Page 1

Winter 2013  Volume 13,  Issue 1

Idaho Farm Bureau Policy for 2013 – pg. 8

Life on the Range – pg. 4

Market Basket Survey – pg. 31


The Ag Agenda

Innovation is Anything but Business as Usual By Bob Stallman

President American Farm Bureau Federation

Albert Einstein once said, “If you always do what you always did, you will always get what you always got.” I’ve tried to adhere to this mantra throughout my life by embracing risk and thinking outside of the box. American agriculture, too, follows this philosophy pretty darn well.  Through innovation and thinking big, U.S. farmers and ranchers have transformed agriculture from mule and plow operations

into one of the most tech-savvy and society-changing industries in the modern world.     Fail Big There’s a popular theory that goes something like this: Failure is not an option--it’s a requirement.  Fear of failing dooms us to repeat what others have done, therefore never finding innovation and change. So, if we are going to think big, we will certainly at some point fail big. But it’s these failures that in the end See STALLMAN, page 7

The President’s Desk

Custer County Challenges Federal Land Managers By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

It’s federally-managed land, not federal land. That’s the point Custer County leaders are trying to make. But so far it has fallen on deaf ears.

Honestly, where or who are local leaders expected to turn to when the heavy hand of the federal government throws cold water on every effort to build or expand a crippled economy? Last April Custer County commission-

ers staged a protest over the locking up of federal land through the declaration of a wilderness study area. The tactic of using wilderness study area declarations to restrict access to public lands is both widespread and controversial. It requires congressional approval to designate wilderness. But federal bureaucrats can create study areas without congressional oversight. These study areas are frequently detrimental to rural economies in the West and rarely meet definitions stipulated by the Wilderness Act, which requires wilderness values and includes See PRIESTLEY, page 38

Inside Farm Bureau

Read Before You Sign

Before entering an agreement, whether it’s business or personal, the first and most essential advice is to carefully read any contract before you sign it. This may seem obvious but it’s not. By reading a contract before we sign, we get to know in advance our rights and duties.

By Rick Keller CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

In the good old days, a man could be taken at his word and a handshake could seal a deal. Thus, written contracts were 2

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / Winter 2013

often the exception rather than the rule. Today, handshake deals are the exception. Because contracts are more important than ever and often govern disputes, there are some important things that we learned in Business Law 101 about contract law. One important piece of advice is that if you sign a contract, the law presumes that you read it and comprehended it. The law does not ordinarily let someone defend against enforcement of a contract on the grounds that he or she did not read See KELLER, page 40


Contents

Volume 13, Issue 1 IFBF OFFICERS President . ................................. Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President ..................................Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President .............................. Rick Keller

Features

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................Shelley Scott Bird .......................................................... Pocatello Chris Dalley ....................................................... Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ........................................... Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant .................................................. Oakley Rick Pearson ................................................... Hagerman Mike Garner.............................................................. Declo Curt Krantz ............................................................ Parma Mike McEvoy..................................................... Middleton Tracy Walton ....................................................... Emmett Marjorie French .............................................. Princeton Bob Callihan . ...................................................... Potlatch Louis Kins ........................................................... Kootenai Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Cody Chandler ..................................................... Weiser

Life on the Mt. Borah Ranch is never dull.

PAGE 4 Idaho Farm Bureau Policy for 2013

PAGE 8

STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ....................... Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Organization............................... Dennis Brower Commodities & Marketing Assistant ........... Peg Pratt Member Services Assistant .................... Peggy Moore Publice Relations Assistant ..................... Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager .......................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager ....................... Kendall Keller Dist. III Regional Manager .................. Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ................... Russ Hendricks Dist.V Regional Manager ...................... Bob Smathers Dir. of Governmental Affairs ....................... Kent Lauer Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs ... Dennis Tanikuni Range/Livestock Specialist..........................Wally Butler Director of Public Relations ............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................ Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager .................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise ................... Julie Christoffersen Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID

Farm Facts

PAGE 33 Word Search – winter

PAGE 34

UI Forestry

A Taste of Idaho food page and recipes

PAGE 26

PAGE 35

Marketbasket Survey

Stacy Dragila – Still going strong

PAGE 31

PAGE 38

IDAHO FARM BUREAU QUARTERLY USPS #022-899, is published quarterly by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201. POSTMASTER send changes of address to: IDAHO FARM BUREAU QUARTERLY P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, ID and additional mailing offices. Subscription: $4 a year included in Farm Bureau dues. MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: Ranch life in central Idaho’s harsh climate

DEPARTMENTS The Ag Agenda: Bob Stallman............................................................. 2 The President’s Desk: Frank Priestley.............................................. 2 Inside Farm Bureau: Rick Keller......................................................... 2 Insurance Matters............................................................................... 27 Classifieds ............................................................................................ 42

can be a challenge but it’s a great way to raise a family.

Photo courtesy of Steve Steubner, Idaho Rangeland Resource Commission.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

3


Life on the Range

The Smith family has ranched in the shadows of Mt. Borah since the 1930’s.

Smith family uses creativity, Yankee ingenuity to run Mt. Borah Ranch By Steve Stuebner There’s never a dull moment at the Mount Borah Ranch, located north of Mackay in Custer County, Idaho. Located at 6,400 feet elevation, under the shadow of Idaho’s tallest peak, the Wiley Smith family has to cope with a short growing season, the constant threat of frost, full-on earthquakes and even running out of water in late summer. But the Smiths rise to the challenge every day, using their Yankee ingenuity and know-how to run a successful cattle ranch. Their family has been 4

ranching here since the 1930s. The place was homesteaded in the late 1800s, and their water rights date back to 1886. “I was raised here,” says Wiley Smith, a friendly guy with a great sense of humor. “I like the agricultural life, being out in the open. No two days are the same. You can have a schedule put together as to what you’re going to do for the day, and then in 15 minutes, that’s all changed. “It’s a good place to raise a family, and there’s always plenty to do.” One of the constant issues at the Mt. Borah Ranch is a short growing season. “The Nat-

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

ural Resources Conservation Service says we should have from the 20th of July to the 10th of August, all consecutive nights with no frost,” Smith says. “But that doesn’t always happen. The shortest summer I remember we had 8 consecutive nights with no frost.” That makes it tricky to raise any crops whatsoever. The Smiths get just one cutting of hay per year, and it’s quite tricky when to plant the seed. “We try to wait late enough to get into that window where you’re going to get your plants up and not get them froze and killed,” Smith says. “The track record is


A short growing season – less than a month – makes putting up hay on the Mt. Borah Ranch a difficult proposition.

getting better because Steve and Leon are watching that pretty close.” Wiley refers to his sons, Steve and Leon, who take the lead in running the ranch these days. The hay crop is a mix of alfalfa and grass. “Our hay is not 100 percent alfalfa. It’s about 40 percent alfalfa and the rest is grass,” he says. “Because if we get an early frost in August, and it knocks 4 inches off of your alfalfa, you’ve lost a lot of hay, but the grass didn’t get froze, you’ve still got it.” In the fall of 1983, the Smiths were thrown a big curve when the Mt. Borah Earthquake erupted, causing $12.5 million in damage. Part of the damage was a huge crack in a concrete flume that delivered water to the ranch from Rock Creek. “We were shook up,” Smith says, showing us the deep cleft in the earth near his ranch, still readily visible almost 30 years later. “It was a 7.3. This ground here is 9 feet lower than it was.”

The damage to the concrete flume turned out to be for the best because it created a new opportunity for the Smiths to install a pipeline and convert to sprinkler irrigation. “It was a blessing because it forced us to abandon 16,000 feet of broken up concrete ditch. We buried main line with the intention of going to sprinkler irrigation. With the sprinklers, you have better efficiency than we had with flood irrigation. The earthquake made us make a change that was good for us.” Smith explains that they purchased used pipes from Wyoming, and a contractor from Hagerman installed it for them for a very reasonable price. “He was a fantastic man to work with, and he done us a fantastic job.” The Smiths have water rights on three creeks that flow out of the Lost River Range, Arentson Creek, Rock Creek and Cedar Creek. But in dry years, they can run

short, even using pipelines for efficiency. “This whole area is a large alluvial fan of limestone gravel and silt,” he explains. “All of the creeks that flow west off of this range, none of them make it to the river, they all sink. So you have to really hang onto that water and not lose any of it if you can help it.” Invariably, Smith says they run out of water in late summer, and hope for a little rain before harvest time. North of the ranch, the Smith’s Hereford cattle spend the summer on a mix of state and federal grazing allotments. Public rangeland provides critical summer feed. The Smith’s manage the range with a deferred pasture grazing management system, meaning that they rest the public land pastures on a rotating basis, under a coordinated resource management plan. Underground pipelines carry water to watering See MT. BORAH p.23

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

5


6

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013


STALLMAN Continued from page 2 make us better than what we were. Without a doubt, modern agriculture has had its ups and downs getting to where it is today. In other words, it’s failed big on an occasion or two. But because of that, modern agriculture is at the forefront in technology, leading to greater efficiency and safety. Recently, at AFBF’s annual meeting, former astronaut Mark Kelly talked about the various satellites NASA uses. As he spoke, I couldn’t help but think to myself that farmers also use satellites and other precision agriculture technologies in their line of work to increase yields and reduce chemical use. American agriculture has employed science and technology to dramatically increase production and choice while lowering prices, but these changes have also altered the experience of farmers and the public in unexpected ways. No longer are we just producing food for our families; each farmer now feeds 155 people. We are using innovative methods to meet the future global demand of feeding 9 billion people and we are finding breakthroughs in cancer research and eradicating other diseases through the groundbreaking uses of food we produce. Entrepreneurial Spirit Recognizing U.S. agriculture’s role in the business sector, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History is partnering with farmers, ranchers and American agri-business to build a collection that reflects modern agricultural practices. The initiative, called “American Enterprise,” will be unveiled in spring 2015 and will celebrate precision farming, traceability, environmental practices, irrigation, biotechnology and hybrid seeds. Agriculture has played a vital role in the development of America’s business sector, from innovation and enterprise to the entrepreneurial spirit that has always been a major focus of America’s farms and ranches. Not only is Farm Bureau partnering with the Smithsonian on this exciting venture, the first donation to the exhibit came from Tennessee Farm Bureau member and dairy farmer Pat Campbell. Campbell gave the museum a selection of photographs, a computer cow tag and a reader unit to show the change in dairying from a hand-labor intensive process to a modern computer-run operation. The donation will also include his personal recollections about how changing technology has altered his work life and has led to greater efficiency and safety. The Smithsonian exhibit will showcase to the public what farmers and ranchers have known for a long time: innovation and technology makes agriculture a leading business opportunity; we are an industry where failing big isn’t bad (at least once in awhile) and our modern farming practices are changing the world in which we live. All in all, innovation on the farm is anything but business as usual.

Farm Bureau Members Pay Less For Choice Hotels!

A $40 room will be closer to

$32 A $60 room will be closer to

$48 A $90 room will be closer to

$72 1.800.258.2847

Farm Bureau Discount Code

00209550

advanced reservations required

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

7


BASIC PRINCIPLES Purpose of Farm Bureau Farm Bureau is a free, independent, nongovernmental, voluntary organization of farm and ranch families united for the purpose of analyzing their problems and formulating action to achieve educational improvement, economic opportunity, environmental awareness and social advancement, and thereby, to promote the national well being. Farm Bureau is local, statewide, national, and international in its scope and influence and is non-partisan, non-sectarian, and non-secretive in character. Farm Bureau Beliefs and Philosophy America’s unparalleled progress is based on freedom and dignity of the individual, sustained by basic moral and religious concepts. Freedom to the individual versus concentration of power, which would destroy freedom, is the central issue in al l societies. We believe the definition of marriage is a union between one man and one woman. We believe that since the beginning of time, man’s ability to provide food, fiber, and fuel for himself and his dependents has determined his independence, freedom and security. We believe that a strong and viable agricultural industry is one of the most important cornerstones in the foundation of our national security, and that the importance of the role that society must never be taken for granted. Economic progress, cultural advancement, ethical and religious principles flourish best where men are free, responsible individuals. The exercise of free will, rather than force, is consistent with the maintenance of liberty. Individual freedom and opportunity must not be sacrificed in a quest for guaranteed “security”. We believe that America’s system of private ownership of property and the means of production has been, and is, one of the major foundation stones of our republic. This element of our economic system and the personal rights attendant to private property, including grazing and water rights, must be maintained and protected. Ownership of property and property rights are among the human rights essential to the preservation of individual freedom. The right to own property must be preserved at all costs. We will take every opportunity to publicize, defend and promote our position, and we will stand firm on basic constitutional rights. We believe in government by law, impartially administered, without special privilege. We support agricultural programs and organizations that give equal opportunity for skills, knowledge and leadership ability.

8

Policy 2013

We believe in the representative form of government; a republic as provided in our Constitution; in limitations upon government power; in maintenance of equal opportunity; in the right of each individual to worship as he chooses; in separation of church and state as set forth in the First Amendment to the Constitution; and in freedom of speech, press, and peaceful assembly. The U.S. Supreme Court imposed one man one vote rule should be overturned and return the United States to the republican form of government that was envisioned by the framers of the Constitution. Individuals have a moral responsibility to help preserve freedom for future generations by participating in public affairs and by helping to elect candidates who share their fundamental beliefs and principles. We oppose the use of public funds for financing political campaigns. People have the right and the responsibility to speak for themselves individually or through organizations of their choice without coercion or government intervention. We believe in the right of every man to choose his own occupation; to be rewarded according to his contribution to society and to save, invest, spend, or convey his earnings to his heirs. These rights are accompanied by the responsibility that each man has to meet the financial obligations he has incurred. We support a society free of drug abuse. We support English as the official language of Idaho and the United States. We support English as the language that students should learn and use in public schools. We support that public schools start the day with reciting the Pledge of Allegiance.

The Constitution Stable and honest government with prescribed and limited powers is essential to freedom and progress. The Constitution of the United States was well designed to secure individual liberty by a division of federal authority among the Legislative, Executive and Judicial branches. The Tenth Amendment assures that liberties are further secured for the states and the people through the retention of those powers not specifically delegated to the federal government. The constitutional prerogatives of each branch of government should be preserved from encroachment. We support the Constitution as the supreme law of the land. Changes should be made only through constitutional amendments, not by federal policy or regulation. One of the greatest dangers threatening our republic and system of private, competitive enterprise is the socialization of America through the centralization of power and authority in the federal government. The centralization

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

of power and responsibility in the federal government violates constitutional purposes. It has usurped state sovereignty and individual freedom and should be reversed. In defense of our constitution, and of the sovereignty of the U.S.A., we oppose the centralization of power worldwide into one world government. Religious Life Our nation was founded on spiritual faith and belief in God. Whereas the Constitution of the United States was founded on moral and religious principles, moral, ethical and traditional family values should get equal support and consideration in the public schools as do the atheistic and humanistic views. We support the right to have religious beliefs and symbols of those beliefs presented in our communities. We vigorously support retention of: 1. “So Help Me God” in official oaths; 2. The phrase “In God We Trust” on our coin; 3. The fourth verse of the “Star Spangled Banner”; 4. The phrase “Under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance.

Capitalism-Private Competitive Enterprise We believe in the American capitalistic, private, competitive enterprise system in which property is privately owned, privately managed, operated for profit, individual satisfaction and responsible stewardship. We believe in a competitive business environment in which supply and demand are the primary determinants of market prices, the use of productive resources, and the distribution of output. We support the continuing freedom of the people of Idaho to manage, develop, harvest and market the useful products of our natural resources. We believe in man’s right to search and research to select the best ways of maintaining quality production of food and fiber. We believe every individual in Idaho should have the right to a job without being forced to join or pay dues to any organization. Government operation of commercial business in competition with private enterprise should be terminated. We also believe that no element of society has more concern for, understanding of, or a greater stake in, the proper husbandry of poultry, livestock, furbearers, game animals and aquaculture than the producer. Economy in Government We consider the proliferation of


government with its ever increasing cost to the taxpayer a major problem. State expenditures and growth of personnel on the public payroll should not be allowed to expand faster than the population and should be compatible with the percentage of economic growth of the state. We believe that Article B, Section 1, “Limitations of Public Indebtedness” of the state Constitution is the main reason for the healthy financial condition of Idaho’s government. We will oppose any attempt to amend this section of the constitution. Tax exemptions granted by the state Legislature that reduce county income should at the same time require appropriations of sufficient funds to replace county revenue losses caused by such exemptions. We support economy at all levels of government. Education We believe that agricultural education is critical in creating and maintaining a strong and viable agricultural industry. We believe education starts with the parent or guardian and is extended to the schools as a cooperative partnership in which parents and guardians have the right to review any and all methods and materials used in the educational processes of school systems. We believe parents have the right to choose how best to educate their children. We believe local school boards must be elected by the people to maintain control of public school systems and must have authority to establish policy for dress standards, personal conduct standards, testing standards, fiscal controls and curriculum. We believe all school systems must be accountable to provide opportunities for all students to obtain proficiency in the basics of reading, writing and mathematics. Parents and guardians must be kept informed by the school system of the educational progress of their children. We believe parents and guardians have an inherent right and obligation to discipline their own children. Political Parties Strong, responsive political parties are essential to the United States system of elective government. We recommend that Farm Bureau members support the political party of their choice. We believe that government should in no way be involved directly in the political process but should lay down certain rules to assure fair and proper elections. We strongly favor retaining the county central political committees composed of county

precinct committee people and their existing functions within the party structure. We are opposed to shifting the functions of a county committee to a district committee. COMMODITES (1) Agrichemicals/Pesticides We oppose establishment of zones of agricultural land in which any kind of legal application or storage of agricultural chemicals is curtailed without sound, scientifically validated evidence to warrant curtailment. We support increased research and labeling for minor-use pesticide registrations. We recommend that compliance with federally approved label instructions should absolve farmers or commercial applicators from liability claims of environmental pollution. We support the continued use of approved pesticides and/or related products until conclusive scientific evidence proves there is an unacceptable risk. We oppose fumigant buffer zone limitations proposed by the EPA without research giving substantial evidence that current practices are negatively affecting bystanders. (2) Commodity Diseases We urge the Idaho State Department of Agriculture to do all within its power to prohibit the importation of Anthracnose virus into Idaho. We support the quarantine of all sources of the potato wart virus. We support active research and the dissemination of information to all interested parties related to rhizomania and urge that any imposed restrictions be based on scientific data. We support any phytosanitary action taken by the Idaho Department of Agriculture to protect the Idaho potato industry from the threat of the “Pratylenchus Neglectus” nematode. (3) Commodity Indemnity Fund We support all efforts to maintain accountability, monitor efficiency and protect the fund. We favor a minimum of $15 million in the state commodity indemnity fund to provide an adequate level of protection for growers. (4) Commodity Promotion We support the organization of commodity commissions for promotion and research purposes of any commodity. We support compulsory deduction of funds if producers can establish the commodity commission through referendum, with assessments being established or increased by a majority vote of the producers, or if producers can easily obtain refunds of their assessments.

We support a periodic referendum if assessment is made mandatory. (5) Commodity Sales We support expansion of Idaho agricultural markets, domestic and foreign. We also support trade missions abroad to better inform our producers and the hosting of foreign delegations to our state in efforts to increase our market share. We support changes to crop insurance that truly reflect a safety net. We oppose double discounts by grain dealers. We support licensing and bonding of all commodity brokers by the State of Idaho. We support identification and quantification on the container label of all seeds that have been identified in samples from a lot of agricultural, vegetable, flower, tree or shrub seed to be sold. (6) Commodity Testing Equipment Commodity buyers’ moisture meters and other commodity testing equipment for the purpose of grading should be certified for accuracy by the ISDA Bureau of Weights and Measures. (7) Country of Origin of Food We support mandatory country-of-origin labeling of agricultural products in the state of Idaho. (8) Environmental Studies We recommend that any individual or group doing environmental studies be held accountable for claims or assertions of damage by agricultural practices to the environment. Claims or assertions should be treated with skepticism until they have been subjected to critical peer review and tested by practical application. (9) Fair Trade We support the concept of fair trade as outlined in American Farm Bureau Federation policy. (10) Field Testing Biotechnology Products We support effective field testing of new biotechnology products to promote commercial use of products that will benefit agriculture and the general public. We oppose any law or regulation requiring registration of agriculture producers who use or sell biotech- based products or commodities. (11) Food Safety/Government Accountability We strongly believe a government agency making public health decisions that result in product recalls, product seizures or destruction of perishable goods must be held accountable when such decisions prove false. Such agencies must be required to compensate or indemnify individuals and companies for the monetary

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

9


losses that occur because of poor or false regulatory decisions. (12) Forage/Soil Sample Testing We recommend that action be taken to set uniform guidelines for all testing labs in the analysis of forage and soil samples, with the Idaho Department of Agriculture to administer them. (13) Hay Certification We support a uniform state noxious weed free hay certification program. (14) Industrial Grade Hemp We support legalizing the production of non-THC industrial grade hemp in Idaho. (15) Lien Law We oppose any attempt to alter the system of centralized filing or fist-in-time, first-in- right system of lien priorities, either in revised UCC Article 9, or any other legislation. Delivered feed shall not be encumbered by a blanket lien from a financial institution until the grower/supplier is paid in full. (16) NAFTA Withdrawal We support a concurrent resolution from both houses of the Idaho Legislature to Congress to take necessary steps to withdraw from NAFTA. (17) Potato Seed Management We support a potato seed management program that encourages the use of certified seed potatoes in seed and commercial production for the control of diseases and pests. We recommend: 1. That the tolerance for late blight in potato seed planted in the state of Idaho be 1% or less at shipping point inspection. 2. That the Idaho State Department of Agriculture recognizes the entire state as late blight infected. LIVESTOCK (18) Animal Care We support the rights of owners and producers to raise their animals in accordance with commonly accepted animal husbandry practices. We oppose any legislation, regulatory action or funding, whether private or public, that interferes with commonly accepted animal husbandry practices. We oppose any animal care legislation that would impose a stricter penalty than the 2012 law. We support fines and/or reimbursement for animal research lost and all costs and damage incurred, when farms or research facilities are willfully damaged. Responsible persons or organizations

10

should pay all costs. We further support the role of licensed veterinarians in the care of animals and support current licensing standards for veterinarians. We support the Idaho Veterinary Practice Act and oppose any efforts to weaken it or the licensing standards. We oppose the creation of an Idaho livestock care standards board. (19) Animal ID We support procedures and or equipment for an animal ID program that makes it possible to trace an animal back to its original location. We support the right of the owner to choose among the acceptable methods of identification and to leave their animals unidentified prior to movement from the premises of origin. We support having the Idaho State Department of Agriculture determine acceptable methods of identification, including hot or cold brands, for the state. (20) Animal Rights We oppose the concept that animals have rights and oppose legislation that would give funds to animal-rights organizations or any public agency or the right to establish standards concerning these socalled rights of animals. (21) Bioterrorism We support legislation that would make it a felony for any person to purposefully spread any type of contagious, communicable or infectious disease among livestock or other animals. We support legislation that would make it a felony for any person who intentionally attempts to transfer, damage, vandalize, or poison the product, water, or facilities of a posted commercial aquaculture operation. (22) Bovine Tuberculosis We support amending Idaho cattle importation rules to make those rules equal to U.S. border states in their restriction of tuberculosis infected/exposed cattle. (23) Brucellosis We oppose all efforts to eliminate the mandatory vaccination law and require its complete enforcement. We insist that the National Park Service eradicate brucellosis in Yellowstone and Grand Teton Parks. We support regulations requiring the appropriate state and federal agencies to control and eradicate this disease in wildlife. We oppose separating the state into zones for definition of brucellosis-free status. (24) CAFO Regulations We support efforts by all livestock

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

associations to create MOUs with the appropriate state and federal agencies. We believe that counties should have the sole right, responsibility and authority under existing laws for the siting of CAFOs (Confined Animal Feeding Operations). We would encourage the counties to consult the local extension personnel, state agencies and soil and water agencies in determining the parameters to write siting guidelines. Matters pertaining to CAFO regulation other than siting should be under the jurisdiction of the state. (25) Cattle Liens Liens should not be attached to livestock until ownership can be proven and verified. (26) Data Confidentiality We support the confidentiality of data collected on farms and feedlots. Only final reports or conclusions should be made a matter of public record. No data collected from individual operations should be made public. (27) Domestic Cervidae We support the right of domestic cervidae owners to use private trophy ranches as a means to ethically harvest their animals. We support the right of domestic cervidae owners to breed, raise, harvest, and market all members of the cervidae family indigenous to Idaho that can be legally acquired. (28) Equine We oppose any attempt to eliminate the equine owner’s or the BLM’s right to the humane slaughter of their equine for consumption or any other purpose. We support construction of new slaughtering facilities and/or use of existing processing facilities in Idaho to humanely slaughter equines. We support individuals and nongovernmental organizations right to save horses from slaughter as long as they take possession of the horses and are responsible for their care and feeding. We support the humane treatment of equine at all times and in all places including those destined for slaughter. We support the continued classification of equines as marketable livestock and oppose any efforts to classify them as pets or companion animals. We support the inclusion of equine in the National Animal Identification System. When an equine is in the custody of a government agency and an adoption has not been able to take place within 6 months, that equine should be harvested or humanely euthanized without delay.


(29) Foot and Mouth/BSE Disease We support stringent controls to protect Idaho’s livestock industry from foot and mouth disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). In addition, the United States must impose restrictions on importation of animals and animal products that could carry other contagious infectious diseases. We oppose importation of live cattle over 30 months of age until sound science proves this does not threaten to spread BSE to the United States. We oppose any announcement to the media of BSE suspects in the U.S. until the final scientific determination is made whether they are positive or negative. We support allowing entities to voluntarily test all slaughtered animals for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in order to ship products to countries that require individual tests. (30) Foot Rot in Sheep We support a continued stringent foot rot control program for sheep in Idaho. (31) Livestock Brands We support the concept that livestock may be left unbranded at the discretion of the owner except for those livestock grazing on federal/state managed lands. We support research into alternative methods of permanent livestock identification and ask that the Brand Department be authorized to recognize these methods. (32) Manure Management We believe that manure and manure/ compost are nutrient-rich residue resources. We oppose manure being classified as industrial waste. We encourage research on manure management including such areas as odor reduction and waste and nutrient management. We encourage programs that educate livestock operators on techniques regarding properly managed organic nutrient systems, especially if implemented with consistent best management practices (BMPs) developed by extension, university and the livestock industry. We support the Idaho State Department of Agriculture allowing certification of third-party soil sampling for nutrient management plan compliance purposes (33) Sheep Tail Length We support the creation of a minimum length standard on tail docking of sheep for show purposes. (34) State Veterinarian We believe the Animal Health Division of the Idaho Department of Agriculture should be

administered by a licensed veterinarian. (35) Trichomoniasis Testing We support full enforcement of state trichomoniasis testing laws on non-virgin bulls by the state veterinarian. WATER (36) Artesian Wells We support the current law regarding artesian wells, if adequate funding for the costsharing of well repairs is provided. We oppose the designation of the heat value from a geothermal source as being the only beneficial use. (37) Bureau of Reclamation Reservoirs Release of water in power head space in Bureau of Reclamation reservoirs shall be controlled solely by state water law. (38) Bureau of Reclamation Water Contracts When renewing irrigation contracts with Bureau of Reclamation; irrigators should retain full quantity of water and be allowed conversion of water service contracts to repayment contracts as required by law. (39) Comprehensive State Water Plan We urge the Governor to appoint Water Resource Board members who will be protective of the waters of the state of Idaho. We oppose all minimum stream flows unless sufficient storage is built to supply priority needs first. We support requiring legislative approval before establishing minimum stream flow, river basin plans and state water plans. We support repealing Idaho Code 42-1503 (e)ii which allows “Minimum Stream Flows” proposed by the Idaho Department of Water Resources to become final if no specific action is taken by the Legislature. We support a mandatory requirement for legislative approval of agreements made by state agencies with federal agencies when dealing with commitments on water. We support the Swan Falls Agreement as originally written in October of 1984. (40) Dams We support legislation that would focus the attention of the Northwest Power Planning Council’s authority on planning to provide for present and future power needs of northwest power states and away from other secondary issues. We support the construction of storage facilities that provide beneficial multiple uses of Idaho’s water, and encourage municipalities, federal agencies and tribal agencies to advocate and fund additional storage to help meet their increasing

demands for water, thus avoiding the need to take irrigation water from agriculture. We support the continued existence and current usage of all dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers. We oppose any efforts to destroy or decrease production of those dams. (41) Effluent Trading We support the concept of effluent trading. (42) Flood Control We recommend that steps, including additional storage facilities, increased recharge and land transfers from federal to state ownership, be taken to control future flooding within the state of Idaho. (43) In-Stream Flows and Reconnect Process We support in-stream flows and reconnect permits of government agencies going through the same process as minimum stream flow permits, and through the legislative process before being allowed. (44) Moratorium We support the current Idaho Department of Water Resources moratoriums on critical groundwater development. (45) Outstanding Resource Waters We support the Basin Advisory Groups (BAGs) and Watershed Advisory Groups (WAGs) process, recognizing that outstanding resource waters (ORWs) are part of this process. We oppose nominations of ORWs by parties other than BAGs and WAGs. (46) State Purchase of Water Rights for Mitigation We support having the state of Idaho purchase water rights for mitigation purposes to be held by the state water board, so water trade may benefit recharge and pump conversions. (47) Transfer of Water Rights We oppose the transfer of water rights to the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). We oppose the taking of water for fish flushing. Water held by the Idaho Water Resources Board will be held and used for purposes intended and in accordance with state law. We believe all water in Idaho should be used beneficially. In the event the BOR or IDWR desires use of water they would have to negotiate on a yearly basis for rental-pool water in accordance with state water law. (48) Waste Management We oppose mandatory facility construction without scientific proof of environmental pollution on an individual basis.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

11


(49) Water Development on New Non-Ag Development We support legislation that would require developers to supply water and water-delivery systems using existing water rights or gray water to new developments. (50) Water Permit Extension We support allowing a permit holder more development time when time is lost or delayed through no fault of the permit holder and/or a second extension of no less than five years. (51) Water Quality We support the continued management of water quality, both underground and surface, by utilizing “Best Management Practices” (BMPs) as as contained in USDA’s “Natural Resource Conservation Services Field Office Technical Guide” and Idaho’s “Forest Practices Act”. Changes in these BMPs should be based only on scientifically monitored data rather than “best professional judgment”. We support the development of BMPs for recreational uses. We support canal and irrigation districts’ efforts to halt unwanted drainage into their water systems. The EPA should not have the authority to arbitrarily impose penalties on landowners without first identifying the problem and giving the landowner an opportunity to correct the problem. If there is a difference of opinion concerning the extent of the problem, a reasonable and cost-effective appeal process of the EPA decision should be available to the landowner. We oppose the deletion of the word “navigable” from the Clean Water Act. (52) Water Quality Standards Water quality standards must be site specific and realistically achievable for each water body. These standards must at least partially support designated beneficial uses. (53) Water Recharge We support state planning and implementation of a basin-wide aquifer recharge. We support the development of new conveyance systems for large-scale recharge of the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer. Government mandated water conservation (i.e. lining of canals, etc.) must be accompanied by equivalent recharge of the aquifer. Aquifer recharge must be considered a beneficial use of irrigation/stock water. Funds for recharge should be available as an annual budget appropriation of the Legislature. We believe that incidental recharge should be recognized as aquifer recharge by the Idaho Department of Water Resources.

12

(54) Water Rights We support state ownership and control of its water held in trust for the residents of the state of Idaho, and will oppose any policy, program, or regulation, including Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing, which would infringe on this right. We support defining public interest under water right law, to give priority to beneficial uses and agricultural viability. We support sanctions upon any party making frivolous claims against water right applications. Frivolous claims are not reasonably grounded in fact or law causing unnecessary delay, increased cost, or harassment. We are opposed to the Water Resources Board accepting any further applications for water rights on surface stream water of the state that has been over decreed and adjudicated. Adequate water for domestic and agricultural purposes should have priority over other uses when the waters of any natural stream are insufficient, as per Article 15, Section 3 of the Idaho Constitution. Permittees on federal land should be allowed to retain ownership of water rights in their name as their livestock provide beneficial use under state law. Minimum stream flows should not jeopardize water rights and should be financed by the benefit recipients. We favor the continued wise development of all Idaho’s rivers and their tributaries as working rivers. We support first in time, first in right, and state control of water issues within appropriate Idaho agencies without federal regulatory or legislative intervention. We support the privatization of Idaho irrigation canal systems. We support the protection of canal and drain ditch easements from arbitrarily being taken over by cities, counties, states, federal or private developers or private landowners and developed into green belts or bike paths. We support the concept of conjunctive-use management when scientific evidence is available to support such management. We support efforts by local groundwater districts to provide supplemental or water bank water to senior surface water users to prevent curtailment of junior water rights. Irrigation districts shall have no net loss of irrigated acres due to growth and development. We oppose changing the historical beneficial use of water rights when that change will have a negative impact on other water right holders. We oppose the Federal Government changing the historic priorities and uses of water storage reservoirs. We oppose any diminishment of storage fill rights due to flood control or other discharge prior to season use.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

(55) Water Spreading We support voluntary conservation of water use by updating irrigation systems. Increases in irrigated acres (water spread acres) due to redesigning or remodeling irrigation systems or development of areas within a recorded water right, should not be excluded from irrigation. Conservation should not adversely affect the full use of an irrigation water right. (56) Water Supply Funding We support dedicating 1/16 of a cent of the state permanent sales tax to assist in meeting the development costs of Idaho’s water supply. (57) Water Transfers We oppose out-of-basin transfers of irrigation water from lands enrolled in the federal cropland set-aside program for use on lands that have not historically been used for agricultural development. We oppose the continued use of the 427,000 acre feet of water for flow augmentation. LAND USE (58) Conservation Reserve Program – Grazing We support managed grazing or other management tools of CRP acres to enhance the health of vegetation at the discretion of local committees. We support the separation of haying and grazing on CRP acres and the use of both as separate management tools. (59) Experimental Stewardship Program We support and encourage the continuation and expansion of the Experimental Stewardship Program and Coordinated Resource Management Program, (CRMP) as long as producer control is maintained in all decisions concerning range management. (60) Government Land Transactions We support no net loss of private property. We urge enactment of legislation to require prior legislative approval for any state land acquisition on a parcel-by-parcel basis. We support prohibiting the sale of state land to the federal government or agencies of the federal government, except for the purpose of building federal facilities or structures. When federal land is sold, traded, or exchanged, all holders of grazing preference must be fairly compensated. When land is to be sold, the current grazing permit holder must have the first right of refusal. If there is no permit holder, the adjacent landowner should be given the first right of refusal based on appraised value. We oppose any land exchanges involving


publicly owned land unless there is strong local support. When any entity acquires property from the federal government, that entity should be required to compensate grazing preference holders on the former federally administered lands for the loss of their property rights if that entity does not continue to maintain and protect those rights. (61) Government-Managed Lands We support multiple-use management of federal and state lands with due regard for the traditional rights of use. We urge county governments to have a land-use management plan with which both state and federal agencies would coordinate in order to protect the land within their tax base. We support the equal-footing doctrine and insist on the passage of legislation to establish a deadline for complete transfer of public land back to state jurisdiction and management. Holders of grazing permits or leases should not be penalized or removed from allotments because of administrative errors or omissions of the land-managing agency. On state and federal government grazing permits and/or lease rules, the word “grazing” needs to be further defined as livestock consumption of forage and brush for livestock production with benefits of weed and fire control. We support grazing contracts on nongrazed public lands to reduce excess fuel that contributes to range or forest fires. We support the timely salvage of trees in burn areas within our state. We support legislation that would promote harvest of trees and forage on federal and state land to help prevent and control wildfire. We encourage the release of federal, state and local government held lands for development or private use. (62) Grazing Fees We support the current state grazing fee formula and the PRIA formula concept. (63) Grazing Permit Transfer We oppose the U.S. Forest Service ruling that will prevent transferring grazing permits for 25 head or less. (64) Idaho Forest Practices Act We support the Idaho Forest Practices Act. We support legislation requiring all forest land owners, even tribal forest land owners, to comply with standards at least as stringent as the rules placed in the act. (65) Idaho Grazing Land Conservation Initiative (GLCI) We support the Idaho Grazing Land

Conservation Initiative. (66) Landfills on BLM Lands We encourage the development of new, as well as the continued use of, county landfills on BLM lands. (67) Local, State or National Land Designation We oppose any infringement upon private property rights through any designation of land by any government entity, including highway scenic byways/ corridors and National Heritage Areas. (68) Mineral Rights We support legislation that would transfer government-retained mineral rights to current landowners (at no expense to the landowners), where there has been no meaningful mineral activity for 10 years. We support requiring property deeds to state the name and address of the person or entity who owns the mineral rights for each property. If mineral rights are sold or transferred, the deed should be updated. The surface owner should be notified and offered first right of refusal. (69) Mining We support the continuation of mineral extraction in Idaho as long as the appropriate mine reclamation and environmental protections are in place and followed. (70) Notification of Property Damage We support notification to land owners when fences or property sustain damage due to accidents. (71) Open Range We oppose any changes to Idaho open range and fence laws. (72) Pest Control We support enforcement of current laws to give counties authority to spray and control insect infestations on private land, with the cost of the spraying to be assessed to the current tax base of the present owner of the land. We support legislation that requires state and federal governments to manage their lands and control their noxious weeds and pests so that no harm is done to adjoining lands, crops and animals. We support full disclosure of the contents of all seed lots by amending the Idaho Pure Seed Law to require the tag or label to list each plant species therein by name and rate of occurrence. (73) Protecting Farm Land We ask all units of government to give high priority to the protection of farm land and/or grazing land when considering other uses of such lands for public purposes. There should be no governmental taking of private property rights by restriction of use

without just and due compensation. We support the federal and state “takings” law in support of the U.S. Constitution, Article V. We oppose any infringement of private property rights caused by regulation of rivers and dams for endangered species. We oppose infringement on private property rights caused by highway districts and transportation departments. (74) Range Management Plans We believe that range management plans developed by the Idaho Department of Lands, BLM or U.S. Forest Service should be based on current factual information. If any plan is proposed without current information, we will join with others to persuade BLM and U.S. Forest Service or Idaho Department of Lands to revert to the pre-existing plan until current factual data is obtained. We support voluntary forage monitoring and oppose mandatory forage monitoring by livestock permittees on federal lands as proposed by the Federal Land Management Policy Act. (75) Rangeland Resource Commission We support the Rangeland Resource Commission and the fees assessed on BLM and U.S. Forest Service grazing AUMs on state lands and on private dryland grazing lands. (76) Regulation of Agricultural Practices We recognize and support long-standing sound agricultural practices such as field burning, including grass seed straw, residue burning, timber slash burning and animal-waste disposal, cultivation and harvest practices. We support farmer participation in voluntary airshed quality programs. We oppose any legislation or regulations that would segregate any agricultural industry, agricultural crop, cropping practice or geographical area and would impose a higher air quality, water quality or environmental standard than is required of any other person, entity, industry or geographical area within the state. We oppose regulations on agricultural practices that are not validated by sound peer reviewed scientific process and supported by scientific fact. We oppose the issuance of undocumented assertions regarding damage to the environment from agricultural practices that are not supported by scientific fact. The Idaho State Department of Agriculture should not have the authority to impose sanctions on livestock operators without first identifying specific problems and giving the operators an opportunity to correct said problems. We oppose mandatory registration or licensing of farms and ranches. We support the farmer’s right to farm by being able to carry on sound farming and forestry

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

13


practices and to be free from environmental regulations that are not proportionately beneficial to the implementation cost. We support access of agricultural implements of husbandry and vehicles to any and all local, county and state roads/ highways in Idaho and oppose the imposition of any minimum speed requirements. (77) Right to Farm We support the right-to-farm law, and the concept behind it, and encourage legislative changes to strengthen the law so it can be enforced at the local governmental levels through conditional use permits or other permitting processes. (78) Riparian Management Proper multiple-use management of riparian areas is essential. We believe these highly productive areas can be properly harvested with modern forest or livestock best management practices (BMPs) and still improve riparian habitat for all uses. We believe these areas should be properly used but not abused. However, management of the entire allotment should not be governed by forage utilization of riparian areas. We support the concept that all existing roads along class 2 streams be given grandfather rights approval. (79) Sawtooth National Recreation Area We oppose any expansion of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area (SNRA). (80) Sheep Grazing We believe that sheep grazing is a valuable use of Idaho forage and resist attempts to terminate grazing permits and/or move domestic sheep because of their proximity to Bighorn sheep. We support the best management practices concept for dealing with this issue. (81) State and County Noxious Weed Control We support stronger enforcement of Idaho’s noxious weed law by the state and counties, together with appropriate use of special managementzone provisions. We urge that Idaho Transportation Department weed control policies, at both the state and district levels, be changed to require that the ITD be in compliance with the Idaho noxious weed law each year, by controlling all infestations each year in a timely and effective manner and by controlling noxious weeds on the full width of all rights of way. We urge the Idaho State Department of Agriculture to require timely and effective noxious weed control by all railroads on their rights of way within the state. We urge that state and county authorities direct more emphasis to rights of way. We request that the Idaho Department of

14

Agriculture add dog rose (Rosa canina) and sweet briar (Rosa eglanteria) to the Idaho noxious weed list. (82) Timber Management We support all efforts by the Department of Lands to optimize the timber yields and stumpage prices as mandated by the Idaho Constitution. We oppose actions by the Land Board or Department of Lands that would inhibit or further restrict these processes, including, but not limited to, habitat conservation plans and conservation easements. (83) Timber Trespass We support legislation that would award delivered log values to landowners with no deduction for logging for incidental timber trespass. Additional penalties would be established for intentional trespass. (84) Wilderness and Restrictive Zones We oppose wholesale dedication of land in Idaho to wilderness and roadless areas and support the release of lands currently held in wilderness study areas (WSA) back to multiple-use management. All lands designated as non-suitable for wilderness must be immediately released from WSA status. We support the traditional balanced multiple-use practices on all federal/state lands and that access to wilderness be free and accessible for everyone. We support negotiated wilderness solutions when the stakeholders have been participating in the negotiations and are in agreement with the solution. We oppose designation of lands in Idaho as biosphere reserves, corridors or buffer zones, using the Lands Legacy Initiative, the Antiquities Act and the National Monument Declarations by the executive branch of the government. We oppose the Central Idaho Economic Development and Recovery Act (CIEDRA), also known as the Boulder-White Clouds Wilderness bill, as currently written or any similar wilderness legislation. We support adding adequate fire breaks in wilderness areas. (85) Wildfire Control We recommend changing fire-control policy to put out any fire upon arrival or as soon as safely possible. Local landowners must be allowed to protect private property. Local entities (such as counties and fire districts) and private landowners and individuals need to be allowed to act as first responders. We support changing state and federal wildfire policy to require that state and federal fire managers and incident commanders coordinate with county and local fire departments and landowners. We also encourage farm groups to

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

coordinate with the state department of lands in organizing trained, local fire crews. We support a provision that state and federal agencies maintain a fire break strategically located to protect private property and to control large wild fires. FISH AND WILDLIFE (86) Animal Damage Control We support animal damage control programs to control and manage predators, rodents and destructive wildlife. We recommend bees and beehives be added to the animal damage compensation list. (87) Emergency Feeding of Wild Game We oppose feeding big-game animals except in emergency situations defined by criteria such as snow depth, temperature, wind chill, and available forge. All money collected by Fish and Game for the emergency feeding of wild game should be used only for feed and feeding, fencing for hay stack protection, and control of predators that are displacing big game animals and preying on them. (88) Endangered Species Act We oppose any effort to create a State Endangered Species Act (ESA). We believe that modern society cannot continue to operate on the premise that all species must be preserved at any cost. We support a revision of the ESA to include a more thorough consideration of agricultural, mining, logging and tree farming in such a manner that these activities will be sustained and made part of any recovery plan. Recovery of Threatened or Endangered (T/E) species should not receive higher priority than human uses or rights. We believe basic requirements of human life have priority over protection of other species, including T/E species. A thorough consideration of all potential adverse impacts to human economic and social welfare should be an integral part of any consideration to list any T/E species. A species cannot be listed before its critical habitat is identified within its scientifically established historical range. Habitat site specific assessments and recovery plans must include comprehensive appreciation and inclusion of the protection of private property rights. No critical-habitat designation should be allowed until it has been established beyond scientific doubt that the species in question is actually present and that endangered or threatened status is actually warranted. The data to satisfy the scientific criteria should meet the guidelines of the Data Quality Act under federal statutes sections 3504(d)(1) and 3516 of title 44, United States Code. The agency, organization or individual requesting the criticalhabitat designation must bear the cost of proving


presence of the species and this must be done through the use of the best available peer reviewed science. We oppose road closures and land and water use restrictions imposed in the name of critical habitat. Anadromous hatchery fish and wild fish should be treated equally under the ESA. Hatchery fish should be counted toward recovery of the species. We support eliminating the marking of hatchery fish. We believe that introduction/ reintroduction of any species must be approved by the state Legislature and must be consistent with local government natural resource plans. Therefore, we urge the passage of legislation that requires federal agencies to coordinate and determine consistency per federal statutes with the proper state agency and local governments when those federal agencies have received a petition to list a species. We support the right of landowners to protect themselves, their families, livestock and properties from all predators including grizzly bears and wolves without legal retaliation. We urge Congress to seek depredation funding for losses or damage resulting from endangered species and to mandate responsibility to deal with such losses. We oppose implementation of the endangered species pesticide labeling program, other than in critical habitat. We oppose the listing of the Giant Palouse Earthworm (Driloleirus americanus) and the Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) as an endangered species. We support livestock grazing as an effective tool to reduce wildfires and enhance plant and wildlife habitat. (89) Fish and Game Department We oppose the acquisition of additional land by the Fish and Game Department. We encourage the department to use good-neighbor management practices on the land they now own, including fences, pests, noxious weeds, and provide sportsmen with guidance and marked boundaries. We oppose any increase in funding for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game from either the general fund or license fees without showing a specific need or use for the funds. The Fish and Game Department must control the concentration of wildlife numbers on all lands and should be prohibited from entering into agreements to limit access to any area, without approval of the local governing authority. We support retaining the present composition and selection method of the Idaho Fish and Game Commission. Hunting license fees and tags should cost disproportionately more than at present for

nonresidents compared to residents. We support a Habitat Improvement Program and request Idaho Fish and Game Commission to reflect strong emphasis on multiple use. We propose that the $1,000 depredation deductible be reduced. Compensation by IDFG for crop loss due to depredation shall be for actual loss minus the one-time deductible and should be expediently paid with no pro-rating. Fish and Game should be responsible to pay for damages caused by management decisions. We support Idaho Fish and Game issuing emergency depredation permits to ag producers and landowners to harvest animals that are causing verifiable damage to crops, livestock and property. The issuance of these depredation permits by IDFG and other actions by IDFG to relieve depredation shall be free of conditions that landowner must allow hunting on their land. Emergency depredation permit holders should have the option to retain possession of harvested animals. We support creating depredation areas for landowners who are annually affected by depredating animals and support mechanisms for quicker response in those areas. We believe the Landowner Appreciation Program (LAP) should be available to anyone owning 320 acres or more and recipients of these tags should be free to do what they wish with the tags. Transactions between the Idaho Fish and Wildlife Foundation and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game may represent a conflict of interest and should be investigated. (90) Fish and Game – Prior Notification The Idaho Department of Fish and Game must have permission from the land owner before entering private property. (91) Fish and Game – Private Reservoir Companies Fish and Game Department shall pay private reservoir companies for the use of that reservoir for fish habitat. The Department should also pay up-keep assessments on reservoirs in which they own water. (92) Fish and Game/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Responsibility We support the reform of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to create local management of the wildlife of Idaho. This program should be site specific to control damage caused from over populated species of both game and nongame animals. We oppose the relocation of wild game and non-game species without proper notice being given to residents and property owners in the area where they are released. The Idaho Fish and Game Department should not engage in activities that encourage only

non-consumptive uses of fish and wildlife species in Idaho. The state or federal wildlife personnel shall be required to file an environmental and economic impact statement before they can release non-native insects or plants in Idaho or make regulations that affect the counties and/or the state. We support the Idaho State Department of Agriculture’s ban on the release of deleterious exotic animals into the State of Idaho. All state and federal agency personnel must go through the elected county sheriff for all law enforcement. (93) Fish Species Population Management We support alternative scientific applications to modify fish species population without affecting contractual agreements or causing detrimental effects on flood control, irrigators, recreation and economies. (94) Sage Grouse We support predator control as a method to increase sage grouse populations. We support grazing on public lands as a primary method of increasing sage grouse populations by controlling the amount of vegetation that fuels wild fires. We support private sector rearing and releasing of sage grouse. (95) Introduction of Salmon We oppose the introduction of salmon above the Brownlee Dam. (96) Salmon Recovery We support the following salmon-recovery alternatives: 1. Physically modifying the dams rather than tearing them down or lowering water levels. 2. Improving barging such as net barge transportation. 3. Privatizing salmon fisheries for stronger fish. 4. Controlling predators of salmon. 5. Utilizing new hydroelectric turbine technologies to achieve the goals of increased power production and reduced hazards to fish. 6. Operating the Brannon bypass system as an option to facilitate salmon recovery and support continued study of the Kevlar Tube and other bypass systems. 7. Regulating harvest of off-shore and instream fish. (97) Snake River Basin Snails We support the delisting of snail species in the Snake River Basin and the grouping of snail species based on taxonomic/biological similarities. We oppose the future listing of new snail species.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

15


(98) Wolves We support hunting and trapping of wolves in all hunting units. We support enforcement of Idaho Code that requires the Idaho Fish and Game to coordinate with local government. The costs associated with wolves, including triple damages for depredation costs, should be borne by the federal government. We oppose any increase in funding for Animal Damage Control by increasing the assessment that is collected at the time of the brand inspection. Until such time that livestock owners are compensated from the federal government, money should be made available from the sale of wolf tags to compensate livestock owners for depredation. We request that all wolf carcasses be presented for testing for communicable diseases. We request that human Hydatid Disease be returned to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfares reportable disease list. We support requiring the ISDA to reimburse any livestock owner whose livestock are infected with Hydatid disease. EASEMENTS (99) Conservation Easements and Scenic Easements We support continuation of conservation easements agreements and scenic easements or agreements only if the real property involved remains on the tax rolls according to use. ENERGY (100) Affordable Energy We support (1) transparency in how energy monopolies plan to incur expenses and make investments that are passed on to ratepayers, (2) thorough, fair and publicly involved processes for evaluating rate requests and setting rates, and (3) increased focus on removing barriers to widely available and affordable sources of energy. (101) Alternative Energy We support the development of alternative energy. We oppose a broad moratorium on alternative energy projects. We support county control in the siting of these projects. We support sales tax incentives to assist in the development of alternative energy projects of less than one megawatt constructed on or by existing agriculture operations. (102) Bonneville Power Administration Credit We support some type of BPA credit that allows all of Idaho’s citizens to benefit from the BPA’s use of Idaho water for power generation.

16

(103) Electrical Energy Hydroelectric Dams: As future demands for electrical energy increase, we support the continued careful use of water as one of our renewable natural resources through existing and the construction of new hydro projects. We encourage the adoption of hydro projects to generate power for sale. We support the relicensing of dams, including the Hells Canyon complex, using a least cost mitigation plan reflecting the desire of the customers to have a reliable power resource at reasonable rates. Renewables: We encourage utilities operating in Idaho to develop economically feasible renewable energy portfolios. We support the construction of economically feasible power generation facilities in Idaho including those that use plant and/or animal residue or logging slash. We support an annual true-up for net metering rather than a monthly true-up. Regulations: We encourage state agencies to remove barriers that prevent utilities from increasing Idaho’s power generation capacity. We oppose any deregulation, reorganization, merger or consolidation of power generation or transmission which could result in loss of water rights, less service or increased rates. We support current laws that require coal fired plants be held to strict standards in the construction, operation and retirement of the facility. Transmission: We support upgrades in transmission and distribution. Routing of utility corridors should be placed on public land first and then to the areas of least impact to private property owners. We support the initiation of on and off ramps in transmission lines within the state of Idaho. (104) Farm Produced Fuel We support grants, cost share programs and bio-fuel production tax credits for farm-scale biofuel projects. (105) Fossil Fuels We support the mining and drilling of fossil fuels. We encourage the state of Idaho to adopt rules for oil and natural gas production that safeguard the water aquifers for all citizens and protect property owners’ rights to use their property. If a local government entity bans the development of mineral rights in its jurisdiction, it should be considered a property rights “taking” and compensation should be provided to the property owner.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

(106) Nuclear Energy We support the generation of electricity from nuclear reactors in meeting our future energy needs and urge the development of permanent disposal sites for radioactive waste material where it will not endanger Idaho’s aquifer. We support research and development of further usage of radioactive waste materials and safer ways of storage. We support development of the fast burn sector of nuclear technology which massively reduces or eliminates the need for nuclear waste disposal. We further support the utilization of the Idaho National Laboratory to provide the lead role in advancing the continued development of this technology. (107) Power Buy Back We support demand control programs as long as current water rights and power usage contracts are protected. These programs must remain on a voluntary basis. (108) Renewable Fuels We support the promotion and use of alternative fuels made from agricultural products, as long as they are driven by open markets and not economically supported by mandates and government subsidies. We encourage all state and local governments to assist in developing renewable fuel projects in Idaho. We support the availability of low-cost fuels, including off road bio-fuels, for the operation of farms and ranches. (109) Utility Companies Utility companies that damage public roads should be responsible for restoring roadways to their original state for at least a period of two years. LABOR (110) Legal Aid We oppose state funding of Idaho Legal Aid Services. We oppose the uninvited presence of Legal Aid personnel soliciting business on private property. (111) Minimum Wage We oppose any state minimum wage that is higher than the federal minimum wage. (112) New Hire Reporting We support changes in the Idaho New Hire Reporting Law to extend the reporting date to 60 days. We support not having to report seasonal temporary workers that work less than 45 days in a year.


(113) Supplemental Agricultural Labor We support programs sponsoring labor for agriculture on a temporary basis. If existing programs fail to satisfy labor needs, we would support a system under which supplemental labor from other countries could be imported on a timely and flexible basis to work in agriculture. When these workers are no longer needed they would be required to return to their countries of origin. If a status adjustment is contemplated for farm workers currently working but not authorized to work in the U.S., then such adjustment may not include citizenship and must include penalties for illegal entry into the U.S. We recommend strict enforcement of our immigration laws and improved procedures to verify status. (114) Unemployment Insurance Eligibility requirements should be made realistic to reflect agriculture’s seasonal employment practices. Business owners should not have to pay unemployment tax on themselves. The minimum basic-period wage criteria for unemployment benefits should be increased proportionately to increases in the minimum wage. (115) Workers Compensation Workers compensation for agricultural employers should provide: 1. Cost control measures and fair base rates.

(117) Assessed Value of Ag Production Land We believe all land being used for commercial agricultural production should be appraised for tax purposes according to its current use, eliminating any consideration of its speculative value, using realistic productivity figures, realistic cost deduction, including government mandated control of noxious weeds, taking into account the USDA’s annual report on farm real estate values in Idaho and that only the landlord’s net share of production be used in computing value for tax purposes, as prescribed by Idaho State Tax Commission rules and regulations. We support the retention of the five-acre minimum productivity option and the Bare Land & Yield Option for forest lands. (118) Budget Caps We oppose the loosening, removal or alteration in any way or the granting of an exemption from limitations and restraints placed by present Idaho law on units of local government, community colleges, school districts, etc., in increasing local property taxes. We oppose the creation of additional tax entities that could be exempt from such limitations and restraints. (119) County Taxing Districts Sharing Administrators We encourage county commissioners, school districts, highway districts and possibly other taxing districts to consider using administrators and secretaries on a county-wide or multi-district basis to help ease the tax burden of administration.

2. Mediation for agricultural concerns. 3. Protection from third party lawsuits. 4. Employer protection from worker caused injuries (i.e. drug & alcohol). Corporate officers should not be required to be covered by workers compensation. Business owners should not be required to pay into workers compensation on themselves since they are prohibited from collecting as business owners. We support changes in the existing worker’s compensation law that would take into consideration the employee’s responsibility when an accident occurs. We support having the settlement reduced by the percentage that was determined that the worker was responsible.

(120) Fuel Tax We oppose repealing the refund tax paid on fuel used off-road. We oppose taxing dyed fuel.

TAX

(123) Local Option Taxation We support local option taxation when used specifically for projects that would have been paid for with property tax dollars.

(116) Agricultural Property Tax Shifts We are opposed to shifting property tax to agricultural real estate. We support removing the Idaho Housing Price Index from the 50% / $75,000 homeowner’s exemption.

(121) Impact Fees We support local impact fees on new or expanding developments to pay for the services required to support growth. We support simplification of current impact fee rules and procedures. (122) Investment Tax Credit We support retention of the current 3% investment tax credit provisions, or an increase in the credit.

(124) Maximum Levy Rates We oppose raising the maximum statutory levy rates for any taxing authority.

(125) Personal Tax Privacy Rights We oppose the county tax assessor’s office requiring personal tax information to establish land use. (126) Property Tax We oppose budget increases and foregone balances that current Idaho State law allows for local governments. We support limiting yearly property assessment increases to a maximum of the state inflation rate. We support legislation that would allow county tax assessments and collection on property that has been purchased by non-profit groups and placed in tax exempt status, such as a tax code that covers environmental tax exempt classification. We support exempting all equipment used in the production of agricultural commodities from personal property tax. (127) Property Tax – Funding Local Government & Schools We support gradually reducing the property tax burden to fund public schools and local government. We are opposed to judges being allowed to levy taxes. We support legislation mandating that plant facilities levy monies can be used only for capital expenditures related to school operation and maintenance. We oppose school districts carrying over these funds to finance the construction of new buildings or the acquisition of additional property. We support removing the school budget stabilization levy that was authorized in the 2006 special Legislative session, unless it is supported by a local vote. We support the creation of standardized mandatory full disclosure of the school district’s revenues and expenditures that are related to extracurricular activities; separated into curriculum and athletics, and budgeted in standard categories of salaries, transportation, supplies and capital expenditures. (128) Sales Tax We oppose removing the sales tax exemption on production items. We support legislation that would exempt non-profit organizational fund-raising from paying sales tax on those receipts. We oppose the collection of use tax on out-of-state goods purchased by Idaho residents. (129) Special Taxing Districts We support county commissioners approving special taxing districts budgets, except independent road districts, before such budgets are published for public review.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

17


We support a requirement that all new taxing districts must be approved by a 66-2/3% majority vote of the registered voters within a district. We support legislation allowing special taxing districts to be funded by a household fee. All taxing districts that charge fees should be under the same 3% cap that applies to counties and municipalities. We support giving library districts the option to be funded by a household fee rather than through an ad valorum tax. If the library district chooses the household fee option, any bonds they pass must also be paid through household fees. We support a ten year sunset on all special taxing districts, after which they would require re-authorization by the voters to continue. (130) State Budget We support zero-based budgeting. We oppose balancing budget shortfalls by any tax increase. We support a constitutional amendment limiting state spending to a calculation determined by population growth and inflation. (131) Super Majority We support retaining the 66-2/3 percent majority vote as required in the Idaho State Constitution for bond levies. We oppose circumventing the required two-thirds majority by creative financing options. (132) Tax Compensation for Federal and State Managed Lands We recommend that a fee in lieu of taxes be assessed on all lands removed from tax rolls by state or federal agency management. We favor an annual fee equivalent to local private property tax on land. (133) Tax Liens We oppose the recording of federal tax liens (IRS) by the county recorder without due process of law. (134) Tax Refund Extension We support income tax assessments and income tax refunds having the same statute of limitations. (135) Urban Renewal Districts We support the repeal of urban renewal laws. LOCAL AFFAIRS (136) Annexation We are opposed to areas adjacent to a city being annexed into the city unless a two-thirds majority of those owning property in the area proposed for annexation vote in favor of the annexation.

18

(137) County Commissioners We encourage county commissioners to develop a Natural Resource Plan per NEPA guidelines that clearly states the objectives and policies of the county in regards to management of the natural resources located on public lands in their county. We encourage county commissioners to invoke the “coordination mandate” of Congress set forth in federal statutes with the public land management agencies plans and actions that may negatively impact the county’s economy, culture and heritage. (138) Distribution of Federal Fines We support legislation that would require public notification of the distribution of fines collected by the governmental agencies in that county. We support legislation that would require federal agencies to return a portion of federal fines collected in the county where the infraction occurred. (139) Elections We support restricting local school bond and levy elections to primary and general election dates. We support a mandatory pre-registration requirement to be eligible to vote in all local bond elections. We support more positive proof of residency for voter registration at the polls. Pay raises for elected officials shall not take effect until the official stands again for election. We support requiring full and complete disclosure of all campaign contributions with stiff penalties for failure to disclose. This will include full disclosure of any personal funds contributed by the candidate. The information will be readily accessible to all interested individuals and organizations. (140) Emergency Response Fees We oppose the imposition of a “crash tax” to cover the cost of cleaning up spills at the site of an accident. We favor reducing regulatory burdens which prohibit low-cost clean-up solutions. (141) Indigent Care Funding We support the use of the interest from the tobacco settlement monies to reduce the indigent care deductible now being paid for by the property owners. The deductible should continue to decrease incrementally as the settlement monies increase, not to drop below $1,000. The reduced deductible for tobacco-related illnesses should be expanded to include a reduced deductible for all health-related situations. (142) Lighting in Agriculture We support adequate lighting to operate agricultural businesses in a safe, efficient and unobtrusive manner.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

(143) Notice of Zoning Change Water-right holders or recipients of water delivered through property that is proposed to be rezoned should receive the same notification of public hearings as surrounding landowners. (144) Public Hearings Public hearings that affect a given area of the state must be held in the area that is affected, at a reasonable time and date for those impacted. (145) Zoning County commissioners should control all zoning in the county. Zoning should be site specific within the county; we oppose the use of blanket zoning ordinances, including sustainable development and smart-growth initiatives. We recognize and encourage the use of planning tools allowed under state law to encourage planned and orderly growth in or near agricultural areas. EDUCATION (146) Adolescent Nutrition We support school districts offering dairy products, healthy nutritional snacks and fruit juices in vending machines on school premises. (147) Ag in the Classroom We support “Ag in the Classroom” in school curriculums to increase student literacy of agriculture. We support an increase in funding for Ag in the classroom. (148) Contracts for Teachers We recommend that the tenure system for schoolteachers be eliminated and replaced with contracts based on evaluation and performance. We support the concept of incentive pay that will improve teacher excellence. Schoolteachers should have the option of being able to negotiate their own contract with the school district as a private contractor. (149) Education Standards and Assessments We support using: 1. Professionally established standards and assessments that can be modified to reflect locally recognized educational values, goals and philosophy. 2. Standards to ensure the progression of a student that reflect a comprehension of the subject. (150) Knowledge of Constitution We support requiring students graduating from Idaho schools to have a thorough understanding of the Constitution and the form of government that it gives us.


(151) Local Control of Education We encourage the State Board of Education and the Idaho legislature to refuse federal funds aimed at promoting control of educational programs in public schools by the federal government. We oppose the gathering of personal information of students that is not related to their academic education without parental consent. (152) No Increase in School Time We oppose increasing required school hours beyond 990 hours per year. (153) Parental Choice in Education We support the voucher system for education. We support the continuing freedom of Idaho parents to choose private school, parochial school, home school, public charter school or public school as prescribed in the Idaho Constitution and in the Idaho Code. We support optional kindergarten. We oppose public funding of pre-kindergarten. (154) Professional Technical Education We support funding for Idaho’s Professional Technical Education Agricultural Science and Technology Teachers to receive just compensation for duties outside the regular school year and or school day. We encourage agricultural science teachers, administrators and school boards to utilize this funding by actively developing and administering programs in their school districts that promote career development, economic stimulation and community development through agricultural education. (155) Right to Challenge Class We recommend that high school students be given the opportunity to challenge high school classes and if able to pass, be given credit for that class toward graduation. (156) Sex Education We oppose the teaching of homosexuality as an acceptable lifestyle. We support the teaching of abstinence as the only 100% effective method to prevent pregnancy. We also support the teaching of abstinence before marriage and monogamy after marriage as the most effective method for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. We further support educating for increased awareness and prevention of any sexually transmitted diseases. (157) Veterinary Students We support an increase from eleven (11) to fifteen (15) seats per year for Idaho residents in the

Washington-Idaho Cooperative Veterinary Medical Education Program.

STATE AFFAIRS (158) Agricultural Research and Extension We support the University of Idaho Agricultural Research and Extension Service and urge the Legislature to adequately fund this vital program. We support adequate funding to the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences to allow research to develop new improved varieties of seed that are classed as public varieties. We request the Legislature examine the role of the University of Idaho as the land grant college, and take steps to ensure the university honors its commitment as our agricultural research facility. The university should be on the same budgeting system as the State of Idaho. We support expanded research and education in all crop areas relative to Idaho. This must also include new and improved plant and animal varieties along with effective insect, pest, disease and weed controls. We also support an informational exchange and cooperative effort within the tri-state area in agchemical registration and research as well as plant/animal variety improvement research. Every effort should be made by state and county officials and the University of Idaho to retain an agricultural extension agent in each county as an extension service of our land grant university. Strong pressure must be exerted to revitalize and improve the agricultural information and education programs. We recommend that extension activities assist farm programs on a first-priority basis, including the integrated Farm Management Program. We also believe that county agents should be first and foremost county agricultural agents. We support the hiring of new extension educators in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences with primary training and experience in commercial agriculture and forestry. (159) Attorney General Review We support legislation that establishes a process whereby farmers and ranchers may request a review by the state attorney general of all local and state ordinances and rules that could violate state law by restricting normal agricultural operations. (160) ATV Safety We oppose the creation of a mandatory class or special license for the ability to ride an ATV on private or public land. (161) Ballot Initiative Process We support using a majority of legislative districts as a geographic requirement for gathering signatures to qualify an initiative for the ballot.

(162) Bicycle Safety We support bicyclists using public roadways being subject to the same laws that motorists must obey. (163) Cell Phone Use We oppose any legislation that would ban cell phone use in vehicles for voice communication. (164) Commercial Auction Companies Bonding We support legislation that would require licensing and bonding of commercial auction companies. (165) Commercial Unmanned Air Systems (UAS) We support the commercial use of unmanned air systems (UAS) for natural resource management. (166) Cross Deputization of Law Enforcement Officers We believe that cross deputization of county sheriffs and any tribal law enforcement officers should be voluntary. (167) Definition of Agricultural Buildings We support changes to Idaho Code to define agricultural buildings as follows: They are buildings where agricultural products are stored, housed or grown. They are buildings where agricultural equipment, including licensed vehicles that are used in the production of agriculture, can be fixed, repaired or stored. They are buildings that are used for the normal servicing of an agricultural business. They can be used by employees as a place of employment as well as a place to have meals and take bathroom breaks as required by GAAP (Generally Accepted Agriculture Practices). (168) Department of Corrections We support legislation requiring the Department of Corrections to notify victims and witnesses who have requested to be notified when inmates convicted of violent crimes will be paroled or issued passes. Records should be reasonably accessible to concerned individuals. We support having names of juveniles convicted of a felony made public knowledge. The Department of Corrections should be required to house nonviolent prisoners in county jails when space is available, instead of shipping them out of state. The state should reimburse counties at the rate that it is paying out-of-state prisons. (169) Drug Penalties We favor stiffer penalties, not necessarily prison terms, for drug pushers, money launderers and repeated users, with no plea bargaining. We oppose legalizing medical marijuana in Idaho.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

19


(170) Drug Testing for Welfare Recipients We support legislation that would require adult applicants/recipients for state and/or federal welfare payments, or similar benefits, to submit to periodic testing for illegal drugs and test negative to receive benefits. (171) Executive Branch MOU/MOA We oppose actions by the governor entering into memorandums of understanding or memorandums of agreement without legislative oversight and approval. (172) Falsifying Reports Knowingly filing a false report and/ or complaint to any agency shall be considered a misdemeanor and the perpetrator should be required to pay damages and/or expenses to the individual that was falsely accused as well as the investigating agency. (173) Gambling We oppose any amendment to the State Constitution to permit licensed or unlicensed casino gaming in Idaho. (174) Government Employees Accountability Employees of government must not be exempt from any laws and should be accountable under law for their actions. State officials should refrain from involving themselves in how county governments operate. Government employees should be restricted from moonlighting in their field of expertise, competing unfairly with private professionals or using government equipment, files etc. (175) Hazardous Waste We believe that each state should, to the extent possible, take the responsibility for treatment and disposal of hazardous waste generated in its state and that these waste products be disposed of in the most feasible manner that will not endanger life or resources. We feel that hazardous material and hazardous waste should be kept separate in the law. We support a statewide hazardous materials clean-up day. (176) Health Insurance We support legislation that opposes the implementation of federal laws and/or executive orders that mandate the state government or individuals to participate in a federal health insurance program specifically including active opposition to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and the state exchange and Medicaid expansion required by PPACA. We support a joint resolution of the State House of Representatives and Senate to the Federal government stating that the State of Idaho will not comply with the PPACA.

20

We support legislation that permits, promotes, and/or assists: (1) in the inclusion of the out-of-state health insurance companies participation in the marketplace of health insurance in Idaho; (2) in individual health savings accounts; (3) in free market solutions to health care costs and access. We support health insurance as a risk management tool by reducing and/or eliminating the number of mandated services. We oppose any legislation to require employers to carry health insurance on their employees whether they are seasonal or full-time. (177) Inmate Care We do not support taxpayer funded procedures that prolong the life of inmates with life sentences. (178) Judicial Confirmation We support the repeal of the “Judicial Confirmation,� Title 7, Chapter 13, Idaho Code, for ordinary and necessary expenses. (179) Liability and Tort Claims We support current Idaho statutes dealing with liability and tort claims and will resist any effort to weaken or erode them. (180) Medicaid We support required co-pay by Medicaid recipients and non-insured persons who use hospital emergency room visits for non-life threatening health care. We support minimum co-pay for primary health care provider visits. (181) Memorials in Public We oppose awarding attorney’s fees and penalties funded by tax money when a judge orders the removal of religious icons and expressions from public property. We support the continued display of the Ten Commandments on public property. (182) Mental Health and Drug Court We support increased state funding for mental health and drug court programs. (183) Mosquito Eradication We support spraying and other methods to kill mosquitoes. (184) North-South Highway We support construction and/or improvement of a North-South Highway to the Canadian border. (185) Planning and Zoning Commission Compensation We support a change in Idaho law allowing members of county planning and zoning commissions to receive payment for the time they

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

devote to their duties if approved by local voters. (186) Private Property Rights/Eminent Domain Private property should be defined to include but not be limited to all land, crops, timber, water rights, mineral rights, all other appurtenances and any other consideration associated with land ownership. We support programs to educate the public about private property rights and about trespass laws. Landowners should retain the right to refuse access within the current law. Landowners having lands adjacent to federal and or state lands should not be forced through coercion/or fear of imprisonment to allow new easements across their land for public access to federal and state lands. The taking of property or easements should be permitted only when there is eminent domain. We oppose the use of eminent domain for recreational purposes, for private economic development or to expand the land holding of wildlife agencies. We support an Idaho constitutional amendment defining public use as found in the eminent domain doctrine to prohibit the condemnation of private property for economic development or any use by private parties. If private property is taken, compensation must be prompt, just and adequate. In the cases of partial taking of real property, the landowner must be compensated when governmentimposed regulations cause a loss in value of private property. Landowners or tenants shall not be held liable for any damages incurred as a result of the condemnation. Entities condemning property shall assume liability for any damages incurred by landowners. (187) Proprietary Information We oppose laws requiring insurance companies or other private business entities to provide proprietary information to state or federal agencies. (188) PUC Rates We will continue to cooperate with organizations that are trying to obtain equitable public utility and freight rates. We oppose any action by the PUC to move in the direction of inverted block rates or in any major rate design revision that would be detrimental to agriculture. (189) Public Employees Bargaining We believe that public employees, when negotiating contracts, should be separate entities in themselves, and by statute not allowed to delegate or reassign their negotiating rights to professional negotiating forces. (190) Public Funded Institutions and Entities All public institutions and entities


funded in whole or in part with public money will discourage and prevent the sanctioning, promotion, encouragement or advocacy of any behavior or any lifestyle containing behaviors that are in violation of Idaho statute or the Idaho Constitution. (191) Reapportionment We support the state’s right to a republican form of government, and the right to pattern our representation in the state Senate and House after the Congress of the United States; with the Senate by county and the House by population. (192) Re-Establish Congressional Lawmaking Responsibility We support the state Legislature in its efforts to encourage Congress to reclaim its constitutional responsibility of making law. Proposed rules or regulations by federal bureaus or agencies should have congressional approval before becoming law. Presidential directives or executive orders should be limited in scope and subject to congressional approval in a timely manner. We support passage of legislation ensuring that no treaty can supersede the Constitution or reduce the protections we enjoy under the Constitution. (193) Regulation Reform We support: 1. Complete review of existing regulations to determine their effectiveness and appropriateness prior to assigning more restrictive regulations. 2. Peer review of the existing regulations to determine their potential to mitigate the problems they address. (194) Rights-of-Way Easement rights-of-way obtained by public or private sectors shall not be committed to any new or additional purpose, either during their original usage or after abandonment, without consent of the owner of the land underlying the easement. Upon abandonment of railway or utility rights-of-way or leases, all property and rights associated with such rights-of-way or leases should revert to the current owner of the original tract. We urge enactment of legislation to require that adjacent landowners be given priority to purchase at fair market value lands that have been vacated by railways, power companies, roadways, etc. and require that public agencies obtaining title to abandoned rights-of-way be responsible for maintaining fences, drainage systems, all field and road crossings and for controlling weeds on any such acquired rights-of-way. We support access to or through federal lands using RS2477. We support allowing county commissioners the ability to determine the validity of

an RS2477 claim, the right to move an RS2477 when it occurs on private land and the ability to temporarily close an RS2477 for resource reasons. To prevent the misuse of RS2477 claims, we recognize the superiority of a property’s title over RS2477 claims. We will not support the use of RS2477 as a tool for the taking of private property without just compensation as prescribed in the Constitution. Any party who controls a railroad rightof-way for use as a trail or any other purpose that prevents the corridor from reverting back to the adjacent landowners, must continue to honor all historical maintenance agreements that the railroad formerly performed including fencing, weed control and any other agreement that may have been in existence before the corridor changed management. (195) Right to Bear Arms We oppose any abridgment of the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which protects the right to keep and bear arms. We support current law that allows lawabiding citizens the right to bear arms and be free from legal jeopardy when protecting themselves, their families and their property. We oppose the retaining of personal records collected by the FBI as a result of firearms purchase background checks. The dangerous weapons code should be updated to reflect these rights in the home, the place of business or in motor vehicles. We support legislation that declares all firearms and ammunition made and retained in-state is beyond the authority of the federal government. (196) Road Closures We believe that when a federal or state agency closes a road, commodity production use on these roads should be exempted from the closure. We oppose the closure of any existing roads. (197) Sharia Law We support legislation banning the implementation of Sharia Law in Idaho. (198) Speed Limit We support increasing the speed limit for trucks to match the speed limit of autos on Idaho’s interstate highways. (199) State Agencies We oppose regulating any phase of farm and ranch business by any state agency that does not have an agricultural representative as a member of its policy-making board or committee. We oppose combining, splitting or changing government agencies without the approval of users of the services. We support the concept of the Soil Conservation Commission or successor entity to advise and aid local Soil Conservation Districts by

providing technical support and a mechanism to receive financial support at no less than fiscal year 2010 levels. We recommend representation by an agricultural producer on the Board of Regents for Idaho’s land grant university and on the Idaho Fish and Game Commission. We urge and will support legislation to require that government rules and regulations, wherever applicable, be based upon supportive disciplinary peer reviewed scientific data and that wherever policies, rules or regulations do not meet this standard the responsible individual and/or individuals can be held liable. When a state law enforcement agency makes an arrest there should be a means provided to reimburse the county for all costs associated in maintaining the prisoner. (200) State Building Code We ask the State Legislature to review the State Building Code with amendments, to limit infringement on private property rights through excessive permit requirements. (201) State Commissions and PERSI We support the development of a policy at the state level that allows for opting out of PERSI for State Commission board members to preserve their IRAs. (202) State Hatch Act We favor restoring the State Hatch Act, 67-5311 Limitation of Political Activity, to its original form and content. (203) State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) We oppose the expansion of the authority of the SHPO and oppose any state funding. (204) State Legal Reform We support reform of the state’s civil justice system, which would cure or substantially solve many of the problems farmers face with hostile, harassing legal services lawsuits. Any person or organization that sues to prevent livestock operation siting, or the use of agriculture or resource management practices, should be required to post a bond in a reasonable amount, which will be forfeited to the defendant to help defray their costs in the event that the suit is unsuccessful. We support legislation by the Idaho Legislature that would require any entity bringing such lawsuits to post substantial bonds based on the potential harm of the lawsuit. Individuals who file complaints against an agricultural operation and request an investigation must pay a fee to cover administration costs. Complete names, addresses and phone numbers are required on each complaint. We support legislation to restore the election of district judges. We support the open and full disclosure

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

21


of the actions of the Idaho Judicial Council. Entities from outside the jurisdiction of taxing districts that file lawsuits against public entities should be required to pay all legal expenses. We support legislation to amend state statutes and the Equal Access to Justice Act to make it clear that state courts may award attorney fees against the U.S. (205) Term Limits We oppose term limits on statewide offices, legislative offices and county and local levels, with individual counties given the choice to adopt or oppose term limits. (206) Termination of Life We oppose abortion except in cases of rape, incest or when there is endangerment to the life of the mother. We oppose any state funding of Planned Parenthood. (207) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLS) We support mandating Idaho’s Department of Environmental Quality to conduct an Economic Impact Analysis of an area’s businesses (including the agri-business and agricultural operations of that area) before initiating a TMDL process for that geographic area. The analysis shall be provided to the Watershed Advisory Group before consideration is given to develop and implement a TMDL. A copy of the analysis shall also be provided to the germane committees of the Idaho Legislature.

22

(208) Transportation We support continuation of independent road districts without oversight by county commissioners. We would consider an increase in the state fuel tax for infrastructure construction. We would consider a tax or fee increase on vehicles of 12500 GVW and under if this revenue is used for infrastructure construction. We oppose the removal of the Port of Entry system from the Department of Transportation. We support increases in gross weights with axle weights non-changing. We support the continued use of long combination vehicles (LCVs). We support the Idaho Department of Transportation policy of issuing oversize load permits for Idaho public roads. We support the continued improvement of Idaho’s agricultural roadways. We support accountability of highway transportation department’s engineers for the cost over-runs and/or miscalculations for wrongful designs of highway projects. We support increasing permit fees on loads exceeding 200,000 GVW to be comparable with fees in surrounding states. (209) Trespass We support a law placing the burden of trespass on the trespasser instead of the landowner. IDFG shall make a concerted effort to educate hunters about private property rights and the location of private property in their hunting

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

regulations and maps. It is the hunters’ responsibility to know where they can hunt and not the landowners’ responsibility to mark or post their property. We support making it unlawful to enter any facility, legally or illegally, to use or attempt to use a camera, video recorder, or any other video or audio recording device without permission from the owner or authorized agent. (210) Unfunded Mandates All new laws passed by the legislature that put financial burdens on the counties or cities should be funded by the state. (211) U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals We support the division of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to add a new northwest U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. (212) Use of the Public Trust Doctrine for Hunting We oppose the use of the Public Trust Doctrine to force private property owners to allow hunting on their private property. (213) Well Drillers License A well shall only be drilled by or under the responsible charge of a licensed driller except that a property owner who is not licensed can construct a well on his own property for his own use with the aid of power driven mechanical equipment with the option of substituting a video tape of the well head and bore for the “well log” showing geologic strata, casing and satisfactory compliance with “Well Construction Standards Rules”.


Mt. Borah Continued from page 5 troughs in different pastures. “Our permit starts on May 25th, but we never put the cattle out until the 5th of June,” he says. “At this high elevation, we want to give the plants as much start at growth before they’re grazed. We think it’s pretty valuable.” The cattle graze on the public range until Sept. 25, and then they’re moved to the home ranch for the winter. The mercury can dip well below zero during the winter in the Lost River Valley not to mention a biting wind chill - so the Smiths built a shed for calving. “We built the first part of it in 1981 and saw the benefits of it. As we fill up, we might have 25 cows and calves in here in a single night.” The calving shed is covered with rugged plastic roofing, which helps radiate heat inside with passive solar energy. Leon sleeps in a “Shanty” next to the calving shed. He keeps watch over the mother cows in the middle of the night. It’s an around-theclock job during the calving season.

handy at mechanic work to keep the ranch running when equipment breaks down. “You don’t have any choice,” Smith explains. “We’re 22 miles from the nearest town; we do almost all of our mechanic work. I won’t tackle automatic transmissions. But as far as overhauling the diesels, transmissions, rear ends, you bet, we can do all of that. I’ve always liked to do mechanic work, and I took carpentry at Idaho State in Pocatello. And it has paid off big for me. Anything we need built, we build it ourselves.” Wiley’s oldest son, Leon, elaborates on how important it is to be able to fix things on the fly. “You can’t be running to town every time you have a flat tire or a bearing goes out,” Leon Smith says. “You have to keep the parts on hand and be able to do it yourselves. Dad does have a gift for mechanicking, he went to college for that, and he enjoys it. He’s got a knack for it; he understands how things go together, how they need to work, he does a good job.

We’ve learned a lot from him.” Leon and Steve plan to continue running the Mount Borah Ranch for many years to come. The Smith’s three other children ended up taking professional jobs elsewhere. The family always has been inspired by their grandfather who bought the ranch in the 1930s, and made a go of it with primitive equipment and no calving shed. Wiley keeps some of the old farming equipment in working order so people appreciate the hard work. “My thinking is grandpa worked too hard here to sell it,” Leon Smith says. “Same thing with Dad. Hopefully one of Steve’s kids will follow him and pass it on. That’s what we’ve done since our grandpa homesteaded the place.” Steve Stuebner is the writer and producer of Life on the Range, www.lifeontherange.org, an educational project sponsored by the Idaho Rangeland Resource Commission.

“With the sheds, we’ve been able to keep our death loss below 5 percent. Before, it was much greater,” he says. “At night we might have 20-25 below zero out there, but you come in here, and it’s 20 above, and it makes a whale of a difference for a calf. Besides that, with the building here and the walls, we’ve stopped the wind. It could be a blizzard outside, but the building stops the blizzard.” The design of the calving shed reflects the ingenuity and carpentry skills of Wiley Smith and his sons. They built wooden gates to create multiple pens in the shed. “Starting at the end of the shed, this alley becomes a pen. There’s one behind us here, and two more gates, so this alley will be full of cows and calves as well as the larger pens. “We do cesareans in the first pen, and all of the pulling equipment and chains are right here hanging on the walls.” Like many ranchers, the Smiths are very Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

23


Stacy Dragila competing in a track and field event. Dragila won a gold medal in the 2000 Olympics and attended Idaho State University. She was the featured speaker at the Idaho Farm Bureau’s Young Farmer and Rancher Conference in January.

Stacy Dragila’s Journey Home By Jake Putnam Idaho’s greatest track and field athlete is home. Stacy Dragila, and family moved back to Idaho in October. Dragila won the Olympic gold medal in the pole vault at the 2000 Sydney Olympics. Winning gold was just a chapter in a long journey. Along the way she married Ian Waltz, welcomed daughter Allyx to the world and looked to settle down. “Ian was still on the US Olympic team,” said Dragila. “He was still competing toward the 2012 Games and I wanted to give back to the sport, so after the Olympics we started making plans.”  Dragila has gained experience coaching high school track athletes and intends to continue coaching. She says it’s about hard work and having a plan.  The whole time Dragila was still an active 24

pole vaulter. She’d show up at a national meet and put in good vaults. But after nagging injuries she retired for good in 2012 and with Ian’s Olympic career drawing to an end they sat down and planned out their move to Idaho. Ian Waltz is no stranger to Idaho. He’s originally from Post Falls wanted to work in a team environment and thought being a firefighter was the perfect fit. “Boise Fire was hiring,” said Stacy. “He went through the process and got a job in Boise. They say it’s a three year process to get in with the fire department. He did it in a year and I’m proud of him.” Stacy grew up on a farm outside of Sacramento and says those early years molded her. “My grandpa had a small fruit orchard. He was an immigrant from Italy. He did all the work on the farm. He had migrant workers help during the picking season. I

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

remember being in the fruit shed packing the boxes. I’m sure I was in the way, but I packed fruit.” Stacy’s Dad later took over the farm and raised cattle, horses, pigs and chickens. “I just loved being on the farm. My friends lived in the city and we’d go out and it was better than the zoo,” she said. “We’d play all day and my mom would honk the car horn at night to get us off the property; but at the same time I dabbled in sports.” Stacy also dabbled in 4-H. “I couldn’t pick one or another so my parents let me do both. I started doing project steers, and then when I was older I showed dairy heifers for a neighbor lady.” Stacy learned the show-ring, mucked out the stalls, and saw every project through. “My parents didn’t feed our animals. If we were going to do it, we were doing it 100-percent and that was our agreement,” she said. “So when I took interest, I com-


mitted to it. I think having projects paid off down the road because I was committed and the responsibility was big.” Stacy learned from the show ring. “The competitiveness of going into the ring and trying to be the best showman I could be, then having the composure in the ring, being the best I could be, I first learned in 4-H,” she said. In high school Dragila played volleyball, track and a few other sports in between. But she also discovered other great loves, FFA, rodeo club and roping. “Aaron Semus was a high school rodeo guy too from Auburn. Jump ahead 10-15 years later and he was one of the founders of the Professional Bull Riders Association. His Dad had a big roping arena, we’d go down there on Thursday and Sunday afternoons and do team roping,” she said.

walkers.” The event was new for women, Dragila was one of the first women pole-vaulters and just a few people knew that the U.S. even had a team. Dragila and Coach Nielsen saw opportunity in the new event. “I knew I had a fighting chance,” she said. “Emma George, the Australian, had the record for three or four years prior to that. She was a rival but I loved her and loved competing against her. She always brought the best out of me because I always knew if I was competing against Emma that I’d set a personal record.” A few more world records and suddenly the 2000 Olympics were thrust on the world

stage. Women’s vaulting was so popular that the International Olympic Committee included it in Sydney. She was fired up and won gold in front of a nearly a billion people that watched the summer games on television. She appeared on ‘Late Night’ with David Letterman, and in ESPN The Magazine in the November issue. She landed sponsorships with Nike, Reebok, Oakley and General Motors. In 2001 she was named Women’s Track and Field Athlete of the Year. Since then she’s won 15 world championships. Stacy has now gone full circle and returned to Idaho. She’s coaching, raising a family and her journey continues.

She excelled, did some goat tying and made her high school rodeo team. But it was track and field that got her to college. She accepted a scholarship to a local junior college and later from Idaho State University. “I was always shooting for something,” she said. “I watched the Olympics with my Dad and he’d talk about things like ‘look how hard she works, she’s made sacrifices to get to that point. She didn’t get here by sitting on the couch. She got there with hard work’. We talked about that and I listened,” said Dragila. She wanted to be an Olympic champion. “So it was like, yea, I want to be an Olympic champion, but how do I get there? What steps do I take to achieve that?” It started in Pocatello. “When I got myself to Idaho State, I learned. Coach Davie Nielsen sat down with us and said, ‘I want everyone to set goals on a sheet of paper,’ and that’s how it started.” It was a coming out year for Dragila. “We were invited to the Olympic trials,” Dragila recalls. “That was the first time I was around elite athletes and vaulting was so new that people asked us, if we are race Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

25


Focus on Agriculture

Farmers Strategize on Social Media By Cyndie Sirekis Several agricultural social media “rock stars” offered tips and encouragement to farmers and ranchers at a strategic engagement conference during the American Farm Bureau Federation’s recent Annual Meeting in Nashville. “Social media allows us to be part of the conversation,” is how Ryan Goodman, a cattle rancher from Arkansas who created the AgricultureProud.com blog put it. Goodman is also a guest contributor to CNN’s Eatocracy blog. He noted that consumers are “already talking about what we’re doing on the farm and ranch.” He has discovered that social media is an effective means of allowing farmers and ranchers to have direct access to people with questions. Zach Hunnicutt, a Nebraska farmer who was recently elected chairman of AFBF’s Young Farmers & Ranchers Committee, has found that he can be an advocate for agriculture by giving a tour of his farm every day using Facebook and Instagram. “Be positive all the time, and be passionate when advocating for agriculture on social media,” Hunnicutt advised farmers thinking about engaging in social media. Passion about what you do on the farm or ranch will draw people in, he said. “Be consistent with social media and you will build community,” said Katie Pinke, author of the Pinke Post blog. Especially if you’re just starting out, 26

concentrating on doing just one or two things well is the way to go, she advised. Pinke, who started her blog several years ago as a “lonely pregnant woman on the prairie trying to find friends,” offered encouragement to those in agriculture who may be hesitant to get started in social media. And, what you do does not necessarily have to be fancy or flashy, she said. All of the panelists have found

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

that engaging in conversations on social media about nonfarming subjects at least part of the time helps increase outreach. Cooking, recipes, kids, sports, music, travel and photography are among the topics they have successfully used for this. Setting up a business page on Facebook for your farm is another strategy the panelists encourage. Having a business page means your farm can be

found on Internet search engines. And it addresses privacy concerns many people have— you can share family photos and stories only on your personal page, for example. Visit the Annual Meeting blog at http://farmbureau.wordpress.com for perspectives about social media and events in Nashville. Cyndie Sirekis is director of news services at the American Farm Bureau Federation.


Insurance Matters Mike Myers ­­— Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Co. of Idaho

Focus on Home Inventory There’s a good reason retailers take inventory every year. If they experience a theft or natural disaster, an accurate inventory allows them to say with certainty what they lost. The same principle applies to your personal possessions. Without an inventory, it would be almost impossible to remember every item in your home, much less its condition for an insurance claim. A home inventory can: • prove your loss in the case of theft, fire, flood, storm damage, or other natural disaster • document your property prior to moving or storage • help you prepare for home leasing • substantiate financial losses for tax purposes or when applying for disaster assistance • help you purchase the right amount of insurance • help a home insurance claim run more smoothly. One of the most convenient and effective ways to document your home’s contents is with a digital video camera. Popular pocket video cameras like the Sony Bloggie or Kodak PlaySport are easy-to-use, affordable (around $100), and allow you to record audio along with the images. The Big Picture

Get exterior shots of your home on all sides. If you added anything to your property – a deck, gazebo, pool, landscaping, etc. – be sure to get shots of it too. Then move to your home’s entryway. Record the walls, floors, and ceilings to cover your flooring, light fixtures, wall coverings, artwork, moldings, etc. that you want to include. Complete Coverage A home insurance claim can run much more smoothly if you get shots of every room, but more importantly, every item in every room. Leave nothing undocumented. Open all the closets, cabinets, drawers, and storage bins. Other Tips Make sure your home is clean because it’s easier to identify what’s covered if it’s not surrounded by clutter. Include your name, address, date and time of the video on the recording and provide narration and commentary throughout the video. Don’t forget to include items that may have been endorsed on your policy or appraised such as jewelry, furs, collections, musical instruments, tools, guns, etc. Even though they may be documented on your policy, a digital video record can help identify those items if they are stolen and recovered later by police.

A pocket video camera can be an effective tool for creating a home inventory. Images Aren’t Enough A comprehensive home inventory should also include a written record of the items in the video. This record should include make, model, serial numbers, purchase history (where applicable), and estimated costs. Keep The Video Safe Don’t let your home inventory become part of a property loss. Store the video somewhere safe, off of your property, like a relative’s home or a safety de-

posit box. Your video can also be backed up relatively easily online. Some backup services like Carbonite offer unlimited storage space for $5 or more per month. For more tips on how to make a complete home inventory, talk to your local Farm Bureau Insurance agent. They can suggest other details you may want to include in your inventory to help make a home insurance claim run more smoothly.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

27


Tree Planting or Natural Seeding? By Chris Schnepf Renewing a forest with tree seedlings is key to sustainable forestry, whether to replace harvested trees or those that died from fire, insects, or disease. Foresters refer to the

process of establishing new tree seedlings as “regeneration.” There are two basic approaches: 1) natural regeneration from new seedlings or sprouts (e.g., aspen) produced by trees left on or near the site and 2) artificial regeneration, more commonly known as tree planting. Prompt reforestation can be critical. Every year that the forest is understocked is a loss in timber production. Where board feet are not a primary

Successful reforestation requires careful planning. Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

focus, brush or grasses taking over a site can make establishing new trees very difficult and expensive. Finally, the Idaho Forest Practice Act requires reforestation within five years of timber harvest. Natural Seeding Natural seedlings are likely to be relatively adapted to the range of environmental conditions a site has historically been exposed to. Many people also like not having to pay for tree

seedlings, though successful natural regeneration can still have site preparation costs. Most tree seedlings family forest owners can purchase have not been through formal tree improvement programs to test for improved growth traits. Natural regeneration may be many forest owners’ only path to genetic improvement, to the extent seedlings come from the best formed and growing trees on the site. However this also works in reverse – if seed trees


are poorly-formed leftovers from harvests focused on taking the best trees, forest genetics can be degraded. Seed trees should be evaluated carefully. A tree species presence near the site doesn’t automatically make it is a good reforestation species. For example, grand fir and Douglas-fir commonly seed in naturally, but often have serious long-term insect and disease issues. If in doubt, touch base with a local forester to see which species are most viable for your site. Seed trees may not have adequate seed crops. Most trees species’ seed production is periodic. For example, lodgepole pine produces good seed crops every 1-2 years, whereas Idaho larch may go 20 years between good seed years. Most Inland Northwest conifer seed does not survive longer Deer and elk can cause extensive damage to tree seedlings. than one or two years after reaching the ground. quire careful planning, but planting tends ing forester to plant tree seedlings, espeGermination conditions must be also right. to require more. For spring planting, get an cially where thousands of trees are being Most conifer seeds germinate best on bare order to the nursery by the fall of the pre- planted. mineral soil (a minimum of duff -- decay- ceding year to reserve preferred seedlings. Choosing regeneration approaches ing needles, twigs, etc.). Historically, wild- Cost-sharing programs for tree planting fires created bare mineral soil. Now it’s also available through the Natural Resources So, should you plant trees or rely on natural created through prescribed burning or with Conservation Service also require advance regeneration? First, how are you managing the stand? For example, few managers use mechanical equipment (often in conjunc- planning. the clearcut silvicultural system without tion with logging). Mechanical approaches You can spend anywhere from $0.38 to planning on prompt tree planting. Landmust balance between creating a good seed $2.25 per seedling depending on the size, owners using the seed tree silvicultural sysbed and minimizing soil compaction. age and quantity of seedlings purchased. tem also often end up doing some planting, Tree Planting Grass and brush compete with tree seedat least supplementally, particularly when lings for moisture, so consider some type natural regeneration is not as successful as Well planned planting is often the surest apof cultural or chemical control to ensure hoped. By contrast the selection and shelproach to prompt reforestation. Tree plantseedling survival, especially on drier sites. terwood silvicultural systems tend to rely ing also brings opportunities for genetic If deer and elk like to camp on your planton natural regeneration, though there may gains, though for most Idaho family forest ing site in the spring, tree protection devicbe some supplemental tree planting, parowners, the only genetically improved tree es such as rigid plastic mesh tubes or a reticularly for desired species not currently seedlings are white pine bred and tested for pellent may be needed to protect your tree present on the site. blister rust resistance. Planting seedlings seedlings from browsing. Pocket gophers from another site-adapted source may add can also kill many seedlings. If you see Regardless of the choice, measuring regento genetic diversity, to the extent natural a lot of gopher mounds, plan for control. eration success by taking some stocking seedlings on the site were from relatively You may be tempted to skip these added plots is critical. If an acceptable number few trees that survived a fire. costs, but consider the potential cost of re- of new tree seedlings are not established Planting provides an opportunity to estab- planting to replace trees that do not survive promptly, planting gets progressively more expensive. lish species that are adapted to a site but these factors. have no seed source there. For example, Planting trees is hard work, and you may Chris Schnepf is an area extension educator most Idaho sites with cedar or hemlock will have a relatively brief window when envi- – forestry – for the University of Idaho in support white pine, regardless of whether it ronmental conditions are right to plant. If Bonner, Boundary, Kootenai and Benewah is currently present. your time and energy for tree planting are counties. He can be reached at cschnepf@ Both natural and artificial regeneration re- limited, consider working with a consult- uidaho.edu. Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

29


The lifeblood of America. They’re the humble heroes who rise before dawn and battle the elements. They put clothes on our backs and food on our tables. Their genuine values and tireless work ethic are an inspiration to us all. We appreciate all that America’s farmers do and invite you to join us in saying thanks at www.fbfs.com/SayThanksToAFarmer. FB02-ID (3-12)

30

Idaho Farm Bureau ID-Tribute(3-12).indd 1

Quarterly / WINTER 2013

3/12/12 3:54 PM


Marketbasket Survey

Retail Food Prices Decline Slightly in Fourth Quarter 2012 Shoppers paid a bit less for food at the grocery store during the fourth quarter of 2012, with some popular fruits and veggies showing a decline in retail price. Lower retail prices for Russet potatoes, bagged salad and apples, among other foods, resulted in a slight decrease in the latest American Farm Bureau Federation Quarterly Marketbasket Survey. The informal survey shows the total cost of 16 food items that can be used to prepare one or more meals was $50.54, down $1.36 or about 3 percent compared to the third quarter of 2012. Of the 16 items surveyed, 10 decreased and six increased in average price compared to the prior quarter. “While prices were down from the third quarter, compared to a year ago, the marketbasket price was actually higher compared to a year ago, by about 3 percent,” said John Anderson, AFBF’s deputy chief economist. “Throughout 2012, food prices were relatively stable, thanks to very slow but steady growth in the general economy coupled with fairly stable energy prices. For this year, we expect food prices to rise by 3 to 4 percent, which is slightly higher than the average rate of inflation over the past 10

years.” Items showing retail price decreases for the third quarter included Russet potatoes, down 39 cents to $2.62 for a 5-pound bag; bagged salad, down 35 cents to $2.59 per pound; deli ham, down 31 cents to $4.89 per pound; apples, down 26 cents to $1.60 per pound; sirloin tip roast, down 22 cents to $4.52 per pound; flour, down 20 cents to $2.37 for a 5-pound bag; chicken breasts, down 7 cents to $3.10 per pound; vegetable oil down 5 cents to $2.86 for a 32-ounce bottle; eggs, down 4 cents to $1.90 per dozen; and bacon, down 2 cents to $4.21 per pound. These items showed modest retail price increases for the quarter: whole milk, up 18 cents to $3.73 per gallon; orange juice, up 11 cents to $3.41 per half-gallon; white bread, up 10 cents to $1.85 for a 20-ounce loaf; ground chuck, up 8 cents to $3.55 per pound; shredded cheddar cheese, up 5 cents to $4.31 per pound; and toasted oat cereal, up 3 cents to $3.03 for a 9-ounce box. The year-to-year direction of the marketbasket survey tracks with the federal government’s Consumer Price Index (http:// www.bls.gov/cpi/) report for food at home. As retail grocery

Tracking Milk and Egg Trends 1 gallon regular milk, $3.73; 1/2 gallon regular milk, $2.38; 1/2 gallon organic milk, $4.00; 1/2 gallon rBST-free milk, $3.15

1 dozen regular eggs, $1.90; 1 dozen “cage-free” eggs, $3.38

prices have increased gradually over time, the share of the average food dollar that America’s farm and ranch families receive has dropped. “Through the mid-1970s, farmers received about one-third of consumer retail food expenditures for food eaten at home and away from home, on average. Since then, that figure has decreased steadily and is now about 16 percent, according to the Agriculture Department’s revised Food Dollar Series,” Anderson said. Details about USDA’s new Food Dollar Series may be found online at http://www.ers.usda.gov/ publications/err-economicresearch-report/err114.aspx. Using the “food at home and

away from home” percentage across-the-board, the farmer’s share of this quarter’s $50.54 marketbasket would be $8.09. AFBF, the nation’s largest general farm organization, has been conducting the informal quarterly marketbasket survey of retail food price trends since 1989. The mix of foods in the marketbasket was updated in 2008. According to USDA, Americans spend just under 10 percent of their disposable annual income on food, the lowest average of any country in the world. A total of 107 shoppers in 31 states participated in the latest survey, conducted in October.

AFBF MARKETBASKET SURVEY 4th Quarter 2012

16 ITEMS: B����� ����� O����� ����� A����� P������� C������ ������� S����� ���� ��� B���� G����� ����� S������ ��� ����� E��� M��� S������� ������ B���� F���� T������ ��� ������ V�������� ���

TOTAL $50.54 Down $1.36 or 3% from 3rd quarter 2012.

Up 3% compared to a year ago.

^ŽƵƌĐĞͬ'ƌĂƉŚŝĐ͗ŵĞƌŝĐĂŶ&ĂƌŵƵƌĞĂƵ&ĞĚĞƌĂƟŽŶΠŶĞǁƐƌŽŽŵ͘ĩ͘ŽƌŐ

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

31


Top Farm Bureau Agents Rookie of the Month: Agent of the Month: Agency of the Month: Eric Wilkins Newell Agency

Rhett Price Schmitt Agency

Schmitt Agency

Schmitt Agency was agency of the year for 2012 Rhett Price was agent of the year for 2012

Idaho Farm Bureau members can save a significant amount on their medications. Take 5 minutes to get a price quote.

USE IDAHO FARM BUREAU CODE (IDFB) Toll-Free Phone 1.866.335.8064 www.thecanadianpharmacy.com

32

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

Step 1:

Call 1.866.335.8064 or go to www.thecanadianpharmacy.com

Step 2:

Tell them you are with the Idaho Farm Bureau (code IDFB) and that you need a price quote on your medication.

Step 3:

If this price is lower than what you currently pay, then The Canadian Pharmacy will help you get your prescription at the discounted price.


F

T

H

A

T T F PF R N S W T H T W H A L TL W R N T LF D P H N FL M L W RL D V H N D V T N P H

R

I

I

I

O E H R E EC U K PB O C PI O S RE EL YS I S C KI B CI I OI C O S EE H L SS CI B

V C B M A V L C Word Search Puzzle: WINTER OPUZZLE: TIMEM- BRRR O P MBRRR WORD SEARCH Winter Time S

L

B

L

U

S

T

C

R

P

E

K

W

A

G

L

O

V

E

L

M

Z

F

M

O

I L HO

ZP

P

S

C

A

R

F

T H PN

NL

E

N

A

M

W

O

E N SS

KN

R

E

N

P

R

H

G

N

N

I

T

S

W

P

R

C

O

C

F

T

H

A

T

Farctic R

W

H

R

I

I

I

O

O

M

V

C

B

S

L

E

Y

O

T

K

R

F

G

B

M

I

K

G

I

H

Z

D

A

T

P

N

V

N

E

S

K

C

O

arctic blizzard blustery brrr chilly coat cocoa cold cozy earmuffs fireplace

T B

E

E

E

N S

K

R Z

M

W

blizzard H C B blustery MbrrrP A Echilly N L coat T R L cocoa EcoldB N Ecozy M U earmuffs L L H fireplace S

L

I

Y

R

Y

I

E

I L L Y S A D P

flurry freeze frost frostbite frozen gloves hat hearth hibernate hypothermia ice

Y

O

E S N L L arctic C C O A F G blizzard T T R K L D V blustery K I O G K G brrr E B B M N R D W B T Z chilly ED R A D E L I MO H U C coat GV R N cocoa U L RT LD P H Z OC WO cold F S L LA K S I cozy E B M H K F P earmuffs O A fireplace T I M W arctic L W flurry D S T N freezeblizzard C E S B O E frost blustery G S frostbite H T P R brrr I R frozen N T O G chilly glovescoat H Z E U R R hat cocoa N K hearth Z T G A cold L V hibernate H A N G cozy hypothermia earmuffs T F W P R I ice fireplace H

M

P

E

icy mittens numb scarf shiver shovel ski sled sleet slippery slush

R

Y

L

D

G B S MH P T A P L R G F S H H

R E N N T E L Y I O arctic flurry T N H G blizzard Z T E R U R Y F freeze E Ufrost blustery N G brrr K E Z B T I S K frostbite F M L A chilly V E H M A Z YA DBfrozen glovescoat T N cocoa F L W L P N RD VNhat cold E Ahearth P O E S R L Y K P Chibernate cozy A I earmuffs hypothermia R Mice fireplace M Ricy flurry mittens freeze U E numbfrost F Hscarf frostbite F Tshiverfrozen shovelgloves S O ski hat M Psled hearth E Ysleet hibernate slippery hypothermia L H slush ice W

E

L O L Gflurry I F R T N icy L Rmittens Y R freeze H S Z O E numbfrost N Gscarf S A frostbite NM K P Z U Nshiver A Gfrozen L E V Y H shovelgloves H Rski D I hat T L F H W hearth sled I L sleet P D hibernate P W E E R hypothermia slippery slush ice snow icy snowball mittens snowflake numb snowman scarf snowstorm shiver snuggle shovel socksski toboggan sled white sleet winterslippery slush

Answers on page 34

snow snowball snowflake snowman snowstorm snuggle socks toboggan white winter

Farm Bureau Members Ski For Less This Winter

www.idahofbstore.com

208-239-4289 Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

33


FARM BUREAU WINTER WORD SEARCH ANSWERS - From p. 33 Answer sheet:

34

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

E

B

L

U

S

T

E

R

Y

H

M

C

C

O

A

T

C

R

P

E

K

W

N

Z

Y

D

V

K

I

O

G

E

N U

A

G

L

O

V

E

S

W

E

R

D

W

B

T

Z

F

M

L

M

Z

F

M

O

L

O

P

E

R

D

L

O

C

Y

B

P

S

C

A

R

F

H

N

L

G

R

U

R

D

Z

R

N

E

N

A

M

W

O

N

S

N

O

W

F

L

A

K

E

A

R

E

N

P

R

H

G

N

N

B

M

H

K

F

P

A

I

I

T

S

W

P

R

C

O

C

O

A

T

I

M

W

R

M

F

T

H

A

T

F

R

W

H

L

W

D

S

T

N

M

R

R

I

I

I

O

H

C

B

I

C

E

S

B

O

E

U

E

O

M

V

C

B

M

P

A

L

G

S

H

T

P

R

F

H

S

L

E

Y

O

E

N

L

L

I

R

N

T

O

G

F

T

T

K

R

F

G

T

R

L

Y

H

Z

E

U

R

R

S

O

B

M

I

K

G

E

B

N

S

N

K

Z

T

G

A

M

P

I

H

Z

D

A

E

M

U

A

L

V

H

A

N

G

E

Y

T

P

N

V

N

L

L

H

D

T

F

W

P

R

I

L

H

E

S

K

C

O

S

L

I

P

P

E

R

Y

L

D

W

E


Farm Facts

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

35


A Taste of Idaho: Meatloaf with a Kick Article and photo By Julie Christoffersen Ever wonder where the classic American meatloaf came from? It can actually be traced back to ancient Rome as early as the 5th century. The Romans minced cooked meats like peacock and mixed them with bread. Meatloaf, these days, is more commonly made from ground beef;

however pork, elk, deer and lamb are also used.

American meatloaf and the Dutch meatball that we know and love today.

The American meatloaf is believed to have been started by the Pennsylvania Dutch. They had a popular dish called scrapple, where pork scraps and trimmings were mixed with cornmeal, wheat flour and spices and formed into a loaf. Before it was served they would pan fry the slices. From scrapple evolved the

The invention of the mechanical meat grinder during the Industrial Revolution really made meatloaf an American household favorite. The meat grinder made it possible for raw meat to be ground and sold to the public at a low cost; however, it took a while for the public to trust the product.

There is nothing traditional about this recipe. Just like the Rio Grande River, this meatloaf is pretty spectacular.

36

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013


Meatloaf recipes, in many variations, could be found in cookbooks, women’s magazines, and were the topic of conversation as women gathered. In the 1950’s the pairing of meatloaf and gravy became a popular dish served with mashed potatoes and green beans. This iconic concoction has re-invented itself over time to remain a favorite on our dinner tables. Quaker Oats Company created recipes that included the company’s products as a binder in place of the traditional breadcrumbs. The binder is what creates that even texture in the dish. Numerous binders can be used in meatloaf. Oatmeal, breadcrumbs, cereal and rice are com-

mon. In this featured Rio Grande Meatloaf, taco shells are used as the binder.

and you’ll see that this recipe uses a crock pot.

This recipe has a Mexican flair that brings great flavor to an old favorite. It is not your typical meatloaf recipe; it has a little bite, making the flavor zesty and warm.

For wine lovers, many wines compliment this popular comfort food. A simple red wine will pair well with a meatloaf. Idaho produces some wonderful reds. You are sure to find the perfect wine for this simple classic meal.

If you don’t like it this spicy, you can cut back on the jalapeno and chili powder. You can buy the black beans with jalapeno if you prefer. Meatloaf is one recipe you can experiment with to fit your family.

Whip up a batch of corn bread muffins, and while the muffins are in the oven you have time to make a green salad. And leftovers make great sandwiches too.

One thing to remember is that meatloaf does not have to be baked in the oven. It does well in a crock pot or the microwave;

CROCK POT RIO GRANDE MEATLOAF Ingredients: Cooking Spray 1 (15oz) can black beans, rinsed and drained 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/2 cups chopped green pepper 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro 11/2 Tablespoons seeded minced jalapeno 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons chili powder 1/2 teaspoon pepper 4 taco shells, finely crushed 2 large egg whites 3 large garlic cloves, minced 2 pounds ground burger (beef or elk) 1/2 cup salsa

Directions: Coat slow cooker with spray. Tear off two sheets of foil long enough to fit in bottom of cooker AND to extend 3 inches over the outside of the pot. Fold each foil sheet lengthwise to form a 2 inch wide strip. Arrange strips in a cross fashion in cooker, pressing strips to bottom of cooker and extending ends over the outside of pot (foil strips become handles to remove meat after cooked). In a large bowl combine beans and next 11 ingredients and stir well. Next crumble beef over the bean mixture and mix until blended. Make a loaf the shape of your pot. Place the loaf on top of foil strips. Cook on low for 21/2 – 3 hours or until done. I serve each slice with salsa spooned on top. Or for the over – preheat oven to 375 ͦ. Pack mixture into a 9 X 5 inch loaf pan coated with cooking spray. Bake for about 1 hour. Let meat loaf stand in pan for 10 minutes before removing it.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

37


Priestley

Continued from page 2

the phrase “untrammeled by man.” This gets us to the heart of the problem in Custer County, which is made up of over 90 percent federally-managed land. As federal bureaucrats tighten restrictions on land use, rural economies suffocate. Locking up resources on public lands leads to job loss. Young people who grow up in rural areas have to leave after high school graduation if there is no place to go to work. Entrepreneurship is stifled by the lack of opportunity and the downward spiral continues. With limited tax base rural counties struggle to provide basic services like police and fire protection. Lack of private land ownership hurts rural school districts’ ability to levy property taxes to replace worn out buildings and poor quality schools detract from a rural area’s ability to attract entrepreneurs. Raging fires that burned over 1.5 million acres last summer in Idaho alone are largely the result of poor management of public land. In our opinion, it makes sense to put

38

people back to work in our forests and start managing them sustainably. Both the forests and rural economies would benefit. Idaho is made up of over 60 percent federally-managed land. At present, Idaho has about four million acres tied up in federally designated wilderness areas and another 2.7 million acres tied up in wilderness study areas. In fact we have wilderness areas that are bigger than some eastern states. But we fail to see any validity to arguments raised by the environmental community that wilderness stimulates rural economies. If that were the case, places like Challis, Mackay and Salmon would be bustling with economic activity. The fact of the matter is wilderness travelers are limited in numbers and frugal in their purchases of local goods and services. A significant percentage of the land residing under the wilderness study area designation in Idaho does not meet the definition of wilderness. To illustrate this point consider that the land that came under dis-

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

pute last spring at the top of the Herd Creek drainage in Custer County contains a road and a campground that was constructed by the Bureau of Land Management. Many if not most other wilderness study areas in the state also suffer from a lack of wilderness qualities under the definition set out by the Wilderness Act. We understand that a lot of people in this nation have romantic notions about the West and they want to preserve open space and lands with wilderness qualities. At this point, the question becomes at what cost? We applaud Custer County’s efforts to challenge the federal government and to force federal bureaucrats to advance the discussion. It’s time for the federal government to loosen its chokehold on rural Idaho and learn how to become a partner that can both satisfy its charge of protecting the great open spaces of the American West and managing public lands in a way that benefit local economies.


Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

39


KELLER Continued from page 2 it. Just as ignorance of the law is no excuse, ignorance of what was in a contract you signed does not ordinarily help your position. Our state Legislature is contemplating adopting a state health insurance exchange in lieu of a federal exchange as defined in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), popularly known as Obamacare. Rhetoric is flowing and dire consequences are being predicted by both sides of the issue. There is a tremendous amount of uncertainty expressed by all. It’s time to calm down and not be in a hurry on the health insurance exchange decision. The rules for the ACA are still being developed. The original document was more than 2,300 pages, authorizing multiple agencies to write rules and regulations implementing the onerous bill that affects a significant portion of the U.S. economy. Those rules and regulations are far from being completed. The Otter administration is asking the state of Idaho to authorize a state exchange on a prayer and a hope that the pending rules and regulations will be acceptable and beneficial to all. Farm Bureau says, let’s wait or in other words, read and understand the contract before we sign. We should have learned our lesson in the adoption of the ACA. It was erroneous and irresponsible of Congress to pass this unpopular bill without reading and understanding the consequences. The former Speaker demonstrated political condescension before the National Associations of Counties in which she said, “But we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of controversy.” Idaho has the option of converting to a state-based exchange in any future year. Every November, the state can re-evaluate. Another reason to wait and not be in a hurry is to further explore the power of Idaho’s sovereignty in implementing the Affordable Care Act.

40

In the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that affirmed that Congress has the right to levy taxes and that ACA is a tax and therefore constitutional, Chief Justice Roberts’ gave a Civics 101 lesson. In his written opinion, he chastised several groups for relying solely upon the Supreme Court to undo or

If Idaho adopts a state health insurance exchange, it would be signing an unread and open contract. dismantle poor or unpopular legislation. The Chief Justice then outlined two other options for reversing or changing laws. The first was the power of the people. He cited that the people can elect individuals who can change the laws. The American people had that opportunity in November and elected to retain individuals that will continue promulgating Obamacare. Chief Justice Roberts then identified another avenue of reversing or changing a law and that was through the power of the sovereignty of the states. This was directed primarily to the question of requiring the states to expand Medicaid coverage as mandated in the Act. He stated: “Federal Government . . . must show that a constitutional grant of power authorizes each of its actions. The same does not apply to the States, because the Constitution is not the source of their power. . . . The States thus can and do perform many of the vital functions of modern government – punishing street crime, running public schools, and zoning property for development, to name but a few – even though the Constitution’s text does not authorize any government to do so. Our cases refer to this general power of governing, possessed by the States but not by the Federal Government, as the ‘police power.’. . . The Framers thus ensured that powers which “in ordinary course of affairs, concerns

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

the lives, liberties, and properties of the people” were held by governments more local and more accountable than a distant federal bureaucracy. The independent power of the States also serves as a check on the power of the Federal Government: ‘By denying any one government complete jurisdiction over all the concerns of public life, federalism protects the liberty of the individual from arbitrary power.’ . . . In the typical case we look to the States to defend their prerogatives by adopting ‘the simple expedient of not yielding’ to federal blandishments when they do want to embrace the federal policies as their own. The States are separate and independent sovereigns. Sometimes they have to act like it.” (Boldness used for emphasis and not in the original document.) Our members voted to oppose the creation of a state health insurance exchange at our annual meeting in December. In adopting the policy that it did, Farm Bureau asks the State of Idaho to exercise its sovereignty as suggested by Chief Justice Roberts to “not yield to federal blandishments” in creating a state health insurance exchange and implementing Obamacare. One of the arguments to support the state exchange is the issue of state control versus federal control; Farm Bureau most often seeks state control. However, in this case we believe it’s best to wait for clarification of the costs and other possible ramifications that remain unknown. By accepting a state health insurance exchange, the State of Idaho will embrace the federal policies of Obamacare as its own. If Idaho adopts a state health insurance exchange, it would be signing an unread and open contract. Idaho should wait. Let’s read and understand the contract before we sign and are obligated by its unknown terms.


Idaho Farm Bureau Discount Program Step 1: Members go to sears.com and find the product(s) they are interested in and write down the product/model number(s). Step 2: Members email the product number(s) to Farm Bureau’s designated contact at Sears Appliance Select: wgill03@searshc.com for a quote. To receive this pricing a member must include their Farm Bureau membership number and Farm Bureau discount code CU068062 in the email. Step 3: After receiving a quote (allow 2-3 business days), members can then choose to use a credit card to purchase the discounted item(s) and it will be delivered via a custom freight company.

THIS OFFER IS NOT AVAILABLE THROUGH SEARS RETAIL OR DEALER All manufacturer warranties apply with the option to purchase extended Sears Protection Agreements. Installation is not included with delivery.

For more information call (208) 239-4289

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

41


Classifieds

Animals

Farm Equipment

Miscellaneous

Showpigs for sale $150.00$200.00. AI and natural bred to some of the top sires in the USA. Will work for mid July-August shows. Call Doug 208-380-0719 or Ashley 208-339-8189

Challenger MT 755, 2209 hrs, annual service checks by Western States, 1000 hrs on 25” tracks, Trimble auto steer and sprayer control, clean one owner, $172,000. American Falls, Id. deegt@aol. com or call 208-220-5588.

Weka 1203 concrete drill, good condition, in case. Middleton, Id. $425.00 208-631-2231

Boer goats for meat and quality brood stock, 4-H and shows. simon_boers@q.com or 208837-6523 ASCA registered Australian Shepherd pups. Working line since 1968. Full satisfaction guaranteed. All four colors available. Boise, Id 208-484-9802 2 year old Blk/white paint gelding. Halter broke. Lunges, feet trimming, no problem to catch. $1000. 3 yr old paint gelding has had 60 days training, very gentle and no vises. $1500. Sandpoint, Id. 208-263-5549 For sale or trade Homozghous paint stallion, black and white, very gentle to handle. Last foal produced 2012 was 13/3 hands high at 6 months of age. 208263-5549 Market lambs for sale $175-$200. June-September shows. Proven champion genetics from some of the top producers in the nation. Breeding ewes also for sale. Email: northwestlambs@gmail.com or 208-608-1200

2012 Spudnik Style, 3 axle trailer for sale. 50 feet long, 3 axle air ride, 24 inch belt, PTO unloading. $58,000 -No F.E.T on this trailer. Please call 208.604.6846 with questions or to see. Located in Blackfoot. Balewagons: New Holland selfpropelled or pull-type models/ parts. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208880-2889 anytime Ready for 2013 Harvest Season. New and 2012 John Deere and Case IH Combines for Rent. Guaranteed Delivery and Maintenance, Repairs on most combine parts included. Call Frank at 208-312-1123 for more details. E-mail at frank@ frankallidaho.com.

Help Wanted Agricultural Collateral Inspection and Appraisals. Ag background required. Training course available. Call 800-488-7570 or visit www. amagappraisers.com.

DEADLINE DATES: ADS MUST BE RECEIVED BY

April 20

FOR NEXT ISSUE OF THE

FARM BUREAU QUARTERLY 42

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / WINTER 2013

Box tops and Campbell’s UPC codes needed to help our small, country school. Your help is greatly appreciated! Thanks for helping our students. Please sent to: Liz Robinson 1440 Dufort Rd, Sagle Id 83860 Free high volume ground squirrel or jack rabbit control. Schedule early. Moscow, Id area. Contact Jim at 208-882-8963. Evenings.

Real Estate/Acreage Ideal Ranch for horses in King Hill, ID. Log home, 99 acres. Borders BLM. Two ponds, springs, Clover Creek runs through ranch. 8 stall horse barn, tack room, indoor arena. Shop, wild life, quiet. More details phone 208-989-6795 Estate Sale: 109 Pine Hollow Road, Stevensville, Montana. 18 irrigated acres, 1960 3 bdrm, 2 bath house with 1 car garage and deck, hay shed, 2110 sq. ft. shop. Was asking $495,000. Price reduced to $295,000. 208-232-8796 40 acres on Emmett Idaho Bench, two miles from town. $6000 per acre or best offer. 26 acres adjoining property also available. 503-522-8964 sandh57@gmail. com House for sale, Blackfoot, Id. 2 1/2 acres, all log inside, 3 bed, 2 bath, Lyons claw tub, oversized 2 car garage, fire pit, sauna, water rights, established trees, with appliances, china cabinet, deck, quiet. $125,000. 208-429-6981

Recreational Equipment Sleeper cab shell w/floor. Fits BTD PU, 61” WX. 34” deep. Windows all sides. Back Door, wired for lights. $400. Pocatello, Id. 208-238-3624

Wanted Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338. Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-2851258 Buying U.S. gold coins, proof and mint sets, silver dollars, rolls and bags. PCGS/NGC certified coins, estates, accumulations, large collections, investment portfolios, bullion, platinum. Will travel, all transactions confidential. Please call 208-859-7168.

SEND US YOUR CLASSIFIED AD FREE TO IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS!

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Non commercial classified ads are free to Idaho Farm Bureau members. Must include membership number for free ad. Forty (40) words maximum. Non-member cost- 50 cents per word. You may advertise your own crops, livestock, used machinery, household items, vehicles, etc. Ads will not be accepted by phone. Ads run one time only and must be re-submitted in each subsequent issue. We reserve the right to refuse to run any ad. Please type or print clearly. Proof-read your ad.

Mail ad copy to: P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848 or email Dixie at DASHTON@IDAHOFB.ORG Name: __________________________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________

SEND US YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS!

City / State / Zip: __________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________________ Membership No. ___________________ Ad Copy: ________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________


Winter 2013 Volume 13, Issue 1  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you