Wear Hajj, to commission a suit in the place where bespoke was invented. But the problem with Savile Row in the 21st century is, quite frankly, one of perception. Even among men like myself—someone who loves suits and is paid to know about them—Savile Row can feel out of touch: a place where you end up being forced to wear “their” style instead of them helping you create your own. I am a man in want of a new suit, but I’m not certain I want one from here. The last suit I had made on the Row is a beautiful double-breasted Prince of Wales check that makes me feel like I’m heading out for a day of light jousting under gloomy medieval skies rather than attending meetings in air-conditioned offices and scarfing salads at my desk. If I ever wore it—which I won’t—it would be wearing me. And yet there is something forbidding about telling a man holding a large pair of scissors his business. While the response is reliably polite, it can also be firmly patrician: There is a house style—honed but not altered much over generations—and Sir would be well advised to bow to its better judgment or take his custom elsewhere. So my question is: Can I call on the expertise of a Savile Row tailor to make me the suit that I actually want rather than the suit that Savile Row thinks I ought to have? Can I do that most American (and least British) thing and order off-menu? “House style is not definitive anymore,” says Will Adams, head cutter at Kilgour, of No. 5 Savile Row. Kilgour is one of the most storied

FROM TOP: The Kilgour showroom at 5 Savile Row in London; Will Adams, head cutter at Kilgour (left), reviews fabric options with Alex Bilmes; British hip-hop artist Tinie Tempah wears a Kilgour jacket at London Fashion Week 2016.

names on the Row and also the most progressive. You can tell by the room we are standing in, a spartan space of steel, glass, and granite, a minimalist box conceived by a modern architecture buff and the brand’s creative director, Carlo Brandelli. Adams is a tall, slender 41-year-old Englishman, and his is a name to conjure with among Savile Row aficionados—a man steeped in

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The Code BESPOKE

Adams takes measurements of Bilmes’s outseam, waist, and shoulders. Typical Kilgour fittings require 16 distinct measurements and three fittings following the initial consultation.

By contemporary standards, the suit I want is hardly radical, but by the antediluvian standards The suit I want is of some Savile Row tailors, it might as well be a space suit—a blue one-button single-breasted hardly radical, cut that I can wear for business and for pleasure. but by the antediluvian It should be smart enough for a meeting with my CEO, casual enough for a night on the town, standards of some tough enough to travel, and comfortable enough for days behind a desk. both the traditions of English tailoring and the Savile Row tailors, What else? I would like the fabric to be English. changing codes of contemporary men’s wear. His I would prefer the jacket cropped relatively short, first job was in a fashion boutique in his homeit might as in the modern style, with two side vents. Most town of Leicester, selling designer labels to cluedwell be a space suit. rebelliously, I want the shoulders soft, in the Italup suburban dandies. While in his final year at the ian style, rather than padded and rolled. I want it London College of Fashion, he interned at the suit maker Timothy Everest and then after graduation worked briefly on half-lined, if lined at all. The trousers should be flat-front and tapered the design team at John Richmond, on the shop floor at the influential toward the ankle, with side fastenings rather than suspenders. The Mayfair boutique Browns, and at the rambunctious casual label Duffer notch lapels on my jacket should be slim but not skinny, and I would of St. George. But Adams’s real education came during the six years he like patch pockets, just this once, because I’m a magazine journalist, not a minister in Winston Churchill’s Cabinet. spent at the ultratraditional Ede & Ravenscroft.

THE NAME S TO KNOW BEYOND THE ROW You don’t have to wander far from Kilgour to get the full monty. Here, four specialty shops only a stone’s throw away. G.   J. C l eve r l ey & C o.

Emma Willis

Crombie

D r a k e ’s

In his 93 years, the late George Cleverley made shoes for everyone from Humphrey Bogart to David Beckham. Today, you can still enjoy the craftsmanship of his chisel-toed creations in ready-to-wear or bespoke options (a custom pair takes about six months to produce). 13 Royal Arcade, 28 Old Bond Street

In the 1980s, Emma Willis began measuring businessmen for shirts right in the comfort of their office. She remains the first lady of London shirtmakers, offering hand-cut, single-needle-stitched garments with meticulously matched seams and mother-of-pearl buttons. 66 Jermyn Street

A good suit isn’t worth much if it’s hidden by second-rate outerwear. Crombie’s reputation spans two centuries (who else has received both commendations from Napoleon III and endorsements from the Beatles?) and still centers on a signature style, with dark wool, velvet collar, and iconic red lining. 48 Conduit Street

Founded in 1977, Drake’s first dealt in silk scarves but later found its footing as London’s go-to tie shop. Each tie is handmade and undergoes 18 inspections throughout the process. That attention to detail has made Drake’s a popular partner; collaborators range from J. Crew to Comme des Garçons. 3 Clifford Street

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PHOTOGRAPHS OF ADAMS AND BILMES BY ANDREW WOFFINDEN

A good cutter, according to Adams, is not only technically adept— ounces in weight, in what Adams describes as “Air Force blue.” “You have to really understand how a garment fits, and sometimes (Translation: “gray.”) My suit will be a three-season suit: comfortwhy it’s not fitting,” he says—but also open to suggestion and col- able at any time other than very hot summer days. Adams doesn’t laboration. He thinks that a cutter should be able to transfer his skills so much as raise an eyebrow at any of my long list of demands, even agreeing to a one-ply body canvas—the most to any tailoring house, just as you’d follow your lightweight, least structured option possible— dentist if she changed practices or your barber if A cutter should for the chest. In fact, he’s so agreeable that I feel he switched chairs. be able to transfer his compelled to ask him if there’s anything about the Of course, in any revolution—even a smallprocess that makes him uncomfortable as a tradiscale sartorial revolt such as mine—there are caskills to any tailoring tionally trained cutter. sualties as well as gains. “Take out the horsehair “Not at all,” he assures. “My job is to advise, not and the demet and you’re losing something for house, just as you’d to dictate. It’s your suit. You’re paying for it. I want sure,” says Adams of the traditional materials that follow your dentist you to feel happy in it.” give a bespoke English jacket its flattering shape As it so happens, my own preferences and the but also its suit-of-armor feel. “You’re still getting if she changed practices Kilgour house style set by Carlo Brandelli are a pattern cut, but it won’t give you that hourglass not far removed; he too favors one-button singleshape. On the other hand, it’s less formal and or your barber if breasted jackets and a slim silhouette, albeit easier to wear. Not everyone wants to look like a he switched chairs. with more structure than the suit I’ve requested. banker—not even every banker.” So, sure, there are still rheumy-eyed old buffers And so Adams takes my measurements and we leaf through books of fabrics: frescos, low-maintenance and who would choke on their postprandial cigars at the mere idea of businesslike; mohairs so robust you could sleep on a park bench in a Savile Row suit lacking shoulder pads and wide lapels, but the them and still look shiny and new in the morning; and flannels, softer sharp-dressed tailors at Kilgour won’t join them in their scorn. and less formal. “Flannel,” says Adams, “makes a man look like he’s There’s life in the old Row yet. ≥ wearing a suit because he wants to, because he looks good in it, rather than because he has to, to conform.” That sounds about right to me, so I select a super-120’s worsted flannel, nine

A B OV E: Daniel Craig wears a navy Kilgour suit in Layer Cake (2004). RIGHT: Adams and Bilmes, all smiles after the painless process.


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The Code GROOMING

Frozen Assets THINK YOU HAVE YOUR GROOMING ROUTINE DOWN COLD? IT MIGHT BE TIME FOR A WINTER OVERHAUL, COURTESY OF SOME GUYS WHO ARE USED TO BRAVING THE ELEMENTS. BY JON ROTH

HOT TODDIES AND HOLIDAY parties aside, the winter months are one long, gray drag. You’re engulfed in layers, trudging through snow, and popping vitamin D supplements like candy. And then there’s the toll that the chill takes on your skin. Cold, dry air saps the moisture right out of your face, and the brutal combination of wind and snow-refracted light can mean double the burn. Luckily, man has made significant headway battling the elements—particularly the men on the following page. Read on for some expert advice on defending yourself against the deep freeze.

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Alex Hibbert 3 0, p o l a r ex p l o r e r, a u t h o r, a n d p h o t o g r a p h e r

Coldest place you’ve ever been: “Nunavut, Canada. At –54 degrees, if you make a

mistake, everything can go downhill very quickly.” Grooming essential: Neutrogena Norwegian Formula hand cream. Beware of: Vaseline. “It magnifies the sunlight. It might make you feel more comfortable, but it can actually cause you to burn a lot worse.” Secret weapon: “It sounds counterintuitive, but I cut all my hair off. If you’re not washing it, it turns into a nest. It won’t insulate you at all. Just buzz it and wear a hat; you’ll feel fresher and cleaner. Plus, it’s considerate—no one likes looking at someone else’s hat hair.”

Jimmy Chin 4 2 , p r o fe s s i o n a l p h o t o g r a p h e r, c l i m b e r, a n d m o u n t a i n e e r

Coldest place you’ve ever been: “Either at the bus stop in Mankato, Minnesota, in –35 degree windchill as a kid or on the summit ridge of Everest during a postmonsoon climb and ski descent.” Grooming essential: Jack Black Intense Therapy lip balm SPF 25. “You can use it on your face, nose, and even cracked fingertips in a pinch.” Beware of: Worn-out extremities. “Take the time to wash and lotion your hands and feet after a long day of hiking. It’s an extra task, but it will keep them healthy.” Secret weapon: “Staying hydrated and well fed is critical to keeping your core warm, which in turn generates heat that keeps your extremities warm.”

Gus Kenworthy 24, freestyle skier and silver medalist at the 2014 Sochi Olympics

Coldest place you’ve ever been: “We did a Big Air competition at Fenway Park earlier this year, and it was the coldest it had been in a decade.” Grooming essential: Burt’s Bees lip balm. Beware of: The sun. “People have this notion that just because it’s winter you don’t need sunscreen.” Secret weapon: “A tight face mask can leave you with sore cheeks. Beard oil helps with softness.”

COLD COMFORT Don’t let Old Man Winter leave you looking like an old man

Nivea Moisture Essential Lip Care You’re not the only one made uncomfortable by your dry, scaly lips. Shea butter repairs the damage, while vitamin B5 hydrates. ($3)

LAB Series Age Rescue+ Densifying Conditioner Adds extra shine and moisture so that whatever’s hiding under that hat looks less like a Brillo pad. ($29)

C.   O. B i g e l ow Chapped Hands Cleanser Liquid hand soap just doesn’t cut it when the mercury drops. Zap the dirt without dooming yourself to dry, cracked digits. ($12)

Zirh Platinum Drenched Ultra Hydrating Moisturizer

Jack Black Industrial Strength Hand Healer

We’re going to build a wall . . . between your face and harsh, moisture-leaching elements. (What did you think we meant?) ($125)

Softens and protects like any good cream should, without the unappealing side effect of awkward, greasy handshakes. ($15)

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To m F o r d Ve r t D’Encens Eau de Parfum Okay, a fragrance isn’t going to shield you from the chill, but notes of smoky frankincense and bracing pine might make you feel a bit warmer. ($225)


The Code TECH

Shoot Like You Mean It 1

Hardware Update

T h e b a l l ’s a p p rates your arm from “beginner”to “high school” t o “p r o” b a s e d on your throwing prowess.

When your camera phone becomes a tool for everything from vacation shots to brunch Instagrams, all of your photos start to have a middling sameness. The cure? Work a new camera into the mix. Nothing captures a vast space—the Sistine Chapel or the Serengeti—like the 360 degree images that you see on Google Maps, and the Samsung Gear 360 [1] ($350; samsung.com) does it in a snap. The Hasselblad X1D [2] ($8,995, body only; hasselblad.com) takes mind-blowingly detailed photos that used to require a cam-


2

3

Gleaming the Cube Going for a small wireless speaker doesn’t always mean sacrificing oomph and bass for the convenience of size. British audio company Naim learned a lot about making big noise in relatively tiny packages by developing sound systems for Bentley cars, and that technology finds its way into its Mu-so Qb ($1,000; naimaudio.com), which tricks you into thinking it’s five times bigger than it is. You can connect to this eight-inch cube via Bluetooth or AirPlay, and Spotify is built-in. Another cool trick: In the right light, the acrylic base makes the cube seem like it’s floating. ≥

Who is this c a m e r a f o r ? I f y o u ’r e adept at using a DSLR and have always fantasized about owning a Hasselblad, this is the one to get.

No.

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The Code C OAT S

Fo r a n OFFICER and a TA K E A C U E F R O M

GENTLEMAN

Prince Charles, circa 1982

Dunhill’s double-breasted greatcoat for fall closely resembles the classic British Warm, the donkey-colored melton worn by army officers on freezing parade grounds for most of the 20th century. Although it has much of the melton’s martial swagger, it is as light and easy to wear as a bathrobe, thanks to the technology and craftsmanship behind its unlined double-faced cashmere weave. Coat ($4,250) by Dunhill; dunhill. com. Dog leash ($580) by Valextra; valextra.com. Bag by Dover Street Market; doverstreetmarket.com.

Go LONG

Any coat worth its stitching can protect you from the worst of winter, but the right topcoat elevates an outfit—even a sweater and jeans—and announces to the world that you dress for something more important than the weather PHOTOGRAPHS BY PHILIP FRIEDMAN

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The Code C OAT S

B LU E I S t h e Wa r m e s t COLOR Bottega Veneta’s summery sea blue is not an obvious choice for chillier months. But why not? As we increasingly think of our clothes as distinct pieces— rather than as part of a conventional, harmonious whole—the possibility for self-expression in pattern, color, or design takes us somewhere entirely new. Coat (price upon request) and sunglasses ($525) by Bottega Veneta; bottegaveneta.com. iPad mini 4 (starting from $399) and headphones ($29) by Apple; apple.com.

TA K E A C U E F R O M Idris Elba

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featuring BRET EASTON ELLIS shop at santonishoes.com

NEW YORK - 762 Madison Avenue - Ph. +1 646 762 3554


The Code C OAT S

A Cut ABOVE A good coat will formalize any look, but it doesn’t have to be cut like a suit jacket. This dove-gray Hermès overcoat points to a roomier trend in men’s fashion, allowing for comfort and movement without sacrificing elegance. Patch pockets give it a casual twist, and its big collar demands to be popped against the wind. ≥ Coat ($7,050) by Hermès; hermes. com. Vintage fabric (worn as scarf, $195) from Mate

TA K E A C U E F R O M Jason Statham

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The Code

COLLECTIVE WISDOM

T E N -Y E A R

What I’ve

A N N I V E RSA RY E D I T I O N

LEARNED

A dozen of our favorite tastemakers share their greatest lessons from the past decade (okay, plus or minus a few years)

RICK OWENS

Eunice Lee De signe r, Unis

D e s i g n e r, R i c k O we n s

E V E N I F E V E RY T H I N G in my work ended tomorrow, it’d still be a triumph. Not to jinx it, but it’s like a marriage that worked. F R E N C H C H E F S C R E AT E these exquisite, perfect pastries, and Italian chefs kind of throw everything into a pot and it comes out great, too. There are different ways to get stuff done. I’m probably more in the Italian pot. I wouldn’t say the process is messy, but instinctive.

that our brand feels like a coveted secret.

W H AT YO U D O N’ T D O is as important as what

you do. Saying no is my default.

I need to retreat once a day and empty myself out. That is my interpretation of luxury—being able to take naps whenever the fuck I want to.

Mark Lee CEO, Barneys New York

The best advice I received is something [Tom Ford International chairman] Domenico De Sole told me: The most important thing was to decide things every day and keep the company moving. Act. Don’t delay.

V U L N E R A B I L I T Y in relationships is important.

Vulnerability in work is not a good idea. W H E N E V E R I R E A D interviews I’ve done, I always feel like I come off as a know-it-all, but I’m so nonopinionated. I just know exactly what I want. I’m not saying that’s what everybody else wants. Everything that I do is just a proposal.

Virgil Abloh D e s i g n e r, O f f-W h i t e

• I’m pretty much still the same as the 17-year-old version of myself. I deejay an awful lot and stay in touch with skateboarding culture. It’s important. • Mistakes? I don’t regret anything. My brain doesn’t work like that.

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BRUNELLO CUCINELLI D e s i g n e r, B r u n e l l o C u c i n e l l i

Never believe your parents when they say that when they were your age, they were better or smarter than you. Don’t believe it.

FRANK MUYTJENS He ad of m en’s d e s i g n , J. C rew

• I’m a big fan of Instagram. Right now I love the stylist Lars-Fredrik Svedberg. His posts have this patina to them. • Stay curious, ask questions, and be open to learn something new every day. That’s our job.

I L LU ST R AT I O N S BY J O E M c K E N D RY

I G O TO T H E GY M every day, have lunch, take a nap, and then start the day all over again at 4:00 P.M. My nap is an extravagance, but I’ve realized that I need it.


CALIBER RM 60-01 REGATTA


The Code

COLLECTIVE WISDOM

TODD SNYDER

Nick Wooster Style consultant

D e s i g n e r, To d d Snyder

BRUCE PASK Men’s fashion director, B e rg d o r f G oodman

I really do believe that chance does favor the prepared mind. Things will happen as they do, but it’s also within your control to work hard and anticipate situations and foresee complications. Be prepared. Things become clearer in the rearview mirror. I worked for a magazine that closed, but had that not happened, I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to work at T magazine.

Massimo Piombo

• I’ve made plenty of fashion mistakes. I always look back and think, Oh, my God, what was I thinking? But if it makes me laugh, then it’s fine. • The best piece of advice I’ve ever been given is “Take every meeting.”

D esigner, Ma ssimo Piombo

Nature means everything to me. I was born in Varazze, a small village on the sea near Genoa. I have a house there now, and the best part of my day is the one-hour drive to and back from Milan, when I get to see the water and the sun. It’s good not just for my health but for my mind.

MICHAEL BASTIAN D e s i g n e r, M i c h a e l B a s t i a n

S O M E T I M E S YO U R B I G G E ST failure on a retail level is your biggest success on a personal level. At Gant, I did a “Brady Bunch Goes to Hawaii” collection, and it bombed. Now that’s the one people will tell me they remember the most. I’ll see pieces on eBay for two times what they cost brand-new. I’m still proud of it. I T E L L YO U N G P EO P L E who want to get a new job to just go out—make friends and talk to people. We hire so many people based on recommendations. I T H I N K YO U R 2 0 S are about establishing your friend group. Your 30s are for your relationship. Your 40s should be about your career. Hopefully, by your 50s, it’s locked down. If you do it out of order, you’ll probably have missed out on something. I F YO U’R E C R E AT I V E , structure is tough. I tried to be disciplined when I first started the label (“I’m going to design from 9 to 11!”) and would get so frustrated, because you can’t force an idea. YO U G OT TA K E E P your head down and do the work. Ralph Lauren’s been in the business for ages and look at him. That’s who you aspire to.

Guy Trebay Men’s-we ar critic, The New York Times

• People really don’t read. I’m really surprised by how many people I work with and encounter who don’t read. Hardly anything is more rewarding to me than a book. Pick up The Makioka Sisters by Jun’ichirō Tanizaki if you have a chance. • I feel grateful for stuff. It’s been on my mind more in the past year than at any other time in my life. So often the people who are complaining about not having much actually have very much.

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I L LU ST R AT I O N S BY J O E M c K E N D RY

• Being nice is so important. You’d be surprised how many people fuck that up. It blows me away. Nobody wants to work with a jerk. • I always try to hire people smarter than me. Nobody can do everything. I can drive the ship, but I need people to put wind in the sails. • My biggest tip is to sleep if you can. I think what keeps me going is that I’ll get eight or nine hours every night.


CALIBER RM 055


FINISHING To u c h A WAT C H T H AT tarnishes naturally may seem nuts, but this bronze case—inspired by diving equipment and alloyed with aluminum—is crafted to take on a predetermined patina. Think of it as managed maturity. The newest edition still has the chamfered case, snowflake hands, and big winding crown that have made the Black Bay an industry favorite since Tudor’s 2012 reemergence in the U. S. market.

Black Bay Bronze watch ($3,975) by Tudor; tudorwatch.com. Masai necklace ($295) and brass necklace ($255) by Giles & Brother; gilesandbrother.com.


The Code

C O M P L I CAT I O N S

Fresh

FAC E S The jargon-filled world of watches can be tricky to navigate (Tourbillon! Escapement!), but really, your timepiece has two essential requirements: keeping precise time and looking damn good while doing it. The rest—from bling to techy features to heirloom potential—is personal preference. Here, our picks for the year’s standouts. PHOTOGRAPHS BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

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The Code

C O M P L I CAT I O N S

UNIFORM Appeal BY NOW WE ’ R E FAMILIAR

with watches reminiscent of aircraft instrument panels, but we’re less accustomed to seeing a watch that calls to mind the navy. This fall, the aviation-inspired Bell & Ross steals a tip from the flash of blue and gold on classic French navy uniforms. The result? The 43mm Aéronavale, which features a handsome blue sunray dial counterbalanced by a sporty blue anodized-aluminum bezel. Aéronavale chronograph ($4,500) by Bell & Ross; bellross.com.

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The Code

C O M P L I CAT I O N S

WORLD Class T H E GRAND MONT B LANC OR B IS T E R R ARU M

(resembling a globe you’d find in a library filled with first editions) houses a 4810 complication, which in simple terms means the watch can keep time in 24 different zones simultaneously. Adjust it via a single pusher that links the hour hand, cities, a day/night indicator, and time

No.

zones—all of which are displayed on a dial that doubles as a piece of wearable art. 4810 Orbis Terrarum watch ($5,900) and Martele fountain pen ($1,565) by Montblanc; montblanc.com. Journal ($280) by Smythson; smythson.com.

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N E W Y O R K – 6 2 5 M A D I S O N A V E N U E / B E V E R LY H I L L S – 2 5 0 N O R T H R O D E O D R I V E M I A M I – AV E N T U R A M A L L / AT L A N TA - O P E N I N G S O O N


The Code

C O M P L I CAT I O N S

I N S I D E Jo b CA RRE RA FA N S , you may be surprised by what you’re looking at. A hypermodern fusion of steel and ceramic, this is the most contemporary creation yet from the 53year-old family of timepieces. The skeletonized dial showcases TAG Heuer’s 01 movement, the brand’s expansion into in-house production. When you’ve got it, flaunt it.

Carrera Heuer-01 ($6,700) by TAG Heuer; tagheuer.com. Sunglasses ($1,100) and carbon-fiber pen ($260) by Porsche Design; porsche-design.com. Wallet ($310) by Montblanc; montblanc.com. Chest ($295) by Restoration Hardware; rh.com. Sculpture ($750) by Aerin; aerin.com. California T key (car starts at $198,973) by Ferrari; ferrari.com. McLaren P1 slot car ($66) by Scalextric; brownieshobbies.com.

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The Code

C O M P L I CAT I O N S

DA R K V i c t o r y D ES P I T E I T S RE P U TAT I O N F O R N O T messing with a good thing (the company’s been content to leave the 40mm Cosmograph Daytona untouched for the better part of 15 years, after all), Rolex doesn’t always just stick to the script. As it did with lines such as the Yacht-Master and the GMT-Master, this year Rolex gave the Daytona a black Cerachrom bezel and a dark, mirrorlike finish. It’s the classic redone with a no-rules, after-hours vibe.

Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona watch ($12,400) by Rolex; rolex.com. Bracelet ($450) by Tateossian; tateossian. com. Fragrance ($225) by Tom Ford; tomford.com. Tumbler (set of two, $460) by Luxury Living; luxurylivinggroup.com. Bernard Buffet: The Invention of the Modern Mega-Artist, by Nicholas Foulkes, from Random House.

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20 YEARS OF

CRAFTSMANSHIP

USING THE FINEST INGREDIENTS

DISCOV E R O UR CO L L E C T I O N O F DI ST I NC T I V E CO LO GNE S THEARTOFSHAVING.COM @theartofshaving


The Code

C O M P L I CAT I O N S

S U R FA C E A r e a I F YOU CA N ’ T go deep, go wide. The clean, numberless dial of this celebrated watch is an exercise in understatement— made yuge. Encasing a Caliber 4400 manual-wind movement, the Patrimony measures 42mm across (just a hair shy of two nickels side by side) yet is only 2.8 mm thick. Vacheron knows that exaggerating one feature means you—ahem— dial the others back. ≥

Patrimony watch ($20,000) by Vacheron Constantin; vacheronconstantin.com. Sunglasses ($405) by Oliver Peoples; 212-585-3433. Cuff links ($2,650) by Bulgari; bulgari.com. Wallet ($340) by Salvatore Ferragamo; 866-337-7242.

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Portfolio 1 Great style isn’t always about buying into the newest trends. Sometimes what looks best is what you’ve lived with—and in—the longest. Here, eight well-dressed men share their favorite heirloom items and the stories behind them.

What,

This Old Thing? O U I G I T H EO D O R E , 4 0, f o u n d e r, t h e B r o o k l y n C i r c u s “I bought this varsity shawl-collar sweater from Bobby Garnett at Bobby from Boston. He unfortunately passed away earlier this year. This is a rare sweater: from the 1950s, 100 percent wool, made in the U. S. A. These sweaters might last 100 years if you take care of them.”

Vintage sweater and ring, Theodore’s own. Shirt ($125) by Polo Ralph Lauren; ralphlauren. com. Trousers ($148) by Nautica; nautica.com. Shoes ($500) by Feit; feitdirect.com. Watch ($7,600) by IWC; iwc.com. Necklace (worn as bracelet, $7,100) by Cartier; cartier.us.

Pho to gra ph s by A L E X E I H AY Inter views by S E A N H OTC H K I S S


MAX POGLIA, 3 5, f o u n d e r, Poglia “I got this U. S. Navy deck jacket at the Front General Store in Dumbo, Brooklyn. They’re Japanese guys, great collectors. I always stop by to check if they have anything I haven’t seen before. I wear this one a lot. It’s tough to find these in good condition.” Vintage jacket and necklace, Poglia’s own. Shirt ($98) by Timberland; timberland.com. T-shirt ($30) by Perry Ellis; perryellis.com. Chinos ($185) by Frame; tntfashion.ca. Bracelet ($295) by John Hardy; johnhardy.com.

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Portfolio 1 MORGAN C O L L E T T, 3 2 , c o f o u n d e r, Saturdays N e w Yo r k C i t y “When my grandfather died in 2013, my grandmother took us into his closet and let us each choose one of his timepieces. I chose this Baume & Mercier for Tiffany quartz watch. It has a brown crocodile-leather strap, which makes it kind of elegant. As I get older, I’m getting more comfortable with formality. We just did a few linen suit separates for Saturdays, and I’m excited about wearing those on a casual day in the office.” Vintage Baume & Mercier for Tiffany & Co. watch, Collett’s own. Sweater ($165) by Saturdays NYC; saturdaysnyc. com. Gold bracelet ($2,900) by David Yurman; davidyurman.com. Beaded bracelet ($125) by Giles & Brother; gilesandbrother.com.

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“When I was born, my grandfather held me in his arms, pointed to his flat-cut ruby ring, and said to my mom, ‘This is his.’ ” —David Seth Moltz

D AV I D S E T H M O LT Z , 3 6 , p e r f u m e r, D.S. & Durga “I found this duffel coat in the attic of my mother’s house in Massachusetts. It was her father’s. We have the same body type, my grandfather and I, so I’ve been reupping these great pieces every time I go back home. It’s slim-fitting and makes you look put together in three seconds, which is hard to do sometimes when it’s freezing outside and you’re wearing a big puffy jacket.” Vintage duffel coat, Moltz’s own. Jacket ($350) by Tommy Hilfiger; tommy.com. Sweatshirt ($275) and jeans ($220) by Rag & Bone; rag-bone.com. Boots ($495) by Timberland Boot Company; timberland.com. Necklace ($255) by Giles & Brother; gilesandbrother.com.


SIMON G O L B Y, 3 6 , c o f o u n d e r, Magasin “I started working for Brunello Cucinelli in 2002. This coat—knit cashmere herringbone lined in silk—was one of his first pieces of outerwear. It’s actually a sample; I don’t believe it ever went into production. I have three coats from back in those days, but this is the one. My friends call it the dragon skin because the inside is so silky and the outside is like a sweater. It’s fucking rad.” Vintage Brunello Cucinelli coat, Golby’s own. Sweater ($165) by Southern Tide; southerntide. com. Trousers ($395) by PTO1; magasinthestore.com.

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Portfolio 1

“This Fieldmaster leather biker jacket is my everyday jacket. It’s unique, with the D pockets, and someone actually personalized it by adding the studs. ” —Max Poglia Vintage leather jacket, Poglia’s own. T-shirt ($28) by Levi’s; levi.com. Trousers (price upon request) by Perry Ellis; perryellis.com. Nautilus watch ($24,830) by Patek Philippe; 212-218-1240.


“ This 1940s Rolex bubbleback watch was my dad’s. His wife bought it for him for his 60th birthday at a flea market outside Florence. He spent a year and a half sourcing the original guts from all over the world. He tried to give it to me when he retired, but I said, ‘No, I’m not ready for it yet.’ When he died, I found it in his closet and haven’t taken it off since.” —Simon Golby Vintage Rolex watch, vintage Ghurka bag, and bracelets, Golby’s own. Sweater ($165) by Southern Tide; southerntide.com. Trousers ($395) by PTO1; magasinthestore.com.


Portfolio 1

HOOMAN MAJD, 59, a u t h o r “I bought this Hermès jacket on Madison Avenue in 1993. It was a little over $1,000. It seemed expensive, but it wasn’t particularly fashionable at the time: English, country gentleman’s cut, kind of Savile Row, threebutton roll. I wear it so much, the edges are starting to go. The elbows wore out— I had to put suede patches on about seven or eight years ago. I don’t want to give it up. Sometimes clothes just make you feel right—like someone cut it for me.” Vintage Hermès jacket and vintage Omega watch, Majd’s own. Shirt ($495), trousers ($895), and pocket square ($175) by Brunello Cucinelli; brunellocucinelli. com. Scarf ($275) by Ermenegildo Zegna Couture; zegna.com.

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“ These John Lobb oxford shoes are 20 years old. I don’t wear black very often, maybe 10 to 20 times a year, so they’ve held up—just a little polish and some shoe trees and they’re good. I buy shoes from shoemakers instead of designers. If you take care of a good pair of shoes, they should last a lifetime, or close to it.” —Hooman Majd Vintage Levi’s jeans and vintage John Lobb shoes, Majd’s own.


Portfolio 1 JOSH P E S KOW I T Z , 3 7, c o f o u n d e r , Magasin “I bought this Stüssy plaid shirt in 1998, my freshman year of college. It was a risk to buy something this size, because everyone was wearing their clothes oversized. But that’s the reason it’s stayed with me for almost 20 years. Well, that and the colors. It still feels modern. It’s the shirt that just hangs around.” Vintage Stüssy shirt, Peskowitz’s own. Double-breasted jacket ($1,750) by Caruso; carusomenswear. com. Jeans ($295) by Levi’s Vintage Clothing; magasinthestore.com.

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“I got this jacket when I was eight

years old. It was huge then. Now it’s too small. My mom was a huge Celtics fan, but my dad is from Chicago, so I got the best of both worlds during the Jordan-versus-Bird era.” —David Seth Moltz

GROOMING BY COLLEEN CREIGHTON FOR KRAMER + KRAMER.

Vintage jacket, watch, sunglasses, and necklaces, Moltz’s own. Navy T-shirt ($64) and white T-shirt ($98) by AG; agjeans.com. Leather bracelet ($125) by Scarpe di Bianco; scarpedibianco. com. Braided bracelet ($125) by George Frost; georgefrost.com.


Portfolio 1 DUNCAN HANNAH, 63, artist “I was on Portobello Road with Anna Sui. They have a great array of tweed jackets there. I picked out the perfect one and styled it for her, and she said, ‘It’s you. Don’t even think about it. Get it.’ So I did. That was about five years ago. You’d be hard-pressed to find such a good tweed jacket today, and if you did, you’d pay a lot for it.” Vintage jacket, Hannah’s own. Shirt ($99), trousers ($350), and tie ($125) by Polo Ralph Lauren; ralphlauren.com.

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T H E I N FO R M AT I O N

Vintage Style

Sure, it would be nice if clothes matured like cheese or wine—in a cool, dark place left to age to perfection. But upping your game requires a more proactive approach: a keen eye, dogged pursuit, and a little bit of luck. Here’s how to give yourself a vintage advantage.

The Six Best Secondhand Stores in the World The Vintage Showroom London Part shop, part resource center for fashion designers, the Vintage Showroom is London’s most painstakingly curated boutique for vintage nuts. Encompassing tailoring and sportswear, military and work wear, it’s where you’ll find the most provenanced garments available to man— some more than half a century old. They’re not all for sale, however; the company’s archive functions as a by-appointment resource for designers researching long-vanished pieces. 14 Earlham Street; 011-44207-836-3964; thevintageshowroom.com

Front General Store Brooklyn Hideya Sagawa (formerly of What Goes Around Comes Around) and partners Hiro Yonekawa and Nishiyama Ikutaka preside over this tucked-away gem in Dumbo, a favorite of the men’s-wear-trade set for its rich mix of famous and unknown, mostly American, work-wear brands. 143 Front Street; 646-573-0123; frontgeneralstore.com

Bobby from Boston Boston Bobby Garnett’s cultish shop suffered a big loss when Garnett died earli-

E N D O R S E M E N T:

T H E V I N TA G E SHOWROOM London’s coolest secondhand store, now in book form er this year, but his daughter Jessica carries on his legacy. Bobby was famous in the fashion industry among style hounds who admired his emphasis on street-inflected preppy runs, from casual collegiate to high-end tailored pieces. 19 Thayer Street; 617423-9299; bobby-fromboston.com

Ceri Vintage Florence If you’re looking to avoid the usual tourist shopping streets, Danilo Ceri is Florence’s go-to guy— the one who has things you can’t find anywhere else. In addition to military and vintage fashion from around the world, Ceri has an interesting

sideline in making oneoff pieces with ancient dead-stock cloth, which he hand-signs on the inside. 26/R Via dei Serragli; 011-39-335-839-0356

ants quietly rummaging through the racks. 2-25-13 Kamimeguro, Meguro-ku; 011-81-3- 5704-8188

J’Antiques Tokyo

Milan’s posh Corso Como shopping district is an unlikely spot for a perfect storm of vintage sensibilities like Eral 55’s. The shop blends preowned clothing with short runs of new dead-stock wool pieces by owner Ermanno Lazzarin’s own tailors. Reworked Levi’s denim mingles with soft sport coats and vintage footwear from storied British shoemakers like Edward Green and Trickers. 14 Piazza XXV Aprile; 011-39-02-659-8829; eral55.com

It’s best not to shop while jet-lagged at J’Antiques in the Nakameguro district of Tokyo; you might come home with an extra suitcase full of authentic Americana. The unassuming store in a quietly chic neighborhood is a treasure trove of far-fromhome clothing from the ’50s onward, from ancient Levi’s to ’80s and ’90s Polo Ralph Lauren. Don’t be surprised if you run into a few men’s-wear gi-

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If you can’t make it to London to scour the goods at the Vintage Showroom, this book is the next best thing. Written by TVS founders Douglas Gunn and Roy Luckett, it contains profiles and photographs of 102 pieces from the store, painting a rough-andtumble portrait of men’s wear, from militaria to motorsports. See the close-ups of grease stains on a jungle tank suit, the anchor buttons on a U. S. Navy peacoat from World War I, even the Velcro fastenings of a pullover parka designed for the British Antarctic Survey. You might not be able to get your hands on the surprisingly modern-feeling pieces (some of them look like they just came down the runway), but they could just inspire your next style swerve— or eBay purchase. $45; thevintageshowroom.com


WISH LIST:

W H AT A

The Cardinal Rules of

EDITOR WA N T S Know your S h* t

N I C K S U L L I VA N EDITOR

What he wants: 1980s Turnbull & Asser dress shirts. Why he wants them: “In the ’80s, Turnbull & Asser had a reputation for insane stripes— sometimes even horizontal— in a combination of colors that other shirtmakers wouldn’t dare.”

The tempting “other items” tag can lead you happily astray. Let it. What you were looking at may steer you to something much more interesting.

JOHN KENNEY

1940s cigarette cases from India.

Whatever you’re into—work boots, militaria, vintage birdcages—amass as much knowledge as you can. Remember: It’s better to know a lot about a little than a little about a lot. (Exceptions: gameshow contestants, short-order cooks.)

G e t Lo s t

Lightweight late’60s Barbour International jacket.

MANAGING EDITOR

What he wants: A Schott NYC Navy peacoat. Why he wants it: “I don’t go in much for ‘technical’ wear. The peacoat has kept generations of midshipmen warm through midnight watch— it can handle my winter.”

Dumb It Down The best sellers—or the ones you’ll benefit from the most—are those who don’t know a thing about what they’re putting up for auction. Misspelled designers and misidentified or misdated items often filter out a huge portion of searchers. Which is why your favorite new brand is “Hemrés.”

M AT T H E W M A R D E N FAS H I O N D I R E C TO R

What he wants: A first-edition hardcover copy of The Stand, by Stephen King. Why he wants it: “I started collecting first editions in high school because of my King obsession. Only used copies. They have more character.”

M I C H A E L ST E FA N OV MARKET EDITOR

What he wants: A vintage mid-’80s Smiths Hatful of Hollow T-shirt. Why he wants it: “You can buy a reprint online, but there’s nothing like the original to retain the essence of the time period and the authenticity of the music.”

“Watch” What You Spend When it comes to watches, unless it’s a crazy bargain, just don’t. A good limit is $250. There are too many shunted-together pieces purporting to be Rolex or IWC, only with a crappy new movement inserted or a brand name painted into a previously blank dial. François Borgel silver trench watch, c. 1918. DiBianco strap.

ALFONSO FERNÁNDEZ N AVA S FA S H I O N A S S I S TA N T

What he wants: An archival piece from Maison Martin Margiela circa 1998. Why he wants it: “This was one of Margiela’s first men’s-wear collections. It’s very simple, hinting at ’90s minimalism, and also very masculine.”

out a one-up bid three seconds before time expires. You won’t win any popularity contests, but there are better places to make friends on the Internet, anyway. ’80s L. L. Bean Maine hunting shoes.

Size Matters For the best gauge of fit, take the laid-flat measurements and compare them with something that you’re sure fits well. Keep in mind that items may have been altered by a previous owner. ’60s bleu de travail French mechanic’s jacket.

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Jacket ($6,635), shirt (price upon request), and trousers ($1,705), Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci; givenchy.com.

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PORTFOLIO 2

STREET FIGHTING MAN

When it comes to fashion, the right answer often is a simple what the hell. After all, developing a strong personal style requires breaking ranks with the uniformed masses. As any good renegade or rock star will tell you—including electro-pop sensation BØRNS, seen here—a step out of your comfort zone is a step in the right direction. Photographs by MAX VADUKUL


PORTFOLIO 2

Suit (price upon request) and shirt ($895) by Versace; us.versace.com. Shoes ($1,215) by Haider Ackermann; haiderackermann.com.


Jacket ($6,680), shirt ($350), trousers ($750), loafers (price upon request), and necklaces (prices upon request) by Gucci; gucci.com. Sunglasses ($400) by Saint Laurent; ysl.com.

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X Vest and trousers (part of suit, $3,995) by Dolce & Gabbana; dolcegabbana.it. Sunglasses ($240) by Dolce & Gabbana; sunglasshut.com.


PORTFOLIO 2

A STAR IS BØRNS AS A TEN-YEAR-OLD working magician in the lakeside resort town of Grand Haven, Michigan, Garrett Borns went by the name of Garrett the Great. He performed at countless birthday parties, staged a weekly show at a local red-sauce joint, and even starred in his own instructional magic video, for which he also built the sets and composed the music. Now, at 24, as he powers through an ever-expanding world tour in support of his retrofuturistic debut album, Dopamine, the glam-pop prince known professionally as BØRNS is drawing on lessons that he learned from his sleight-of-hand days. “How to improvise when you fuck up,” he explains. “Pretending like you still know what’s going on and then trying to recover from it. It kind of thickens your skin. That’s pretty much been the past year and a half of my life.” Ever since Taylor Swift endorsed his first single, “Electric Love,” calling it an “instant classic” on Instagram, Borns has often had the out-of-body experience of hearing his own falsetto wherever he goes. “Even if you can’t hear the lyrics,” he says over lunch in Los Angeles, his adopted hometown, “you’re hearing its melody under an ad for Hulu or Southwest Airlines. It’s, like, subliminally happening around you.” It’s the one that kicks into gear Marc Bolan–style, with a chunka chunka drumbeat and skuzzy guitar licks, and then segues into an a cappella finger-snapping bridge by way of Haim before revving back up into its soaring chorus (“And all I need is to be struck by your Eee-lec-tric LUH-OOO-UH-OOO-UHVE”). But like Borns himself—who’s looking very Hunky Dory–era David Bowie in a green crop top and high-waisted blue jeans that accentuate his rail-thin frame, his long and wavy locks glinting in the sun—there is just something undeniable about “Electric Love” that transcends pastiche. “The structures are a lot more simplified now, especially in pop music,” he says. “The Bee Gees, for example, wrote songs

that sound so simple and palatable to your ear, but when you actually break them down, they’re so heady and complex. I’m trying to write songs with vivid colors and techniques that trick your mind. It’s more fun that way.” Borns may have an old soul, but he often comes across as a mischievous innocent. At one point, he interrupts himself midsentence—“God, the amount of butt cheeks hanging out in Santa Monica is just . . .”—and then strikes up an imaginary conversation with our waitress. “I’ll have the side of butt cheeks, please. Yes, with the coconut oil. I can do the lathering.” Borns arrived in L. A. at 21 and lived in an actual tree house, which was surrounded by fruit trees and nestled in a remote canyon, while tooling around town in a ’78 Mercedes 300D and indulging in 20-something pleasures such as “picking up produce at the farmers’ market, cooking for myself, going to yoga, exercising a lot, and just clearing my mind.” Now he embodies what the fashion rags are calling “the new Gucci man,” as conceived by creative director Alessandro Michele. Borns was invited to Gucci’s January runway show in Milan, where he sat in the front row, and at Coachella in April, he rocked a louche-and-lacy ensemble. “I’m living the dream, man,” he says—but there’s a twinkle in his eye that makes you question what he really means by that. The dream, Borns clarifies, “is pushing yourself further than you think you can go. It’s feeling like the payoff is equal to the amount of work that you’re putting in.” Though he just got back to L. A., Borns has no time to chill. He’s off to Chicago tomorrow, followed by Europe for more festivals, and then he heads back to the States for a tour with the Lumineers. After which, he says, “it’s back to the drawing board.” Temperamentally driven to take his audience by surprise, Borns—like Bowie—is destined to metamorphose. Indeed, it’s happening before my very eyes. Flashing fingernails dotted with last night’s polish, he lifts a glass to his lips and sips a bright red elixir. “It’s the Roots and Remedy,” he says. “Anything with beets. I’m a beet aficionado. Ever read Jitterbug Perfume? The Tom Robbins novel? The whole book is about finding immortality. They’re searching for the secret ingredient. They worship the beet.” Near the end of our lunch, I ask Borns if it bothers him that his name is always mentioned in the same breath as Taylor Swift’s. His eyes narrow. “She’s the biggest pop star in the world,” he says. “Why wouldn’t you want to be associated with that? It’s like saying, ‘You gotta try this juice, man. It’s the best juice ever!’ Doesn’t make the juice taste any different, you know?” —L A U R E N C E L O W E No.

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Polo shirt ($395) by Orley; orley. com. Shirt ($600) by Jeffrey Rüdes; jeffreyrudes.com. Trousers ($229) by Tommy Hilfiger; tommy.com. Sunglasses ($160) by Ray-Ban; ray-ban.com.

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PORTFOLIO 2

Cardigan ($1,595), jacket ($1,719), and trousers ($1,085) by J. W. Anderson; j-w-anderson.com. Sneakers ($1,570) by Roberto Cavalli; robertocavalli.com.


PORTFOLIO 2

Shirt ($875) by Lanvin; lanvin.com.


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PORTFOLIO 2

Jacket ($1,185) by DSquared2; dsquared2.com. Shirt ($810) and jeans ($850) by Dior Homme; diorhomme.com.


PORTFOLIO 2

Shirt ($1,020), trousers ($1,400), and shoes (price upon request) by Prada; prada.com. Socks by Haider Ackermann; haiderackermann.com.


P R O D U C E D B Y J O Y A S B U R Y P R O D U C T I O N S . S T Y L I N G ( B O R N S ) B Y M AT T H E W M A R D E N . G R O O M I N G B Y L A U R Y N T U L I O . H A I R ( E X T R A S ) B Y VA N E S S A P R I C E F O R T H E R E X A G E N C Y. S E T D E S I G N B Y B R YA N P O R T E R F O R O W L A N D T H E E L E P H A N T. C O S T U M E D E S I G N ( E X T R A S ) B Y C A L L A N S T O K E S F O R G E R S H . F O R A D D I T I O N A L C L O T H I N G I N F O R M AT I O N S E E PA G E 1 6 0 .

X

Jacket ($1,895), shirt ($595), trousers ($595), and boots ($750) by Burberry; burberry.com.

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Sacred An intimate look inside the creative sanctuaries of four influential men BY WHITNEY ROBINSON

The Haas Brothers 32, artists and designers

Over the past six years, twin brothers Simon (left) and Nikolai Haas have come to define Los Angeles’s contemporary-art scene with their psychedelic, humorous, and often adolescent-tinged work, which plays on themes relating to nature, sci-fi, color theory—and anatomy. Their two-year-old industrial space in West Adams is just as unorthodox, functioning as a workshop for constructing their large-scale pieces, a hall for throwing parties, and (naturally) a recording studio. “Sometimes it’s full of furry beasts and other times it’s full of sculptural trees,” Nikolai says. “L. A. doesn’t impose. It’s there for you to build whatever you want out of it.” P H OTO G R A P H BY D O U G L AS F R I E D M A N

Spaces


Olivier Zahm 5 3, e d i t o r, P u r p l e Fa s h i o n m a g a z i n e

“Fashion is social; interiors are intimate,” says cofounder of the avant-garde Parisbased fashion zine Purple, Olivier Zahm, whose personal style gravitates toward Cuban heels, aviators, and tight bombers— Midnight Cowboy by way of the Left Bank. His former apartment, a penthouse in an industrial building on the Canal St.-Martin, is filled with pieces amassed from more than 20 years in the business: black-and-white Terry Richardson portraits of Chloë Sevigny; a vintage McIntosh sound system (he listens to a record every night before going to bed); casually tossed Moroccan rugs. “This is the place I go to escape my creative life,” he says. “A secret place for resting, reading, having sex, and long conversations.” P H OTO G R A P H S BY T H E S E L BY

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Frédéric Malle 5 4 , fo u n d e r, E d i t i o n s d e P a r f u m s

Frédéric Malle built a mini fragrance empire on his ability to sniff out the world’s greatest perfumers. The rooms of the 15th-floor apartment he shares with his wife and children on Manhattan’s Upper East Side evidence a similar skill for unearthing creative genius. “The origin of each object is irrelevant,” he says of his collection. “Quality is the important thing.” Malle, who has been buying pieces since childhood, frequently rearranges to make room for new acquisitions. “The art on my walls has always been a source of energy for me. It sets the bar at a level that pushes me to be better in my own work.” P H OTO G R A P H S BY T H O M AS LO O F

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The Best of The Information

T E N -Y E A R

A N N I V E RSA RY E D I T I O N

At the risk of self-congratulation, we’ve dropped quite a bit of useful knowledge in the past decade. Consider these our greatest hits of timeless* wisdom.

HOW TO

The AllPurpose Suit

But where’s the fun in that? STEP 1 Make a single stitch in the shirt, about an eighth of an inch long. Leave a three-inch end of loose thread.

T H E S E D AY S , W H E N A L M O S T N O O N E ’ S D O I N G I T, S U I T I N G U P I S T H E P E R F E C T WAY T O S E T YO U R S E L F A PA R T

STEP 2 A . Up a Notch

Repeat above, but perpendicular to the last stitch to make a cross.

A small, high notch right on the collarbone flatters anything you wear underneath your jacket— even a turtleneck.

B . Go Brown

STEP 3

We used to say navy was the standard, but in these ever more casual times, brown suits almost every occasion.

Thread the needle up through one hole in the button and down through the diagonally opposite hole. Hold the button about an eighth of an inch away from the shirt throughout. Next time, use the other holes. Repeat four times.

C . T h a t Fu z z y Fe e l i n g Texture is fashion’s way of displaying character. To show you have some, look for fabrics with visual interest and depth.

D . Make Some Ro o m The jacket should have some fit, but a suit that’s so tight it looks painted on identifies you as the man . . . of 2009.

Wrap the thread tightly around the shank created between the button and the cloth to create a tight pillar.

E . S n e a k At t a c k Wearing sneakers with a suit is practically conservative these days, but keep it sophisticated by choosing leather (not canvas).

F. Think Big

STEP 5

Flat-front trousers are still perfectly great, but minimal pleats and more volume in the leg are the latest trend.

Push the needle through this pillar a couple times. Cut the thread close to the pillar.

Jacket ($2,995), sweater ($1,095), and trousers ($895) by Ralph Lauren; ralphlauren.com. Sneakers ($800) by Santoni; santonishoes.com.

*Slightly updated. Time makes fools of us all.

(With thanks to Alexander S. Kabbaz.)

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I L LU ST R AT I O N S BY J O E M c K E N D RY

STEP 4


You don’t work in accounting (or even if you do, you don’t have to look like you do), so ditch the briefcase for an upgraded tote. Unlike the soft-bodied bag you’re slinging to the beach, find one made of a tougher material like leather, with a closable strap to keep your most personal items, well, personal.

A

A . Grey New York Grey New England bag Handmade in Milan of pebbled leather, this discreet tote has a flat bottom that allows it to stand without toppling over. $950; gnygne.com

B . B o s e Q u i e t C o m fo r t 35 headphones The cushions envelop your ears to enrich sound and cancel noise—now wireless, too. $350; bose.com

C . Dunhill Sentryman pen Because a man should always be ready to take a note (or a number), make sure your pen is a good one. Price upon request; dunhill.com

D . Tu m i 4,0 0 0 m Ah power ban k This textured charger juices up all your devices in a body that’s the size of an iPhone. $85; tumi.com

E . Appl e iPad Pro This lightweight tablet’s ideal for dashing off an email, reading a book, or killing some zombies. From $799; apple.com

F. Montblanc sketchbooks # 147, # 14 9 Take a sketch or write a reminder in a notebook (both large and small) bound in Italian Saffiano leather. $40, $105; montblanc.com B

C E D

F


Shoes

The Best of The Information

THE OTHER

WINDSOR KNOT A quick-release, nonslip knot for your shoelaces Counter

As a young woman, Olga Berluti, the guru behind the luxury brand, would sometimes fit custom-made Berluti shoes on the Duke of Windsor, aka the former Edward VIII. She noticed he tied his shoes in a particular way, and he explained that he’d been taught the knot by his grandmother Queen Alexandra to ensure he was never embarrassed by trailing laces. This is it.

A half-moon-shaped piece of leather that reinforces the heel.

Q u ar t er The shoe’s rear, from the laces to the heel on both sides.

We l t The strip of leather running all around the shoe to which both the sole and upper are attached, creating a watertight seal.

Throat The opening of the shoe, into which the foot is inserted.

STEP 1

STEP 2

Instead of the usual over-and-under start, wrap one lace under a second time.

Make a loop with the righthand lace and bring the left lace behind as in a usual knot.

STEP 3

STEP 4

Wrap the left lace around the loop you made in the right end.

Make a loop in the left lace in the usual way and begin to tighten.

STEP 5

STEP 6

Before fully closing the knot, take the lefthand loop and loop it through once more.

Tighten the knot by pulling as usual on the two bows. Ta-da!

Fac i ng s The parts of the quarter through which the shoelaces pass.

A glet s The sealed ends of the laces that make threading through eyelets easy and prevent laces from fraying and unraveling.

Laces Cylindrical (or rattail) laces are always more sophisticated than flat ones. Choose laces in waxed cotton, which helps them last longer by reducing water damage and the friction caused by drawing them through the eyelets.

G ra in The texture of the leather, which can range from smooth to pebbled (as here).

Vam p The front part of the shoe reaching all the way back to the quarter.

Toe The very tip of the vamp, right above where your actual toes hit.

Shoe ($795) by Scarpe Di Bianco; scarpedibianco.com.

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The Best of The Information

CASE

M AT E R I A L S

The Anatomy of the Watch A T H R E E - M I N U T E G U I D E T O WAT C H M A K I N G J A R G O N

S TA I N L E S S S T E E L The good: Lightweight and highly corrosion-resistant. The bad: Prone to scratches.

YELLOW GOLD The good: Holds a shine and, if you’re so inclined, screams luxury. The bad: The purer the gold (i.e., the higher the karat), the softer the metal and the more prone it is to dents.

ROSE GOLD The good: A rich, distinctive color. The bad: The red color tarnishes with time.

You’ve never seen anything quite like the Richard Mille Regatta Flyback chronograph, but it still bears the hallmarks of regular watchmaking—and a price tag usually reserved for a BMW i8. $150,000; richardmille.com

The case:

T h e push er s:

and protects the watch from one piece of metal

and includes the lugs. zero. T h e d ia l:

The crown:

Also known as the face, it displays the time with markings and subdials.

Also known as the stem, it’s often found at the 3:00 position and used to adjust the settings. In manual watches, the crown is used to wind the mainspring.

The cr ystal: The covering that protects the dial. It’s typically made of glass, plastic, or synthetic sapphire (i.e., crystallized aluminum oxide).

The batons: The rectangular bars affixed to a watch

T I TA N I U M The good: Lightweight and tough— about half the weight of steel but almost twice as strong. The bad: Difficult to work with, so it’s expensive to repair.

Watches

to mark the hours.

The bezel: T h e subd ial s: of chronographs, these small circles are used to mark elapsed time.

Watch roll: it keeps your automatic watch accurately ticking while you’re not wearing it, it’s useful. To avoid wear on the winding mechanism, most winders should run only 30 minutes a day. By Wolf ($215); wolf1834.com. Watch ($1,195) by Zodiac; watchstation.com.

will keep your watch safe in transit. Then again, so will a tube sock. By Hodinkee ($55 each); hodinkee.com. Watch ($850) by Filson; filson.com.

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If you are lucky enough to have a watch collection, congratulations. You might also want a place to house them all for storage and travel. By Smythson ($550); smythson.com. Watches by, from left, Bulova, Seiko, IWC.


How to Compliment a Woman Guide

Never harp— it seems d isin gen uous. Try: “Love your hair.

When’s dinner?”

You ca n say t hat h er ha ir is a n improvement, but not so much of an improvement as to imply that you d id n’t like it before. Try: “I like what you’re doing with your hair.”

Yo u r n i e c e l o o ks cute or pretty. Your wife l ooks gorgeous, stunning, beautiful, or am az in g. Try: “You look [any of the

adjectives above].”

As basic as it s o u n d s , wo m e n l ove t o h e a r that a color looks g r e at o n t h e m . Try: “That color looks

really nice on you.”

Nothing says sincerity more t h an t h e l ook on your face. Either that or a wel l -pl ac ed expletive. Try: “You look fucking

amazing.”

When complimen t in g her chest or ass, t r y t o avo i d s o u n d i n g lascivious. Try: “That color looks really nice on you.”

W h en in d oubt , go simple. Try: “Wow.”


The Best of The Information

Notes on Worry-Free Ogling N O S U N G L A S S E S ? H E R E ’ S H O W T O A P P R E C I AT E A B E A U T I F U L W O M A N A N D G E T A WAY W I T H I T.

Women

A N I L LU ST R AT E D GUIDE TO

KISSING WOMEN

H OW TO AVO I D G E T T I N G CAU G H T:

Position yourself so that the person you wish to ogle is between you and something you’re actually allowed to look at (e.g., the ocean at the beach or the television at a bar). Do it alone. By yourself, it’s a discreet act of appreciation, like watching a sunset. When done with a couple other guys, however, you draw attention to yourselves, and what was harmless can seem predatory and disrespectful.

The Air-Kiss R e m e m b e r : No lips to skin, and no cheek to cheek, either. Good for: A casual acquaintance.

YOU’V E B E E N CAUG H T: W H AT N OW?

Shift your attention immediately to the object in the background and hope she thinks that you weren’t actually looking at her. Or . . . if she doesn’t buy that, approach her and say, “Excuse me, but is your name [insert name here] and did you go to [insert name of your alma mater here]?” When she says no, apologize and say she reminds you of an old friend from college. Walk away and don’t so much as breathe in her direction again. Or . . . be bold. Maintain eye contact and smile, because if you act like what you did was wrong, then she’s more inclined to think it was wrong. If you have any interest beyond ogling, go say hello. And, if applicable, remove your wedding band. —BEN CAKE

The Quick Peck R e m e m b e r : Go for her right cheek. G o o d f o r : Your mom.

The European Kiss

Get Out of the Doghouse: Liar’s Edition O C C A S I O N A L LY, Y O U H AV E T O L I E T O Y O U R W I F E — F O R H E R S A K E . ( AT L E A S T T H AT ’ S W H AT Y O U C A N T E L L Y O U R S E L F. ) B U T W H E N Y O U G E T C A U G H T, S O M E T I M E S A S I M P L E A P O LO GY I S N ’ T E N O U G H .

I L LU ST R AT I O N S BY J O E M c K E N D RY

Flowers By Marífleur ($150); marifleurdesign.com.

He r n ew haircut Azure Crystal Woman perfume By M. Micallef ($265); osswaldnyc.com.

Th at woman who wa lke d by Aviator sunglasses By Fendi ($450); fendi.com.

On the Mouth R e m e m b e r : No tongue in public. G o o d f o r : Your wife or significant other. Or both.

Y O U L I E D A B O U T. . .

He r d r e s s

R e m e m b e r : Let her initiate the second peck. G o o d f o r : Your wife’s Italian cousin.

He r fr i e nds

He r m o the r

Suede pumps By Casadei ($775); casadei. com.

Python-skin bag By Gucci ($4,700); gucci.com.

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On the Hand By Van Cleef & Arpels ($56,500); vancleefarpels.com.

R e m e m b e r : The mouth lightly touches the hand. Never lick between the fingers. G o o d f o r : The pope’s ring.


The Best of The Information

F

E

G D

Safety pin

C

J A

B

doesn’t show. I

You never know when, M

H

enjoying a flaming hotel’s minibar. L

Zyrtec K

The Perfect Dopp Kit… This is the perfect Dopp kit. To the untrained eye, it may look like other, nonperfect Dopp kits, but here’s why it’s perfect. For one thing, it’s made of nylon, so it’s suited to the messy rough-and-tumble of travel (just wipe it clean). For another, it’s a shallow rectangle that you can stack in your bag. Finally, it’s roomy enough to hold all of this, which is more or less what every man should carry. Dopp kit ($120) by Reiss; reiss.com. A. Kiehl’s Facial Fuel UV Guard sunscreen ($38) B. V76 by Vaughn hair wax ($21) C. Kiehl’s Age Defender Eye Repair cream ($30) D. Le Labo Santal 33 cologne travel tube ($150) E. ClarinsMen Active face wash ($23)

F. Baxter of California citrus and herbal-musk deodorant ($19)

J. The Art of Shaving Morris Park Collection razor ($60)

G. Nivea Men moisturizing cream ($2)

K. Marvis cinnamon mint toothpaste ($6)

H. Molton Brown hydrating cream

L. Quip electric toothbrush (from $40)

I. The Art of Shaving lemon shaving cream ($30)

M. Radius dental floss ($4)

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When your allergies start acting up (or that shrimp ceviche turns into an itchy throat), you’ll be glad to have a nondrowsy antihistamine on hand.

Berocca This trendy effervescent vitamin supplement claims to aid mental sharpness and physical energy. Remember: No one’s ever died of a hangover, but why take the chance?

Disinfecting wipes Because that tray table—in its upright and locked position or otherwise—is potentially the filthiest thing on the entire airplane.


The Best of The Information

Create Your Own Business Card

Work

A N I L LU ST R AT E D GUIDE TO

SHAKING HANDS

A

E

B The Basic

F

C

Good for: The first meeting.

D The Hand Grab Font : Adobe Garamond. Paper color: O ff-w h it e . Fo r the r e s t: Se e be l ow. A . Direct

B . Paper:

phone number and email address in sevenpoint type.

100-pound or higher card stock. Matte finish.

C. Type color: black.

D. Full

E . Optional:

address in seven-point type, with caps and small caps.

brief description of service provided in seven-point type.

F. Name in 11-point type, with caps and small caps; title goes directly beneath in seven-point type, with initial caps.

Good for: A warm introduction.

A note on social media:

Websites and Twitter handles are fine. Instagram is dicey. Never list your Tinder profile.

The Summit

The BusinessCard Guide

Good for: An international détente.

A M E R I C A N P SYC H O E D I T I O N

• Off-white backgrounds are a sign of good taste. Bone is good. Eggshell is better. Pale nimbus* is best.

I L LU ST R AT I O N S BY J O E M c K E N D RY

T h e S h o u l d e r To u c h • Serifs are a classic sign of good taste; sans serif is more modern and therefore suspicious. Preferred fonts include Romalian and Silian Rail.

Good for: A heart-to-heart.

• Opt for a tasteful thickness in paper stock; if your card is flimsy, people will think you’re flimsy. • Raised lettering: tasteful. • Watermarks: whenever possible.

The Neck Grab * This color doesn’t really exist, but it’s a slightly lighter white than eggshell.

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Good for: A menacing send-off.


Food & Drink

The Best of The Information

The Well-Stocked Wet Bar YO U ’ R E N O T A B A R T E N D E R A N D YO U D O N ’ T L I V E I N A B A R . B U T YO U D O, O N O C C A S I O N , L I K E T O E N T E R TA I N , A N D Y O U WA N T T O K N O W T H E E S S E N T I A L I N G R E D I E N T S A N D T O O L S R E Q U I R E D T O M A K E M O S T O F T H E C O C K TA I L S Y O U ’ D E V E R WA N T T O M A K E . Y O U , S I R , A R E I N L U C K .

By David Wondrich Dry vermouth

The Bottles

OUR PICK: Noilly Prat

Rye whiskey

OUR PICK: PUG!

Stirring rod

OUR PICK:

Cointreau

Long barspoon

Rittenhouse

Campari

Wooden mallet

You can also substitute a good bourbon like Old Pappy Van Winkle’s Family Reserve.

Or another kind of brandy.

Scotch whisky OUR PICK: Famous Grouse

Yellow Chartreuse or Bénédictine

If you’re looking for more of a sipping Scotch, try a Balvenie 12-year-old single malt.

2 bottles red wine, 2 bottles white wine, assorted beers.

Cognac

OUR PICK: Russian

The Glasses

Dark rum OUR PICK: El Dorado

five-year-old White rum OUR PICK: Mount Gay White

6 highball glasses 6 martini or coupe glasses 6 all-purpose wineglasses

Tequila OUR PICK: Don Julio

Reposado

T h e To o l s Glass and tin shakers

Gin OUR PICK:

(Good for cracking ice fast.)

Blender, if you’re so disposed

Optional:

Vodka Standard

Canvas coin sack

And Don’t Forget Plenty of club soda Plenty of tonic Fresh lemons Limes Simple syrup (1 part sugar, 1 part water, heated until the sugar dissolves, then stored in a squeeze bottle.)

And/or superfine sugar

Strainer

Tanqueray Sweet vermouth OUR PICK: Martini & Rossi

Jiggers (Two sizes: 1½ oz by ¾ oz and ½ oz by 1 oz.)

Hand juicer Muddler

THE MASTER LIST OF

HANGOVER REMEDIES The Po i s o n

Beer

Red Wine

White Wine

Dark Liquors

Carbonated Mixed Drinks

The Symptoms

The grains and yeast in beer lead to bloating and diarrhea.

The tannins lead to sharp, migrainesque headaches.

The sugar content in some white wines can trigger dehydration and headaches.

These contain congeners, substances that, when metabolized, can lead to intense nausea.

The carbonation causes you to absorb the alcohol faster and increases the likelihood of dehydration.

The Remedy

Alka-Seltzer Plus. The carbonation soothes your nausea while the aspirin takes care of the headache.

Aspirin and Gatorade. The aspirin eases headaches, and the Gatorade helps replace the fluids you’ve lost around the brain.

Rehydrate with some water over the course of the day and take an ibuprofen for the headache.

A whisky and lemonade (preferably with homemade lemonade). Lemon stimulates digestion while whisky decreases withdrawal symptoms. Or see: red wine.

See: red wine.

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How to Sear a Steak Guide

BY CHARLIE PALMER

FOR YEARS CHEFS talked about

searing meat to caramelize the surface, forming a crust that seals in juices. Then a food-science writer named Harold McGee explained that the browning of meat isn’t caramelization (which occurs only when sugar is present); it’s something called the Maillard reaction, related to the combination of carbohydrate molecules and amino acids. Although searing may not technically seal in juiciness, the contrast between the crust and the tender interior is otherworldly.

The t ools: A heavy, thick-bottomed pan (like cast iron), which will evenly distribute heat and won’t cool down when meat is added. Tongs. Stabbing with a fork will release all those precious juices. Just stab yourself with a fork and see what happens. Grape-seed oil, for its high smoking point. When oil smokes, it develops an acrid taste. Canola works fine, too, and is cheaper. (Rule of thumb: The less flavor an oil has, the higher the smoking point.)

St ep 1 : Warm pan over high heat and add just enough oil to coat the bottom. Heat until the oil begins to “roll,” moving in ripples when the pan is slightly shaken.

Step 2: Dry meat with a paper towel. Season well, showering salt over it from about a foot above, through your fingers. Pepper, too. Do this just before searing—if the salt draws out moisture, the resulting steam can inhibit browning.

St ep 3 : Add steaks, but leave about an inch between them, so any moisture evaporates immediately.

St ep 4: Reduce heat to medium when you see that the edges of the meat touching the pan have browned (about 3 minutes). The sear is there; now we’re going for some crust. Add extra oil if the pan is dry—most of the stuff you added in the beginning will now be spattered all over your stovetop. Flip the steaks after 4 more minutes and sear the other side for 3 minutes. For more welldone, transfer pan to a 350 degree oven to finish, about 4 to 6 minutes. Remove the steaks from the pan and let rest for a good 5 minutes before serving. The juices need to redistribute themselves through the meat before slicing.


Ciao


PORTFOLIO

Almost a century after this legendary city perfected the modern silhouette—suits and jackets that are soft and unstructured, with the right amount of flair— its streets are still a source of inspiration. We asked eight men who know Naples well to discuss its innumerable charms (and share a few restaurant recs, too).

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Napoli! Ph ot og ra p h s by

P H I L P OY N T E R

I n t e r v i ews by DAV I D C O G G I N S

“My favorite tailor, and the only other brand I sell in my store in Milan, is Cesare Attolini.” —Andrea Boniello, owner, M. Bardelli clothing store Jacket ($5,900), shirt ($550), tie ($350), and trousers ($1,400) by Cesare Attolini; cesare attolini.com. Shoes by Bardelli; mbardelli.com. Socks ($30) by Bresciani 1970; neimanmarcus.com.

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“I love the fresh fish at Dora, a small restaurant off the Riviera di Chiaia.” —Sergio Guardi, cofounder, Barbanera shoes Coat ($4,695), jacket ($2,895), shirt ($375), and trousers ($425) by Ermenegildo Zegna; zegna.com. Tie ($195) by Eidos Napoli; saks. com. Sunglasses ($350) by Persol; sunglasshut.com.

“In Naples, you don’t see the sea—you feel it inside yourself.” No.

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PORTFOLIO “My favorite tailor is Luca Rubinacci; his shop off Via Filangieri is the best men’s store.” —Sebastiano Guardi, cofounder, Barbanera shoes Coat (price upon request), suit ($6,450), tie ($300), and pocket square ($220) by Kiton; kiton.it. Shirt ($750) by Stefano Ricci; stefanoricci.com.

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“Everyone should see the Veiled Christ sculpture at the Sansavero Chapel.” —Andrea Boniello Suit ($2,500), shirt ($250), and tie ($150) by Bardelli; mbardelli.com.

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PORTFOLIO “My favorite restaurant in Naples is Baccalaria; they cook only baccalà, but in 60 different ways.” —Nicolangelo Gelormini, film director Coat ($1,295) by L.B.M. 1911; 515-2832121. Suit ($1,295) by Luigi Bianchi Mantova; 212-302-3661. Shirt ($485) by Finamore; barneys.com. Tie ($125) by Eleventy; eleventy.it. Shoes ($745) by Church’s; church-footwear.com.

“I LOVE THE STRATIFICATION OF THE SOULS THAT YOU CAN STILL SEE IN THE WALLS OF THIS CITY, SINCE THE FIFTH CENTURY B.C., LIKE THE RINGS IN THE WOOD OF A TREE.”

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“Go to Moccia for coffee and their special tomato pizzetta.” —Sebastiano Guardi Suit ($3,375) by Belvest; belvest.com. Shirt ($375) by Ermenegildo Zegna; zegna. com. Tie ($230) by E. Marinella; marinellanapoli.it. Loafers ($600) by Barbanera; barneys. com. Socks ($30) by Bresciani 1970; neimanmarcus.com.

“I NEED TO EAT PIZZA. I LOVE IT. IT SOUNDS EVERY DAY. .  .  .  A ND IN NAPLES, I ALWAYS No.

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PORTFOLIO

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“See the Farnese Collection and the Neapolitan Gallery at the Capodimonte Museum.” —Sergio Guardi

Suit ($3,495) by Ravazzolo; 404-231-0044. Shirt ($520) by Battistoni; battistoni.com. Tie ($230) by E. Marinella; marinellanapoli.it. Shoes ($600) by Barbanera; barneys.com. Socks ($30) by Bresciani 1970; neimanmarcus.com.

SO ORDINARY, BUT I COULD HAVE IT EAT AT LEAST TWO IN ONE SITTING.” –Sergio Guardi


“Naples in one word: energy. An explosion of energy, and a crazy, fatalistic vision of the world.”

“My favorite restaurant has always been Dora, but I recently discovered Coco Loco, which has delicious fresh fish and a great wine cellar.” —Cesare Cunaccia, editor at large, Italian Vogue Suit ($6,900), shirt ($590), and tie ($295) by Cesare Attolini; cesareattolini.com. Shoes (price upon request) by Calzoleria Rivolta; calzoleriarivolta.com.


PORTFOLIO

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“I love Salvatore Ambrosi’s workshop for trousers. He has a special taste for geometry, volume, and design.” —Cesare Cunaccia

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Suit ($6,900), shirt ($590), and tie ($295) by Cesare Attolini; cesareattolini.com. Shoes (price upon request) by Calzoleria Rivolta; calzoleriarivolta.com. Radiomir California watch ($7,700) by Panerai; panerai.com.


“Try the pizza at Sorbillo in the old town. Once you’ve tried fried pizza, you can’t live without it!” —Mario Aprile, financial services Coat ($6,295) and suit ($3,125) by Canali; canali.com. Shirt ($305) by Caruso; carusomenswear.com. Tie ($300) and shoes (price upon request) by Kiton; kiton.it.


PORTFOLIO

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“The best coffee in Naples is at Caffè Cimmino.” —Andrea Boniello Suit ($2,500), shirt ($250), tie ($150), and shoes ($1,200) by Bardelli; mbardelli.com.

“IF YOU WANT TO WAKE UP ENJOYING CASTEL DELL’OVO VIEWS, STAY AT THE GRAND HOTEL VESUVIO. IF YOUR TASTE IS MORE MODERN, CHOOSE THE ROMEO HOTEL. IF YOU LIKE NEAPOLITAN FOLKLORE, STAY IN THE OLD TOWN AT PALAZZO CARACCIOLO.” No.

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“Naples is not like a prostitute. It doesn’t reveal itself all at once.” “My favorite Naples landmarks are Sanità and all the churches, buildings, and catacombs along the Sacred Mile.” —Giovanni Gravina di Ramacca, lawyer, luxury and leisure consultant Suit, shirt, and shoes, Gravina di Ramacca’s own. Tie ($230) by E. Marinella; marinellanapoli.it.

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PORTFOLIO

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“The Donn’Anna Palace is amazing. It offers a breathtaking view and has been used in many movies and in Armani and Prada advertisements.” —Mario Aprile Coat ($1,750) by E. Formicola; hstockton.com. Suit ($4,595) by Brunello Cucinelli; brunellocucinelli.com. Shirt ($295) by Eleventy; eleventy.it. Shoes ($805) by A. Testoni; testoni.com.


PORTFOLIO

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“IN THE OLD TOWN, YOU CAN FIND IT ALL: GREAT MEALS, SIGHTSEEING, SHOPPING. I LOVE THE CITY’S SOUL, ITS UNIQUENESS, HOW IT’S RETAINED ITS IDENTITY. ANY FAULTS IT HAS ONLY ADD TO ITS RICHNESS.”

“My favorite clothing store is Etcetera Etc. on Via Vetriera.” —Antonio Martinello, architect Jacket ($3,900), tie ($225), and trousers ($850) by Isaia; isaia.it. Shirt ($625) by Finamore; barneys.com. Shoes ($1,495) by Tod’s; tods.com.

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P R O D U C T I O N ( L O C A L LY ) B Y S A LVAT O R E A D D E Z I O. G R O O M I N G B Y PA U L D O N O VA N F O R C L M . L O C AT I O N S A N D T R AV E L E X P E R I E N C E S U P P L I E D B Y G I O VA N N I A N D L A U R A G R AV I N A D I R A M A C C A , L U X U R Y A N D L E I S U R E C O N S U LTA N T S .

“I’m obsessed with some peculiar churches, like the gorgeous and colossal Gesù Nuovo, with her esoteric flavor and opulence.” —Cesare Cunaccia

Jacket ($1,095) by Pal Zileri; 212-751-8585. Shirt ($625) by Finamore; barneys.com. Tie ($164) by Magnifique Napoli; magnifiquenapoli.com.


T H E I N FO R M AT I O N

Naples, Italy How to eat, drink, shop, and get your cultural fix like an honest-to-God Neapolitan

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Boats docked alongside Castel dell’Ovo on the Gulf of Naples.

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First, a Note About Napoli... A B R I E F R U M I N AT I O N O N T H E T I M E L E S S I TA L I A N C I T Y

The essential appeal of Naples is its chaos—the looming doom that is Mount Vesuvius, the dynamic nightlife, the intensity of the people, the whiff of illicitness that seems to be everywhere, and even its traffic. (Go ahead, try and find a car that is not dinged or scratched.) And then imagine all of this raucousness jammed into a place of unspeakable beauty, where history drips from every façade and courtyard.

Spend time walking the jumbled streets of Naples and you learn, very quickly, that Neapolitans don’t just love their city; they have very—very— specific opinions about what the best parts of it are. And you’d be a fool not to listen and learn: who makes the best pizza, who cuts the best suit, who pulls the best coffee. And if by chance you disagree with someone’s choices, you are advised to be prepared to mount a vigorous defense.

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Naples is a city with no illusions about itself. It’s visceral in the best sense—it’s impossible to inhabit this centuries-old city that has created so much beauty and not feel very much alive. —D AVID C OGGINS

I L LU ST R AT I O N BY ZO Ë M O R E O' F E R R A L L

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Where to Shop

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T H E C I T Y T H AT P E R F E C T E D M O D E R N TA I L O R I N G S T I L L H A S I T A L L S T I T C H E D U P

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An Englishman may raise an eyebrow if you ask him who his tailor is; a Neapolitan won’t. In fact, Neapolitans discuss their clothiers with the fervor American men reserve for sports teams. If money is no issue, start at [1] Rubinacci (149 Via Chiaia). Perfectly situated on the Chiaia, the shop offers an extensive collection of ties, light-as-air jackets, shirts with suitably large collars, and Belgian loafers. Above the shop is the studio where bespoke clothes are cut and sewn without the sound of any machines (be-

cause there are none). An unlined sport coat? A definitive double-breasted suit? You’re in the right place. If you want something more local, head to [2] Ettore de Cesare Sartorie (15 Piazza Vanvitelli), in the hilltop neighborhood of Vomero. De Cesare is the third-generation owner of an intimate space, and everything he sells is custom. He’ll lead you across a small walkway to a studio where the tailors make not only suits but surprisingly nice safari jackets. Get a true bespoke suit based on a paper pattern cut just for

MUSEUMS:

TWO TO SEE Because you should come home with a little bit of culture along with your three new suits and five extra pounds From the Romans in 4 B.C. to Napoleon in 1806, Naples has been shaped largely by its conquerors. [8] The National Archeological Museum of Naples (19 Piazza Museo Nazionale) is a truly extraordinary place with a wonderful collection of early Roman statues as well as mosaics and other artifacts from Pompeii that re-create that vanished world. At one of the highest points in the city is [9] Museo di Capodimonte (2 Via Miano), the former Bourbon palace surrounded by majestic gardens. You’re here for paintings by Italian masters like Titian, Raphael, and Caravaggio. When I visited, Julian Schnabel was leaving wearing a baseball hat and a pair of purple pajamas. What more could you want?

you, starting at an earthbound $1,900. If you want a shirt from Naples—and you do—head to [3] Piccolo (14 Via Chiaia). At the far side of a courtyard are a series of small rooms with endless bolts of fabric. Tailors will take your measurements and ask for a few of your preferences, and you’ll have a shirt sent to you in a few weeks. It’ll run you about $200, depending on the material. Once Piccolo has those measurements, you can order any time, which can be a blessing or a curse, depending on your level of self-control. You can also try [4] Salvatore Piccolo (92a Via Carlo Poerio), the cult shirtmaker (no relation) with a surprising array of basic shirts—white or blue—with expressive collars and unexpected fabrics, like a pitch-perfect chambray ($250, much cheaper than his American line). Perhaps the quintessential Naples store is [5] E. Marinella (287 Riviera

di Chiaia). Another thirdgeneration business, it’s the most famous tie maker in the city, if not the country. Businessmen have been known to swing by on their way to work (the shop opens at 6:30 a.m.), and a custom piece will cost you only about $145. As for his mostly restrained designs, Mr. Marinella cites a lesson his father taught him: You don’t want your tie to be too interesting; it distracts from your face. [6] M. Cilento & F.llo (203–204 Riviera di Chiaia) was founded in 1780 and is often cited as the oldest men’s store in Naples. They specialize in bespoke clothing but have a terrific selection of bags and shoes. At the other end of the spectrum are the series of small stores on the Chiaia. All have vaguely English names and all seem to be having sales. (Locally made shirts for $35!) We recommend [7] Ascot (72 Via Chiaia), which offers washed cotton sport coats for under $110.

A Word on Coffee “ W H I C H WAY T O T H E S TA R B U C K S ? ” S A I D N O N E A P O L I TA N E V E R

Any Neapolitan can tell you where to find a good cup of coffee. We suggest you try [10] Café do Brasil (31 Via Luca Giordano) or [11] Mexico (86 Piazza Dante). In Naples, cups are very short, very strong, and, if you’re like the average resident, imbibed more than four times a day. Uniformed waiters walk briskly down the street, bringing covered trays— often with a single cigarette alongside the cup— to people who don’t have time to leave work for their regimented caffeine infusion. One tip to drinking coffee in Naples: It’s always served with water, which should be drunk first. Drinking water after coffee is an insult—you’re not tasting it, not considering it, not respecting it. You will have plenty of

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time to practice this because everyone you meet—from a friend at his office to a store owner—will always ask if you want a cup. Before you know it, you’ll be on your sixth espresso of the day, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing— you’re probably not going to eat dinner before 9:00 P.M., anyway.

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WHERE TO

E AT Mangia, mangia... you get the idea When it comes to Italian seafood, [12] Ristorante Dora (30 Via Ferdinando Palasciano) is a classic choice—two small tiled rooms with no view whatsoever. Come here for linguine with langoustines, shrimp, and clams, or seafood risotto. If you’re on an expense account, look toward the lobster or the grilled fish of the day. Tony the waiter will test your knowledge of U. S. state capitals, and he knows his stuff. Naples produces Italy’s greatest mozzarella. It’s tangier and slightly grassier than what you’re used to, and not at all bland. Taste this firsthand in the famous series of cheese stores [13] Sogni di Latte (13 Via Michele Kerbaker). Tomatoes in Naples are small and very sweet, and the basil doesn’t get any fresher. Put it all together and you have the pizza margherita. Try one at [14] da Concettina ai Tre Santi (7 Via Arena della Sanità), a bright, welcoming establishment near the Sanità food markets that’s been at it since 1951. Lunch with a beer is about $10. When they bring the pizza out, you’ll swear you won’t be able to finish it, but there’s no need to lie to yourself. Naples’s patron saint of pizza, however, is Enzo Coccia of [15] Pizzaria La Notizia (53 and 94 Via Michelangelo da Caravaggio). Coccia is sought out by chefs from around the world for his advice on dough making and proper crust consistency. It shows. The more traditional setting, usually with a line out the door, is Pizzaria 53. Pizzaria 94, right down the street, is a more experimental outpost. Try the fried pizza—like a calzone, but not nearly as heavy, with a faint hint of smoke. ≥


CREDITS See “One Tough Mudder,” page 48.

Photographs and Illustrations: Editor’s Letter, p. 32: Susan Pittard/Studio D. One Tough Mudder, p. 52: Ensemble: Ben Goldstein/Studio D; storm-chasing: Jim Reed/National Geographic. The Peaks of Perfection, p. 54: Skier: Merkushev Vasiliy/Shutterstock; pp. 55, 56: Chairlift, Alta Badia: Pete Kovacevic; p. 56: Prato Piazza: PatitucciPhoto; clothing, accessories, pins: Ben Goldstein/Studio D. Magnum Force, p. 60: Ben Goldstein/Studio D. Hauling Class, p. 62: A. J. Mueller. Only If It Suits You, p. 66: Richard Richards/Condé Nast; p. 67: Showroom: Stuart C. Wilson; Tempah: Kirstin Sinclair; p. 68: Clothing: Stuart C. Wilson; p. 69: Layer Cake: Sony/Neal Peters Collection. Frozen Assets, p. 72: Kimberley Frenchlighter; p. 73: Kenworthy: Simon Bruty/Sports Illustrated; products: Ben Goldstein/Studio D. Hardware Update Is Available, p. 74: Football: Ben Goldstein/Studio D. Go Long,

p. 76: Prince Charles: Princess Diana Archive; p. 78: Elba: David M. Bennett; p. 80: Statham: HM/Gaumer-Griffin. Information: Vintage Style, p. 111: David Lawrence/Studio D. Street Fighting Man, p. 115: Sunglasses by Garrett Leight; model on left: swimsuit by Oye; on right: swimsuit by Solid & Striped; p. 116: Model on left: Shirt by Lucky; shorts by Levi’s; on right: shirt by Gap; skirt by Hudson; p. 124: Model on left: Jacket by Pam & Gela; dress by Blessed Are the Meek; shoes by Jimmy Choo; necklace and ring by Swarovski; bag by Sam Edleman; in middle: dress by Maje; shoes by Jimmy Choo; on right: shirt and pants by Sandro; shoes by Jimmy Choo; p. 125: Model on left: Shirt by Frame; on right: shirt by Callens. Sacred Spaces, pp. 126–127: Courtesy Trunk Archive. Best of The Information, p. 132: Jones, from The Eyes of Laura Mars: Everett Collection; suit: Ben Gold-

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stein/Studio D; p. 133: Ben Goldstein/Studio D. p. 134: Shoe: Philip Friedman/Studio D; p. 135: The Tools: Philip Friedman/Studio D; p. 136: Martin Rusch/Trunk Archive; p. 137: Obama: Jason Reed/Reuters; p. 138: Ben Goldstein/Studio D; p. 139: American Psycho: Lions Gate/Everett Collection; p. 140: Everett Collection; p. 141: Will Styer/The Licensing Project. Information: Naples, p. 159: Coffee: Breana Branham. My Favorite Thing, p. 162: Cucinelli: Alessandro Albert.

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