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January 2013 • Volume 17, Issue 1

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Living With Wolves: A Mountain Man’s Perspective

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Idaho Farm Bureau

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Corn Futures Flatten


Keeping our Resolutions in 2013 By Bob Stallman AFBF President

The New Year is upon us, which means many of you have probably made a New Year’s resolution or two. The funny thing about resolutions is that they are easier to make than to keep (I speak from experience). Come January 7, that piece of cheesecake typically wins out,

A Look Back at Farm Bureau’s Accomplisments By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

Editor’s Note: Following is the speech Idaho Farm Bureau President Frank Priestley delivered during the organization’s 73rd

It Depends if Your Ox is Getting Gored By Rick Keller CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

For years, hay producers and feed suppliers have criticized the unfair laws that meant their feed sales had a high probability of never being paid once the commodities left their fields for dairy and cattle

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

The Ag Agenda while the elliptical machine is already starting to gather dust.

Should Old Acquaintance be Forgot

But, when it comes to Farm Bureau, my resolutions—along with those of Farm Bureau leaders and members—never waiver. Continuing to build upon Farm Bureau’s 94 successful years of ensuring that farmers and ranchers’ voices are heard, is one resolution we do not back away from.

As we delve into 2013, Farm Bureau has several legislative and regulatory resolutions. First off is getting to know the new members of Congress as they take office and acquire committee assignments. It will be important for Farm Bureau to get to know these members and pay close attention to the makeup See STALLMAN, page 6

Annual Meeting held in Boise on December 4-6.

heard. These veterans have put their lives on the line so that we could have the freedom to be here today to meet as a group to promote our cause. May we never take their service for granted.

On Nov. 9th we held the second annual Salute to Veterans at the home office in Pocatello. It is humbling and sobering to spend time with these veterans. As we repeated the pledge of allegiance I heard two retired officers standing behind me as they pledged their allegiance to the flag of the United States of America. Tears formed in my eyes as I heard it spoken like I had never before operations in the state. For years, state credit laws have given first priority for debt recovery to the banks which financed the cows, leaving the feed supplier in a less favorable position, often costing them hundreds of thousands of dollars and having little chance of ever being paid. The apple cart was turned over in a state district court last May when the Twin Falls court ruled that feed producers have first priority on the sale of a defaulted dairy’s livestock.

We just finished the ultimate act of freedom, the right and privilege of voting. As with most things in life, we didn’t get everything we wanted. Some people or issues we voted for passed and some See PRIESTLEY, page 7

The decision has been appealed to the Idaho Supreme Court. No hearing date has been set by the Supreme Court. The bankers are now complaining that without being in first position, they may be less willing to give loans to dairies and cattle operations, causing uncertainty in the agricultural community. And yet the same bankers show little sympathy to the hay producer who cannot make his operating loan See KELLER, page 6


Volume 17, Issue 1

IFBF OFFICERS

President ................................... Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President ..................................Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President .............................. Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................Shelley Scott Bird .......................................................... Pocatello Chris Dalley ....................................................... Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ........................................... Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant .................................................. Oakley Rick Pearson ................................................... Hagerman Mike Garner.............................................................. Declo Curt Krantz ............................................................ Parma Mike McEvoy..................................................... Middleton Tracy Walton ....................................................... Emmett Marjorie French .............................................. Princeton Bob Callihan . ...................................................... Potlatch Louis Kins ........................................................... Kootenai Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Cody Chandler ..................................................... Weiser STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ....................... Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Organization............................... Dennis Brower Commodities & Marketing Assistant ........... Peg Pratt Member Services Assistant . ................... Peggy Moore Publice Relations Assistant ..................... Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager .......................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager ....................... Kendall Keller Dist. III Regional Manager .................. Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ................... Russ Hendricks Dist. V Regional Manager ...................... Bob Smathers Dir. of Governmental Affairs ....................... Kent Lauer Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs ... Dennis Tanikuni Range/Livestock Specialist..........................Wally Butler Director of Public Relations ............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................ Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager .................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise ................... Julie Christoffersen Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID GEM STATE PRODUCER USPS #015-024, is published monthly except February, May, August and November by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201. POSTMASTER send changes of address to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, Idaho, and additional mailing offices. Subscription rate: $6.00 per year included in Farm Bureau dues.

MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: The South Fork Ranch, also known as Hettinger Ranch, is located on the South Fork of the Salmon River about 20 miles from Warren. Tim Hull has managed the ranch for over 20 years. Photo by Steve Ritter

Gary and Sandy Fuhriman of Bannock County were recipients of this year’s Idaho Farm Bureau President’s Cup Award. Photo by Steve Ritter

Farm Bureau Delegates Set Policy for 2013

Delegates to the 73rd Annual Convention of the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation set the organization’s course for 2013 and beyond this week as farmers and ranchers from across the state representing 37 county Farm Bureaus met in Boise. Delegates reviewed the organization’s entire policy book updating positions and adding new policy on a wide range of agriculture, natural resources and other topics. Specifically, the delegates voted not to support a proposal to increase brand inspection fees to help offset costs associated with the management of wolves, adopted new policy on management of existing roads on public lands, updated policy on sage grouse management and voted to oppose establishment of a state health care insurance exchange. Delegates sent a recommendation to the IFB State Board of Directors opposing implementation of “federal laws or executive orders that mandate the state government or individuals to participate in a federal health insurance program.” President Frank Priestley awarded Gary and Sandy Fuhriman of Bannock County the IFBF President’s Cup for their contribution to Farm Bureau over the past three decades. The Fuhriman’s helped establish trade relationships with Mexican grain milling companies that quadrupled Idaho’s grain trade with Mexico. Gary Fuhriman is the former (retired) IFB director of commodities and marketing. Prior to that the couple were active volunteers for the organization, with Gary serving as Teton County FB president and later as a state board member while Sandy was a leader in the FB Women’s organization. “On an early tour we met people that were influential in the Mexican wheat market See CONVENTION page 4 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

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but didn’t realize the real influence they had at the time,” said Gary Fuhriman. “But it paid off and we realized that families were the key. We got to know their families and invited them up along with their wives. Once we got to know each other a mutual trust was developed.”

to the next generation. Along the way they tackled tough issues like the capital gains tax. Kohtz received an all-expense paid trip to the American Farm Bureau Federation Meeting in Nashville in January where she’ll compete against peers from throughout the nation.

  “Farm Bureau was always a part of our family life,” said Sandy Fuhriman. “In fact when I was in high school my dad sold Farm Bureau insurance in the winter so it’s always been a part of my life. He was on the State Board and it was an easy transition for Gary and I to become active in Farm Bureau.”

Wes and Julie Mackay of Lemhi County won the YF&R Excellence in Agriculture Award, receiving a cash prize and an Ipad computer. Conrad and Adriane Isaak of Power County won the YF&R Achiever Award, a four-wheeler from Polaris, and a trip to the American Farm Bureau Annual Meeting in Nashville.

The Women’s Leadership Committee honored five women as District Women of the Year. This year’s honorees are: Sharon Harris of Woodruff, Linda Crapo of Parker, Freda Lee, of New Plymouth, Carol Fleener of Moscow and Evelyn Jones of Paul. 

  Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter addressed Farm Bureau on Tuesday thanking the group for support in removing Slickspot peppergrass from the endangered species list.

 Elizabeth Kohtz of Twin Falls County won top honors in this year’s Young Farmer and Rancher Discussion Meet. Kohtz won a Polaris four-wheeler for her efforts. Kohtz did a skillful job bringing background knowledge to the meet and seamless discussions into ‘passing on the family farm’

  IFBF members also attended educational workshops on marketing, legislative issues, residue management, the Affordable Healthcare Act, and a constitutional law seminar put on by Justice Dan Eismann of the Idaho Supreme Court. The banquet entertainment was a rousing song and dance troop called the “Musetes.”

Tom Geary, past president of the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation, chats with current President Frank Priestley during the organization’s 73rd Annual Meeting. 4 #

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  Tom Daniel of Boundary County was elected to the IFB State Board of Directors. Re-elected to the Board were Dean Schwendimann of Madison County, Chris Dalley of Bingham County, Rick Pearson of Twin Falls County and Tracy Walton of Gem County.

Elizabeth Kohtz of Twin Falls County was the winner of this year’s Idaho Farm Bureau Young Farmer and Rancher Discussion Meet. She won a Polaris 4-wheeler and an all-expense paid trip to the American Farm Bureau Convention in Nashville, Tenn., to compete in the AFBF Discussion Meet. Photo by Steve Ritter

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter spoke during the opening session of the Idaho Farm Bureau’s 73rd Annual Convention.


Adriane and Conrad Isaak of Power County, left seated, were this year’s recipients of the Idaho Farm Bureau Young Farmer and Rancher Achiever Award. They won a Polaris UTV. They are pictured with Matt Boone, regional manager for Polaris Industries, and far right, Cody Chandler, YF&R Chairman.

Left to right, Wes and Julie Mackay of Lemhi County were recipients of this year’s Idaho Farm Bureau Young Farmer and Rancher Excellence in Agriculture Award. They are pictured with YF&R Chairman Cody Chandler. They received a new computer and a cash prize. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

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keller

Continued from page 2 payment because of a defaulted hay sale in which the banker received primacy. Who is right and who is wrong depends on whose ox is being gored. Farm Bureau believes that delivered feed should not be encumbered by a blanket lien from a financial institution until the grower/supplier is paid in full. Farm Bureau is a general farm organization, with members affected on both sides of this issue. During our meetings, it is not uncommon to hear a complaint about a dairyman not paying for hay delivered or a protest about the high price of feed putting a cattleman out of business. Both sides rely upon each other and to benefit each, sales

agreements must be honored. Shamefully, financial institutions are seeking political cover and are trying to identify this dispute as a difference between agricultural sectors, which it is not. The issue before the Idaho Supreme Court is a contract law dispute. Once determined, banker and producer will seek a solution. Each needs the other. With the current legal uncertainty, each side is skittish of the other. The bankers will continue seeking first position before loaning on cattle and the hay producer will continue placing liens on the forage sold until it is paid for and the check clears the bank.

Until such time that the Idaho Supreme Court decides, the Latin phrase Caveat Emptor (“Let the buyer beware”) needs to be adjusted to “Let the seller beware.” Hay producers and feed suppliers, know your customers well. Seek reliable credit information about your clients before you deliver the commodity. Perfect the liens by filing a financing statement on the feed sale in your county, thereby making the lien visible for any bank or financial institution researching the buyers. If there is doubt, don’t agree to the sale. It is easier to make a future sale on hay that is in the stack on your place than it is to recover the hay after it has been fed to livestock.

Stallman

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of the new committees, especially those important to agriculture and rural communities. Depending on what has happened with the farm bill come Jan. 3, getting a new bill passed will be a top resolution for farmers in the new Congress. Fortunately, congressional leaders will have the farm bill legislation from the 112th Congress to use as a well-discussed head start. If need be, I am optimistic the new Congress can pick up where the last one left off and pass a fiveyear farm bill by spring planting time. It also remains a priority for Farm Bureau to continue its goal of minimizing the effects of unfair taxes like the estate tax and capital gains tax. We will also continue our work in the regulatory arena and in the courts on environmental issues, like caring for the Chesapeake Bay. And we will work toward comprehensive labor reform. We need a solution that addresses

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agriculture’s unique labor needs with a market-based, flexible agricultural worker program, which reflects real-life workforce challenges for all crop and livestock producers. On the executive side, we will know President Obama’s budget priorities by early February. In my estimation, his main goal will be to focus on ways to reduce the deficit. While getting the country’s financial house in order is a priority for Farm Bureau members, it will also be important to make sure that farming programs receive adequate funding to carry out their missions without taking disproportionate cuts. And There’s a Hand my Trusty Friend  Outside of the Capitol Beltway, Farm Bureau members will continue their resolve of advocating for agriculture through consumer outreach. Farmers have made significant strides in recent years of having

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genuine discussions about modern agriculture with their neighbors, community leaders and even strangers. Through the use of social media outlets, like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, farmers are not only telling consumers about how they raise food and care for their animals, they are taking them onto their land and into their barns to show them. Reaching out in this manner has not always been second-nature for farmers, but by working with one another and accepting a helping hand from other Farm Bureau members, we have accomplished a lot and we can only achieve more. By joining together in traditional Farm Bureau fashion, I am confident we can meet our 2013 resolutions head on and make the most of the many opportunities that this New Year holds.


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didn’t. It is now our job to work with our elected officials to make this state and country the best we can. Idaho Farm Bureau is active in the election process: Agri-Pac donated $100,750 to candidates for State legislative races this year and 92% of those candidates won. 15 counties held Meet-the-candidate meetings. Electing the right people is very important, but we do more than just getting them elected. We work with them throughout the year. 13 county Farm Bureaus held educational tours for local government officials 20 county Farm Bureaus sponsored legislative report back meetings. 29 county Farm Bureaus were represented at the IFBF Legislative Conference. 15 county Farm Bureaus presented “Friend of Agriculture” awards to legislators. In all, 30 legislators were honored based on their voting record in the 2011 and 2012 legislative sessions. Legislators who received the award had at least an 88 percent voting record in accordance with Farm Bureau policies. All of the members of our congressional delegation were presented the AFBF Friend of Farm Bureau Award for their voting record in accordance with Farm Bureau policies. 54 legislators attended our annual Legislative Conference Strolling Buffet along with 135 county Farm Bureau leaders. Several state officials also attended the conference including Governor Butch Otter, Senate President Pro Tem Brent Hill, Speaker of the House Lawrence Denney, the chairmen of the House and Senate Agriculture Affairs Committees, Chairmen of the Senate and House Resource committees, Co-Chairmen of the

Joint Finance and Appropriations Committee, the Director of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the Deputy Director of the Idaho Department of Agriculture. 2011 was a record breaking year for agriculture. Idaho’s 2011 farm cash receipts are estimated to be $7.38 billion—29 percent above 2010’s $5.73 billion. This year is expected to fall short of the record-setting farm gate returns of 2011. But overall, this has been a good year for most of Idaho Agriculture. And according to the Farm Journal, if trends continue, 2013 will also be a very good year for corn and soybeans. Corn is the leader in grain prices. If corn is up, usually barley and wheat are too. Fremont County Farm Bureau President Val Hammond provides a farm trivia sheet during his county’s annual banquet. One question this year was “How many potatoes are grown in Idaho?” The answer, according to the trivia site, LegendsofAmerica.com, is 27 billion. Now this figure got me to thinking about a number that we hear often, 1 trillion. So I thought “How much would a potato be worth if the total crop was to be worth $1 trillion? My simple math came up with the answer of $36.66 per potato. If we took the hypothetical question just a bit further and have a crop of potatoes pay the national debt, one potato would have to fetch $559.90 to value $15 trillion. Of course we don’t raise exactly 27 billion potatoes, so you might want to do your own figuring when you are bored with nothing to do. This is just food for thought, so to speak. Well it is true that a person with plenty of food has many things to worry about, but a person with not enough food has only one worry. Yes, there are many concerns that face each of us and agriculture as a whole. Among them are input costs, regulations, EPA, ESA, DEQ, water, frost,

and many other things. We don’t waste our time worrying about things that we can’t control. I think that those of us in agriculture are an optimistic group. We plant seeds in dry soil having faith the rains will come and the sun will shine and we will again produce a good crop. We spend our time and efforts on those things that we can affect. We have had some great victories in the courts this year. The first was a big win for private property rights. On March 21, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled in favor of a North Idaho couple, Mike and Chantell Sackett who were ordered by the EPA not to develop their private property in Bonner County due to federal regulations under the Clean Water Act. A judge ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service erred in listing the Slickspot Pepper Grass. The 9th Circuit court of appeals ruled in favor of the Idaho Farm Bureau and the Montana Farm Bureau, declaring wolf populations recovered and no longer in need of federal protections under the Endangered Species Act. We remain involved in the dispute over whether sage grouse deserve ESA protection. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determined this year that sage grouse warrant protection but the agency has not pursued a listing due to “other species facing more immediate and severe extinction threats.” Endangered species issues will continue to be a challenge in Western states. Another challenge we face is public awareness about our food supply. We feel the best way to teach people about where food comes from and what it takes to get it from the field to the table is by hands on experiences. To address this concern, 17 county Farm Bureaus See PRIESTLEY page 8

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held or co-sponsored “on the farm” tours. The Gooding/Lincoln County Farm Bureau hosted local government officials and news reporters on a farm tour in September. One of the stops was the Blind Canyon Aqua Ranch owned by Gary and Linda Lemmon. The group learned about the importance of fresh clean water along with how the fish are raised from eggs to full size. Did you know that it takes 13 years for a sturgeon to produce eggs for caviar? We also visited the Ballard Family Dairy and Cheese Company, owned by Steve and Stacie Ballard. We learned the art of cheese making and value-added marketing. Steve explained how a new solar thermal system works to reduce the cost of heating water. The third stop was at Donley Farms Dairy, a new 1,000 cow operation. They taught us about their record keeping system that tracks cattle through breeding and calving dates, vaccinations and includes individual production records. Feeding rations were discussed and the different feeds they use depending on where the cow is in the cycle from the dry cow pen to the fresh cow pen and the nutritional requirements that keep dairy cattle producing at top efficiency. After the tour we were joined by members of the county Farm Bureau for a picnic and a chance to hear from the candidates seeking election. Lemhi County sponsored a tour of a jerky processing plant in Idaho Falls and one of the farms that raises buffalo to help supply the fast growing buffalo jerky market. It was interesting to me to see the strong and tall fences that are needed to handle these wild animals of the American West. Milk, cheese, buffalo jerky, trout, sturgeon and caviar, all produced in Idaho by Farm Bureau members. Lemhi Farm Bureau also invited a county commissioner and a state rep8

resentative from Montana to join them, and Idaho Legislators, Lenore Barrett and JoAnn Wood and a Lemhi County Commissioner to inspect highway 29, the road over Bannock Pass from Leadore to Dillon Montana. This road is used extensively to haul cattle to market and to deliver feed to Lemhi County ranches. The idea was to get them to see the need and work together to improve the condition of the road. Ada County sponsors a petting zoo at the Boise Zoo. Thousands of children attend this every year. They are also involved in The Quest for The Golden Apple project at the Julia Davis Park. I can’t talk about hands-on education without giving kudos to the State Board, MAC committee, and the many volunteers who helped in educating over 2,100 people with Maggie the cow and the Giant Book of Wheat. It has been a great success and we have now added a second, furnished MAC trailer in order to meet the demands of our public school system. Thank you to the more than 150 volunteers who made it all possible. Please plan to keep up this good work. Besides the many hands on education projects and programs, IFBF awarded 8 academic scholarships in the amount of $6,000 or $750 each. Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company contributed $1,200 to the expense of the scholarships. Thirty one counties awarded scholarships. Eight county Farm Bureaus paid the tuition for area teachers to attend Ag in the Classroom training. Here is a sobering statistic. Did you know that Idaho is forth in the nation for deaths by suicide, which is 67 percent higher than the national average? Due to a combination of stressors, farmers are at an increased risk for suicide. We are providing educational posters informing of the Suicide Prevention Hot-Line.

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Idaho Farm Bureau is a new sponsor of SPAN –Idaho (Suicide Prevention Action Network). This is a sad story that hits far too close to home for many of us. Let’s be more aware of those that are close to us. Reach out to those that are depressed. Many times as simple of a thing as being a friend can make a difference. In Farm Bureau we have many things to be happy about. Our ending membership last year was 66,290. This put us in a larger membership category with the AFBF. We are now competing for awards with states with a larger membership than we have. We are finishing the 2012 year with 68,311 members. At the last AFBF convention we were awarded for the third straight year the Pinnacle award, which is the award for being the most outstanding Farm Bureau in our membership category. We also received Awards of Excellence in Ag Education & Promotion, Leadership Development, Member Services, Policy Implementation, and Public Relations & Information. IFBF also received the Navigator Award for exceptional membership growth, and an engraved platter recognizing our outstanding Women’s Leadership Programs. We have been told that for 2012 we have earned Leadership Awards for Education and Outreach, Leadership Development, Member Services, and Policy Development and Implementation. Also we will receive the Navigator Award for membership growth again. We will have to wait and see for any other awards. As I have said many times, “We don’t do our work to get awards, but we don’t get the awards without doing our work”. Thank you to everyone. It’s is an honor to serve as the President of Idaho Farm Bureau.


The lifeblood of America . They’re the humble heroes who rise before dawn and battle the elements. They put clothes on our backs and food on our tables. Their genuine values and tireless work ethic are an inspiration to us all. We appreciate all that America’s farmers do and invite you to join us in saying thanks at www.fbfs.com/SayThanksToAFarmer. FB02-ID (3-12)

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3/12/12 3:54 PM Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013 9


The Hettinger Ranch is located on the South Fork of the Salmon River about 20 miles from Warren.

Living with Wolves

Article and photos by Steve Ritter

Over the last 23 years, Tim Hull has made his living in the Idaho backcountry, existing in a lifestyle suited for few. As a ranch manager and hunting guide he has seen big changes in the environment – particularly big game populations - since wolf reintroduction happened in the mid1990’s, Hull has seen a dramatic drop in elk numbers and in hunters willing to book a backcountry hunt. It takes over an hour for a vehicle to tra10

verse the last 11 miles of switchbacks to the South Fork Ranch, also known as the Hettinger Ranch on the South Fork of the Salmon River. Over those 11 miles the elevation difference is 4,000 feet. From Thanksgiving to mid-May the only access is by snowmobile.

Hull winters alone, caring for a string of pack and saddle horses. In the summer he puts up hay from small fields in the canyon. His water comes from a spring and a small hydro plant generates power. Friends visit from time to time and his mail and

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supplies are flown in during the summer months. This area where Hull once made a good living guiding elk hunters has become nearly devoid of elk. Hull believes the trend will continue if something drastic isn’t done. The lure of outfitting big game hunters is what brought Hull to Hettinger Ranch. What he has witnessed since the re-introduction of the wolf makes him shake his head in frustration. “Who are these people that 20 years ago


plans.

efit of all Idahoans.

The 2012-13 season is the third year wolf hunting will be allowed.

Hull says, “I’ve been doing this for 30 years and have had customers that would come five or six years in a row and maybe they wouldn’t get an elk but we’d always see elk and always see tracks and they came back cause it looked like there were a lot of elk around.” Well guess what, now you take those same guys hunting and when they look down all they see is wolf tracks and now that customer is going to go to Alaska moose hunting or Colorado for elk hunting. It’s real discouraging because you don’t get the repeat business. It’s a tragedy.”

So far 122 wolves have been shot by hunters and another 15 wolves have been removed by trapping. The final tally for the 2011-12 season was 225 removed by hunting and 124 by trapping.

Tim Hull and his wife Judy raised three daughters on a remote ranch in Idaho’s backcountry. Judy and the girls spend winters in Moscow where she teaches school.

said they aren’t going to eat all the elk? They are eating all the elk,” he said. “Here’s the thing, we live way back here and we used to be able to go across the river and there was always either sex hunting and anybody could go over there and kill a cow and then there used to be a 200 cow elk permit hunt on this side and you could get a cow tag for over here. Well guess what, now you can’t kill any cows on the other side of the river and instead of giving out 200 tags they give out 25 because the darn wolves are killing all the calves.”

his own trapping license and is confident he will catch some of the predators before they wipe out the 2013 calf crop. “We will never get rid of all of them by trapping but we’re educating some of them and it’s helping,” said Hull. Wolves can now be legally hunted and trapped in parts of Idaho in accordance with Idaho Fish and Game management

Wolf reintroduction in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming was carried out by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Congress ordered the recovery project under the Endangered Species Act. Wolves are now establishing populations in Oregon, Washington and Utah and overall numbers are estimated in excess of 3,000 animals. Idaho Fish and Game was eventually handed management responsibilities for the wolves. Passions run deep on both sides of the re-introduction. Fish and Game officials often feel caught in the middle. Their duty is to manage all wildlife (including wolves) for the ben-

Hull now guides big game hunts in other parts of Idaho and Oregon where the wolf predation is not impacting hunting opportunities to the same extent. Wolf managers say Idaho currently has about a thousand wolves. Hull says do the math. If one wolf eats seven or eight elk a year that’s a whole bunch of elk we lose each year.

Elk are usually very secret at calving time but now, Hull says the elk come right into his hay fields to birth their calves to avoid the wolves that circle the ranch all winter and spring looking for food. “This winter I’m eating a stinky old mule deer buck rather than a nice, fat, juicy cow elk, it’s just horrible,” Hull said. Last year professional trappers caught 30 wolves within a 20mile radius of the ranch. This year Hull has plans to acquire

Tim Hull cutting alfalfa on the Hettinger Ranch on the banks of the South Fork of the Salmon River. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

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Slickspot Peppergrass grows only in Southwest Idaho. Photo courtesy of Boise State University

Slickspot Peppergrass off threatened list: Otter calls listing “fatally flawed” By Jake Putnam The small, white flowering plant seen on the Southwest Idaho range known as Slickspot peppergrass was dropped from the federal threatened species list this fall. Cattlemen are breathing a sigh of relief because the listing could have severely limited grazing across Southwest Idaho.  “I am encouraged that the Court agreed with my argument,” said Idaho Governor Butch Otter, in an address to the Idaho Farm Bureau on December 4th. “The federal government’s decision, to list the species was flawed under the Endangered Species Act.” 12

Otter termed the listing flawed because the US Fish and Wildlife Service did not consider a widespread conservation effort by ranchers and recreation stakeholders to protect the plant. In August Federal Judge Candy Dale ordered the federal agency to reconsider the listing according to her instructions.  The primary issue was whether the listing would stay in place while the federal government addressed the problems cited by Judge Dale’s earlier ruling.  Had the listing remained in place, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service could immediately proceed with designating “critical

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habitat” for the plant’s recovery. Otter sued the government three years ago, arguing protections for Slickspot peppergrass weren’t grounded in the best science and ignored the state’s preservation efforts.  Otter made an appearance at the Idaho Farm Bureau Annual Meeting December 4th to thank rank and file members for donations dating back to 2009 and their support. “I remember asking the Farm Bureau for support and you sent a check, for that I thank you.” Otter told the crowd of supporters.


Idaho Governor Butch Otter addresses Idaho Farm Bureau members on December 4th.

“Endangered species issues will continue to be a challenge in western states,” said Idaho Farm Bureau President Frank Priestley. “And we’re going to be engaged every step of the way.” Gov. Otter not only thanked IFBF for financial support but also for the group’s support in helping the state find a similar solution for protection of sage grouse. The sage grouse is a candidate for an Endangered Species Act listing. “I strongly encourage the federal government to take Judge Dale’s reasoned decision to heart and recognize that there is not a slam-dunk case for simply re-listing the plant,” Otter added. In 2009, the plant was listed as a threatened species. Otter and Idaho protested, saying a species can only be listed if it’s likely to become endangered in the future.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologists wrote in the ESA listing document that the habitat continues to get worse across Idaho. Biologists added in the report that wildfire and

cheat grass continue to threaten the species across the Snake River Plain.

and caught the eye of then Congressman Butch Otter.

“I don’t know if fire or cattle are the problem here,” said Idaho Farm Bureau range specialist Wally Butler. “Slickspot peppergrass is very specific to Elmore, Owyhee and Twin Falls Counties. These are the only places where Slickspot occurs. It grows in those alkaline pockets, that’s where the plant got its nickname. The species fluctuates greatly every year, but it does fine with cattle. It was thought to be detrimental but it’s been proven otherwise.”

Otter set up a number of tailgate meetings in the field and took an active role in 2003 when he took part in developing a state conservation plan that brought ranchers, recreationists and conservationist together with the goal of preventing an ESA listing for Slickspot.

The plant ranges from 4 to 12 inches in height, and has many tiny, white flowers that resemble the garden flower sweet alyssum. Slickspot peppergrass typically grows in small areas within larger sagebrush habitat.  To save the plant and to keep it off the list, a number of private, state and federal groups developed a Candidate Conservation Agreement for the plant back starting back in 1999. The effort grew each year

Then in January 2004 the US Fish and Wildlife Service found that a listing was not warranted because on the plants abundance, as well as the development of a Candidate Conservation Agreement to preserve the species. Despite that effort, the Obama administration listed the species as threatened in 2009. On Dec. 4th, Judge Dale refused to leave a threatened designation for Slickspot peppergrass in place while the wildlife agency works to remedy errors it made when it listed the plant under the Endangered Species Act in 2009.

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Learning About

Silvicultural Systems By Chris Schnepf People driving through Idaho forests seeing various types of timber harvests tend to focus on the effect on the landscape. Frequently they view a harvested forest as no longer there – it was cut down. Unless the land was converted to a new use, foresters usually see something different: a forest set back to an earlier stage of succession – a young forest rather than a forest lost forever. This is because most foresters view timber harvests and other stand treatments in the context of a silvicultural system. The term silviculture derives from the Latin root for forests (”silva”), hence silviculture is the “culture of forests.” Silviculture includes all practices used to reach some forest management objective: harvesting, planting, fertilization, thinning, etc. Silviculture is not just about producing wood products. Managing forests for huckleberries, elk, or snow retention requires silviculture every bit as much as managing for wood products does. A silvicultural system is a specific system of practices 16

Clearcuts can be an effective silvicultural system for Lodgepole pine.

designed to create favorable growing conditions for the types of forest stands we wish to perpetuate, based on a solid understanding of forest ecology. The management unit for a silvicultural system is the “stand”, which is a contiguous group of trees that are similar enough in age, structure, or other forest characteristics to be distinguished from the surrounding forest and managed as a unit. A stand can be anywhere from 5 acres to 100 acres or larger. Even-Aged Silvicultural Systems The term “even-aged forest”

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

sometimes brings forth images of trees grown like cabbages, as Aldo Leopold once described an agronomic approach to forestry. However historically, a given fire event often created a mosaic of disturbances across a burned area. In some places a fire burned along the ground surface, leaving taller trees alive. But in other areas, fires often left patches (sometimes large patches) of varying sizes where all the trees were killed. These patches usually seeded in within the next 20-30 years, creating naturally even-aged stands. Sometimes people are skeptical of this, because they have

seen trees of varied sizes growing in many Idaho forests. But remember - a large tree is not always an old tree and a small tree is not always a young tree. This is particularly true with shade tolerant species such as grand fir. It is very common to bore a 2-6 inch diameter grand fir in northern Idaho and discover it is nearly the same age as a 24 inch diameter tree growing right next to it. The term even-aged does not mean all the trees in a stand have to be the exact same age. An even-aged stand is technically defined as one in which the trees are within 20 percent of the same age relative to the


rotation length. Rotation length is the time forest trees will be grown before cutting them and starting a new regeneration cycle. By this definition, with a 100 year rotation, a stand with an average age of 40 years, with some trees 20 years old, and others 60 years old would still meet the definition of an even-aged forest. Silvicultural systems often have names associated with the kind of harvests they use to regenerate new forest stands. There are three classic even-aged silvicultural systems: clearcut, seed tree, and shelterwood. With the clearcut silvicultural system, all the trees in a unit are harvested in one operation and the area is usually reforested by planting, unless abundant natural seeding is expected. Units can be a variety of sizes and shapes, but generally anything larger than a group selection (2-3 acres) can be called a clearcut. The seed tree silvicultural system is like a clearcut, except that 5-10 trees per acre are left evenly distributed across the site to produce tree seed. The seed trees are usually removed after new seedlings are established.

The clearcut and seed tree systems tend to open up the site fairly dramatically and may not be a good choice on very dry sites, or where they is not a firm commitment to prompt regeneration by tree planting. The shelterwood silvicultural system is similar to the seed tree system, except that more trees are left to shelter the site new seedlings will be regenerating in. This system is commonly used on hot, severe sites and where visuals are critical. Shelterwood harvests may be made in two or three entries, where small trees are removed in one harvest, more trees are removed in a second “seed cut”, and finally the seed trees are removed in a third harvest after new seedlings have become well established. In Idaho shelterwood cuts are most commonly done in two cuts – like a seed tree cut only more trees are left. All three of these systems usually include some thinning over the life of the forest. Typically these systems include one precommercial thinning (called pre-commercial because the trees cut are too small to be taken to a mill) and at least one commercial thinning later. Uneven-Aged Silvicultural Systems Uneven-aged silvicultural systems perpetuate a stand with at least three distinct tree age classes. Classic uneven-aged management aspires to creating an all-aged stand, with many young trees and progressively fewer older trees. Occasionally you will hear someone refer to a shelterwood or a seed tree cut as uneven-aged management, but that is incorrect. With these systems, overstory trees are only left on-site long enough to establish new seedlings. Once adequate new seedlings are established, the overstory trees are removed, leaving an even-aged forest.

The selection silvicultural system maintains a range of desired tree ages.

The selection silvicultural system is the most traditional approach to growing uneven-aged stands. The selection system attempts to maintain a range of desired tree sizes, species, and ages by harvesting individual trees (individual selection) or small groups of trees (group selection). Groups are usually less than 2-3 acres.

Typically selection systems remove some trees every 10-15 years- - the goal is a regular, periodic flow of wood, regardless of price. Thinnings aren’t generally used in the classic selection system (though some groups might be thinned) because each stand entry thins the stand somewhat. The goal with each entry is to maintain an all-aged stand. New trees are regenerated naturally. Shifting an even-aged stand to all the age cohorts required for the selection system takes decades of meticulous attention to be successful. Because individual tree selection maintains a fairly shady environment, it is best suited to sites which can sustain shade tolerant trees over the long term, or drier sites where shade tolerant trees will not take over (e.g., where ponderosa pine is the only conifer species found in the understory). Occasionally you will hear someone refer to “logging selectively” as an alternative to even-aged treatments. Ask them how they would do it. If they are simply talking about one entry, taking all trees over a certain diameter, they are not talking about the selection silvicultural system. Rather they are talking about diameter limit cutting (sometimes referred to as hi-grading), where all trees above a certain diameter are cut regardless of individual tree vigor, species, distribution, or age. Because most Idaho forest stands are evenaged, simply cutting trees over a certain size usually leaves the poorest competitors on the site to grow and parent new seedlings. This is like choosing the wimpiest steer in the herd for your bull, or using your smallest potatoes ever year for seed potatoes the next– in both approaches you would be breeding for smaller cattle or spuds. The same is true in diameter-limit cuts – leaving the smallest trees erodes stand genetics. Cutting just the largest trees in an even-aged stand is the opposite of what happened in these forests naturally. Variable Retention Harvesting Partially in response to concerns about the social acceptability and sustainability of See UI FORESTRY page 23

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Focus on Agriculture

Farmers and Veterans: Strong, Resilient and Independent By Sabrina Matteson Most people have a clear image of what farmers are like. That’s because people create fixed stereotypes and then believe their own generalizations about members of a particular group. At a recent workshop in a rural Midwestern state, a group of people wrote down the stereotypical characteristics of those who work the land. This included: farm18

ers are strong, have red necks, and wear overalls and plaid shirts; they get up early and go to bed with the sun; they tuck a straw in the sides of their mouths and smell like work (which really means sweat and manure); they are independent, selfreliant and shoot things that cause harm to their livestock; and they undertake great risks for little profit, enjoy hardship, think imaginatively, and are highly respected by the community despite the fact that most

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

folks would never do what they do.  The list went on—identifying some great and some awful characteristics—but it’s striking how comparable these farmer traits are to stereotypes of those in the military. In 2008, Michael O’Gorman, an organic farmer from California, was struck by the similarities of farmers and soldiers. Farm kids have the skills to become great sol-


diers and soldiers can become great farmers. He thought it amazing that no one was helping veterans become farmers, even though they are so obviously suited to that life. Thus, the Farmer Veteran Coalition was born. Marc Henrie of Smithfield, Utah, served as a platoon leader in the Utah Army National Guard field artillery in Iraq. This cattle and hay farmer agrees that there are a lot of similarities between soldiers and farmers.  “The main thing I would point out is our love for the land and  our ability to work hard,” says Marc. “Soldiers and farmers share long days, often working through the night. They have bonds with those with whom they serve and are very loyal. Farmers and veterans are known as fearless risk-takers. Many are asked to do difficult tasks, often as they risk their own safety or livelihood.  Both groups continue to hope

for a bright future and are optimistic for what the future holds.”  Paul Schwennesen of Double Check Ranch in Winkelman, Ariz., confirmed this love of hard work when he went off to boot camp. Other enlistees were complaining how difficult it was but Schwennesen thought that it was easier than life on the farm.  “The military helped me to learn an organized, methodical approach to time management,” says Schwennesen. “There are lots of moving pieces in the military and the farm, and it is important to get them all to pull in the same direction at the same time. We are conditioned by the reality of our lives with early mornings, long hard days and physical exertion.” The Farmer Veteran Coalition provides education, risk management training, funding and technical assistance to prepare

veterans become farmers. Assistance for internships also is offered, particularly for disabled veterans to obtain the necessary training to run their own operations as they heal from war-related injuries in a productive environment. Let’s count our blessings that there is an organization working to transition our veterans, who have already sacrificed so much for us, into a life for which many of them are so perfectly suited. While we’re at it, let’s abandon the stereotypes and instead honor the noble similarities between farmers and veterans by welcoming more of them as they embark on a different way of serving our nation.  Sabrina Matteson is director of rural affairs at the American Farm Bureau Federation.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

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XTREME SIDE x SIDE PERFORMANCE.

Top Farm Bureau Agents

Jonathan Jensen                     Agent of the Month (Schmitt Agency) Polaris would like to congratulate Jake Andersen the winner of this year’s Young Farmer and Rancher Discussion Meet as well as Greg and Gwen Andersen for being presented with the Idaho Farm Bureau’s 2011 Young Farmer and Rancher Achiever Award. We hope you enjoy your new Polaris Trail Boss 330 and RGR 400 and thank you for your continued contributions to the Idaho Farming and Ranching Community. A big thank you to those Idaho Polaris dealers who continue to support the Idaho Farm Bureau and Young Farmer and Rancher Program:

Vehicles shown with optional accessories. Avoid operating Polaris RANGERs on paved surfaces or public roads. Riders and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Drivers of RANGER vehicles must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license. Warning: ATV’s can be hazardous to operate. For your safety: Avoid operating Polaris ATV’s on paved surfaces or public roads. Riders and passengers should wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Polaris ATV models are for riders aged 16 and older. Be sure to take a safety training course. For safety training information in the U.S., call the SVIA at (800) 887-2887, see your dealer, or call Polaris at (800) 342-3764. In Canada, see your local dealer. ©2011 Polaris Industries Inc.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

Ryan Porter                     Rookie of the Month (Newell Agency)

Agency of the Month     Palmer Agency


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UI FORESTRY

Continued from page 17 widespread clearcutting, some scientists working in Pacific Northwest coastal forests have experimented with silvicultural approaches that retained more large trees, snags, and downed logs and other biological legacies of old growth forests, to structurally and functionally enrich the new stand. This approach, referred to as variable retention harvesting (VR), does not fit exactly into uneven-aged management, but may be appropriate to mention here. Two general types of retention are discussed and they are frequently combined in the same harvest unit. Dispersed retention retains trees and other stand structures in a dispersed or uniform pattern. Aggregated retention strategically retains structures as intact forest patches (usually smaller than 2.5 acres in size) within the harvest unit. Many Idaho forest owners are already practicing aggregated retention if they have a stream going through their property, since our forest practice laws require leaving forested corridors along streams to sustain riparian function. Aggregated retention has a several advantages over dispersed retention, including leaving portions of the forest floor intact, leaving soft snags in a way that does not threaten logger safety, and allowing more light into the unit for shade intolerant species. The shelterwood silvicultural system leaves green trees after the harvest, so isn’t it VR? Maybe. Normally a shelterwood system would remove remaining trees after regeneration is established. It could only

be classified as VR if you left the overstory trees through the next rotation or longer. Choosing a System All of these systems have advantages and disadvantages, depending on the site and the owner’s objectives. For example, if defoliating insects such as spruce budworm are a frequent problem on a site, evenaged forests are usually harder for them to get around in. One advantage to uneven-aged systems (in addition to aesthetics) is less logging slash in any one harvest. The choice of silvicultural system depends on desired species, site characteristics, current stand conditions, management goals, wildlife needs, and logging conditions, among other factors. The critical thing to think about when choosing a silvicultural system is not just how a forest will look (though that can be very important), as much as how that forest will function. A shelterwood harvest may leave mostly pine and larch in the overstory to regenerate those species, but if there is not enough sunlight reaching the understory, Douglas-fir and grand fir will tend to dominate. Generally, going from clearcut, to seed tree, to shelterwood, to selection systems, you tend to move from: favoring shade intolerant species to favoring shade tolerant species; fewer roads and skid trails to more roads and trials and more entries using them; See UI FORESTRY page 25

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Grain Marketing with Clark Johnston

Corn Futures Flatten The best way to describe the futures markets as we moved into the Christmas season was to use an old Willie Nelson song, “Turn out the lights the Party’s over.” Traders began to liquidate their position in Chicago wheat moving the market below the 200 day moving average about a week before the Holiday. The Relative Strength Index moved below 30, (the lowest level we had experienced in over a year). To say the least it looked as though the trade took their money and went home. Oh, let’s not forget the lack of positive news coming out of DC either. When it is all said and done the Chicago March Wheat contract had moved close to a dollar lower from the end of November to Christmas. The March corn futures moved 58 cents lower for the same time frame. There was sentiment in the corn trade that just maybe we had rationed the corn stocks adequately enough for us to now make it into new crop. Only time will tell but if Informa has it right we could very well be on track to produce a corn crop close to 14 billion bushels in 2013. This may not affect the old crop futures but it could certainly put a damper on the new crop prices. Corn futures may move in a sideways trend but basis will strengthen as we move into the spring. The corn that is currently left in the hands of the producers is being held onto firmly and it doesn’t look as though they will be willing to fire sale their inventory in the near future. The corn basis strengthened by 10 cents per bushel just before Christmas just on the news that the Corp of Engineers had taken steps to keep the Mississippi river open for barge traffic. With the corn futures trading flat from now through July feeders may want to look

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at buying in at least some of their needs for this time frame. The 14 RSI moved down to support levels and with the basis strengthening it looks as though the market is positioned to move cash prices for corn back higher. In the wheat market producers should now take a breather and wait for the market to move higher. Wheat prices reached a level that gave us the opportunity to increase our export sales as well as the momentum studies indicating that the market could have very well ran its course lower for now. Also in the local market the supply of soft white wheat is running below the demand for now. We also feel that if the corn market does indeed move back higher the local feed lots will be back into the feed wheat market sometime in the early spring. This could set the stage for a bidding war between the feeders and the flour mills for their bushels. In this case the flour mills would probably be the more aggressive of the two just for the fact they can’t mill anything other than wheat. If we do move into this type of market if will still be necessary to remember to sell when someone wants to buy, Just for the fact that these markets are usually very thin and don’t last very long. Once a Mill has covered their needs they will leave the market returning only when forced to do so. This will be a good time to place your pricing orders with the mills and/or feeders. Put your prices in at levels you can live with and then be grateful when the market reaches your objective. The huge benefit to these types of contracts is that if forces you to follow through with your merchandising plan. It doesn’t let you hold until prices move back lower.

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Clark Johnston

Let’s switch gears for a minute and talk about diesel fuel. Over the past 10 years prices for diesel have increased from now through the end of April. The prices at this time are higher than 9 of the past 10 years leaving us with two different thoughts of mind concerning prices over the next few months. The prices have been in a trend lower and with the high prices will they continue in that trend or will the prices follow the historical trends and start to move back higher. For my money I am sticking with the historical trend and say the prices will move higher over the next few months. You’re right, only time will tell but, either way the price moves you could feel good about pricing fuel now. You will either feel good that this is the highest price you paid or you’ll feel good that you bought fuel at the lower level. Don’t hesitate to call for more information on the markets and trends. 801-458-4750 Clark Johnston is a grain marketing specialist who is on contract with the Idaho Farm Bureau. He is the owner of JC Management Company in Northern Utah. He can be reached at clark@jcmanagement. net


UI FORESTRY

Continued from page 23

more dramatic effects on visuals to less dramatic, a large flush of understory vegetation (wildlife browse and huckleberries, but also brush that competes with seedlings) after the harvest to shorter, smaller flushes; harvesting a larger amounts of volume per entry vs. harvesting smaller amounts of volume over time; decreasing temperature and frost extremes if they are issues for the site; decreasing opportunity to improve forest genetics through planting; increasing complexity and coordination over time to be successful; increasing risk to residual trees during logging and site preparation; and increasing logging expense from working around more leave trees and multiple entries. There are, of course, some notable exceptions to these generalizations. For example, the seed tree system has the greatest potential to improve naturally seeded trees’ genetics because you are leaving the very best trees and they are cross-pollinating with each other. The seed tree system also has the highest risk of losing trees from windthrow or snow, particularly if there were many trees/acre prior to cutting. Site and Stand Considerations Site and stand considerations play a critical role in these decisions. For example, if a site is harsh and dry a shelterwood might be very appropriate. If a stand has been repeatedly high-graded, leaving nothing but poor quality trees, a clearcut and planting might be the most sustainable option. If the site has dwarf mistletoe issues and you want to regenerate with the same species, a system that removes the infected trees is critical. Wildlife Which silvicultural system is good for wildlife depends on a couple critical ques-

In Idaho cutting trees only over a certain diameter usually degrades forest genetics.

tions. First, which wildlife species are being considered? Different wildlife species have different habitat needs. Second, what types of habitat are found (or not) on nearby properties? For example, if elk are your species of interest and you are surrounded by dense, second growth forests, a clearcut that creates browse from understory plants may be helpful. If a forest stand is surrounded by wheat fields, a system that leaves more thermal cover may be more important for elk. Water Quality The greatest potential source of sediment to streams from timber harvesting is not so much erosion from the surface of the area harvested, as it is the roads and skid trails used to harvest timber. To the extent a silvicultural system uses fewer roads and skid trails, and less often, the potential effects on forest water quality will generally be less. To the extent a silvicultural system requires more roads and skid trails, and more use of them, it becomes even more important to designate skid trails and reuse them in later harvests. As with wildlife effects, water quality is also affected by what is happening on neighboring properties. For example, if a large percentage of a basin has all the overstory trees removed by fires or timber harvesting in a short time period, spring flows

may increase, which can sometimes stir up sediment in and along streams, reducing water quality. The degree of this is quite variable depending on each watershed’s unique characteristics. Talk to a Forester There can be many variations on the basic systems lined out here. They can be tweaked and customized to better meet specific site objectives (e.g., making group selections a little larger for shade intolerant species then aggressively precommercial thinning early to give those species a leg up against more shade tolerant tree species that may outcompete them in the shade from the unit boundaries). Again, the growing conditions needed by specific tree species you want to favor are of primary importance. Balancing between goals, site conditions and financial considerations to choose a system or collection of silvicultural systems (if you have a larger acreage) that works best for you is challenging. A forester can help you assess those conditions, and choose a silvicultural system that best reflects your forest management goals and the site. Chris Schnepf is an area extension educator – forestry – for the University of Idaho in Bonner, Boundary, Kootenai and Benewah counties. He can be reached at cschnepf@uidaho.edu.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

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Farm Bureau Members Ski For Less This Winter

www.idahofbstore.com

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

208-239-4289


Alfalfa prices are up and the market looks good going into the new year. Farm Bureau file photo

Hay Prices up:

Producers say It’s a Seller’s Market By Jake Putnam Hay supplies in the Pacific Northwest are as tight as they’ve been in more than a decade due to drought and strong demand. The 2012 season began with low inventories and that’s impacting dairies and feedlots this winter.  The cool, wet spring of 2012 delayed the first cutting of alfalfa across most of the Idaho. That pushed back supply and kept prices high all summer. By September there was very little inventory left and that’s causing prices to spike this winter. Farmer David Hansen of Weiser ships all

of his hay to dairies on the Oregon Coast and this year he is receiving top dollar for every bale. “We’ve had a long season and that’s allowed us five cuttings,” said Hansen. “And we got up the hay pretty good this year. Moisture was a factor in the first cutting and the third cutting but it was a phenomenally good year. Prices are extremely high in western Idaho.” Hansen is getting well over $200 dollars a ton, and he still has plenty of hay in the barn. “We’re getting about $235 straight across, and it’s cheaper and easier shipping to the

Oregon Coast than east,” said Hansen. A few Washington County farmers sought out the Oregon market back when prices were not so good. Back then they were looking for buyers they could depend on in good times and bad. “It was years ago that I found this market,” Hansen said. “It’s hard to find good dairies that recognize the quality of the hay. There’s a reliance and trust that has developed. They now take 100-percent of what I grow and that’s a wonderful thing to build a relationship on. “It’s great having See HAY PRICES, page 28

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HAY PRICES

Continued from page 27

an established consumer that will buy year round.” Hay growers say that there are no shortcuts in dairy grade hay production. “West coast dairymen are paying dearly for quality hay and they demand the best hay out there. If you can supply what they need, when they need it, they’re willing to pay a premium. It’s a seller’s market right now,” said Hansen. Idaho hay producers say they have an edge provided by a normally dry growing season with controlled irrigation. They can get the hay up without a lot of moisture. In Oregon dry, leafy bales without mold are hard to find. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the drought of 2012 reduced al-

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falfa, by 3 percent to as much as 28 percent in the Midwest. The yield losses varied widely according to soil types, age of the stand, and rainfall. But that can change rapidly with a summer thunderstorm. “That’s why I’m glad I have consistent customers. They’re going to stick with me, I’m sticking with them. I don’t worry about marketing, I’m just focusing on quality and I can keep the customers I have,” said Hansen. Hansen grows 420 acres and all of it goes to the Oregon Coast. Nationally, according to the USDA, the total hay-acres decreased by 3.8 percent that’s 2.3 million acres. Much of this land was converted to corn and soybeans be-

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cause of economic considerations. Idaho Farm Bureau President Frank Priestley said he had a great hay year in Southeast Idaho. “My hay was good this year,” Priestley said. “It’s as good as the water supply. Where there’s water there’s extremely good hay, simple as that.” We had the heat element and the watered hay was very good.” If current weather patterns persist, growers are expecting another good irrigation season in 2013. Market experts say the loss of hay to grain crops will continue to impact hay supply across the country in 2013. But high hay prices are starting to attract some acres back into production.


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American farm bureau federation news

EPA Withdraws Order In the Face of Farmer’s Lawsuit WASHINGTON, D.C.,– In a surprise about-face, the Environmental Protection Agency has withdrawn an order demanding that West Virginia poultry grower Lois Alt obtain a Clean Water Act discharge permit for stormwater runoff from her farmyard or face up to $37,500 per day in penalties. While the action is a great victory for Alt, it leaves unresolved a major legal issue with serious implications for other livestock and poultry farmers that must be addressed, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation. The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of West Virginia ruled in October that AFBF and West Virginia Farm Bureau have the right to join Alt’s lawsuit. EPA had aggressively opposed the Farm Bureaus’ participation. EPA’s withdrawal of the order comes six months after Alt filed her legal action and a mere six weeks before Alt and AFBF are scheduled to file briefs challenging EPA’s interpretation of the law. In withdrawing its order, EPA cited new management practices identified during a

May 2012 re-inspection of the farm. However, EPA’s inspection report also states that dust, feathers and small amounts of manure were still observed on the ground at the farm – which was the very same basis of EPA’s original order, according to AFBF General Counsel Ellen Steen. “EPA still has not backed away from its position that any amount of pollutant on the ground at a livestock or poultry farm requires a Clean Water Act permit,” according to Steen. “The more likely reason for EPA’s withdrawal is that it does not want to defend its position in court.” “This is a personal victory for Lois Alt, but it should not have taken a federal lawsuit to convince EPA to withdraw an order that was illegal from the start,” said American Farm Bureau Federation President Bob Stallman. “EPA’s withdrawal of the Alt order without correcting its legal position still leaves other farmers and ranchers hanging in uncertainty, vulnerable to the same threats that Ms. Alt faced.” EPA’s November 2011 order threatened Alt with $37,500 in fines for each time storm-

water came into contact with dust, feathers or small amounts of manure on the ground outside of her poultry houses as a result of normal poultry farming operations. EPA also threatened separate fines of $37,500 per day if Alt failed to apply for a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit. Alt responded by filing her own legal challenge to the EPA order in June 2012. “EPA says its withdrawal is based on a May 2012 re-inspection of the farm, but I can’t help but notice that EPA only withdrew the order after Farm Bureau was granted intervention in October,” Steen explained. “It’s like upsetting the chess board when you know you are in danger of losing. All signs are that EPA does not want to defend its position in court.” “EPA knows very well that most farmers lack the resources to fight back when they face an EPA order – even if the order has no legal basis,” noted Stallman. “We are happy for Ms. Alt that EPA has flinched, but the principles for which she stood remain in danger.”

AFBF Selects New YF&R Committee Members WASHINGTON, D.C., December 13, 2012 – A group of top-notch young agricultural leaders were named recently to the American Farm Bureau Federation’s Young Farmers and Ranchers Committee. The AFBF Board of Directors selected some of the organization’s most active and dedicated young members to be part of the 2013-2015 YF&R Committee. Their terms will officially begin on March 1, 2013. The new YF&R Committee members include:

Todd and April Mackie from California; Jake and Jennifer Carter from Georgia; Greg and Contessa Harris from Kentucky; Jeff and Alyssa VanderWerff from Michigan; Alexandra Wright from New York; Travis and Renae Gebhart from South Dakota; Chet and Dancey Creel from Texas; and Dustin and Harmony Cox from Utah. “Farm Bureau’s YF&R Committee members play a vital role in helping lead our organization through innovative and forwardthinking planning and ideas,” said AFBF

President Bob Stallman. “I am very proud of these young members’ accomplishments so far and am confident they will continue to flourish throughout the coming year.” The YF&R program includes men and women between the ages of 18 and 35. The program’s goals are to help younger Farm Bureau members learn more about agriculture, network with other farmers and become future leaders in agriculture and Farm Bureau.

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American farm bureau federation news

Monthly Crop Report Shows Little Change in Corn, Soybeans WASHINGTON, D.C.,– The Agriculture Department’s monthly crop report showed no change in the 2012 ending stocks forecast for corn and a slight decrease for soybeans compared to the prior month. Identical to last month, corn ending stocks in the U.S. for the marketing year are projected to be tight at 647 million bushels, representing 21 days of supply. Globally, USDA pegged corn ending stocks 13.4 million metric tons lower than the prior year, primarily due to the effect of the protracted drought in the U.S. While USDA did lower the global ending stocks figure, the estimate of Chinese corn production was boosted by 8 million metric tons compared to last

month; however, demand also increased so global stocks for corn are essentially unchanged. Ending stocks for soybeans are projected to be 130 million bushels (about a 16-day supply), which Todd Davis, a senior economist with the American Farm Bureau Federation, described as “incredibly tight.” Global wheat stocks were projected down at 177 million metric tons, reflecting greatly reduced crops in the former Soviet Union, Australia and Argentina. “Once again, all eyes turn to the Southern hemisphere, as large corn and soybean crops there could ease the tight stock situ-

ation in the U.S.,” Davis explained. Soybean production in Argentina and Brazil is forecast 26 percent higher compared to the prior crop, which will be beneficial if realized. “Market watchers will have a lot of information to chew on in early January,” noted Davis. USDA’s January report will provide the final production numbers for the 2012 crop. The estimate of grain stocks on Dec. 1 also will be released in January, in addition to an estimate of the U.S. acreage seeded to winter wheat.

AFBF Statement on Fiscal Cliff, Farm Bill Extension January 2, 2012

provisions for businesses.

“While much work remains on addressing the spending side of the ledger, the fiscal cliff package that was just approved injected a good dose of certainty into our nation’s tax policy. That is a major achievement. The measure restored the $5 million exemption level for the estate tax, which was in danger of falling to just $1 million. On the minus side, the top estate tax rate increased from 35 percent to 40 percent. Permanent capital gains tax provisions that retain lower rates was a positive point, as was the inclusion of enhanced expensing

“Extension of the 2008 farm bill, however, is little more than a stop-gap measure. We are glad that a measure is in place for most of this year, but we are disappointed that Congress was unable or unwilling to roll a comprehensive five-year farm bill proposal into the fiscal cliff package. Now, it will be up to the new 113th Congress to put a new farm bill in place, and we will continue to insist on the kind of reforms that were included in the proposals approved by the Senate and the House Agriculture Committee during the 112th Congress.

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“As the new Congress punches in, members already face a huge work order. While the fiscal cliff package addressed the revenue side of the equation, it did not do enough to cut federal spending in a meaningful way. Without progress on the spending side, we are on a one-way road to fiscal disaster. It is our hope that the new Congress will exercise the leadership needed to put our nation on a path toward fiscal responsibility and agricultural innovation and prosperity.”


Potato Processing during November

Processors in Idaho and Malheur County, Oregon used 7.32 million cwt of raw potatoes during November, a decrease of 3 percent from last November. Accumulated processing of 2012 crop raw potatoes to December 1 was 26.8 million cwt, down 5 percent from last year. Idaho potatoes accounted for 22.6 million cwt of the total processed, down 2 percent from last year. The remaining 4.22 million cwt were produced in other states. Processors in the 9 major States have used 73.2 million cwt of potatoes this season, down 4 percent from the same period last year. Dehydrating usage accounted for 13.5 million cwt of the total processing, up 1 percent from last year.

Idaho Potato Stocks Up

Potato stocks held by growers, dealers, and processors in Idaho on December 1 totaled 101 million cwt, 11.0 million cwt more than on hand December 1, 2011. Disappearance, at 42.2 million cwt is up 9 percent from last year’s 38.8 million cwt. Processors in Idaho and Malheur County, Oregon used 7.32 million cwt of raw potatoes during November, a decrease of 3 percent from last November. Accumulated processing of 2012 crop raw potatoes to December 1 was 26.8 million cwt, down 5 percent

from last year. Idaho potatoes accounted for 22.6 million cwt of the total processed, down 2 percent from last year. The remaining 4.22 million cwt were produced in other states. Nationally, the 13 major potato States held 280 million cwt of potatoes in storage December 1, 2012, up 11 percent from a year ago. Potatoes in storage accounted for 68 percent of the 2012 fall storage States’ production, up 2 percent from the previous year. Potato disappearance, at 132 million cwt, was 2 percent above December 1, 2011. Season-to-date shrink and loss, at 13.7 million cwt, was unchanged from the same date in 2011. Processors in the 9 major States have used 73.2 million cwt of potatoes this season, down 4 percent from the same period last year. Dehydrating usage accounted for 13.5 million cwt of the total processing, up 1 percent from last year.

Idaho Potato Production Up

Idaho’s potato production is expected to total 143 million cwt, up 11 percent from last year’s 129 million cwt, and 27 percent above the 2010 crop. Planted acres of 345,000 and harvested acres of 344,000 are up 25,000 acres from 2011. Statewide, yield per acre is estimated to be a record 416 cwt, up 12 cwt from last year. Yield per acre in the 10 Southwestern counties, at 520 cwt, decreased 20

cwt from last year. Acreage for the 10 Southwest counties, at 20,000 acres planted and harvested, increased 1,000 acres from last year. Because of the acreage increase, total production in the area is up 1 percent from last year at 10.4 million cwt. In Idaho’s “other counties,” yield per acre is estimated at 410 cwt, compared to 395 cwt a year ago. Other area production from 324,000 harvested acres is expected to total 133 million cwt, 12 percent above last year’s 119 million cwt. Data from the Potato Objective Yield Survey shows that 32.9 percent of the russet potatoes were at least ten ounces, up from 25.6 percent that reached that size in 2011 and 20.0 percent that reached that size in 2010. Of the Russet potatoes in the 2012 sample, 80.9 percent met the 2.0 inch or 4 oz. minimum size and grade requirements for U.S. No. 1 potatoes, up from 80.2 percent last year. Processing grade and U.S. No. 2 potatoes, with a 1.5 inch minimum, accounted for 18.0 percent of the 2012 crop.

Bean Production Increases

Idaho’s 2012 dry edible bean production totaled 3.02 million cwt, up 61 percent from last year’s production of 1.88 million cwt. Planted acreage of 145,000 and harvested acreage of 144,000 increased from last year’s 95,000 acres planted and 94,000 acres harvested. Aver-

age yield was 2,100 pounds per acre, up 100 pounds from the previous year. Chickpea (garbanzo) production accounted for the largest portion of Idaho’s dry bean crop with 41.1 percent of the total. Pinto production more than doubled from last year to account for 29.5 percent of Idaho’s production. Small Red production accounted for 9.6 percent of production. Pink production accounted for 7.0 percent of Idaho’s production. Navy production accounted for 4.2 percent of production. Black production accounted for 2.1 percent of Idaho’s production, and Great Northern production accounted for 1.9 percent. Dark red kidneys, light red kidneys, cranberries, and other classes made up the remaining dry edible bean production in Idaho. Of the ten classes of dry edible beans estimated for Idaho during 2012, all except Great Northerns posted production gains from last year.

Red Meat Production Down

Commercial red meat production at Idaho packing plants for November 2012 totaled 3.7 million pounds, down 1 percent from November of last year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Accumulated red meat production for the January-November 2012 period totaled 39.3 million pounds, down 56 percent from the comparable period a year earlier.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

33


Farm Technology Invaluable

In an article in USA Today, which ran recently, it showcases farming technology in today’s agriculture. The article hails technology, like precision agriculture, as invaluable for 21st-century farmers, touting “higher yields, less waste, higher profits, less environmental impact, higher growth and a priceless perk—less time away from the family,” according to the article. In the piece, AFBF’s Dale Moore discusses how GPS is the most efficient means for farmers to “control use of the products and limit applications to only what is needed for a plant to grow,” by accurately being able to use fertilizer and nutrients.

Special Purchase Helps Move Big Potato Crop

The Agriculture Department will spend $25 million for a special purchase of fresh and processed potatoes. The buy will help move a large 2012 crop and was requested in a Sept. 28 letter by the National Potato Council. The purchase is the equivalent of about 300 million pounds of fresh potatoes, which will be sent to federal nutrition programs and food banks.

34

Crop Insurance Program Dates

USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) reminds producers of the fast approaching winter and spring sales closing dates for Multiple Peril Crop Insurance (MPCI) programs. This also includes the whole farm insurance programs Adjusted Gross Revenue Pilot (AGR) and Adjusted Gross Revenue-Lite (AGR-Lite). AGR and AGR-Lite cover most farmraised crops, animals, and animal products.    

Upcoming Sales Closing Dates 

 January 31, 2013         Final date to buy or change AGR insurance in select counties in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Final date to submit required documents to continue or change 2013 AGR-Lite insurance for EXISTING POLICY HOLDERS in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. February 1, 2013         Final date to buy or change crop insurance coverage for 2013 Spring Planted Onions in Idaho, Oregon and Washington and Cabbage in Oregon and Washington.   March 15, 2013           Final date to buy or change ALL OTHER Spring Seeded MPCI (excluding wheat in counties with Fall and Spring planted types). Final date to buy 2013 AGR-Lite insurance for NEW APPLICATION/ENROLLMENT POLICIES in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

and Washington.           Current policyholders and uninsured growers must make all of their decisions on crop insurance coverage before the sales closing date.  If there is no coverage in a county for a specific crop under the traditional MPCI program; producers may ask a crop insurance agent whether they would be eligible for coverage under a written agreement.  Producers are encouraged to visit with their crop insurance agent to learn specific details for the 2013 crop year. Federal crop insurance policies are sold and delivered solely through private insurance companies and agents. A list of crop insurance agents is available at all USDA Service Centers in the United States or on RMA’s web site at http://www3.rma. usda.gov/tools/agents/.

Revamping Ag’s Image

A Commentary in a recent edition of Ag Professional talks about the need to revamp agriculture’s image. Colleen Scherer, managing editor of the publications, says, “The agriculture industry has struggled with its image in recent years. Activists want to paint the picture that agriculture is destructive; dumping chemicals and fertilizer on the ground and into the groundwater, uses monocultures that destroy wildlife habitats and produces

food that is harmful to humans and livestock. Organic groups want to pit Big Ag against the family farmer.” She says that agriculture’s image needs to change, and even got a push earlier this week when USA Today ran the article “Technology is King Down on the Farm,” which looks at—and defends—how technology has changed the agriculture landscape.

2012 Census of Agriculture

It’s not every day that a walk to your mailbox leads to an opportunity to help shape farm programs, boost rural services and grow your farm future. But for producers across the country, that opportunity will soon become a reality with the 2012 Census of Agriculture, according to the Agriculture Department.  The census is currently being mailed to millions of farmers and ranchers across the United States.

Neighborly Cooperation Can Avoid Problems

USDA has asked farmers of varying sizes and types of crops to help promote coexistence, particularly in regard to biotech crops, in agriculture. Barry Bushue, AFBF vice president and a member of USDA’s committee, shared his thoughts


recently with Newsline. “Maybe there are folks who would like it to be more controversial than it is, but it truly isn’t. Farmers have been working side by side, neighbor to neighbor for generations, but the iteration of this committee was its ability to look at how we do that, where the issues are, how we can enhance our abilities to work together,” said Bushue. 

Livestock Traceability Rule Announced

The Agriculture Department recently announced a final rule establishing general regulations for improving the traceability of U.S. livestock moving interstate. USDA received more than 1,600 comments on the proposal.  In response to recommenda-

Wheat Genome Sequencing Hailed as Breakthrough

Agriculture Department scientists working as part of an international team have completed a “shotgun sequencing” of the wheat genome, a paper

tions from Farm Bureau and cattle groups, USDA modified the final rule to recognize brands as official identification when agreed upon by both the shipping and receiving states; maintain back tags as an alternative identification to ear tags for animals moving direct to harvesting; and exempt beef cattle under 18 months of age, with the intent to phase in these animals through a separate rulemaking once the system has proven effective for breeding cattle. Under the final rule, unless specifically exempted, livestock moved interstate would have to be officially identified and accompanied by an interstate certificate of veterinary inspection or other documentation, such as owner-shipper statements or brand certifi-

published in the journal Nature reported recently. The achievement is expected to increase wheat yields, help feed the world and speed up development of wheat varieties with enhanced nutritional value. “By unlocking the genetic se-

cates. The rule encourages the use of low-cost technology and specifies approved forms of official identification for each species, including metal ear tags or “Brite” tags for cattle.  Producers utilizing livestock for custom slaughter or home consumption are exempted, as well as chicks moved directly from a hatchery.  

Secretary Tom Vilsack pointed to a recent study, which finds that while the use of biobased products in automobile manufacturing is increasing, there are still many parts in the topselling automobiles manufactured in the United States that may be replaced with biobased materials.

USDA Grants Support Sustainable Bioenergy Production

The Environmental Protection Agency has kept its word about farm dust regulations, which is a big relief for a lot of farmers and ranchers. “Course particulate matter” is the government’s way of talking about farm dust when it’s discussing how to regulate it. Recently EPA determined there is currently no need to make those regulations any tougher. The rules will come up for review again in five years.

crets of wheat, this study and others like it give us the molecular tools necessary to improve wheat traits and allow our farmers to produce yields sufficient to feed growing populations in the United States and overseas,” said Catherine Woteki, USDA’s chief scientist and undersecre-

tary for research, education and economics. “Genetics provides us with important methods that not only increase yields, but also address the ever-changing threats agriculture faces from natural pests, crop diseases and changing climates.”

USDA announced recently $10 million in research grants to spur production of bioenergy and biobased products that will lead to the development of sustainable regional systems and help create jobs, including within the automotive industry. At the announcement, Agriculture

No New Farm Dust Regulations

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

35


FARM BUREAU COMMODITY REPORT GRAIN PRICES

Portland:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Corn

Ogden:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Pocatello:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Burley:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Nampa:

White Wheat (cwt) (Bushel)

Lewiston:

White Wheat Barley

LIVESTOCK PRICES

11/26/2012

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs Over 700 lbs

Cows

Utility/Commercial Canner & Cutter

Stock Cows Bulls

Slaughter

BEAN PRICES: Pinto Pink Small Red

8.27 8.94-9.07 9.51 288-291.25

N/A - .71 to - .70 - .47 - .20 to - 19.25

8.30 8.47 8.97 12.00

8.40 8.21 8.83 11.20

+ .10 - .26 - .14 - .80

8.00 7.92 8.43 11.83

7.80 7.37 8.02 11.67

-

7.98 8.01 8.44 12.25

7.40 7.53 7.95 12.25

- .58 - .48 - .49 Steady

13.08 7.85

12.63 7.58

- .45 - .27

8.50 241.50

8.19 224.50

- .31 - 17.00

11/21/2012

12/26/2012

Trend

116-167 103-140 91-116

126-198 116-166 112-150 116-122

Steady to + 7 Steady to - 1 + 9 to + 10 + 25 to + 6

121-172 117-149 92-145 80-116

117-172 117-148 110-135 119-120

- 5 to steady Steady to – 1 + 18 to - 10 + 39 to + 4

75-105 63-102

65-101 75-106

- 10 to - 4 + 12 to + 4

57-78 45-70

55-79 50-71

- 2 to + 1 + 5 to + 1

700-1500

800-1500

+ 100 to steady

61-90

63-89

+ 2 to - 1

35.00-38.00 40.00-42.00 40.00-42.00

35.00-36.00 40.00-42.00 40.00-42.00

Steady to - 2.00 Steady Steady

Compiled by the Idaho Farm Bureau Commodity Division 36

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

Trend

No Bid 9.65-9.77 9.98 308-310.50

Feeder Steers Under 500 lbs 126-191 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

12/26/2012

.20 .55 .41 .16


IDaho Hay Report Dec 21, 2012 Tons: 3075 Last Week: 5000 Last Year: 750 Compared to last week, Premium and Supreme Alfalfa steady to weak in a light test. Trade slow to moderate with light to moderate demand in pre-holiday trading. Retail/feed store/horse steady. Buyer demand good with light to moderate supplies. All prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise stated. Alfalfa Large Square Supreme Premium Good

Tons

100 475 200 1000 100 200

Price

Wtd Avg

215.00-215.00 225.00-225.00 210.00-210.00 225.00-225.00 210.00-210.00 190.00-190.00

215.00 225.00 210.00 225.00 210.00 190.00

Comments

Alfalfa/Grass Mix Large Square Fair

1000

170.00-170.00

170.00

Alfalfa hay test guidelines, (for domestic livestock use and not more than 10% grass), used with visual appearance and intent of sale Quantitative factors are approximate and many factors can affect feeding value. Source: USDA Market News, Moses Lake, WA.

Tarped Export Retail/Stable

POTATO PRODUCTION Idaho Potato Production Up 12 Percent

Idaho’s potato production is expected to total 127 million cwt, up 12 percent from last year’s 113 million cwt, but 4 percent below the 2009 crop, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Planted acres of 320,000 and harvested acres of 319,000 are up 25,000 acres from 2010. Statewide, yield is 398 cwt (field-run

5 Year Grain Comparison

Grain Prices................12/23/2008...................12/23/2009...................12/22/2010..................12/19/2011..................12/26/2012 Portland: White Wheat..................... 5.50 .............................4.85 ..............................7.60 ..........................5.86 ........................... 8.27 11% Winter.....................No Bid ..................No Bid .................No Bid .............6.74-6.86 .........8.94-9.07 14% Spring........................8.34 ...........................No Bid ...............No Bid.............................9.62 ...........................9.51 Corn...............................175.25-176 ................. 176-180.25........................246.75 ...........260-261.50...................288-291.25 Ogden: White Wheat..................... 5.00 .............................4.45 ..............................6.55 ............................5.85............................. 8.40 11% Winter........................5.14................................4.32 ..............................7.02 ............................5.73 ............................ 8.21 14 % Spring.......................7.17 .............................5.47 .............................8.67 ............................8.22 .......................... 8.83 Barley................................. 6.75 ..............................5.83 ..............................8.50 ...........................10.70.............................11.20 Pocatello: White Wheat.....................4.22 .............................4.25 ..............................6.20 ............................5.55............................. 11% Winter....................... 4.82 .............................4.00 ..............................6.64 ............................5.73 ........................... 14% Spring........................ 6.97 ..............................5.31 .............................8.51 ............................8.32 .......................... Barley................................. 5.65 ............................5.73 ...........................8.85 ..........................9.90 ..........................

7.80 7.37 8.02 11.67

basis), up 14 cwt from last year. Yield in the 10 Southwestern counties, at 530 cwt, decreased 15 cwt from last year’s record high for this area. Acreage for the 10 Southwest counties, at 19,000 acres planted and harvested, increased 3,000 acres from last year. Because of the acreage increase, total production in the area is up 15 percent from last year at 10.1 million cwt. In Idaho’s “other counties,” yield is estimated at 390 cwt, compared to 375 cwt a year ago. Other area production from 300,000 harvested acres is expected to total 117 million cwt, 12 percent above last year’s 104 million cwt.

Burley: White Wheat..................... 4.10 .............................. 4.14 .............................6.24 ............................5.65............................. 11% Winter....................... 4.87 .............................4.03 ..............................6.59 ............................5.46 ........................... 14% Spring........................ 6.59 .............................. 5.14 .............................8.43 ............................8.00 .......................... Barley.................................6.00...............................5.50 ..............................8.50 ..........................9.50 ..........................

7.40 7.53 7.95 12.25

Nampa: White Wheat (cwt)...........7.42 ..............................6.67 .............................10.66..............................8.58 ......................... 12.65 (bushel)........... 4.45 ..............................4.00 ..............................6.40 ............................5.15............................. 7.58 Lewiston: White Wheat..................... 5.20 .............................4.70 ..............................7.15 ............................5.65............................. 8.19 Barley................................96.50 .......................... 116.50 .......................171.50...........................176.50........................ 224.50 Bean Prices: Pintos................................38.00 ...........32.00 ........... 22.00-24.00.......................45.00 ...35.00-36.00 Pinks............................37.00-38.00........................32.00 ........... 24.00-25.00.......................45.00 ...40.00-42.00 Small Reds...................40.00-43.00...................30.00-32.00.................. 26.00-30.00 ..........45.00-46.00 ...............40.00-42.00 ***

IDAHO Milk production UP 2.3 Percent December 19, 2012

Idaho milk production during November 2012 totaled 1.09 billion pounds, a 2.3 percent increase from the same month last year, but a 4.2 percent decrease from October 2012, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. October 2012 milk production was revised to 1.14 billion pounds, up slightly from the preliminary level. Average milk production per cow in November 2012 was 1,880 pounds, up 40 pounds from last year’s level. The average number of milk cows during November was 579,000 head, unchanged from November 2011.

Milk production in the 23 major States during November totaled 14.9 billion pounds, up 1.1 percent from November 2011. October revised production at 15.2 billion pounds, was down slightly from October 2011.The October revision represented an increase of 1 million pounds or less than 0.1 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,758 pounds for November, 19 pounds above November 2011. The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.47 million head, 3,000 head less than November 2011, but 8,000 head more than October 2012. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

37


5 Year livestock comparison .....................................12/22/2008...................12/21/2009...................12/21/2010...................12/19/2011..................12/26/2012 Under 500 lbs................. 82-112 ........................94-131 .........................117-153 ....................136-195 ...................126-198 500-700 lbs.....................73-104 .......................85-111 .........................105-139.........................120-160........................ 116-166 700-900 lbs......................65-87 .........................70-94 ........................85-119 .....................105-139.........................112-150 Over 900 lbs....................72-78 ...........................70-85 ..........................86-113...........................98-119 .......................116-135 Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs..................75-95 ........................87-126...........................112-148 ....................125-159.........................117-172 500-700 lbs......................70-91 ........................77-102 ..........................97-127 .....................112-149.........................117-148 700-900 lbs......................62-85 ...........................70-89 ..........................81-108..........................101-128........................ 110-135 Over 900 lbs.......................75 ........................76-79 ............................N/A .......................110-112.........................119-120 Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs..................38-50 ...........................45-64 ...........................63-85 .......................... 65-96 ........................65-101 Over 700 lbs.................... 41-52 ...........................43-59 ............................58-82 ......................... 65-99 ........................75-106 Cows Utility/Commercial...........30-47.............................33-55.............................40-66........................... 46-72............................55-79 Canner & Cutter..............20-37.............................23-44.............................35-58............................ 45-62............................ 50-71 Stock Cows......................385-860 ......................580-920 ......................690-1200..................... 800-1470......................800-1500 Bulls – Slaughter............35-64.............................39-63.............................51-76............................ 50-73 .........................63-89

Idaho Cattle on Feed Up 4 Percent from Previous Year December 21, 2012 Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in Idaho from feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head on December 1, 2012 totaled 245,000 head, up 4 percent from the previous year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The cattle on feed inventory is up 2 percent from November 1, 2012. Placements of cattle in feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during November totaled 40,000 head, down 6,000 head from November 2011 placements. Marketings of cattle from feedlots with 1,000 head or more during November totaled 34,000 head, down 1,000 head from last year. Other disappearance totaled 1,000 head during November. Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.3 million head on December 1, 2012. The inventory was 6 percent below December 1, 2011. Placements in feedlots during November totaled 1.92 million, 6 percent below 2011. Net placements were 1.84 million head. During November, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 645,000, 600-699 pounds were 450,000, 700-799 pounds were 375,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 453,000. Marketings of fed cattle during November totaled 1.76 million, 1 percent below 2011. Other disappearance totaled 88,000 during November, 9 percent below 2011.

Cattle Outlook December 21, 2012 USDA’s cattle on feed report said there were 6.0% fewer cattle in large feedlots than on December 1, 2011. November placements were down 5.6% while marketings were down 0.7%. The on-feed number is 0.6% above pre-release trade forecasts. Retail beef prices set a new record in November.The average price of choice beef in grocery stores during November was $5.152 per pound. That was 12.1 cents higher than in October, 15.1 cents higher than in November 2011, and 5.9 cents above the old record set in January 2012. The new record for retail beef is encouraging as $5.10 per pound choice beef was becoming something of a price ceiling. The 5 area price of slaughter steers averaged $126.10/cwt during November. That was 30 cents higher than the month before and $2.60 higher than November 2011, but 70 cents below the record set in March of this year. Beef carcass cutout values were mixed this week. On Friday morning, the choice boxed beef carcass cutout value was $193.22/cwt, down $1.05 from last Friday. The select carcass cutout was $177.22/cwt, up $2.03 for the week. The choice-select spread, $16.00/cwt, dropped $3.07 from Friday. Fed cattle prices were higher on light volume this week.Through Thursday, the 5-area average price for slaughter steers sold on a live weight basis was $126.13/cwt, up $2.91 from last week and up 75 cents from the same week last year. Dressed steers prices averaged $199.91/cwt this week.

38

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 633,000 head, up 0.2% from last week and up 6.0% from a year ago. The average steer dressed weight for the week ending on December 8 was 878 pounds, up 2 pounds from the week before and up 25 pounds from a year ago. This was the 48th consecutive week with steer weights above the year-earlier level. Year-to-date cattle slaughter is down 3.5% but due to heavier weights beef production is down only 1.2%. Oklahoma City stocker cattle prices were $5 to $8 higher while feeder cattle prices were $3 to $5 higher this week with prices for medium and large frame #1 steers: 400-450# $180.50-$194.50, 450-500# $169-$184, 500-550# $162-$174, 550-600# $150.50-$166.50, 600-650# $146-$162, 650-700# $146.50-$159.25, 700-750# $139-$155.50, 750-800# $144-$149.75, 800-900# $138-$148.25, and 900-1000# $141.25/cwt. Live cattle futures prices ended the week higher. The December live cattle futures contract closed at $129.27/cwt, up $2.37 from the previous Friday. February cattle settled at $133.57/cwt, up 97 cents for the week. April fed cattle contracts settled at $137.32/cwt. Provided by: University of Missouri


Classifieds Animals

Farm Equipment

Recreational Equipment

Wanted

2 year old Blk/white paint gelding. Halter broke. Lunges, feet trimming, no problem to catch. $1000. 3 yr old paint gelding has had 60 days training, very gentle and no vises. $1500. Sandpoint, Id. 208-263-5549

Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models/parts. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime

2011 Polaris ATV 6 passenger Ranger Crew. 44 hrs with 15 ft trailer. Appraised at $11,500. Both like new. Malad, Id 208-7664897

Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258

For sale or trade Homozghous paint stallion, black and white, very gentle to handle. Last foal produced 2012 was 13/3 hands high at 6 months of age. 208-263-5549 ASCA registered Australian Shepherd pups. Working line since 1968. Full satisfaction guaranteed. All four colors available. Boise, Id 208-484-9802 Boer goats for meat and quality brood stock, 4-H and shows. simon_boers@q.com or 208-837-6523 Looking for an older (but not quite ready to die) riding mule that anyone can ride. I need one with lots of trail experience, and a minimum of bad habits! 208-879-5426

Farm Equipment

Ready for 2013 Harvest Season. New and 2012 John Deere and Case IH Combines for Rent. Guaranteed Delivery and Maintenance, Repairs on most combine parts included. Call Frank at 208-312-1123 for more details. E-mail at frank@frankallidaho.com. Help Wanted

Earn $75,000/yr Part Time in the livestock or equipment appraisal business. Agricultural background required. Classroom or home study courses available. 800-488-7570.

Miscellaneous Box tops and Campbell’s UPC codes needed to help our small, country school. Your help is greatly appreciated! Thanks for helping our students.Please sent to: Liz Robinson 1440 Dufort Rd, Sagle Id 83860

2012 Spudnik Style, 3 axle trailer for sale. 50 feet long, 3 axle air ride, 24 inch belt, PTO unloading. $58,000 -No F.E.T on this trailer. Please call 208.604.6846 with questions or to see. Located in Blackfoot.

Weka 1203 concrete drill, good condition, in case. Middleton, Id. $425.00 208-631-2231

Challenger MT 755, 2209 hrs, annual service checks by Western States, 1000 hrs on 25” tracks, Trimble auto steer and sprayer control, clean one owner, $172,000. American Falls, Id. deegt@aol.com or call 208-220-5588.

Sleeper cab shell w/floor. Fits BTD PU, 61” WX. 34” deep. Windows all sides. Back Door, wired for lights. $400. Pocatello, Id. 208238-3624

Recreational Equipment

FREE CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS send to: dashton@idahofb.org

Wanted Looking for a clean out bucket for a backhoe. Must be over 40” wide and no more than 48”. Prefer no teeth but would consider all options. Can be any model. Please call 208-539-4140. Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338.

DEADLINE DATES:

ADS MUST BE RECEIVED BY

FEBRUARY 20 FOR

NEXT

ISSUE. FREE CLASSIFIEDS

Non commercial classified ads are free to Idaho Farm Bureau members. Must include membership number for free ad. Forty (40) words maximum. Non-member cost- 50 cents per word. You may advertise your own crops, livestock, used machinery, household items, vehicles, etc. Ads will not be accepted by phone. Ads run one time only and must be re-submitted in each subsequent issue. We reserve the right to refuse to run any ad. Please type or print clearly. Proof-read your ad.

Mail ad copy to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848 or email Dixie at DASHTON@IDAHOFB.ORG Name: __________________________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________ City / State / Zip: __________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________________ Membership No. ___________________ Ad Copy: ________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2013

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January 2013, Volume 17, Issue 1