__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

December 2012 • Volume 16, Issue 8

3

Sugar Industry Thrives on Innovation, Technology

12

Farm Bureau Salutes Idaho Veterans

ÂŽ

Idaho Farm Bureau

16

Converting Biomass to Energy


The Holidays are Here and the Duck is Lame By Bob Stallman AFBF President

Its official, the holidays are upon us. We narrowly escaped the rapid fire of election ads and weren’t even finished with the Thanksgiving meal before being fa-la-la-lala’d with luxury cars wrapped in bows and soft drink-swigging polar bears. As the commercials indicate, December is a time for celebration

Proposition 37 Shot Down in California By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

A ballot proposition requiring labeling of genetically modified food, assumed by many as a slam-dunk, was given a thumbs down by Cali-

Red, Blue and the Code of the West By Rick Keller CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

A quick glance at the 2012 county election results map shows the United States bathed in red with little islands of blue dotting the landscape and large blue clusters concentrated in the metropolitan centers on both 2

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

The Ag Agenda and giving (and receiving).

Deck Congress’ Halls

In the political arena, on the other hand, December is typically a down time. This especially holds true when new congressional members have just been elected and the previous Congress is in lame duck mode. But, if Congress doesn’t act soon on several significant outstanding items, all of our gooses will be cooked.

Before we even think about throwing on the Yule Log, we need to get our legislative house in order. If Congress doesn’t make some important decisions before Jan. 1, the U.S. economy will drop off what is being termed the “fiscal cliff.” A plan needs to be hatched to cut $1.2 trillion over the next 10 years from

fornia voters recently, leaving backers of the dubious idea scratching their heads.

level on this issue, biotech crops have become very important to say the least. Biotech corn and soybeans have made up a significant portion of the U.S. harvest since 1995. Biotech sugarbeets now make up 95 percent of the total crop. Corn and soybean percentages are similar. Before they were introduced, the crops were evaluated by various federal agencies and deemed safe for human consumption with no discernible differences from conventional crops. But is there a risk? See PRIESTLEY, page 19

Prop. 37 proponents from all over the country are now regrouping for their next onslaught on our food supply. The fact that they can’t prove there is any difference between the sugar, corn, or soy, that comes from a genetically engineered seed and the sugar, corn or soy that comes from traditional seeds makes no difference – to them. When you drill down to the farm coasts. The bitter election is over, yet the wrangling and hostility remain. Both sides are reluctant to yield as the stalemate continues. I’ve tried to analyze why the red believe what they do and how the blue can even conceive what they support. What is the basis of the difference? In my reflection I attribute it to the environment and values we were raised in and with. I can’t speak for the coastal communes, but do have some sense of what makes the red group think as

See STALLMAN, page 7

we do. Ramon Adams, a Western historian, describes it best as the “Code of the West.” As the West was settled, from the Appalachians to the Rocky Mountains, there was no law. Lack of written laws made it necessary for the frontiersman, cowboy, prospector or pioneer to frame some of their own, thus developing a rule of behavior which became known as the “Code of the West.” That code has been handed down from father to son and mothSee KELLER, page 7


Volume 16, Issue 8

IFBF OFFICERS

President ................................... Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President ..................................Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President .............................. Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................Shelley Scott Bird .......................................................... Pocatello Chris Dalley ....................................................... Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ........................................... Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant .................................................. Oakley Rick Pearson ................................................... Hagerman Mike Garner.............................................................. Declo Curt Krantz ............................................................ Parma Mike McEvoy..................................................... Middleton Tracy Walton ....................................................... Emmett Marjorie French .............................................. Princeton Bob Callihan . ...................................................... Potlatch Louis Kins ........................................................... Kootenai Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Cody Chandler ..................................................... Weiser STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ....................... Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Organization............................... Dennis Brower Commodities & Marketing Assistant ........... Peg Pratt Member Services Assistant . ................... Peggy Moore Publice Relations Assistant ..................... Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager .......................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager ....................... Kendall Keller Dist. III Regional Manager .................. Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ................... Russ Hendricks Dist. V Regional Manager ...................... Bob Smathers Dir. of Governmental Affairs ....................... Kent Lauer Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs ... Dennis Tanikuni Range/Livestock Specialist..........................Wally Butler Director of Public Relations ............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................ Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager .................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise ................... Julie Christoffersen Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID GEM STATE PRODUCER USPS #015-024, is published monthly except February, May, August and November by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201. POSTMASTER send changes of address to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, Idaho, and additional mailing offices. Subscription rate: $6.00 per year included in Farm Bureau dues.

MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: Idaho is one of the leading sugarbeet producing states in the U.S. Sugarbeets account for about half of the nation’s sugar supply and virtually the entire crop comes from biotech seed. Farm Bureau file photo

Sugarbeets are a mainstay in Idaho agriculture. Emerging technology has increased yields and quality of the crop. Farm Bureau file photo

Sugar: An Industry in Transformation By John Thompson

A well-known fact among Idaho farmers is that while a good potato crop will pay for a new Cadillac, sugarbeets will pay the mortgage. These big, robust, grotesquely-shaped tubers that can stand the roughest handling and spend the winter in a pile exposed to freezing conditions are starting to gain the respect they deserve. And technology has played an important role in the evolution of this crop. Recent History In the mid 1990’s the Amalgamated Sugar Company was offered for sale by Valhi, a Texas Company. Investor Harold Simmons who managed Amalgamated Sugar starting in the early 1980’s helped arrange the buyout. However, many growers were reluctant to make the investment.

Growers paid $400 per acre to purchase shares allowing them to maintain that acreage into the future. At the onset, 205,000 shares were purchased. Snake River Sugar Company purchased Amalgamated holdings in Nampa, Nyssa, Oregon, Twin Falls and Paul. Randon Wilson, the Salt Lake City attorney who managed the merger, said it was the largest agricultural cooperative ever put together in the U.S. from the ground up. Larger cooperative deals have been made but resulted from mergers. Growers packed meeting halls across southern Idaho during the winter of 1996-97 to hear Wilson’s presentation. Wilson who grew up on a farm near Logan, Utah, and served as an infantry officer in Vietnam convinced a majority of sugarbeet growers that forming the coop and purchasing the company was the right thing to do.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

3


Although there was reluctance among growers to take the leap and buy the company, and it has resulted in consolidation of the industry (there were about 1,200 farms who bought in compared to 804 now) the consensus today is that it was the right thing to do. “I don’t think you could find a grower out there that would second guess what we have done now,” said Raft River grower and Snake River Sugar Board Member Mike Garner. “We are a big player in the industry and it could have all been sold or shut down.” Duane Grant, a Minidoka County farmer and board chairman for Snake River Sugar said there is a strong demand for the company’s shares. “The cooperative has grown and matured and now offers a clear vision of a profitable crop in a stable industry to its members,” Grant said. “We have been through some rough times but those difficult times have made the cooperative

stronger. We have a good board, good governance and excellent support among our members.” Over the years since the formation of the Snake River Sugar Company, shares in the company have traded for a wide range of prices. Amalgamated Sugar President CEO Vic Jaro said shares in eastern Idaho are currently trading for up to $1,200, while shares in southwest Idaho are worth $500 to $800. Eastern Idaho has fewer crop options and larger farms, which tends to make shares more valuable. When wheat prices spiked in 2008 the price of sugarbeet shares collapsed. In some instances shares were surrendered to banks. Some growers even paid Snake River Sugar a penalty and planted wheat instead of beets. However, recent changes in global sugar production and technology have brought sugarbeet production back to the forefront in Idaho. For a more complete history of sugar pro-

duction in the Intermountain West, including several mergers, consolidations and acquisitions, and how congressmen from the region protested the annexation of Hawaii in 1897, follow this link: http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amalgamated_ Sugar_Company Technology Farm equipment has improved to the point that most growers can now precision-plant 24 rows of sugarbeets per pass and many are harvesting 12 rows per pass, loading a 10-wheeler in less than three minutes. Amalgamated Sugar is also utilizing new machines that pick up and load beet piles from fields during harvest to reduce truck congestion at beet dumps. Equipment that utilized GPS technology along with genetically modified seed has drastically reduced the amount of hand labor needed to produce a sugarbeet crop. These developments are saving farms significant production costs. However, the

Sugarbeets are grown on about 180,000 acres in Idaho. Virtually the entire crop comes from biotech seed. Farm Bureau file photo

4 #

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012


biggest technological leap forward has come from seed.

ster crop,” sometime in the near future if the right climactic conditions converge.

Growers agree that the Monsanto Company’s Roundup Ready technology has taken the sugarbeet industry to a new level. The genetically engineered seed, which has been widely used since 2007, produces plants that can withstand application of the pesticide Roundup (glyphosate). Eden sugarbeet grower and Snake River Sugar Company Board Member Carl Montgomery said California has prohibited GMO sugarbeets, but in all of the other sugarbeet producing states it would be difficult to find any acres that are not planted with Roundup Ready seed. USDA estimates 95 percent of U.S. sugarbeet acreage is Roundup Ready.

“With conventional beets the spray would hook them if you sprayed when it was cold, wet, or damp and they would suffer for a couple of days,” Isaak said. “With Roundup you can spray in any conditions and you might not get a perfect kill on the weeds but the beets are not hurt.”

Power County sugarbeet grower Conrad Isaak says yields have increased because the crop doesn’t have to compete with weeds for fertilizer and water. Isaak believes Idaho growers will produce a “mon-

The new technology produces a better stand which results in better yields. “This year we had hard, crusty dirt in the spring and had a hard time getting the beets going,” Isaak said. “With prime conditions we could produce a monster crop. I believe we will see it one day. It’s coming.” Technological Issues Although genetically modified sugarbeet seed provides many benefits, growers are also faced with increased cost for seed, also called a tech fee. The fee is charged in exchange for the intellectual property put

into developing the seed. Snake River Sugar buys the seed and then distributes it out to its members. The growers are required to pay the tech fee on a per unit basis. Depending on plant spacing, a unit of seed plants roughly a half-acre. On some farms growers prefer tighter spacing, making their tech fee higher. Tech fees have been increasing every year since biotech seed became the norm. This discourages growers from planting tighter stands and many growers would prefer to pay the fee on an acre basis rather than by unit. Snake River Sugar buys seed only from Monsanto. Board Chairman Duane Grant said Monsanto is the only company offering genetically modified sugarbeet seed. Liberty Link, a similar genetically engineered product developed by Bayer was offered to growers in the late 1990’s but never gained global regulatory approval, was never planted commercially, and is no longer available.

Amalgamated Sugar Company will process about seven million tons of sugarbeets this winter. Farm Bureau file photo

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

5


With regard to the per unit discussion and tech fees, Grant explained that Monsanto shares the royalties from seed sales with two other companies that participated in the technological development process of the crop. KWS, a German company, and Syngenta also receive a portion of the royalties. Biotech sugarbeets are grown on one million acres, all in the U.S., while Roundup Ready corn takes in 90 million acres in the U.S. and Roundup Ready soybeans account for 85 million U.S. acres. These two biotech crops are also sold in other countries. These demographics render sugarbeets relatively insignificant in the global scope of agriculture and this unfortunate fact makes it difficult for Snake River Sugar to negotiate an acreage deal, Grant said. “The formula penalizes growers who want to grow the best crop possible by using more seed,” Grant said. “It’s a nonsensical position from the growers’ perspective, but negotiation with these large multinational companies is not something they take lightly.” He added that although negotiations with Monsanto over tech fees are ongoing, he doesn’t expect the company to move away from its per unit position.

Grant said growers would welcome a competitor and would like to see Liberty Link get back into the sugarbeet seed business. But he stopped short of calling Monsanto’s dominance of the market a monopoly. “The definition of a monopoly is a company that has actively positioned itself to control a market and exclude competition,” he said. “Monsanto is unique in that they are the only company that has offered a product to the sugar industry. No one can look at the fact that nearly 100 percent of the sugarbeet acres in the U.S. are planted with Roundup Ready varieties and not raise eyebrows that this is set up for abuse. But our experience so far in working with Monsanto and the other stakeholders is that new value created should be shared 50-50 between the growers and the companies that developed the product.” Another problem tied to the new technology is herbicide resistance. Raft River farmer Mike Garner plants Roundup Ready corn and alfalfa, along with his beet acres. “If you spray but don’t kill a weed with Roundup and then it goes to seed they get tougher to kill,” he said. “So we go in and break the cycle using conventional herbicides.”

Garner said he doesn’t spray his Roundup Ready corn with Roundup anymore because the risk of developing resistance is too high. He said many growers are tank mixing a broadleaf herbicide with Roundup on Roundup Ready crops. “It’s a very common practice now,” Garner said. “We can’t take a chance with developing resistance; we have to be really careful.” In spite of increasing costs associated with tech fees and the need for additional chemicals to prevent resistance development, Garner said he wouldn’t consider going back to conventional sugarbeets at this point. “The cost of Roundup is very affordable and there are other generic brands with the same formulation that are labeled for sugarbeets so the competition is out there,” he said. Labor One area where biotech seed and GPS technology has reduced costs for producers is labor. Better planters and seed deSee SUGAR BEETS page 26

About 800 Idaho farms produced sugarbeets this year. The bulk of the crop is raised in Minidoka, Cassia, Twin Falls, Power, Bingham, Elmore and Canyon counties. Farm Bureau file photo 6

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012


Stallman

Continued from page 2

the deficit, something of which Congress has known about for awhile. If Congress doesn’t act by the end of the year, automatic, across-the-board government cuts will kick in, affecting more than 1,000 federal programs, many of which will impact agriculture. For example, all commodity and many conservation programs will be cut by 7.6 percent next year. And agriculture research, Extension activities, food safety and rural economic development programs are just a few others that will be cut by 8.2 percent in 2013. Crop insurance will survive the first year, but will likely face cuts in year two.

While all Americans will feel the impact, the cuts will slice right through rural America, which is so dependent on Extension services and rural development. With Boughs of Folly The fiscal cliff will also impact tax breaks. An important one for farmers is the estate tax, which will revert from a $5 million exemption at a 35 percent tax rate to a $1 million exemption with a top tax rate of 55 percent. This could impact one out of every 10 farms and make it almost impossible for young farmers to carry on their family operations. The capital gains tax rate will also increase

come Jan. 1, from 15 percent to 20 percent. This, too, will greatly impact farmers. Because capital gains taxes are imposed when buildings and farmland are typically sold or transferred to new or expanding farmers, it will become more difficult for farmers to shed their assets or upgrade their businesses. Congress has a lot on its holiday plate during the next several weeks. By the way, did I mention that we still don’t have a farm bill? But, that’s a topic for another day, maybe over eggnog . . . Until then, have a happy and safe holiday season.

keller

Continued from page 2 er to daughter sinking into the fiber of our souls and the souls of our communities. The “Code of the West” is not carved in stone, but is an unwritten code of short sayings that state a general truth or aphorism. The “Code” has been immortalized in Western novels by authors that shaped our heritage as they articulated our heritage. Can anyone doubt the moral and ethical impact of hundreds of books written by the likes of Louis L’ Amour, Zane Grey and other Western authors? Their books have inspired hundreds of movies portraying how the “Code” applied to daily living. The “Code” was entrenched in the television and movies we watched, shaping our thoughts and values: including series such as Roy Rogers, Bat Masterson, Bonanza, Maverick, Wagon Train, the Virginian, the Rifleman, Zorro and many others. We watched these movies and series usually on a Saturday or Sunday evening (on the only television set in the house) as a family, guided by and with our parents, reemphasizing right from wrong and reinforcing the values contained in the “Code.” This antecedent code lives on in values for today. Author James P. Owen, in his book,

Cowboy Ethics, What Wall Street Can Learn from the Code of the West, identifies ten principles that capture the essence of the “Code of the West.” Live each day with courage. Take pride in your work. Always finish what you start. Do what has to be done. Be tough, but fair. When you make a promise, keep it. Ride for the brand. Talk less and say more. Remember that some things aren’t for sale and know where to draw the line. We reds took a thumpin’ this election. “You can’t tell how good a man or a watermelon is ‘til they get thumped.” Character shows up best when tested. To the red supporters, it looks bleak out there, but “every trail has a few puddles.” “It is not enough for a man to learn how to ride; he must learn how to fall.” Some words of wisdom from the “Code” come to mind. “Play the hand you were dealt.” “Pull yourself up by your bootstraps.” Improve our situation by our own efforts. Stay involved, stay connected. Let our legislative and executive branches know how we feel. We are a self-reliant lot. In our communications emphasize “don’t fix it if it ain’t broke;” “God put the firewood there, but that every man must gather and light it himself;” “life is not fair and it is not the

responsibility of the government to make it so;” and “any government big enough to give you everything you want is big enough to take everything you got.” There will be some tough and difficult decisions to make, but we must “do what has to be done.” Some decisions will have higher priorities. “A cowboy’s horse always eats first.” We will need to be patient. “The hardest thing about learning to ride is the ground.” We won’t and didn’t get everything we wanted or expected. We will hit hardships, difficulties and challenges. Above all, we “ride for the brand.” We are loyal Americans. Our loyalty will be witnessed by our diligent hard work, cheerfulness, and fervent defense of our country against any harm or slur. We must not “kick up dust around the chuck wagon.” Remember the “Code of the West,” the unwritten code. These principles have shaped our lives. It has made us who we are better than we were. Pass these principles to our children and grandchildren. Teach them what has made this nation and country great. Don’t “take the last of the water without refilling the bucket.” Teach them, the “Code of the West.”

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

7


A ceremony was held recently in Boise’s Julia Davis Park to recognize agriculture’s heritage in Idaho.

Ag Pavilion Dedicated in Boise’s Julia Davis Park Article and photos by Jake Putnam

Bureau Board Member Lew Murgoitio.

In Boise’s Julia Davis Park a new sandstone pavilion stands as a monument to Idaho Agriculture.

In the 1860’s Tom Davis built orchards where the Pavilion in Julia Davis Park now stands. The farm provided food to Idaho City miners and thousands of settlers passing through Boise traveling the Oregon Trail.

The Pavilion was dedicated in October and is the only monument in Idaho honoring the industry that built the great State of Idaho. “I think it symbolizes how big agriculture is in Idaho. I think its outstanding to have something like this in Boise where many people will see it and tell the story of the importance of agriculture in the past and the future to come,” said Ada County Farm 8

Diane Myklegard Davis, a great-granddaughter of Tom and Julia Davis told those gathered at the dedication that the new pavilion tells a story of Idaho’s diverse agriculture industry. “My great grandfather brought agriculture to Boise, and my families still in agricul-

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

ture, and it’s still a big part of our lives,” she said. One-hundred yards from the Zoo, in the highest traffic area of the park sits 44 engraved stones - one from each county in Idaho. Each stone has an agriculture factoid engraved in native sandstone and arranged in an attractive circular plaza. Clearly visible, also etched in sandstone are the brands of Idaho ranchers, and the seals of Idaho’s commodity commissions. Featured prominently is the Ada County Farm Bureau. “This is one of the first places where ag-


riculture started in Idaho,” said Ada County Farm Bureau President Don Sonke. “It’s fitting that we’re here. Over a quarter of a million people pass through here each year. This is the spot where Tom Davis planted one of the first commercial orchards in Idaho. It’s the perfect spot to have an agricultural memorial to farming pioneers.” Boise Mayor Dave Bieter says most Idahoan’s including his family can trace their roots to agriculture and this memorial reminds us of agriculture’s importance in the Gem State. “The effort was big, the project bigger,” said Bieter. “Agriculture is so important to our state, our city and our valley. We can’t overstate that. It’s so fitting that in our capital city, in this spot that agriculture can be celebrated.” The pavilion with adjoining bathroom facility and the sandstone plaza carried a price tag of more than $330,000, according to the Boise Parks and Recreation Department. Much of the funding came from corporate donations from throughout the state. “There’s no monuments to agriculture in Idaho,” said Murgoitio. “The pavilion is a step in the right direction. Hopefully one day we can have monuments across the state. But this one sends the message that a monument is needed because agriculture has historical impact. It will in the future and it’s what we’re about.” The Franklin County stone reads: “Alfalfa is one of the most nutritious crops to feed animals,” and is just one of 44 agriculture facts. Organizers think that curious school chil-

Each of Idaho’s 44 counties is recognized with a sandstone-engraved agriculture factoid.

dren will spend at least an hour digesting agriculture facts in a beautiful setting. “There’s a million and a half visitors that will come through here each year. This is the capitol city and it’s nice to have the Farm Bureau’s name here,” said Sonke.

will continue to tell the story of Idaho agriculture throughout the park. Thanks to Ada County Farm Bureau and donations

from other agriculture organizations, Sonke says the Farm Bureau will have a presence for decades to come.

Back in 1907 Tom Davis donated 40 acres of land along the Boise River to the City of Boise in memory of his wife Julia with the stipulation that the orchards be turned into a park for residents to enjoy. 97-year old Tom Davis attended the event. He’s the grandson of Tom and Julia Davis, Boise’s first farmers of note. He was there to celebrate agriculture and the Davis legacy. “I’m very proud of my grandparents,” he said. “And I’m very proud of the city and what they’ve done with the park.” The Agriculture Pavilion is part of a long term project in Julia Davis Park called ‘The Second Century.’ It’s part of a plan that Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

9


Focus on Agriculture

Working Together for a Dynamic Agriculture By Barry Bushue

progress.

Open the food section of your favorite Sunday newspaper or visit the food and agriculture blogosphere and you occasionally get the impression that segments of agriculture are in a competitive feud with one another. It seems consumers are constantly pressured to pick a favorite. Organic versus conventional? Global market chains versus locally sourced? Traditional versus modern?

Our committee just completed a year-long discussion on ways to enhance coexistence among different production methods, specifically biotech and nonbiotech crops. We tackled some challenging topics but in the end developed a set of consensus recommendations that aim to serve the interests of all segments of agriculture.

But visit with farmers who earn their livelihood working the land, as I do, and you get a much different impression. Most farmers and agribusinessmen and women have an unbridled respect for their counterparts, regardless of the region where they live, the crops they choose to grow or the production methods they embrace. Today’s farmers are sophisticated and they understand that one size doesn’t fit all. And that it will take a diverse agriculture and food system to meet the 21st century demands of a rapidly escalating global population, more sensitive and discerning wealthy consumers and increasingly strained natural resources.

I leave it to you to read every detail of the final AC21 report delivered this week. In brief, our recommendations centered on the history of successful coexistence in identity-preserved

When I was appointed a member of AC21, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack’s Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture, I didn’t plan on dispelling this misconception of a dueling agriculture industry. But along with my fellow committee members, I think we’ve made 10

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

agriculture where there is a market-based price premium for maintaining the integrity and purity of a crop; the potential to implement education and outreach initiatives to improve stewardship and neighborto-neighbor coexistence; and whether or not there is a need to help some farmers manage risk through a new insurancetype product. I’m optimistic the AC21 recommendations can improve the way farmers work together because they reflect a diversity and mutual respect embodied in our committee’s membership.

For my part, there are two core principles I believe are worth keeping in mind as we work together to strive for a dynamic agriculture industry that continues to respond to consumer preferences while maintaining our role and reputation as the most productive source of affordable, high-quality agriculture products in the world. The first principle is choice. Farmers should have the freedom and ability to pursue their own best interest when determining what safe and environmentally sound cropping methods to adopt. The second principle is innovation—in markets and technology. The growth of our industry depends on maintaining and improving access to new input technologies, including biotechnology, while preserving and enhancing the marketability of farmers’ products in domestic and foreign markets. This requires a science-based regulatory framework that is appropriately rigorous as well as efficient and predictable. Then, farmers and agribusiness can be free to identify and pursue consumer-driven, value-added market opportunities for which our industry is so well-known. Barry Bushue is the owner of a family nursery, berry, and flowering basket farm in Oregon and serves as vice president of the American Farm Bureau Federation.


The lifeblood of America . They’re the humble heroes who rise before dawn and battle the elements. They put clothes on our backs and food on our tables. Their genuine values and tireless work ethic are an inspiration to us all. We appreciate all that America’s farmers do and invite you to join us in saying thanks at www.fbfs.com/SayThanksToAFarmer. FB02-ID (3-12)

ID-Tribute(3-12).indd 1

3/12/12 3:54 PM Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012 11


SALUTE TO VETERANS

The Idaho Farm Bureau celebrated the second Annual Salute to Veterans on November 9th. Veterans presented the colors and were honored by several hundred well-wishers. Images Courtesy of Jenny Losee Photography

12

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

13


14

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

15


From Wood to Wing Biofuels and the NARA Opportunity

By Randy Brooks Energy is essential in our daily lives. We use it to fuel our cars, grow our food, heat our homes, and run our businesses. Most of our energy comes from burning fossil fuels like petroleum, coal, and natural gas. These fuels provide the energy that we need today, but there are several reasons why developing sustainable, renewable alternatives makes sense for tomorrow. A number of renewable resources like solar, wind, hydropower, geothermal, and bio- Forest residuals may soon be burned in jet engines as opposed to being burned as slash piles. mass have slowly transformed Photo courtesy Robert Barkley, Idaho Department of Lands the U.S. energy supply. These tanol, biodiesel, and renewable gasoline. In systems we need, the U.S. Government energy sources are called “renewable” be- fact, the Energy Independence and Securi- supports research and development (R&D) cause they never run out. They can also be ty Act of 2007 sets the goal of producing 36 that private companies are unlikely to unproduced locally and do not have to be im- billion gallons of biofuels a year by 2022. dertake on their own. ported from other countries. If the United States is able to achieve this One of the Government’s most important One of the most promising renewable en- goal, in 10 to 15 years cellulosic biofuels R&D focus areas is renewable transportaergy sources for transportation purposes is will be found in many gas stations across tion fuels. Energy legislation, as mentioned from biomass. Biomass is any organic ma- the country. above, has set long-term goals for developterial that has stored sunlight in the form In the United States, our economy is large- ing these fuels. The Department of Energy of chemical energy, such as plants, agricul- ly designed to run on fossil fuels. For ex- (DOE) is working with universities, natural and forest crops or residues, munici- ample, our cars run on gasoline made from tional laboratories, and private companies pal wastes, and algae. The U.S. Department oil, and most of our power plants use coal to develop new fuels for cars, trucks, and of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of and other fossil fuels to produce electricity. jets. Energy are focusing their efforts on new Changing these systems can be costly and and better ways to make liquid transporta- time-consuming. To help develop the new Making biofuel out of living plants may sound like new technology, but it’s actually tion fuels or biofuels, like ethanol, isobu16

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012


With the rapid development of enzyme technologies in the last two decades, the acid hydrolysis process has gradually been replaced by enzymatic hydrolysis. Chemical pretreatment of the feedstock is required to prehydrolyze (separate) hemicellulose, so it can be more effectively converted into sugars. This process has also reduced the cost of production.

Forest slash piles make good feedstock for conversion to biofuels. Photo courtesy of Robert Barkley, Idaho Department of Lands

been around for awhile. We can make ethanol out of corn and other living plants, but what about making fuel out of trees? The first attempt at commercializing a process for ethanol from wood was done in Germany in 1898. It involved the use of a dilute acid to hydrolyze (decompose by reacting with water) the cellulose (woody materials) to glucose (sugars), and was able to produce about 18 gallons per dry ton of biomass. Soon after, the Germans developed an industrial process capable of yielding around 50 gallons per dry ton of biomass. This process soon found its way to the US, resulting in two commercial plants operating in the southeast during WWI. These plants used what was called the American Process — a one-stage dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis. Though the yields were half that of the original German process (25 gallons of ethanol per ton versus 50), the quantity of raw material produced over time by the American process was much higher. A drop in lumber production forced the plants to close shortly after the end of WWI. In the meantime, a small but steady amount of research on dilute acid hydrolysis continued at the U.S. Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin. During World War II, the US again turned to cellulosic ethanol, this time for conversion to butadiene to pro-

duce synthetic rubber. The Vulcan Copper and Supply Company was contracted to construct and operate a plant to convert sawdust into ethanol. The plant was based on modifications to the original German process as developed by the Forest Products Laboratory. This plant achieved an ethanol yield of 50 gallons per dry ton, but was still not profitable and was closed after the war.

In general there are two types of raw material required for the industrial process (feedstock) used for biofuels, forest or woody biomass and agricultural biomass. In the US, about 1.4 billion dry tons of biomass can be sustainably produced on an annual basis. About 370 million tons or 30% are forest biomass. Forest biomass has higher cellulose and lignin content and lower hemicellulose and ash content than agricultural biomass. Forest biomass has significant advantages over agricultural biomass because of the difficulties and low ethanol yield in fermenting pretreatment materials from agricultural biomass. Forest biomass also has high density which significantly reduces transportation cost. It can be harvested year around which eliminates long term storage needs. The lower ash content of forest biomass significantly See UI FORESTRY page 25

Forest slash piles could soon be chipped and converted to biofuels. Photo courtesy of Margo Welch, Idaho Department of Lands Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

17


Federal trapper Shane Robinson spoke to Boundary County Farm Bureau members recently about wolf control and biology.

Federal Trapper Speaks in Boundary County Article and photo by Bob Smathers Shane Robinson, of USDA’s Wildlife Services, spoke on wolves at the Boundary County Farm Bureau annual meeting on Saturday, November 9 in Bonners Ferry. He indicated that there were few complaints about wolves in the Boundary County area, but lots of problems in areas further south in the central and southern Panhandle. “Wolves have not been much of a problem north of I-90, but that could change in the future” says Robinson. Robinson said that hunting and trapping of 18

wolves is helping stabilize the population, but has not reduced it. “Interest in trapping is high, but will likely be a novelty,” says Robinson. He expects trapping of wolves to taper off over time as the benefits will be small relative to the paybacks. Robinson offered to take questions after speaking and one Farm Bureau member asked whether or not it was true that only one female in a wolf pack breeds. Mr. Robinson said this was true because the alpha female will kill or run off other females in the pack that come into heat. Another Farm Bureau member suggested that the wolves

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

present in Idaho before introduction of the gray wolf were a different species of wolf as they were smaller. Robinson said this is a myth. He said the gray wolf and the timber wolf are one in the same species. “There have been reports of 200 pound gray wolves in recent years, but these reports have not been confirmed,” says Robinson. “The largest confirmed wolf that has either been trapped by Wildlife Services or shot by a hunter has been in the 130 to 140 pound range; there have been no confirmed 200 pound wolves taken.”


pRIESTLEY

Continued from page 2

History suggests otherwise. In addition to increased yields, biotech crops eliminate the need for multiple applications of weed-killing chemicals. Biotech crops are engineered to withstand application of glyphosate, a multi-spectrum herbicide. What this means is farmers using biotech seeds are able to apply glyphosate to kill both broadleaf weeds and grasses. The chemical blocks the photosynthetic process of the weeds – in effect killing them by eliminating their ability

to process sunlight, without harming the crop in production. This technology has saved farmers millions of dollars while at the same time drastically reduced the amount of chemical herbicide needed to bring a crop to harvest. So biotech crops are good for farmers and good for the environment too. But what is the benefit to consumers? Better yields equals more food available to feed a growing population. A ready supply of commodities also keeps grocery prices affordable.

“Biotech crops are good for farmers and good for the environment too. But what is the benefit to consumers? Better yields equals more food available to feed a growing population.”

Should food that contains biotechnology be labeled? It’s an interesting question. California voters

took Prop. 37 down by a 53 to 47 percent margin despite polling data that showed 91 percent of Americans support labeling food that comes from biotech crops. This is an important vote because California is a bellwether state, is the country’s most populous state and is the top producer of agriculture products in the nation. Supporters of Prop. 37 argued that consumers have a right to know what is in the food they eat, which is a point well taken. But the fact of the matter is the food is the same whether it contains biotechnology or not. In addition, the cost of labeling food packaging increases the overall cost of the food. California voters decided it wasn’t an expense worth paying for.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

19


XTREME SIDE x SIDE PERFORMANCE.

Top Farm Bureau Agents

Rhett Price                          Agent of the Month (Schmitt Agency) Scott Chappell                      Rookie of the Month (Schmitt Agency)

Polaris would like to congratulate Jake Andersen the winner of this year’s Young Farmer and Rancher Discussion Meet as well as Greg and Gwen Andersen for being presented with the Idaho Farm Bureau’s 2011 Young Farmer and Rancher Achiever Award. We hope you enjoy your new Polaris Trail Boss 330 and RGR 400 and thank you for your continued contributions to the Idaho Farming and Ranching Community. A big thank you to those Idaho Polaris dealers who continue to support the Idaho Farm Bureau and Young Farmer and Rancher Program:

Agency of the Month     Schmitt Agency

Idaho Farm Bureau members can save a significant amount on their medications. Take 5 minutes to get a price quote.

USE IDAHO FARM BUREAU CODE (IDFB) Toll-Free Phone 1.866.335.8064 www.thecanadianpharmacy.com

Vehicles shown with optional accessories. Avoid operating Polaris RANGERs on paved surfaces or public roads. Riders and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Drivers of RANGER vehicles must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license. Warning: ATV’s can be hazardous to operate. For your safety: Avoid operating Polaris ATV’s on paved surfaces or public roads. Riders and passengers should wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Polaris ATV models are for riders aged 16 and older. Be sure to take a safety training course. For safety training information in the U.S., call the SVIA at (800) 887-2887, see your dealer, or call Polaris at (800) 342-3764. In Canada, see your local dealer. ©2011 Polaris Industries Inc.

20

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

Step 1:

Call 1.866.335.8064 or go to www.thecanadianpharmacy.com

Step 2:

Tell them you are with the Idaho Farm Bureau (code IDFB) and that you need a price quote on your medication.

Step 3:

If this price is lower than what you currently pay, then The Canadian Pharmacy will help you get your prescription at the discounted price.


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

21


Ken Ivory, president of the American Lands Council recently spoke to members of the Idaho County Farm Bureau in Grangeville.

Where is the State/Federal Line? Article and photo by Bob Smathers Ken Ivory, president of the American Lands Council and author of “Where’s the Line?” spoke at the Idaho County Farm Bureau annual meeting on October 27 in Grangeville on the topic of state versus federal jurisdiction. The question he presented is where exactly is the line between the jurisdiction of the several states and that of the federal government? He argued that there were three fundamental principles that guided the revolutionary work of the Founders on this topic: - It is the nature and disposition of men and governments to amass unbridled power, 22

- Man’s unalienable rights come only from the Creator (not from a government or a court), and - Governmental powers come only from the people (not from a government or a court). Mr. Ivory went on to say that “ in addition to the internal check of the separation of powers among the three branches of the federal government, the states are by design the critical external check on federal government’s power. The Founders engineered the Constitution in this manner to specifically create a double security to the rights of the people.”

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

The topic of the federal lands transfer to the states was also discussed by Mr. Ivory and how the western states have been “short-changed.” He argues that the federal government stole from the western states by not giving them the lands that were promised, but giving a “few” dollars back instead through PILT or “western welfare.” Payments in Lieu of Taxes” (or PILT) are federal payments to local governments that help offset losses in property taxes due to nontaxable federal lands within their boundaries. The state of Utah with the blessing of Governor Gary Herbert has passed legislation demanding that the federal government


The map below shows that the majority of the land within the western state boundaries is federally owned as shown in red. Notice the stark difference between the eastern and western states with regard to land ownership.

A Message For Our Dairy Farm Customers

honor its promises made to Utah when Utah became a State in 1894 -- to hand over title to Utah’s federally controlled public lands to the state of Utah. HB148, sponsored by Representative Ken Ivory-R, West Jordan requires the feds to do so on or before December 31, 2014, and allows five percent of the proceeds to be retained by the state, and 95 percent of any proceeds be paid to the federal government. It also requires the state to set up a public lands commission. HB91, sponsored by Utah Rep. Kenneth Sumsion-R, American Fork would require the Utah attorney general to file an action to enforce the Utah Enabling Act if the federal government does not comply with Utah’s demands. “The Feds promised multiple use/sustained yield on federal lands within western state borders, but the states can’t touch it,” says Ivory. In Utah, counties are working on natural resource plans to manage federal lands within their boundaries. Except for National Parks and wilderness, everything will be managed for production according to Ivory. Some lands could be privatized if they are an island in the middle of private land, but Ivory does not envision the sale of much transferred federal land in Utah. A process will be in place though to accommodate this if necessary. The American Lands Council with Ken Ivory at the Helm is attempting to get the support of all western governors to push for similar legislation in their states to put up a united front. The federal government has not disposed of its lands as it promised and this has hamstrung the western states when it comes to taxes, jobs, education, agriculture, timber, and natural resources. Disposal of federal lands has been done before in the eastern states and this should be done in the west so these lands can be managed for the benefit of the people. “The western states have to exert their jurisdiction because it is their jurisdiction” says Ivory.

At Idaho Power, our goal is to provide you with fair-priced electricity safely, reliably and responsibly. If the quality and reliability of your electric service fails to meet your expectations, or if you have questions or concerns about stray voltage, please contact your Idaho Power agricultural representative.Idaho Power’s agricultural representatives have the skills and resources to address your concerns. If necessary, they can arrange for an on-site investigation so that we can resolve any electric service issues quickly. Blackfoot & American Falls Area Dennis Elison 208-236-7744 delison@idahopower.com Mini-Cassia Area Daniel Moore 208-736-3215 dmoore@idahopower.com Twin Falls, Jerome & Gooding Area Gerald Orthel 208-736-3430 gorthel@idahopower.com

Mountain Home & Boise Area Tim Fenwick 208-388-6366 tfenwick@idahopower.com Nampa & Caldwell Area Mike Liechty 208-465-8626 mliechty@idahopower.com Payette & Ontario Area Cortney Forsberg 208-642-6546 cforsberg@idahopower.com

The American Lands Council will have a booth at the Idaho Farm Bureau Annual meeting in Boise in December. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

23


Grain Marketing with Clark Johnston

Watch the Technical Indicators

From the end of August through the end of November the Chicago March wheat contract traded in a 60 cent range. The interesting fact in the market during this time frame was that although the trading range remained somewhat consistent the market itself made new lows five times with the market moving from a low of $8.86 on August 28th to a low of $8.54 on November 16th. The 16th of November was also the first time that the RSI had dipped below 40 since the middle of May. The futures were also trading fairly flat as the March 2013 contract and the September 2013 contract were trading at the same level. Usually when we see markets that are flat or inverted we can say that the stocks are short but, in this case we really aren’t short wheat but are short corn. The wheat market is still trying to determine just how much wheat we are actually going to feed this marketing year. For now it is anybody’s guess but we do have a pretty good idea of the fundamental numbers and just how much we need to ration the corn crop in order to make it to new crop. Cattle numbers are down and we know there is very little chance that will change over the next year or two. Of all the demand factors it does look as though it will be feed that will be rationed the most at least percentage wise. The poultry feeders in the southeast were importing corn from South America until just recently when Brazil began having some challenges with shipping. The importing of this corn reduced the amount of soft red wheat they used in their rations. Projections now are that we will be left with a, stocks to use ratio in soft

24

red of 42% at the end of the year.

Hard Red Winter wheat is the one class of wheat where stocks will be tight this year. With most of the large feed lots in the HRW growing areas it only stands to reason that this was the class that will be and was used the most in the rations. The ending stocks to use ratio for HRW is now projected to be 17%. This is 11% lower than earlier projections. Corn is still the reason for the high prices and tightening stocks with the socks to use ratio now at 5.5%. To put it plainly, this is 20 days usage. For now it does look as though the market is doing a good job of rationing the crop but, this could change at any time. As I have mentioned in the past once the crop is in and we have a good idea of the supply/demand numbers we need to pay very close attention to the technical indicators. Even with the market trading somewhat sideways over the past few months the technical have given you both buy and sell signals on several occasions. You may not like the prices but, that may be as good as it is going to get over the next few weeks or maybe months. As producers it will be important to know just where you are as far as your profitability is concerned. Just by knowing these levels will allow you to place your pricing orders with the elevators or flourmills and feel good about your decision. Use the marketing tools that are available to you, yes sometimes they may take some time to learn but, you will need to know how to read and assess just what a technical chart may be telling you. More than any time in

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

Clark Johnston

the past now is the time to take the emotion out of marketing your commodities and it will be these tools that will help you in the years to come. If you haven’t already, now is a good time to begin making your plans for your 2013 crop. Recently I have had the opportunity to sit down with producers to assist them in knowing just where their breakeven levels are and projecting just where they will need to merchandise their commodities in the upcoming year in order to be profitable. We don’t know exactly where the input costs will be but, by using estimates and then adjusting as we move forward they will have a very good idea as to just where they need to sell the crop as well as where they will need to purchase their inputs. Remember, Airline pilots don’t fly by the seat of their pants and neither should we. Clark Johnston is a grain marketing specialist who is on contract with the Idaho Farm Bureau. He is the owner of JC Management Company in Northern Utah. He can be reached at clark@jcmanagement. net


UI FORESTRY

Continued from page 17

reduces dead load in transportation and processing.

waste – into biojet fuel and valuable bioproducts.

Woodchips from slash piles, tree tops, and saw dust from saw mills, and waste paper pulp are common forest biomass feedstock for cellulosic ethanol production. Many of the dead standing beetle killed pines throughout the West are also great candidates for feedstock. Many of the beetle killed pine have been infected with blue stain fungus (a fungus carried into to the wood by e bark beetles) which reduces the economic value of the wood as a lumber product.

From Wood to Wing – Funded through a five-year USDA grant, NARA will take a holistic approach to building a supply chain for aviation biofuel with the goal of increasing efficiency from forestry operations to conversion processes. Using a variety of materials such as forest and mill residues (without competing with existing industries), con­struction waste, and new energy crops, the project aims to create a sustainable industry to produce aviation biofuels and important co-products. The project includes a broad alliance of private industry and educational institutions from throughout the Northwest.

Now, having provided a background for biofuels and biofuel development, I would like to introduce the readers to NARA. NARA stands for Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance. NARA joins public universities, government laboratories and private industry to develop ways to turn one of the most plentiful and renewable resources/commodities - wood and wood

NARA aims to identify a few communities in each of the four states within the NARA project area (Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana) for possible development of biorefineries. The researchers associated with NARA will conduct testing and in-

depth surveys with the aim of establishing criteria for identifying other possible sites. Eventually, NARA hopes to identify sites in every state that might serve as biorefineries for aviation biofuels or co-products. Working with community stakeholders like you, NARA researchers will develop a unique strategy for economic development. In summary, producing bioenergy from forests residuals is sustainable, renewable and doesn’t necessarily compete with food or fiber production. NARA is actively seeking to gather input, so to find out more and get involved, please visit nararenewables. org/or. Randy Brooks is a University of Idaho associate professor and extension educator in forestry, 4-H, and agriculture. He can be reached at the UI-Clearwater County Extension Office 2200 Michigan Ave. Orofino, ID 83544 Phone: 208-476-4434 FAX: 208476-4111 E-mail: rbrooks@uidaho.edu

Refer a friend, get a gift!

ATIONS! CONGRATULGLENNS FERRY A OF MANUAL RIVER

The program that rewards you for your referrals.

OUR LATEST

R! $500 WINNE

Every year, thousands of satisfied

neighbors about Farm Bureau

agent for a free, no obligation quote

customers refer their friends and

Insurance and give them a copy of

and gives your agent a completed

families to Farm Bureau Insurance.

the Rewards Program Referral Card.

card, we put your name into our

We recognize these word-of-mouth

(Cards are available from your agent.)

quarterly drawing for a $500

referrals are one of the best ways for

When your qualified referral contacts

MasterCard® Gift Card - even if your

us to grow. Now, we would like to

your agent, fills out the card for your

referrals don’t purchase a policy.

thank you for your referrals and your

agent and purchases a policy from

trust with our new Rewards Program.

Farm Bureau Insurance, we send you

Here’s how our Rewards Program

a $25 MasterCard® Gift Card. Plus,

works: Tell your friends and

for every referral who contacts your

Certain restrictions apply. Please see the Rewards Program flyer available from your local agent for complete details.

facebook.com/fbmidaho twitter.com/fbmidaho

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

25


SUGAR BEETS

Continued from page 6

velopment mostly ended the need to thin sugarbeets by the early 1980’s. These developments drastically reduced the need for hand labor in most cases. GPS technology has enhanced farmers’ ability to place seeds at exact spacing intervals. When Eden grower Carl Montgomery got back into the sugarbeet business in 1980 after taking a few years off he made the decision to end the practice of hand thinning. At that time it was common for growers to hire a thinning crew in the spring and then pay to have their fields weeded twice more later in the summer before the rows closed. Crews making three to four passes through a field hand weeding and thinning caused a lot of disruption and set crop development back – not to mention the labor cost.

ing company in the U.S. is allotted a quota for production each year. U.S. companies that buy sugar are required to purchase up to 85 percent of the overall domestic demand based on USDA estimates. After 85 percent of domestic production is purchased, sugar can be imported from other countries.

“Biotech seed has realty transformed our industry,” Montgomery said. “You just don’t see weedy beet fields anymore.” On the Horizon Improvements to the company’s three processing plants, and better storage and handling capabilities coupled with improvements on the agronomy side have increased the company’s efficiency. CEO Vic Jaro said although they started out with 205,000 shares or acres planted in sugarbeets, they only need about 180,000 acres in production now. When the market allows, growers are encouraged to plant a few more acres as was the case this year when a seven percent overage was allotted. The company employs 1,000 full-time employees and an additional 900 temporary workers during harvest. The three plants in Twin Falls, Nampa and Paul will process around seven million tons of beets between November and the end of March 2013. The overage is expected to be less next year. Several sugar producing states have abundant crops this year and the overall price of sugar has dropped 40 percent over the last six months. Under the sugar provisions in the Farm Bill, each process26

Beet Field in Idaho. Farm Bureau file photo

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

“The sugar market is cyclical, just like everything else,” said Power County grower Conrad Isaak. “We have had two solid years and next year looks good but maybe not quite as good as this year. We would be naïve to think it will last forever but we will take advantage of it while we can.”


Shane Stevenson, left, and Quinn Inwards attend the World Food Prize Symposium in Des Moines Iowa.

Meridian Student Presents Paper on World Hunger By Jake Putnam Meridian - Rocky Mountain High School teacher Shane Stevenson instructed his students to think - then shoot for the sky. The topic in his Ag Science class at Meridian’s Rocky Mountain High School was world hunger, specifically finding ways to feed the world and then write about it. “One out of seven in the world goes to bed hungry. I think if we look at the big issues we need to figure out and we need to solve hunger,” said Stevenson. “I wanted to enter the essays in the World Food Prize.” The World Food Prize was founded by Nobel Peace Prize winner Norman Borlaug to recognize and inspire great achievements in improving the quantity and availability of food in the world. Stevenson wanted a project with impact and student Quinn Inwards took the project to heart. He studied the African country of Niger.

“I looked into their farm practices and found that their farming style is more subsistence based farming,” Inwards said. “They grow just a single crop to feed their family. It’s not production agriculture like we have here. So I want to sway them away from subsistence farming and suggested they grow more crops and crops with more nutrients.” Inwards essay was so thoughtful and detailed that it was accepted by World Food Prize judges. In turn, Stevenson and Inwards were invited to attend the conference in Des Moines, Iowa. Inwards is the first participant from Idaho.  The Rocky Mountain High student read his paper to the Borlaug Symposium panel that consisted of Norman Borlaug’s daughter along with a scientist from the Cornel University and an official from the Ministry for International Development. “We’re running out of farm land and resources and we need to increase yields and

crop size. We have to feed 9 billion people by 2050,” said Inwards. “That’s a tall order, we don’t have food to waste and that got me thinking.” Inwards essay was well received because it offered a two-fold plan. It consists of diversification of crops and preservation of food. “The suggestion,” said Inwards, “was to take different approaches and preservation methods like canning and drying food, just to stretch food stuffs longer and that means less post-harvest waste for them,” said Inwards. More than 1,000 students attended, but only a hundred presented and that made the symposium special. Inwards was one of the few that got to present a plan involving world hunger and food security issues. During the three-day Global Youth InstiSee HUNGER ESSAY, page 29

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

27


County Happenings

Idaho Farm Bureau Discounted Pricing!

In addition, you can select and purchase these additional great products for your home: • • • •

Craftsman® Garage Storage Large Screen Televisions Sealy® and Sears-O-Pedic® Mattresses NordicTrack® Exercise Equipment Craftsman® Lawn Tractors Kenmore® Outdoor Grills

This unique program from Sears Commercial features —

• A private selection consultation, with a professionally trained specialist • Preferred Affiliate Program Pricing, backed by our Price Matching Plus policy • Program and pricing is only available through Sears Commercial Sales. • This offer is not available through Sears retail or dealer stores.

3 Easy Step for Farm Bureau Members Step 1: Members simply go to sears.com and find the product(s) they are intersted in and write down the product/model number(s).

University of Idaho Collegiate Young Farmer and Rancher members recently set up the MAC trailer on campus. Photo by Bob Smathers

Step 2: Members email the product number(s) to Farm Bureau’s designated contact at Sears Applicance Select: wgill03@searshc.com for a quote. To receive this pricing a member must include their Farm Bureau membership number and Farm Bureau discount code CU068062 in the email. Step 3: Members can then use a credit card to purchase the discounted item and it will be deilivered via a custom freight company. All manufacturer warranties apply with the optino to purchase extended Sears Protection Agreements. Installation is not included with delivery.

28

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012


HUNGER ESSAY

Continued from page 27

tute, Inwards and 150 other high school students were able to chat with and exchange ideas with internationally renowned Laureates and world leaders in food, agriculture and international development. There was also the chance to attend the 54 guest lecturers including 2012 World Food Prize Laureate Dr. Daniel Hillel of Israel; Secretary General Ban Ki-moon of the United Nations; Princess Haya bint Al Hussein of Jordan; Rajiv Shah, Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development;  and researchers from around the world. The scholars also sat in and took part in student round table discussions. One on of the highlights of event was when Stevenson and Inwards got to put their ideas into action. They helped put 25,000 meals in boxes for shipment to Tanzania and Haiti. They joined other students in long assembly lines packing food for the hungry. In just two hours the project was

completed; each box with enough food to feed six families consisting of rice, soy supplements, vegetable blends, and mineral packets. After attending the symposium Inwards says he’s convinced that genetically modified crops are not harmful, instead are needed to feed the hungry. “Obviously there’s still research that needs to be done but I think GMO’s are beneficial to a growing population,” he said. “We’re running out of resources and we need more research in order to feed the hungry.” Inwards was inspired by Ag Teacher Shane Stevenson. Stevenson is on a mission to expand the scope of his Meridian classroom to the world.  “While back there we got to listen to a bunch of people from around the world talk about the importance of agriculture,” said Stevenson. “We listened to different

methods of using sound and sustainable sciences; those are things that’ll ease starvation in the world.” Stevenson said that there was also talk of empowering women in developing countries and how teaching them the basic science of agriculture can help fight hunger in families. They learned that helping people become more sustaining will one day make countries players in the international marketplace. High school educators and students interested in participating in the next symposium should visit www.worldfoodprize. org/youth and select their state on the map for information on the 2013 Global Youth Institute. Quinn Inwards is the first Idahoan to win an invitation to the World Food Prize; Stevenson hopes he’s not the last.

Farm Bureau Members Ski For Less This Winter

www.idahofbstore.com

208-239-4289 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

29


Carpet

Laminate

Vinyl

Idaho Farm Bureau Member Benefit

Some stores will have designated staff to handle Farm Bureau members so members should identify themselves at the beginning of the process. This will prevent them from having to switch staff in the middle of the selection process. If you have any questions, call 208-239-4289.

Idaho Falls

Coeur D’Alene

Area Rugs

Hardwood

Boise

Carpet One Floor & Home 405 West 17th Street (800) 227-7381 or 529-1951

Panhandle Carpet One Floor & Home 739 West Appleway Avenue (866) 497-5088

Neef's Carpet One 1507 Main Street (208) 343-4679

Lewiston

Skelton's Carpet One Floor & Home 222 1st Street (208)746-3663

Twin Falls

Pioneer Carpet One Floor & Home 326 2nd Avenue South (866) 497-8176 or 734-6015

Neef's Carpet One 9601 West State Street (208) 947-1800

Pocatello

McCall

Sandpoint Furniture Carpet One Floor & Home 401 Bonner Mall Way (208) 263-5138

L & K Carpet One Floor & Home 129 North Second Avenue (208) 233-6190

30

Ceramic Tile

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

Lake Fork Design Center 13872 Highway 55 (208) 634-4599

Ponderay


American farm bureau federation news

Stewardship, Neighbor-to-Neighbor Farming Urged The American Farm Bureau Federation is pleased with the outcome of a year-long discussion of the Agriculture Department’s Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture on ways to promote coexistence in agriculture. The AC21 presented its report to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to be used as guidance to enhance working relationships among farmers growing different types of crops, specifically biotech and non-biotech crops. In 2011, Vilsack tasked the AC21 with providing recommendations for strengthening coexistence among various agricultural production methods. American Farm Bureau Federation Vice President Barry Bushue, a member of the AC21, said the

report’s recommendations could benefit all of agriculture. The AC21 report highlights the importance of diversity in U.S. agriculture and the history of successful coexistence in identitypreserved markets, whereby production practices maintain each crop’s integrity and purity. “Finding ways to work together to serve specialty, high-value markets is one of the greatest strengths of the U.S. agriculture industry,” said Bushue. “As American farmers continue to innovate, I am optimistic that our recommendations can help identify coexistence practices where they are working, improve stewardship where needed and mitigate

much of the underlying concerns about the real and perceived risks related to coexistence,” continued Bushue, noting that the committee’s report emphasizes proactive grower outreach and education. The AC21 also explored the idea of compensation to address economic losses by farmers whose crop value may be reduced by the unintended presence of biotechnology but determined that a compensation mechanism isn’t necessary or justified at this time. “I’m pleased our committee carefully weighed the evidence, listened to the needs of growers and choose to emphasize improved stewardship and neighbor-to-neighbor coexistence,” said Bushue.

New AFBFA Curriculum: Feeding Minds, Cultivating Growth The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture is celebrating the release of “Feeding Minds – Cultivating Growth,” the latest educator resource to be developed by the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture. The guide and accompanying books can be purchased online starting early next week at www.agfoundation. org. “Feeding Minds – Cultivating Growth” teaches young people to care for others, build healthy relationships and learn from their elders while living vicariously through the narratives of young farmers

and ranchers. The educator’s guide supports classroom reading of one or more of the following Farm Bureau-designated accurate ag books: “The Beef Princess of Practical County” by Michelle Houts, “Heart of a Shepherd” by Rosanne Perry, and “Little Joe” by Sandra Neil Wallace. The educator’s guide is a turn-key resource for middle school teachers, including standards-based lesson plans, take-home enrichment activities, supporting handouts, summarizing information about each text, a suggested implementation plan, and a scoring rubric for a final project.

Thanks to a generous donation by Random House, Inc, the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture is giving away 15 class sets of books and educator’s guides this fall. Interested middle school educators are encouraged to contact their state Farm Bureau Agricultural Literacy Coordinator. Coordinators may submit one school nomination per state. Recipients will be selected on a first come-first serve basis. For more information, please contact the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture at foundation@fb.org.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

31


American farm bureau federation news

USDA Increases Corn and Soybean Production Forecast The Agriculture Department’s November monthly crop report moderately increased 2012 production forecasts for corn and soybeans compared to the prior month.

“As anticipated, there were no major changes to the projected production totals for both corn and soybeans this month,” said AFBF senior economist Todd Davis. “The early harvest numbers provided a fairly clear picture on the size of the 2012 corn and soybean crops in the October report,” he added. USDA forecast corn production at 10.7 billion bushels, down 1.6 billion bushels compared to 2011. The average yield for corn was forecast at 122.3 bushels per acre this year, up slightly from the October projection. Corn ending stocks for the marketing year

are projected to be tight at 647 million bushels, representing 21 days of supply. Soybean production is forecast at 2.97 billion bushels, down 123 million bushels compared to 2011. The average yield for soybeans was forecast at 39.3 bushels per acre, 2.6 bushels per acre less than the 2011 average yield. Ending stocks for soybeans are projected to be 140 million bushels (about a 17-day supply), which Davis described as “uncomfortably tight.” How the weather will affect corn and soybean production in South America continues to be closely watched, with USDA forecasting that Argentina and Brazil will increase soybean production by 1.87 billion bushels compared to 2011.

“A large soybean crop in both the U.S. and South America is needed to relieve the tight stock situation here,” Davis said. “All of the production uncertainty will be of concern to the market until both continents have large crops that allow stocks to rebuild. This uncertainty will keep the market volatile.” USDA is continuing to conduct producer surveys and field analysis, which will provide information about the drought damage done to the 2012 corn and soybean crop, according to Davis. The department’s January report will provide the final production projects for the 2012 crop. USDA’s crop production reports and world grain supply/demand estimates are available online.

Schools Receive Agriculture in a Growing World Grants Twenty-five schools were recently selected as grant recipients for the Agriculture in a Growing World program, made possible by the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture with partnership from the Nutrients for Life Foundation. Grant recipients represent the following states: Ariz., Calif., Colo., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kan., Ky., La., Md., Mich., Neb., N.J., N.M., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa., S.C., Tenn., Texas, Wash, and Wis.

Grant recipients will receive a class set of “The Man Who Fed the World,” by Leon Hesser. This book brings to life the story of Norman Borlaug, a man who came from a one-room schoolhouse in Iowa and became one of the 100 most influential persons of 32

the 20th Century. In Borlaug’s eyes, fertilizer was a key component to staving off starvation, and Nutrients for Life carries this message forward on a daily basis.

“The Agriculture in a Growing World contest offers a great opportunity for classrooms all over the country to talk about modern agriculture and its role in feeding a growing population,” said Nutrients for Life Executive Director Harriet Wegmeyer. “We are excited to partner with AFBFA and sponsor this insightful resource in high school classrooms.” Grant recipients will also receive an educator’s guide full of turn-key lesson plans, as well as important information about the upcoming essay contest.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

The Agriculture in a Growing World Essay Contest is a national competition, open to 9th-12th grade students who have explored the book “The Man Who Fed the World.” Any school, whether grant recipient or not, that has implemented this curriculum may enter the contest. The book, which comes with supporting educator resources, can be purchased at www.agfoundation.org. Contest details are available online at http://bit. ly/MGUrRJ. Essays and accompanying entry form must be emailed to foundation@ fb.org or faxed to 202.314.5121 by April 1st, 2013. Questions about the grant program and essay contest can be sent directly to educationdirector@fb.org.


AFBF Sessions Include Higher Seed Prices on Rural Development Tap for 2013 Idaho Red Meat Production Up

Commercial red meat production at Idaho packing plants for October 2012 totaled 4.2 million pounds, up 21 percent from October of last year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Accumulated red meat production for the January-October 2012 period totaled 35.6 million pounds, down 59 percent from the comparable period a year earlier.

FoodSource Online Information

The U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance has unveiled USFRA FoodSource. The online resource was designed to provide accurate information about food in a one-stop destination. “USFRA recognizes that consumers have questions and want to learn more about how their food gets from the farm to their plate,” said Bob Stallman, chairman of USFRA and president of the American Farm Bureau Federation. “With so much information available to consumers today, we wanted to create one destination that compiled factual and unbiased information on food production. This new site, USFRA FoodSource, provides these resources and also adds the voice of farmers and ranchers responsible for raising and growing the food we eat.” http://www.fooddialogues. com/foodsource

Agriculture Census to ask New Questions of Farmers

The 2012 agriculture census, which will be mailed out in mid-December, will ask farmers for the first time about Internet usage, land use and crops used for renewable energy. According to USDA, the answers to these questions and others will help policymakers with important program development and funding decisions. “There’s strength in numbers, so the more farmers that are counted, the better for the agricultural industry,” according to Renee Picanso, director of USDA’s Census and Survey Division. AFBF, too, is urging all of its members to fill out the census and return it by the deadline on Feb. 4. An online version is also available.

Roger Brooks, president & CEO of Destination Development International, will be a session speaker at AFBF’s 94th Annual Meeting in Nashville, on Jan. 13. His topic is “Things You Can Do Today to Make a Difference Tomorrow.” The workshop will provide tips on inexpensive marketing and community-improvement actions that can be implemented immediately to increase local spending, attract visitors, extend their stays and increase sales. Using case histories, advertising examples and dozens of photos, attendees will learn how merchants have doubled their sales for just pennies and tricks that will pull customers into farmstands and communities. http://annualmeeting. AFBF Annual fb.org/ Meeting website

Food Safety in the Wake of Natural Disasters

A Consumer’s Guide to Food Safety, published by the Agriculture Department’s Food Safety and Health Inspection Service, includes useful tips for anyone facing a natural disaster. Loss of power during or after a natural disaster is common. The guide includes food safety steps to follow when preparing for a natural disaster in advance, and what to do after the event is over to ensure the safety of food consumed. A Consumer’s Guide to Food Safety http://www.fsis.usda.gov/ PDF/Severe_Storms_and_ Hurricanes_Guide.pdf

Farmers can expect to pay between 5 percent and 10 percent more for crop seed next year, according to Alan Miller, a Purdue University agricultural economist. Miller forecasts that the price for seed corn will be higher by 5 to 7 percent, soybean seed will be up 7 to 10 percent and wheat seed could increase more than 10 percent. The 2013 seed price increases Miller expects to see are higher than prior years.

USFRA Calls for Farmer, Rancher Voices

More than 350 farmers and ranchers have signed up to be a part of the U.S. Farmers & Ranchers’ “Grow What You Know” program to counter inaccurate, unfair and misleading stories about today’s agriculture in the news media and online. Still, additional voices are needed to more fully represent agriculture. Please encourage growers you know to go to the Food Dialogues website (http://www.fooddialogues. com/) to sign up for the Farmer and Rancher Mobilization (F.A.R.M.) Team Rapid Responders.

Spraying Insecticide? There’s an App for That Scientists working for the Agriculture Department have released two mobile phone applications, or “apps,” to make things easier for anyone who Briefs continued on page 34

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

33


needs to adjust insecticide spray equipment. The apps were developed by Agricultural Research Service scientists at the agency’s Areawide Pest Management Research Unit in College Station, Texas. The apps are designed to ensure that aerial and ground-based crews can hit targets and minimize pesticide drift by keying in specifics on the type of equipment and pesticide they are using. With dozens of manufacturers producing dozens of different types of spray technology— each with its own nozzle type, flow rate and pressure setting range—the equipment setup can get pretty complicated. Aerial sprayers also must factor in wind speed, air temperature, flight speed and humidity. The apps incorporate the latest science of spray technology, including “spray nozzle atomization” models developed by ARS at College Station. They can be used with a smartphone and accessed right from a field or the cabin of a small aircraft.

Take the Healthy Plate Challenge

The National Academy of Sciences’ Koshland Science Museum on recently kicked off a trilogy of activities to encourage kids and all consumers toward a lifetime of healthy eating habits using the popular USDA food icon, MyPlate. The centerpiece is an event with DC Central Kitchen called the Healthy Plate Cook-Off. 34

Teams of culinary job training students will prepare meals inspired by MyPlate and ChooseMyPlate.gov. There is also an invitation to “Take the Healthy Plate Challenge.” By planning, preparing and sharing healthy plates modeled after MyPlate, photographing or filming the final meal and sharing the photo/ video, entrants are eligible to win an online popular vote and receive a personal selection of Koshland Science Museum swag! The submission deadline is Monday, Dec. 17.

New AFBFA Curriculum: Feeding Minds, Cultivating Growth

The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture is celebrating the release of “Feeding Minds – Cultivating Growth,” the latest educator resource to be developed by the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture. The guide and accompanying books can be purchased online at http://www.agfoundation. org/. “Feeding Minds – Cultivating Growth” teaches young people to care for others, build healthy relationships and learn from their elders while living vicariously through the narratives of young farmers and ranchers. The educator’s guide supports classroom reading of one or more of the following Farm Bureau-designated accurate ag

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

books: “The Beef Princess of Practical County” by Michelle Houts, “Heart of a Shepherd” by Rosanne Perry, and “Little Joe” by Sandra Neil Wallace

July and October 2012 Farm Labor

For the Mountain I Region of the U.S. (Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming), there were 29,000 hired workers on farms and ranches during the week of July 8-14, 2012, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). Hired workers worked an average of 48.5 hours during the survey week at an average wage of $9.87 per hour. During the week of October 7-13, 2012, there were 30,000 hired workers on farms and ranches. Hired workers worked an average of 53.6 hours during the survey week at an average wage of $10.17 per hour. There were 906,000 workers hired directly by farm operators on the Nation’s farms and ranches during the week of July 8-14, 2012, up nearly 9 percent from a year ago. Workers hired directly by farm operators numbered 872,000 for the reference week of October 7-13, 2012, up more than 5 percent from the October 2011 reference week.

Despite Easing of Feed Prices, No Dairy Rebound Expected

Feed prices are coming down, according to the Agriculture Department’s World Agricul-

tural Supply and Demand Estimate, but the department’s November Livestock, Dairy and Poultry report shows the U.S. dairy herd is expected to average 9,225 thousand head in 2012 and slip to 9,125 thousand head next year as a result of the profit squeeze experienced by producers this year.

Stewardship, Neighbor-to-Neighbor Farming Urged

The American Farm Bureau Federation is pleased with the outcome of a year-long discussion of the Agriculture Department’s Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture on ways to promote coexistence in agriculture. The AC21 presented its report to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to be used as guidance to enhance working relationships among farmers growing different types of crops, specifically biotech and non-biotech crops. Barry Bushue, AFBF vice president and a member of the AC21, said the report’s recommendations could benefit all of agriculture. “As American farmers continue to innovate, I am optimistic that our recommendations can help identify coexistence practices where they are working, improve stewardship where needed, and mitigate much of the underlying concerns about the real and perceived risks related to coexistence,” said Bushue, not-


ing that the committee’s report emphasizes proactive grower outreach and education.

Groups Raise Concerns About New ‘Sportsmen’s’ Bill

USDA Study Shows Trends in Public and Private R&D

Analysis published by USDA’s Economic Research Service in the most recent issue of the journal Science examines the relationship between public and private investments in research and development and their importance in agricultural input industries.

The Public Lands Council and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association joined the American Farm Bureau Federation in a letter alerting Senate leaders to their concerns about the recently introduced Sportsmen’s Research discussed in the arHeritage Act of 2012 (S. 3525). ticle notes that globally, most Part of the groups’ unease with of the increase in agricultural the legislation is the broad production over the past 50 definition of “aquatic habitat,” years can largely be attributed which, according to the bill, to rising crop and livestock includes areas adjacent to an yields rather than to the exaquatic environment, if the ad- pansion of acreage devoted to jacent area “serves as a buffer” farming. or “protects the quality and USDA Offers Proquantity of water sources.”  posal to Spur Rural

“One could argue that all of the land on which our members produce livestock and crops falls under this definition,” the groups wrote to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). Baucus Focused on Protecting Farmers From Estate Taxes Politico reports that Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.) is adamant about maintaining the current estate tax exemption of $5 million and the 35 percent top rate to help farmers and ranchers who want to pass their operations on to their children. 

Broadband Networks

USDA recently announced a plan to spur the development of rural broadband networks. The proposal, published in the Federal Register last week, would allow USDA to give funding priority to broadband projects in areas of greatest need. The changes would apply to projects funded through the Community Connect grant program, which is administered by the Rural Utilities Service.

Caribou Habitat Ruling Released

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) recently anUnless Congress acts, on Jan. nounced its final critical habi1, the estate tax exemption will tat designation for the southern drop to $1 million and the top Selkirk Mountains population rate will jump to 55 percent. of woodland caribou. With that low of an exemption, many more farmers and ranch- The southern Selkirk Mouners would be vulnerable to the tains population of woodland caribou has been protected tax.  under the Endangered Species

Act (ESA) as an endangered species since 1984. It occurs in the Selkirk Mountains of northern Idaho and northeastern Washington and British Columbia. The Service is designating 30,010 acres in Idaho’s Boundary County and Washington’s Pend Oreille County as critical habitat because they contain the physical and biological features essential to the conservation of the species. The final designation, modified from the 2011 proposed 375,552-acre designation, is a result of 150 days of public involvement and extensive analysis that included public information meetings, hearings, comment periods, scientific peer review, and a reexamination of information regarding occupancy at the time of the caribou listing. “Thoughtful inquiry and scientific information was presented to us by Tribes, citizens, federal and State agencies, elected officials and other interested parties. Because of this, we have a modified rule that adheres to policy, is responsive to issues raised by others, and most importantly, addresses priority habitat for caribou conservation,” said Brian T. Kelly, the Service’s Idaho State Supervisor. “We are most appreciative of the time invested by many during the comment periods, public meetings and hearings. We look forward to participation in the collaborative conservation of this species in the future.” Under the ESA, the Service is required to identify the most important geographic areas that are critical to the conser-

vation of a listed species. The critical habitat designation requires federal agencies to consult with the Service on federal actions that may affect critical habitat, and prohibits federal agencies from carrying out, funding, or authorizing the destruction or adverse modification of the habitat. Activities undertaken by private landowners that do not involve any federal funding, permits or other activities are not affected by a critical habitat designation. The designation does not affect land ownership or establish a refuge, wilderness, reserve, preserve or other conservation area, and it does not allow government or public access to non-federal lands. The U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Washington, required the Service to submit a final critical habitat designation under the terms of a Settlement Agreement with Defenders of Wildlife, Lands Council, Selkirk Conservation Alliance, and the Center for Biological Diversity, which petitioned the Service to designate critical habitat for the caribou. The final critical habitat designation; proposed rule; draft economic analysis; maps; public comments and reports are available at http://www.fws. gov/idaho, or by appointment during normal business hours at the Idaho Fish and Wildlife Office’s Spokane and/or Boise offices. For more information, please contact Bryon Holt of the Service’s Idaho Fish and Wildlife Office at 509-893-8014, or by email at bryon_holt@fws. gov

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

35


Farm Bureau Members Pay Less For Choice Hotels!

FARM BUREAU COMMODITY REPORT GRAIN PRICES

Portland:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Corn

Ogden:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

A $40 room will be closer to

Pocatello:

$32 A $60 room will be closer to

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Burley:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Nampa:

White Wheat (cwt) (Bushel)

$48 A $90 room will be closer to

Lewiston:

White Wheat Barley

Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

1.800.258.2847

Farm Bureau Discount Code

00209550

advanced reservations required

11/26/2012

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs Over 700 lbs

Cows

Utility/Commercial Canner & Cutter

Stock Cows Bulls

Slaughter

BEAN PRICES: Pinto Pink Small Red

8.88 9.81-9.94 10.44 307.75-308

No Bid 9.65-9.77 9.98 308-310.50

N/A - .16 to - .17 - .46 + .25 to + 2.50

8.20 8.82 9.21 12.10

8.30 8.47 8.97 12.00

+ .10 - .35 - .24 - .10

8.00 8.68 8.68 11.87

8.00 7.92 8.43 11.83

Steady - .76 - .25 - .04

7.95 8.35 8.77 12.25

7.98 8.01 8.44 12.25

+ .03 - .34 - .33 Steady

13.41 8.05

13.08 7.85

- .33 - .20

8.75 229.50

8.50 241.50

- .25 +12.00

10/24/2012

11/21/2012

Trend

148-198 127-165 114-148 102-126

126-191 116-167 103-140 91-116

-

22 11 11 11

127-179 120-155 109-133 95-116

121-172 117-149 92-145 80-116

-

6 to – 7 3 to - 6 17 to + 12 15 to steady

75-105 63-102

75-105 63-102

Steady Steady

57-77 48-70

57-78 45-70

steady to + 1 - 3 to steady

900-1150

700-1500

- 200 to + 350

59-87

61-90

+ 2 to + 3

35.00-38.00 40.00-42.00 40.00

35.00-38.00 40.00-42.00 40.00-42.00

Steady Steady Steady to +2

Compiled by the Idaho Farm Bureau Commodity Division 36

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

Trend

LIVESTOCK PRICES Feeder Steers

$72

10/24/2012

to to to to

-7 +2 -8 - 10


IDaho Hay Report

Fri Nov 16, 2012

Tons: 7732 Last Week: 890 Last Year: 5930 Tons: Compared to last week, Supreme and Premium Alfalfa for domestic use steady to firm. Trade turned moderate to active this week. Demand moderate to good for all classes. Retail/feed store/horse steady. Buyer demand good with light to moderate supplies. All prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise stated. Tons Price Wtd Avg Comments Alfalfa Large Square Supreme 1400 210.00-230.00 220.00 Premium/Supreme 882 225.00-225.00 225.00 Premium 1500 220.00-220.00 220.00 Good 1000 190.00-200.00 195.00 Fair 2500 180.00-180.00 180.00

Timothy Grass Large Square Premium

450

190.00-190.00

190.00

Retail/Stable

Alfalfa hay test guidelines, (for domestic livestock use and not more than 10% grass), used with visual appearance and intent of sale Quantitative factors are approximate and many factors can affect feeding value. Source: USDA Market News, Moses Lake, WA.

POTATOES FOR PROCESSING Potato Processing in Idaho and Malheur County Down 5 Percent from Last Year November 21, 2012

IDAHO---Open-market trading by processors with growers was inactive. Processors in Idaho and Malheur County, Oregon have used 19.5 million cwt of

5 Year Grain Comparison Grain Prices................ 11/19/2008...................11/29/2009...................11/18/2010...................11/17/2011.................. 11/26/2012 Portland: White Wheat..................... 5.38 .............................4.85 ............................No Bid.............................5.92 ..........................No Bid 11% Winter...................5.78-5.93 ...................5.68-5.72 .....................No Bid ..............6.87-7.02 ..........9.65-9.77 14% Spring........................ 8.05 ............................. 7.13 ...........................No Bid............................10.17 ............................9.98 Corn...............................174-176.25 .....................178.25 ...................223.50 ...........267-267.25 ..............308-310.50 Ogden: White Wheat..................... 4.62 .............................4.55 ..............................5.95 ............................6.00............................. 8.30 11% Winter....................... 4.94...............................4.58 ..............................5.68 ............................5.82 ........................... 8.47 14 % Spring...................... 6.83 .............................6.00 ..............................7.22 ............................8.75 ............................ 8.97 Barley..................................7.15 .............................6.03 ..............................8.50 ...........................11.40............................ 12.00 Pocatello: White Wheat..................... 4.60 .............................4.40 ..............................5.65 ............................5.65............................ 11% Winter....................... 4.56 .............................4.53 ..............................5.60 ............................5.91 ........................... 14% Spring........................ 6.77 .............................5.76 .............................7.41 ............................8.81 .......................... Barley.................................6.50 ............................6.04 ............................7.81 .........................10.41...........................

8.00 7.92 8.43 11.83

2012 crop raw potatoes to November 1, down 5 percent from last year. Idaho potatoes accounted for 15.4 million cwt of the total processed. The remaining 4.08 million cwt were produced in other states. Processors in Washington and Other Oregon Counties have used 26.3 million cwt of 2012 crop raw potatoes to November 1, up 9 percent from last year.

Burley: White Wheat..................... 4.05 .............................4.40 ..............................6.00 ............................5.85............................. 11% Winter....................... 4.58 .............................4.50 ..............................5.35 ............................5.67 .......................... 14% Spring........................6.34 .............................5.80 ..............................7.14 ............................8.71 ........................... Barley.................................6.50...............................6.00 ..............................8.25 .........................10.25...........................

7.98 8.01 8.44 12.25

Nampa: White Wheat (cwt).......... 7.08 ..............................7.30 ..............................9.00 ............................8.67 .......................... 13.08 (bushel)........... 4.25 .............................4.40 ..............................5.40 ............................5.20...............................7.85 Lewiston: White Wheat......................5.10 ..............................4.60 ..............................6.05 ............................5.64............................ 8.50 Barley............................... 114.50............................ 116.50 .......................161.50...........................194.50......................... 241.50 Bean Prices: Pintos................................38.00.............................32.00....................... 22.00-24.00.......................45.00.......................35.00-38.00 Pinks............................37.50-38.00...................30.00-32.00.................. 24.00-25.00.......................45.00.......................40.00-42.00 Small Reds...................38.00-42.00...................30.00-32.00.................. 24.00-28.00.................45.00-46.00.................40.00-42.00

IDAHO Milk production UP 0.9 Percent November 19, 2012 Idaho milk production during October 2012 totaled 1.13 billion pounds, a 0.9 percent increase from the same month last year, and a 1.1 percent increase from September 2012, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. September 2012 milk production was revised to 1.12 billion pounds, down 2.1 percent. Average milk production per cow in October 2012 was 1,960 pounds, up 30 pounds from last year’s level. The average number of milk cows during October was 577,000 head, down 4,000 head from October 2011.

Milk production in the 23 major States during October totaled 15.2 billion pounds, down slightly from October 2011. September revised production at 14.7 billion pounds, was down 0.6 percent from September 2011. The September revision represented a decrease of 19 million pounds or 0.1 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,791 pounds for October, 1 pound above October 2011. The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.47 million head, 10,000 head less than October 2011, and 8,000 head less than September 2012. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

37


5 Year livestock comparison ..................................... 11/19/2008...................11/19/2009....................11/20/2010...................11/18/2011.................. 11/26/2012 Under 500 lbs.................88-120 .......................95-125 .........................109-155 ....................130-194 ................... 126-191 500-700 lbs.....................75-107 .......................84-121 ..........................95-131 .......................122-158........................ 116-167 700-900 lbs......................75-96 .........................79-94 .........................90-121 .....................101-137........................103-140 Over 900 lbs....................70-93 ...........................73-87 ..........................85-101..........................105-120..........................91-116 Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs.................75-108 .........................85-112...........................107-138 ....................121-166.........................121-172 500-700 lbs......................73-91 ........................77-101 ..........................96-129 .....................112-145.........................117-149 700-900 lbs......................68-90 ..........................70-88 ..........................90-113..........................105-129......................... 92-145 Over 900 lbs....................65-86 ..........................60-82 ........................80-102..........................88-115.......................... 80-116 Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs..................39-58 ...........................49-67 ...........................63-85 .......................... 65-94 ........................75-105 Over 700 lbs....................42-68 ...........................49-65 ...........................55-80 ........................ 65-100..........................63-102 Cows Utility/Commercial...........25-50.............................30-56.............................35-59.............................40-71............................ 57-78 Canner & Cutter.............. 21-38.............................27-43.............................35-52............................ 44-62............................45-70 Stock Cows......................400-845 ......................500-935 ......................500-1300..................... 750-1325......................700-1500 Bulls – Slaughter............38-60.............................36-60.............................45-71.............................45-75 ......................... 61-90

Idaho Cattle on Feed Up 7 Percent from Previous Year November 16, 2012

Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in Idaho from feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head on November 1, 2012 totaled 240,000 head, up 7 percent from the previous year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The cattle on feed inventory is up 4 percent from October 1, 2012. Placements of cattle in feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during October totaled 55,000 head, the same as October 2011 placements. Marketings of cattle from feedlots with 1,000 head or more during October totaled 44,000 head, down 4,000 head from last year. Other disappearance totaled 1,000 head during October. Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.3 million head on November 1, 2012. The inventory was 5 percent below November 1, 2011. Placements in feedlots during October totaled 2.18 million, 13 percent below 2011.This is the lowest cattle placements for the month of October since the series began in 1996. Net placements were 2.10 million head. During October, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 680,000, 600-699 pounds were 505,000, 700-799 pounds were 435,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 560,000. Marketings of fed cattle during October totaled 1.84 million, 3 percent above 2011. Other disappearance totaled 78,000 during October, 20 percent below 2011.

Cattle Outlook November 16, 2012 Cattle imports from Mexico fell to just 43 thousand head in September, the lowest level since August of 2010.The big increases in cattle moving into the U.S. from south of the border from December 2011 to July 2012 appear to have run their course, and this will only add to the tight availability of feeder cattle in the coming months. This afternoon’s USDA cattle on feed report is expected to show the largest year to year decline in cattle on feed supplies since the summer of 2009. The choice retail beef price again topped $5 per pound in October at $5.03, 9 cents higher than September. Further price increases are expected and quite frankly necessary in the next couple of years for packers and feedlots to successfully navigate the combination of high corn prices and relatively expensive feeder cattle. Beef exports trailed year ago levels for the ninth consecutive month in September. It is a difficult economic climate in which to sustain strong beef demand, both internationally and in the U.S. The inability of the choice beef cutout to top $2 per pound despite 14 days at or above $1.98 during 2012 raises concern that customers might not be willing or able in the current environment to pay the prices for beef necessary to return profits to all levels of the beef industry. Beef carcass cutout values were little changed vs. last week, though movement was in opposite directions as the choice-select spread continues to widen. On Friday morning, the choice boxed beef carcass cutout value was

38

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

at $192.83/cwt, up 96 cents from last Friday. The select carcass cutout was at $172.33/cwt, down $1.23 for the week. Fed cattle prices were steady. Through Thursday, the 5-area average price for slaughter steers sold on a live weight basis was $124.94/cwt, up 48 cents from last week and up $2.64/cwt from the same week last year. Steer prices on a dressed basis averaged $195.13/cwt this week, up 13 cents from a week ago and up 19 cents from a year ago. This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 629,000 head, down 2,000 head from last week, and down 1.6% from a year ago.The average steer dressed weight for the week ending on November 3 was 873 pounds, down 3 pounds from last week. Oklahoma City feeder cattle prices were steady to $2 lower this week with prices for medium and large frame #1 steers: 400-450# $170-$186, 450500# $172-$185, 500-550# $143-$177, 550-600# $142-$166, 600-650# $140-$154, 650-700# $133.50-$148.50, 700-750# $131-$146, 750-800# $135-$143, 800-900# $133-$144.75, and 900-1000# $122.50-$126/cwt. The December live cattle futures contract closed at $126.35/cwt, up 60 cents from the previous Friday. February cattle settled at $130.20/cwt, up 85 cents for the week. April fed cattle contracts settled at $134.15/cwt. The June fed cattle contract ended the week at $130.12. January feeder cattle futures ended the week at $145.57/cwt, 3 cents lower than last Friday. March feeders closed at $148.20/cwt. Provided by: University of Missouri


Classifieds Animals

Real Estate/Acreage

Wanted

Help Wanted

Showpigs for sale $150.00-$200.00. AI and natural bred to some of the top sires in the USA. Will work for mid July-August shows. Call Doug 208-380-0719 or Ashley 208339-8189

House for sale. 3 bedroom 2 bathroom nice lot close to school and river in Homedale. Owner may carry with $10,000 down call Mike 208-389-9200

Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258

Earn $75,000/yr Part Time in the livestock or equipment appraisal business. Agricultural background required. Classroom or home study courses available. 800-488-7570.

ASCA registered Australian Shepherd pups. Working line since 1968. Full satisfaction guaranteed. All four colors available. Boise, Id 208-484-9802

Farm Equipment Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime

Estate Sale: 109 Pine Hollow Road, Stevensville, Montana. 18 irrigated acres, 1960 3 bdrm, 2 bath house with 1 car garage and deck, hay shed, 2110 sq. ft. shop. Was asking $495,000. Price reduced to $295,000. 208-232-8796

Wanted

SEND US YOUR CLASSIFIED AD

Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338.

FREE TO IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS!

DEADLINE DATES:

ADS MUST BE RECEIVED BY

December 20 FOR

NEXT ISSUE.

send to: dashton@idahofb.org

FREE CLASSIFIEDS

Non commercial classified ads are free to Idaho Farm Bureau members. Must include membership number for free ad. Forty (40) words maximum. Non-member cost- 50 cents per word. You may advertise your own crops, livestock, used machinery, household items, vehicles, etc. Ads will not be accepted by phone. Ads run one time only and must be re-submitted in each subsequent issue. We reserve the right to refuse to run any ad. Please type or print clearly. Proof-read your ad.

Mail ad copy to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848 or email Dixie at DASHTON@IDAHOFB.ORG Name: __________________________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________ City / State / Zip: __________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________________ Membership No. ___________________ Ad Copy: ________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / DECEMBER 2012

39


Eligible Farm Bureau members in Idaho can receive a $500 rebate on each qualifying 2012 or 2013 model year Chevrolet, GMC or Buick vehicle they purchase or lease. This Farm Bureau member exclusive is offered for vehicles purchased or leased at participating dealerships through Farm Bureau’s—GM PRIVATE OFFER at a participating GM dealership. Members simply go to www.fbverify.com, enter their Farm Bureau membership number (i.e. 123456-01) and zip code, and print off a certificate to take to the dealership. Discount must be processed at time of purchase. To qualify for the offer, individuals must have been a Farm Bureau member for at least 60 days prior to the date of delivery of the vehicle selected. The Farm Bureau discount is stackable with some incentives and non-stackable with others. See dealership for full details or call Joel at (208) 239-4289.

Profile for Matrix Digital Media Inc

December 2012, Volume 15, Issue 8  

December 2012, Volume 15, Issue 8  

Advertisement