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July 2012 • Volume 16, Issue 5

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Goats Ingest

Honey Bees

Wildfire Threat

Rebound

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Idaho Farm Bureau

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Grain Market Report


The Great Rural America Paradox

The Ag Agenda

By Bob Stallman AFBF President

A wise man once said that rural America has become viewed by a growing number of Americans as having a higher quality of life, not because of what it has, but rather because of what it does not have, like traffic, crime and crowds.  This sentiment can be seen in the growing number of urban transplants that have made their way toward greener and more spacious pastures.

Farm Bill Priorities Changing By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand from New York recently wrote a column about the Farm Bill currently under consideration and the nutrition pro-

Broome County Farm Bureau By Rick Keller CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

I recently returned from New York State where I was part of an American Farm Bureau Federation review team that meets with state Farm Bureaus. The teams arrive at the invitation of the state Farm Bureaus. They meet with volunteer and staff 2

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

But, while many Americans equate living in the country with a simpler way of life, this couldn’t be further from the truth. The reality is that poverty in rural America is increasing, while opportunity continues to decline because of limited education, healthcare and broadband services. So, rural America being defined by what it does not have can also be a negative. It’s the great rural America para-

grams that make up about 80 percent of the spending in the bill. Sen. Stabenow concluded that more money should be shifted from supporting farms to providing food stamps to low income families. There are now 46 million Americans receiving food stamps – over 15 percent of our nation’s population. During her research Sen. Gillibrand traveled around her state and discussed federal farm programs with many farmers and antihunger advocates. She opposes the leaders; review the corporate documents and policies of the organization. Suggestions are extended to the state board for consideration. It was a pleasure to meet with the wonderful men and women of the New York Farm Bureau. They have a great Farm Bureau. As a 33-year Farm Bureau veteran, New York holds a special place for me. It was there in Broome County that the first county Farm Bureau in the nation was created. From that meager beginning slightly over a

dox. Connecting Kids The lack of technology, infrastructure and even basic services present major challenges for rural citizens.  This is evident in rural classrooms, where nearly one in four U.S. kids attends school. Struggling rural school districts are grappling with teacher retention and lack of educaSee STALLMAN, page 8

$4.5 billion in cuts (over 10 years) to nutrition programs contained in the bill. Sen. Stabenow overlooks two important points. First is the fact that government feeding programs won’t much matter if we don’t have farmers and ranchers to produce our food. And second, our nation is facing a fiscal crisis that won’t be averted unless spending is brought under control. See PRIESTLEY, page 8

hundred years ago, more than 2,836 county Farm Bureaus now dot the country. In the early 1900’s, agriculture was perceived as being a dwindling and dying industry. In 1908, President Teddy Roosevelt appointed a fourmember Country Life Commission to gather information on the condition of rural life and farming. Roosevelt said, “No nation has ever achieved permanent greatness unless this greatness was based on See KELLER, page 25


Volume 16, Issue 5 IFBF OFFICERS President ....................................Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President .................................. Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President ............................... Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................ Shelley Scott Bird ........................................................... Pocatello Chris Dalley ........................................................Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ............................................Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................ Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant ................................................... Oakley Rick Pearson .................................................... Hagerman Mike Garner............................................................... Declo Curt Krantz ............................................................ Parma Mike McEvoy..................................................... Middleton Tracy Walton ....................................................... Emmett Marjorie French ............................................... Princeton Bob Callihan ......................................................... Potlatch Louis Kins ........................................................... Kootenai Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Cody Chandler........................................................Weiser STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ........................ Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Member Services ................................... Ray Poe Dir. of Commodities ............................. Dennis Brower Commodity Assistant .................................. Peggy Pratt Membership Assistant ............................... Peggy Moore Market Information Assistant . ................ Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager ........................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager ....................... Kendall Keller Dist. III Regional Manager ................... Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ................... Russ Hendricks Dist. V Regional Manager ....................... Bob Smathers Director of Governmental Affairs ............ Kent Lauer Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs .... Dennis Tanikuni Range/Livestock Specialist........................... Wally Butler Director of Public Relations .............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................. Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager .................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise ................... Julie Christoffersen Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID GEM STATE PRODUCER USPS #015-024, is published monthly except February, May, August and November by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201. POSTMASTER send changes of address to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, Idaho, and additional mailing offices. Subscription rate: $6.00 per year included in Farm Bureau dues.

MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: Goats are being used to control weeds and reduce the threat of wildfire in the hills north of Boise. Photo by Steve Ritter

Homeowners associations on the Boise Front are employing goat herds to knock down weeds and reduce the threat of wildfires. Photo by Steve Ritter

Goat Grazing Fights Wildfire Threat on the Boise Front By Jake Putnam On steep northwest Boise hillsides, goats are grazing on cheat grass, thistle and skeletal rushweed. But that’s not all. The large herd of goats is digesting the threat of wildfire High temperatures, low humidity and strong winds in Idaho have resulted in explosive fire conditions according to the Bureau of Land Management. The conditions are dangerous enough that Quail Ridge Subdivision homeowners are taking bold steps to protect their homes from wildfire.  Enter goat herder Tim Linquist of Wilder. His livestock herd is causing a sensation in Boise’s north end. He was contracted by the Quail Ridge Homeowners Association to reduce the wildfire threat and it’s getting attention.  “Oh, people are out watching us,” Linquist said. “You just don’t see goat herds in the city limits.”  On this day people are taking photos, many just stopping by see the goats. Range Specialist Wally Butler of the Idaho Farm Bureau tracks rangeland conditions across the state and says conditions are alarming. “We’ve had a much drier spring than a year ago,” said Butler. “We’ve had six or seven man-caused fires this week alone. Wildfire destroyed four homes in Elmore County and the fires are weeks ahead of the traditional fire season.” See GOATS page 4 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

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GOATS

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Goats prefer to graze weeds and woody plants, leaving behind bunch grasses for deer and other wildlife. Photo by Steve Ritter

Along Boise’s urban front heavy grass and brush is a threat to million dollar homes. It’s been decades since wildfires blew through the foothills and through the years the brush and grass has built up to dangerous levels. “We have an accumulated fuel load on the urban front and that’s worrisome.  A goat herd is one way to protect the urban interface and grazing sure helps,” added Butler. “We’re using the goats for weed and brush control to reduce the fire load,” said Linquist. “The goats are turned out onto the hillside, they’ll eat it down, and then we’ll 4 #

move onto another spot. I’d say the conditions are real ripe here for fire.” The way it works is simple: The Quail Ridge homeowners rents Lindquist’s herd. The goats get to graze on weed delicacies, Lindquist gets a check and the threat of wildfire is greatly reduced.  Goats love the weeds but leave behind bunchgrass and bitterbrush for deer.  “What we’re trying to accomplish here is to graze the goats for a certain period of time depending on the acreage. Then we move on till the job is done. We won’t gaze it to the ground, but if a fire burns up

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this hill, it burns slowly,” said Lindquist. Range Specialist Butler agrees with Linquist saying grazing won’t stop wildfire; just give firefighters and homeowners a fighting chance to knock down a fire before it reaches any homes. Boise City Deputy Fire Marshall Romeo Gervais says Warm Springs Mesa in east Boise used the goats earlier this year and when fire struck a few weeks ago homeowners were able to put the fire out. “The fire was stopped dead in its tracks,” said Gervais. “The wildfire was out before our crews got there. It’s a steep area where


if we hadn’t used the goats as a mitigation measure up front, it would have been a bigger deal than it was.”

and intuitive, but with the great feed and being able to roam makes a very happy herd.

Gervais says goat grazing works. “We’re encouraging homeowner associations to get on board, especially in the steep foothill sections of town because it’s going to be a long fire season.”

When he first got into the business he was asked how he was going to make money. At the time hay prices were through the roof. Linquist told the

friend that he’d do it by having people pay to graze his herd. The friend laughed at the crazy notion, but that’s just what Linquist did.  Now Linquist laughs all the way to the bank, and the Boise hillsides are a bit safer from wildfire.

Linquist treats each goat like an employee, employees that constantly eat and work. “They do it happily, they love to roam these hillsides, and they’re eco-friendly,” he said. The goats are a hardy Boer-Spanish cross, “They’re bred to graze like this,” Linquist said. “We don’t feed them hay, and they don’t get pampered. They go out and work and as an added bonus, they leave behind fertilizer.” The herd of 700 now grazing Quail Ridge can mow down about seven acres a day. The price is about $2,100 dollars a week. The herd is rotated but kept together by electric fences, herders and guard dogs. “They do a really good job. The does and kids work side by side and after the Quail Ridge job they’ll move on to another project and this is much cheaper than a crew of guys with weed eaters,” Linquist said.  Linquist says goats are also better than sheep and cattle in weed abatement because they destroy more than 90-percent of the seeds during digestion. So skeletal rushweed thistle, and even cheatgrass seeds are wiped out after a good grazing.  Gervais agrees, “With cattle and sheep you’ll still have seeds to deal with.” In in the foothill sections grazed last year on the Boise Front, native grass beat out the cheat grass and rush weed. “We’re sold on the grazing approach and are encouraging neighborhood associations to look into it. In fact there are grants available to offset the expense,” added Gervais. Linquist says sometimes a few goats get out, but they’re quickly rounded up. He adds that when one goat gets upset, they all do and the goats are intelligent

Lynda Linquist, center, and her husband Tim, own We Rent Goats, a grazing and biological plant control business in Wilder. Her sons are Cody and Ty, the dog is Jack. Photo by Steve Ritter

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Bees Make a Comeback; Swarms Reported Across U.S. By Jake Putnam WEISER - On June 4th, Hanna Widener of the Washington County Farm Bureau noticed a mysterious dark cloud outside the insurance office.  At first she thought it was a swarm of gnats but when she opened the door she heard

the distinctive sound of buzzing bees. “I thought what in the world is going on?” Then Widener opened the door.  “They were swarming in the entryway and bees were everywhere,” she said. “To make matters worse, people were pulling up to the office and driving away because

of the bees and we were stuck inside.” Widener called a beekeeper who calmed frayed nerves saying swarms were normal and they’d settle down.  “Sure enough, by closing time they calmed down and went up in a tree,” she said. On the same day in Denver the Arizona Diamondbacks beat the Rockies 9-7, but the buzz surrounding this game was the bees that invaded the stadium. The swarm took over a camera bay next to the Rockies’ dugout in the fifth inning. They remained on a hand rail until a beekeeper arrived to vacuum up the swarm and relocate them. Gina Lauer of west Boise watched a swarm amass on a tree in her front yard in early June. She checked on the Internet and found beekeeper Bryce Ostler of Boise who immediately went to work capturing the bees. “There’s just lots of swarms this year,” said Ostler. “It’s because of the mild winter, it didn’t kill off the bees and we had good carryover from last year. A lot of the sterile hives stayed active last winter and now bees are ready to split and move on.”  After tumbling to a 23-year low in 2007, western honeybee populations seem to be on the rebound but a mysterious epidemic continues to plague some colonies. Western apiarists who rent bees to farmers for crop pollination agree that the wet winters - and good blooms have helped ease the “colony collapse disorder that grabbed headlines over the past five years. Idaho beekeepers say they’re better at making up for the die-off by dividing their colonies, importing new queen bees or buying whole colonies outright. The number of bees in a typical operation can range anywhere between about 20,000 and 150,000.

A swarm of bees was recently re-located from a Boise neighborhood. Photo by Gina Lauer

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Ostler says while fellow beekeepers think they’ve seen the end of colony collapse disorder he’s not as optimistic


“They’re back this year, but it’s hard to tell from year to year,” he said. “This year’s just been a good year. We’re taking advantage of it; I’ve been out capturing swarms, putting them into hives and getting all that production into usage to work. We need a good season of pollination.” The National Agricultural Statistics Service counted 410,000 colonies in California last year that’s up from 340,000 in 2007. The percentage counts are similar in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Beekeepers say the national data underrepresents the number of colonies because the yearly survey is voluntary and doesn’t include operations that rent bees for pollination in California. They say colony counts could reach more than 500,000.

Police officer Anthony Planakis is the NYPD bee expert, and he has 18 years of experience with bee swarms. “Within the next week, we’re going to get bombarded again,” he said. Planakis has tackled at least 30 swarms this spring. He’s snatched them from eaves of buildings, light poles even fire hydrants. Planakis says first and foremost swarms are normal and says if you see a swarm and want it taken care of don’t kill or harm the bees. “Notify a beekeeper immediately,” said

Planakis. “They’re important in the pollination process.”  Ostler says the bees are not aggressive in the swarm and seldom attack. “At this point so they’re not going to be out attacking people. You can look at them from a distance a swarm is rare and fascinating to watch, but call a beekeeper to come and collect it,” said Ostler. By midsummer the bees get settled in, form new colonies and will disappear, but if it’s a good bee year they’ll be back next year says Ostler.

But that’s still below the peak of 620,000 colonies in 1989. Still industry experts are heartened by bee health improvement. Idaho Beekeepers say early pollination across the Snake River plain had a hand in creating the swarms. There’s more nectar and pollen for the bees and it’s built the hives up earlier than normal when bees get too crowded they split and swarms search for new homes. Colony collapse disorder was first reported in 2006 by a Pennsylvania beekeeper. He lost most of his bees after trucking his hives to Florida for the winter. His operation was almost wiped out. Scientists say the sickness targeted the insect’s gut, interfering with its ability to take in nutrients.  The disorder typically killed a third of each colony in California and throughout the United States, but some colonies lost up 90 percent of the workers that simply flew off and died. Scientists are still trying to figure out what caused the collapse. The latest research reveals several things worked in tandem, including dry weather, poor food sources, environmental stress, insecticides, fungi, mites and viruses.  Meanwhile back in New York City the New York Police Department reported swarms from Manhattan to Queens. The New York Post reported swarms stopping traffic in the Bronx and sending people scrambling.

Swarms of bees requiring re-location are on the increase in Idaho and across the nation. Photo by Gina Lauer

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Stallman Continued from page 2

tion technology that their urban counterparts take for granted, while seeing enrollment that is growing at a faster rate than anywhere else in America. Top this off with increasing rural poverty that 41 percent of rural students live in daily, as well as an increasing number of students with special needs. There’s a misconception that rural America and schools are stable and financially secure. But, they face every challenge that urban schools do, and more. That’s why Farm Bureau is supporting the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act which is up for reauthorization. This law helps rural schools and communities that are affected by declining revenue from timber harvests. This year alone, rural communities stand to lose more than $346 million for improvements to public schools and other valuable infrastructure and stewardship projects. Failing to reauthorize this bill jeopardizes the economies and education systems of more than 780 already-struggling rural counties and school districts in 41 states.

Connected Nation Teachers aren’t going to remain in rural areas without access to basic technology and services and neither will healthcare professionals and small business owners.  Access to broadband plays a huge role in whether rural communities survive and flourish or wither and die. As the number of rural doctors continues to decline, so do rural businesses. According to Inc. Magazine, 70 percent of business owners in rural America will need to transition their businesses to new owners by 2020. That is a staggering figure. And, by all counts, it appears that broadband access is a major component of the economic engine. Many states across the nation are addressing rural technology challenges. One program in particular that is being utilized by many states is Connected Nation, a broadband adoption project to create connected communities. This program trains regional leaders how to work with their communities to secure more internet access and con-

nect more people. They make up community planning teams that help groups engage in teaching computer classes, mentor older adults and help with online job searches. It is Connected Nation’s philosophy that rural communities benefit through assessment, planning and self help, while citizens benefit through expanded access to relevant technology. Importantly, the private sector benefits from a more investment-friendly environment and increasingly  tech-savvy consumers. So, while rural America remains for many an idyllic land of open spaces and simpler ways of life, those who live there know the real deal. Access to basic services continues to be essential for rural communities and the competitiveness of our nation. Rural residents and their children shouldn’t be kept at a disadvantage by inadequate education, healthcare and business opportunities.  It’s time to get past the paradox.

Priestley Continued from page 2

Just like any other business, farms have to be profitable to be sustainable. Federal farm programs protect agriculture from weather related disasters and volatile global economics. These programs ensure a safe, abundant and affordable food supply for consumers. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) makes up 80 percent of the $100 billion in annual spending contained in the Farm Bill that the U.S. Senate recently passed. Farm programs are changing under the new Farm Bill from traditional direct payments to crop insurance programs that protect farms from weather and fiscal catastrophe. Sen. Stabenow is concerned about the 8

300,000 low-income families in New York whose food stamps would be cut by $90 per month under the new Farm Bill. Stabenow voted against the bill for that reason. Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo voted against the bill because the cuts were not deep enough for his liking. Farm Bureau supports the bill but also understands exactly where Sen. Crapo is coming from. What Stabenow’s position seems to overlook is the fact that this nation is staring down the barrel of a $14 trillion dollar debt load. That’s a nearly incomprehensible mountain of debt. A trillion is a million million. One trillion seconds is equal to 32,000 years. Many of our federal lawmakers seem to have lost track of the fact that

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we have reached a time where every government program must be scrutinized and made accountable. Farm and food programs make up less than one percent of the federal budget. Farmers across the nation understand this debt crisis and have supported deep cuts to the 20 percent of the Farm Bill funding earmarked for agriculture programs. What we don’t want to see are cuts to agriculture programs followed by increased spending on social programs. What we would like to see is less politics and more statesmanship from Washington D.C. Above all else, our federal lawmakers need to find the way to a balanced budget before it’s too late.


Focus on Agriculture

Farmers Try to ‘Stop the Flood of Regulation’ By Erin Anthony Growing up, we all needed guidance at times. Don’t run with scissors. Don’t forget your jacket. Don’t eat yellow snow. If you make that face one more time, it might get stuck like that. But, as adults, not all guidance is helpful or benevolent. That is particularly true if the guidance is coming from a government regulatory agency. Take, for example, the Environmental Protection Agency’s effort to expand its regulatory reach under the Clean Water Act to nearly every drop of water, and some dry land, too. Through what’s officially known as a “guidance document,” EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers are seeking to remove the word “navigable” from the Clean Water Act. That action would allow them to regulate even a roadside ditch that holds water for only a few hours after a big rain. Both agencies have been upfront about their intent to use the guidance process to increase their regulation of water bodies and lands that have been under the states’ regulatory authority. Another issue is the way the agencies are going about it. They’re using a guidance document, rather than going through a proper rule-making. Formal rule-making allows input from farmers, ranchers and other landowners—the people who would be flooded with an expensive slew of new regulations

and permitting requirements should the guidance document be put in place. Along with farmers, ranchers and other landowners, there are another 544 people EPA and the Corps are ignoring: 535 U.S. senators and representatives and nine Supreme Court justices. The lawmakers who wrote the Clean Water Act never intended for the federal government to have the kind of control it is seeking over local bodies of water.  Similarly, in two rulings, the Supreme Court affirmed important limitations of the federal government’s jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act. Having to get another permit doesn’t sound like that big of a deal, but at $30,000 to well over $100,000 for some permits, these requirements sometimes

force growers to avoid farming otherwise productive acreage just so they don’t trigger federal permit and extremely costly mitigation requirements. But in most parts of the country, it would be just about impossible to farm around every wet spot that EPA and the Corps want to regulate. To dry up EPA’s effort, Farm Bureau has launched the “Stop the Flood of Regulation” campaign. As part of the campaign, farmers and ranchers are asking their senators and representatives to support the Preserve the Waters of the U.S. Act (S. 2245 and H.R. 4965), which would prevent EPA from taking action through this guidance document. They also will be sharing their stories of regulatory inundation through social media plat-

forms. Look for the #stoptheflood hashtag on Twitter. And a Facebook page will give farm and ranch families a platform for sharing how this guidance effort might affect them. There is no doubt; without action, a flood of federal regulations appears imminent. Many of our nation’s farms and ranches could find themselves awash in new, expensive and unwarranted regulations—even if the cause of those regulations is an inch-deep puddle following a downpour. Long after the puddle dries, the effect of the regulations could linger. Erin Anthony is assistant editor of FBNews, the official newspaper of the American Farm Bureau Federation.

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Photo courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services

Task Force Releases Sage Grouse Recommendations By John Thompson A task force of range and wildlife experts along with state and local politicians released recommendations on how to preserve sage grouse populations in midJune. The 31-page document, which recognizes critical, important and general habitat zones for the desert-dwelling birds, was sent to Idaho Gov. Butch Otter for further consideration. There are several references in the pages citing lack of adequate time to fully develop recommendations or reach 10

consensus among task force members. The recommendations will be incorporated with existing sage grouse management efforts underway since 2007 by local working groups. However, if the recommendations become state policy, everyone who uses state or public lands inside areas deemed critical or important to sage grouse can expect management changes placing sage grouse conservation above almost all other uses.

managed to provide optimum conditions for sage grouse including sagebrush canopy cover, sagebrush height, sagebrush proximity to riparian areas, grass and forb canopy cover and forb availability. Under the recommendations, livestock producers can also expect changes related to fences and livestock handling facilities, water troughs and salt licks, grazing intervals, and several other practices aimed at building sage grouse populations.

Livestock operators with grazing allotments inside critical or important habitat zones can expect that rangeland will be

A map released by the task force

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

See SAGE GROUSE, page 19


The lifeblood of America . They’re the humble heroes who rise before dawn and battle the elements. They put clothes on our backs and food on our tables. Their genuine values and tireless work ethic are an inspiration to us all. We appreciate all that America’s farmers do and invite you to join us in saying thanks at www.fbfs.com/SayThanksToAFarmer. FB02-ID (3-12)

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Adams-Valley County Farm Bureau Showcase Pasture Management By Jake Putnam CASCADE - From snow-capped Mountains, the Adam-Valley County Farm Bureau Ag tour got off to a shaky start June 19th. Temperatures hovered in the 40’s after an early morning frost. “The growing season is short,” said Valley-Adams County Farm Bureau President Dave Veselka. “As a matter of fact it froze here last night so it’s definitely a shorter season. As I came into town, there were lilacs blooming in someone’s yard, they bloom in late march in Boise.” This is the County’s second annual Farm Tour. “We have two counties in our organization,” said Veselka. “We have a lot of country with a lot of diversity, and this year we’re going to see the Cascade end, the extreme south end.” Last year the tour had 17 participants, this year 32 signed up. “It’s important to get everyone together,” explained President Veselka. “We even invite newspaper people and local towns people; anyone who’s interested in coming gets an invite. Adams-Valley County Farm Bureau teams up with the University of Idaho to bring all the ranchers, farmers and business people together. 

Valley County Farm Bureau held a tour in mid-June. County President Dave Veselka said the growing season is short due to high elevation. There were 32 participants in this year’s tour. Photo by Steve Ritter

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

“It’s our way of educating people about agriculture and the importance it plays in our local economy,” Veselka said. “We try to make several points. It’s primarily an ag tour for farmers and ranchers but we try and draw in anyone that wants to know more about agriculture.” “So this year the emphasis is on ranch-


The Valley-Adams County Farm Bureau held its second annual farm tour in mid-June. The University of Idaho Agriculture Extension Service participated in the event, as well as several farmers, ranchers and local residents. Photo by Steve Ritter

es,” said Shana Hamilton, Ag Extension agent for the University of Idaho. “The purpose is to just get out there and see what everyone else is doing and see if we can figure it out for ourselves too.”

ties are mainly related to federal lands. He says there’s a vast amount of public land in the area and federal issues dealing with water and endangered species dominate county resolutions meetings.

Organizers rented a yellow school bus and packed it with tour-goers. First stop was Little Land and Livestock in Round Valley.

“The wolf issue and soon grizzly bear reintroduction are a big concern to us. We’re also very sensitive to road closures because in our counties it’s harder to get around because they keep taking roads out,” he said. “We want access and it’s a constant battle with federal agencies.”

“Up on this end of the county we pasture a lot of yearlings and we have just a summer season because the season is short and elevations are high and cool,” said Veselka. “Grain crops and potatoes are the only crops we will grow. Primary Ag production here revolves around pasturing and I’m talking mostly yearlings with some cows and calves.” Veselka says the big issues in the two coun-

Hamilton said the Ag Extension Service is a lifeline for farmers and ranchers and the ag tour is a way to connect names and faces. “I field every kind of question,” said Hamilton. “From ‘are there natural antibiotics?’ to people bringing in bug and plant samples

and they want me to identify them.”  The Farm Bureau and the U of I Ag Extension work hand in hand throughout the year and the tour is a chance to connect. “I’ve talked to a few already and said, ‘I’ve talked to you on the phone, or I’ve heard about you but have never met you,’ so this tour was really nice,” said Hamilton. “It’s also good for people that are not as involved in ag because they get to see what the Extension office does.” Veselka says the Farm Bureau has positive presence in the two counties. “We do our best and exert ourselves into the community. We get behind 4-H functions especially in the schools. We also do Ag in the Classroom and this tour is just another program we have going in our two-county operation.”

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Watering and Feeding

Landscape Trees

By Randy Brooks This column has mainly focused on caring for tree in our forests, but what about care of landscape trees which lend aesthetic value, among other things to our home sites? Do you want the trees in your yard or around your home to grow faster or perhaps look prettier? Try feeding them in the spring and watering them during them during the hot, dry summer months to increase growth. Extended periods of time without rain can stress trees and reduce vigor even if the signs of stress are not visible. Trees are able to stand upright because their roots are firmly anchored in soil. The soil holds water and nutrients essential for tree growth. Soil texture, structure, and depth are extremely important to trees throughout their lives. Soils are composed of small particles of sand, silt, or clay. Clay particles have the ability to become grouped together in aggregates so that each aggregate acts as a single, larger-sized particle. This aggregation is referred to as structure. Well aggregated soils 16

have the desirable properties of sand (good water movement and good aeration) as well as the high water and nutrient holding capabilities of clays. Soils that are primarily sand or silt aggregate poorly, so their properties depend essentially on their texture. Knowing the type of soil you have can influence the duration of watering periods, Soils with high clay content cannot handle (absorb) large water applications like sandy soils can. Water Requirements All plants require water for growth. Plants obtain water from the soil and lose most of it through their leaves by evaporation (transpiration). Plants receive water from either precipitation or irrigation. How much water is available to a tree depends on soil type, but also on the depth and spread of the roots. Most roots are located within three feet of the surface. When there is sufficient water, most of it is supplied from the top three or four feet of soil. In dry periods, deep rooted plants can draw water from deeper in the soil. During dry periods, or in areas where irrigation is necessary, keep a close eye on your trees to determine when they need water. Signs of water stress include wilting, a change of leaf color (from shiny to dull, or

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

from dark green to light graygreen), a decrease in growth, an increase in susceptibility to insect and disease problems, and premature leaf fall. Trees should be watered before any of these signs are apparent. Once moisture stress begins, dormancy may set in. There are a number of ways to water efficiently: basins, furrows, sprinklers, soaker hoses, drip systems, or micro spot emitters. The most important goals to remember are to avoid runoff, confine water within the drip line of the branches, and to apply the water uni-

formly. Soaker hoses, drip systems, or micro-emitters are the best ways to apply water slowly without runoff and uniformly. The purpose is to make as much of the applied water available to the tree as possible. Take care when using sprinklers to provide supplemental irrigation moist foliage is a prime breeding ground for fungal diseases. Fertilizer Requirements Nitrogen fertilization makes young trees grow and reach landscape size more rapidly. However, mature trees may need little or no fertilization as long as they have good leaf col-

Consider feeding and watering trees that begin to lose vigor and crown growth, especially those that are landscape trees or are important for aesthetic purposes.


or and grow reasonably well. In fact, increased vigor may needlessly increase the size of the trees and density of the leaves, which is fine if trees are intended for future harvest, but not necessary for landscaping purposes. Leaves on the inside of such trees, or plants under them, grow poorly because of heavy shade. However, this may be a benefit in that it can inhibit undesirable plants (weeds). You may want to wait until the trees are 3-5 years old, since fertilizers have been shown to have an insignificant effect on young seedlings, unless the site has been shown to have a specific nutrient deficiency. As a starter, apply nitrogen at a rate of 2 to 4 pounds per 1000 square feet. Try to apply a “complete fertilizer” containing nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium and perhaps sulfur. Be sure to read the directions and follow the recommendations on the label. If the fertilizer bag says 18-10-10-7, this means that the contents are 18%

nitrogen, 10% phosphorous, 10% potassium, and 7% sulfur. So if you have a 100 pound bag of fertilizer, 18 pounds of it is nitrogen. One method used to determine how much fertilizer to apply is to measure the diameter of the tree trunk. For each inch, use .1 to .2 pounds of actual nitrogen, in other words, 1 to 2 pounds of a 10 percent nitrogen fertilizer, such as 10-8-7. It should be mentioned here that most fertilizer applications are made based on the percentage of nitrogen in the fertilizer. Because nitrogen is mobile in the soil, apply only the necessary amount in two intervals. One-half in the spring and onehalf in the summer is a good program to follow. Keep the fertilizer at least 6 inches away from the trunk to avoid injuring the tree. After the first year, apply nitrogen fertilizer to an area with a radius of 1.25 times that of the tree canopy. After application, sprinkle

Landscape trees may often be crowded and competing with other trees and vegetation for nutrients and moisture. The trees in this photo are good candidates for nutrient and water applications.

or irrigate the area to dissolve the fertilizer and get it to move into the ground where the roots can access it. Remember, fertilizers are salts, and if you do not irrigate to dissolve the fertilizer, the tree and surrounding grass may get “burned.” Fertilizing in the fall with nitrogen is not recommended as it may keep the tree actively growing well into the frost season which will severely injure the new succulent growth.

of soil PHS. Well-drained soils in high-rainfall areas usually are acid, as are a lot of forest soils, while those in low rainfall or arid areas are usually neutral or alkaline. In many alkaline soils (soils with a pH higher than 6.5) like southern Idaho has, a number of trees may be low or deficient in iron, as evidenced by pale yellow leaves with finer dark green veins. These symptoms are most obvious on the first growth in early spring.

So how much fertilizer should you apply? Let the trees be your guide. If growth is excessive on young trees, put on less per area next time, or skip the next intended application. If shoot growth is shorter than you want and leaf color is pale, increase the applied amount up to twice the previous amount. As trees mature, fertilize them only if growth or leaf color is not up to expectation.

If a tree is not responding to nitrogen, show or describe the symptoms to experts such as your County Extension Educators (Agents), or Extension Foresters in your area.

In most soils, you need not worry about soil pH, as trees grow satisfactorily over a wide range

Randy Brooks is a University of Idaho associate professor and extension educator in forestry, 4-H, and agriculture. He can be reached at the UI-Clearwater County Extension Office 2200 Michigan Ave. Orofino, ID 83544 Phone: 208-476-4434 FAX: 208-476-4111 E-mail: rbrooks@uidaho.edu

Trees require water much like our lawns - consider additional water on trees around the home and in the landscape to keep the foliage green and attractive. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

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Senators Urge Better Access to Potato Markets Cite Mexico’s agreement to purchase fresh potatoes Washington, D.C.  – Idaho Senators Mike Crapo and Jim Risch have joined a number of their colleagues in an effort to increase sales of U.S. potatoes to Mexico. The Mexican market for potatoes from Idaho and other U.S. states is estimated to be worth about $30 million. Mexico signed an accord in 2003, agreeing to lower import restrictions on potatoes from Idaho and other U.S. states. Since the agreement was signed, however, the Mexican government has not fulfilled its commitment, citing concerns with pest control and sanitary issues. In the letter, Crapo, Risch and seven others say those concerns are vastly overstated. The Senators are calling on U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack to intervene with the Mexican government to end the nineyear stalemate over U.S. exports to Mexico. Their letter follows: Dear Ambassador Kirk and Secretary Vilsack: As you are both aware, we have been very supportive of efforts to obtain access for U.S. potatoes to all of Mexico.  In spite of these efforts, Mexico has failed to fulfill the requirements of the market access agreement signed by the United States and Mexico in 2003 that established a clear path for achieving better access for our nation’s potato products.  As Mexico’s potential entry into the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations continues to be discussed, we urge your Agencies to work with Mexico to resolve the outstanding concerns on market access for U.S. fresh potatoes. Recently, an international panel of experts was convened to review the technical issues associated with expanded market access.  According to the panel of experts, only 6 of the 67 pests that Mexico raised issue with were found to be “of concern.”   During the mediation, it was initially agreed that mitigation measures would be taken for 3 of 18

the pests.  However, Mexico later insisted that mitigation be done for 33 pests, even though the panel of experts did not consider these a risk for spreading through fresh potatoes.  This unnecessary requirement by the Mexican government has led to the deadlock that we currently face on this issue.  These extra and unnecessary mitigation measures are an effective trade barrier that is not supported by science.  Further, in addition to the pest concerns, the panel examined and found that Mexico has not applied established principles for dealing with the sanitary and phyto-sanitary issues.  We hope that the very limited set of remaining issues identified by the panel will be resolved quickly, and U.S. potatoes

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

will gain fair and full access to Mexican markets.  Taking steps to address these outstanding market access issues would send a very positive signal that Mexico is willing to work on constructive solutions and create better trade policy.   The failure by Mexico to resolve the potato market access dispute is concerning, given the growing evidence that any risks associated with the movement of fresh potatoes from the United States to Mexico can be effectively mitigated.  We strongly urge you to continue to push Mexico on resolving these technical issues and communicate to Mexico the importance of implementing the market access agreement for U.S. fresh potatoes.


SAGE GROUSE Continued from page 10

identifies 9.9 million acres in southern Idaho that account for 89 percent of the known sage grouse leks in the state. This area is believed to support a majority of Idaho’s sage grouse population. About 65 percent of the area is managed by the Bureau of Land Management, 7 percent by the U.S. Forest Service with the remainder being state and private land. Roughly identified, the map distinguishes a large tract of land along Idaho’s southern border in Owyhee and Twin Falls counties, a large tract of land that straddles the north border of Minidoka, Lincoln and Gooding counties, and large sections of Clark, Custer, Lemhi, Bingham, Power and Bear Lake counties as either critical or important habitat. “Because the species can move across large areas during the year, IDFG is unable to precisely calibrate Idaho’s sage grouse population or the minimum viable population,” the document states. With regard to grazing, the document’s executive summary states that effected livestock producers will be kept informed of upcoming management changes and that assessments of rangeland will be conducted over three to five year time periods. The document also acknowledges that grazing is regarded as a secondary threat to sage grouse. Primary threats are listed as wildfire, invasive species and large infrastructure projects. Secondary threats include livestock grazing management, West Nile virus, grazing infrastructure and recreation.

“Adaptive management changes related to existing grazing permits should be undertaken only if improper grazing is determined to be a causal factor in not meeting habitat guidelines specific to site capability, for three out of five years,” the document states. Habitat assessments will be completed in conjunction with grazing permit renewals. Assessments will focus on allotments located within critical habitat zones, followed by allotments inside important habitat zones. One of the objectives is to recognize, encourage and incentivize land use practices that are actively maintaining or improving sage grouse habitat. There are no studies available that directly relate livestock grazing or stocking rates to sage grouse abundance or productivity. Most research on sage grouse has been conducted in the presence of livestock grazing. According to the recommendations, most concerns about grazing effects on sage grouse are focused on riparian areas and heavy use by livestock at water troughs. “What sage grouse respond to and are affected by are conditions at the larger landscape,” the document states.

rise to the level of secondary threat.” In spite of lacking data on how grazing may affect sage grouse populations, numerous studies have been published on the characteristics of sage grouse seasonal habitats. This information has shown what sage grouse need in relation to sagebrush canopy and herbaceous plants needed for productive sage grouse habitats, the document states. Fences and taller structures used to handle livestock are believed to provide perches for raptors that kill sage grouse. The recommendations include avoiding constructing new fences within two kilometers of occupied leks. Also, taller

structures such as corrals, loading chutes and water storage tanks should be located at least two km from occupied leks to reduce opportunities for perching birds of prey. Fences should be marked with permanent flagging to reduce sage grouse collisions. Fences that are not needed should be removed and placement of new fences, corrals etc. “should include consideration of their impact on sage grouse,” the document states. For more information on the sage grouse task force recommendations, following this link: http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/ public/wildlife/?getPage=310

“Therefore, livestock grazing should be viewed as a landscape stressor with monitoring and management actions conducted at appropriate scales. Accordingly, the FWS (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) does not consider livestock grazing in general as a threat to the species. Only where management issues are documented over time does this activity Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

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XTREME SIDE x SIDE PERFORMANCE.

Polaris would like to congratulate Jake Andersen the winner of this year’s Young Farmer and Rancher Discussion Meet as well as Greg and Gwen Andersen for being presented with the Idaho Farm Bureau’s 2011 Young Farmer and Rancher Achiever Award. We hope you enjoy your new Polaris Trail Boss 330 and RGR 400 and thank you for your continued contributions to the Idaho Farming and Ranching Community. A big thank you to those Idaho Polaris dealers who continue to support the Idaho Farm Bureau and Young Farmer and Rancher Program:

Top Farm Bureau Agents

Agent of the Month             Rhett Price Schmitt Agency

Agency of the Month                                     Schmitt Agency

Farm Bureau members pay 10% less off of “Best Rate” . New Farm BureauAvailable Member Benefit 10% qualifying monthly recurring Calloff Toll-Free: 877-670-7088 services for new and existing users. For Super 8 call 800-88ount ID# 61810 For New lines: Call 866-464-8662 Exclusive Offers/Waived Activations Farm Bureau Promo Code 10099TMOFAV Farm Bureau Node 4732231 This discount does not apply to unlimited calling plans and non-recurring services such as overage cost or international long distance charges. Other restrictions may apply. Contact T-Mobile for full details.

Vehicles shown with optional accessories. Avoid operating Polaris RANGERs on paved surfaces or public roads. Riders and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Drivers of RANGER vehicles must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license. Warning: ATV’s can be hazardous to operate. For your safety: Avoid operating Polaris ATV’s on paved surfaces or public roads. Riders and passengers should wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Polaris ATV models are for riders aged 16 and older. Be sure to take a safety training course. For safety training information in the U.S., call the SVIA at (800) 887-2887, see your dealer, or call Polaris at (800) 342-3764. In Canada, see your local dealer. ©2011 Polaris Industries Inc.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

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County Happenings Idaho Farm Bureau’s MAC Trailer spent time in Bingham County recently. In this photo IFBF Board Member Bryan Searle shows first graders what wheat looks like and explains how flour is made and what it is used for. Another part of the event was Kindergarten Adventure Day where children learned about cattle ranching. Volunteers helping with the event include Chris, Kimmel, Naomi, Quinci, Joyce and Ralph Dalley, Sara Erb, Jocelyn Hoge, Shannon Bevan, Todd and Emma Cook, Judi Hale, Karen Thomson, Mark Bair, Sterling Hatch, Klay and Kade Keller.

Minidoka County FB President Larry Johnson, center, recently presented $1,000 scholarships to AshquaMarie Bliss, left, and Lygia Alves. Both students plan to attend the College of Southern Idaho.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012


The Fremont County FB recently broke ground for a new office. Pictured left to right are FB Mutual Operations and HR Manager, David Acevedo, State Director Dean Schwendiman, County Board Members, Alan Baum, Brody Harshbarger, Paul Siddoway, Meghan Zielinski, Ben Peterson, Curtis Parkinson, County President Val Hammond and Ashton Mayor Neils Thueson.

Idaho Farm Bureau Discount Program Step 1: Members go to sears.com and find the product(s) they are interested in and write down the product/model number(s). Step 2: Members email the product number(s) to Farm Bureau’s designated contact at Sears Appliance Select: wgill03@searshc.com for a quote. To receive this pricing a member must include their Farm Bureau membership number and Farm Bureau discount code CU068062 in the email. Step 3: After receiving a quote (allow 2-3 business days), members can then choose to use a credit card to purchase the discounted item(s) and it will be delivered via a custom freight company.

THIS OFFER IS NOT AVAILABLE THROUGH SEARS RETAIL STORES All manufacturer warranties apply with the option to purchase extended Sears Protection Agreements. Installation is not included with delivery.

For more information call (208) 239-4289

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

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Grain Marketing with Clark Johnston

Wheat Crop Uncertain The overall wheat production this year looks to be lower than the early projections for the world. Russia and the Ukraine have had hot and dry conditions along with Australia which is estimating the production there to be as much as 18 percent less than last year. This could help us out as the early projections were showing an increase in the ending stocks for the 2012/13 crop year. It now looks as though we will have a very good chance for a reduction in the stocks to use ratio at the end of the year.

Clark Johnston

Well it happened again this year. The weather has turned too hot and too dry over the past few weeks. Conditions in the South have been less than perfect for the corn pollination with the same conditions in the Eastern Corn Belt. The wheat harvest which was early also experienced reduced yields in most areas of the country. The jury is still out on the wheat crop in Idaho as we have experienced dry conditions in some areas as well as frost damage in others. The frost damage looked to be mostly in the wheat that was 2 to 3 weeks ahead of normal. The dry land farms in the southern part of the state are very dry and it looks as though we will see reduced yields as well as the real possibility of quality problems this year. For now the irrigated wheat looks good but, having said that the spring wheat has had a rough start in some regions of the state. Even with irrigation the soil this spring was so dry the crop had a tough time just getting established.

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We really wouldn’t want to wish bad luck on any one but, because of the current news we are seeing a renewed optimism among producers for better prices in the upcoming year. This could be good and bad for us at the same time. The good part is you could have an opportunity to sell your wheat higher than earlier projected giving you the prospect of being more profitable. On the other hand if the wheat crop is not milling quality the markets for that wheat could be few and far between. The spread between the wheat and corn futures at this time aren’t that conducive to feeding wheat this year.

months could still work for you. Now would be a good time to look at opening your own trading account. This will allow you to sell the deferred futures months while at the same time giving you the flexibility to still market your wheat to which ever company has the best basis bid later on. Being able to trade you own futures account is not a cure all in your marketing plan but, it does give you the opportunity to contract your wheat when the futures reach that point that will help you make a profit this year. As the markets continue to change and become more and more volatile the need for you to change your market strategies becomes a necessity and the need for you to designate more time to your plan will also be critical to the success of your operation. Most producers experienced a huge gamble this year as they locked in their high priced inputs without protecting themselves by selling or hedging the price of the finished product. In these volatile markets it becomes more and more important to be able to use these tools to your advantage.

Depending on the quality of your crop you may need to be sure to sell when someone wants to buy. The market for feed wheat could be very thin this year.

This may sound foreign to you and you may think that is difficult to learn but just remember, line by line, here a little and there a little.

Milling quality wheat this year looks as though we could see basis levels a little higher once we get through the harvest. Acreage in some classes looks to be off this year and with the potential for reduced yields the processors may find the need to compete for the good bushels.

Clark Johnston is a grain marketing specialist who is on contract with the Idaho Farm Bureau. He is the owner of JC Management Company in Northern Utah. He can be reached at clark@jcmanagement. net

As we have talked about in earlier articles locking in the futures prices in the deferred

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012


KELLER

Continued from page 2 the well-being of the great farmer class.” He continued, “There is too much belief among all our people that the prizes of life lie away from the farm.” In submitting the report of the Commission to Congress, Roosevelt once again warned that the rapid advancement of city life was not the true measure of America. The Commission concluded that farmers could not be left behind if the whole nation was to prosper. It became an issue for business leaders around the nation. In 1910, business leaders in the Binghamton Chamber of Commerce, located in Broome County, New York proposed a farm department in the Chamber “. . . to extend to farmers the same opportunities for cooperation now enjoyed by the business men of this city.” A few progressive farmers responded by taking out memberships in the Chamber. The position of a county demonstrator or

farm advisor appealed to the farm committee of the Chamber; a new concept to educate farmers about the latest agricultural techniques. The Chamber found and hired the right man in John H. Barron, a graduate of the state college of agriculture. Raised on a farm and a member of the Grange, Barron opened an office in the Binghamton Chamber of Commerce in 1911. His salary was paid jointly by the chamber, the railroad (which had a vested interest in agriculture) and the USDA. Barron became available free of charge to the farmers of Broome County as an expert agriculturist. The farm committee of the Chamber was called the Farm Bureau. Farm Bureau was the logical choice of a name because the Chamber already had a traffic bureau and a manufacturing bureau. In 1914, farmers gathered at a county meeting and became the Broome County Farm Bureau Association and took over the agricultural responsibilities of the Chamber. James Quinn be-

came the first president of Broome County Farm Bureau. A hundred years later, I was able to meet some of the leaders of the Broome County Farm Bureau. One leader is Judi Whittaker, who farms the same farm as the first county Farm Bureau President James Quinn. The county has retained farms and its rural character, and Broome County Farm Bureau is an active part of the community. Now, county Farm Bureaus are in ninetyfour percent of the nation’s counties or parishes. Local farmers and ranchers gather to discuss issues that affect the farm and rural community. Each is aware of its responsibility and shares Roosevelt’s conviction that no nation will be great unless its agricultural base is also great. Thank you Broome County Farm Bureau for your foresight and example. You changed an industry and the nation.

OUR AGENTS HAVE BEEN

SINCE 1947 When there’s a lot of ground to cover, Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company of Idaho agents believe it’s best to meet with customers face-to-face. They’ll cover your property on foot before they’ll cover it on paper. Contact your local agent today for personal service from someone who knows Idaho and you. Left and above: Max Silva of Silva Dairy in Buhl, Idaho, with his Farm Bureau Insurance agent, Lisa Bothof. 48 OFFICES THROUGHOUT IDAHO VISIT WWW.IDFBINS.COM TO FIND THE AGENT NEAREST YOU.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

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June WASDE Report Corn 2011-2012 STOCKS

Wheat U.S.

ENDING

Ending stocks for corn remained unchanged in June at 851 million bushels despite trade expectations stocks would decrease slightly from May. USDA bumped corn use for ethanol by 50 million bushels for the marketing year, but then also offset corn exports with a 50 mb decline. Tight domestic supplies and increased competition, particularly from Brazil, are also expected to reduce U.S. export prospects for corn during the summer. While keeping ending stocks the same, USDA also kept the average price for corn unchanged for the year with a range from $5.95 to $6.25 a bushel. 2012-2013 STOCKS

U.S.

ENDING

U.S. corn ending stocks for 2012-13 did not change from the May report, sticking at 1.881 billion bushels. The range estimate for was wide, but overall was projected a 140-millionbushel lower. WORLD PRODUCTION AND ENDING STOCKS World corn ending stocks for 2011-2012 were increased slightly to 129.19 million metric tons from the 127.56 from mmt reported in May. WASDE also increased the 2012-13 word corn stocks to 155.74 mmt, up from May numbers by 3.4 mmt. 26

2011-2012 STOCKS

U.S.

ENDING

Projected U.S. wheat ending stocks were lowered by 40 million bushels, which is 29 mb lower than the average trade estimates. Along with lower stocks, WASDE also projected a 10 mb increase in food use and a 30 mb increase in exports for 2011- 12. The increase in food use stems from higher milling reports earlier this year from the North American Millers’ Association. Overall, WASDE projected all U.S. wheat production at 2.234 billion bushels, down 10 mb with lower forecast winter wheat production. 2012-2013 STOCKS

U.S.

ENDING

Ending stocks are projected at 694 million bushels, down 41 mb from the May estimate. This too is lower than pre-report estimates which had only pegged a 7 million bushel dip from the May numbers. Large production declines are expected in hard-red winter wheat states such as Nebraska and Colorado. With reduced supplies and expected higher prices, feed residual use is lowered by 10 million bushels. WORLD PRODUCTION AND ENDING STOCKS Old-crop wheat were lowered by 1.44 million metric tons from May figures to 195.56 mmt for June. New crop wheat ending stocks were also low-

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

ered by 2.37 million metric tons to 185.76 mmt. New crop decreases primarily came from former Soviet Union countries, including Russia. US Wheat Production Winter Wheat production is forecast at 1.68 billion bushels, down 1 percent from the May 1 forecast but 13 percent above 2011. Based on June 1 conditions, the United States yield is forecast at 47.3 bushels per acre, down 0.3 bushel from last month but 1.1 bushels more than last year. Expected area for har-

vest as grain or seed totals 35.6 million acres, unchanged from May 1. Hard Red Winter, at 1.02 billion bushels, is down 1 percent from a month ago. Soft Red Winter production is up slightly from last month and now totals 428 million bushels. White Winter production totals 231 million bushels, down 1 percent from last month. Of this total, 14.1 million bushels are Hard White and 217 million bushels are Soft White.

e e y r r F ta o N

At all county Farm Bureau offices for Idaho Farm Bureau Family of Member Services members.

TM


American farm bureau federation news

AFBF Statement on Farm Bill WASHINGTON, D.C., June 21, 2012 – “The bipartisan farm bill approved today by the Senate (S.3240) provides farmers improved risk management tools consistent with Farm Bureau’s core principles. While no farm bill is perfect, this is a solid bill that was worthy of Senate approval. The bill includes important reforms and is fiscally responsible, while including important provisions to enhance crop insurance, maintain a viable marketing loan program and minimize the potential for farm program provisions to drive producer decisions.

“There is still a lot of hard work ahead to fully secure the kind of policy we believe our farm and ranch families need, but we applaud the Senate for approving a workable bill and moving this process forward. The Senate has provided us solid footing by approving a bill that stands firm on $23 billion in savings, yet protects and strengthens the federal crop insurance program and provides a commodity title that attempts to encourage producers to follow market signals rather than make planting decisions in anticipation of government payments. “Now our attention turns to the House

Agriculture Committee, which will begin its farm bill legislative activity in July. It remains critical for farmers to know what their new farm bill will be as they begin thinking about and looking toward next year’s cropping decisions. Farm Bureau remains committed to ensuring farmers have the tools they need to manage risks and minimizing the limitations imposed on farmers regardless of the size or type of their operations. And we are convinced that having a new farm bill in place this year is overwhelmingly in the best interest of our members.”

Increased Trade With Russia Will Benefit U.S. Farmers WASHINGTON, D.C., June 20, 2012 – Timely congressional approval of permanent normal trade relations status for Russia will benefit U.S. farmers and ranchers, the American Farm Bureau Federation told a House Committee today.

the U.S. has extended to Russia on an annual basis since 1992,” Wood said. “It recognizes Russia’s joining the World Trade Organization, which will provide our farmers and ranchers with more certain and predictable market access.”

Wayne Wood, president of Michigan Farm Bureau, testified on behalf of AFBF before the House Committee on Ways and Means.

Russia’s commitment to adhering to WTO provisions on sanitary and phytosanitary measures in particular will benefit U.S. farmers and ranchers because this will limit the country’s ability to impose arbitrary measures that have impeded trade in

“PNTR makes permanent the trade status

the past. In his testimony, Wood explained that exports of U.S. farm goods to Russia are likely to increase substantially following congressional approval of PNTR and the country’s accession to the WTO. U.S. sales of beef, poultry, pork, apples, cheeses, soybeans and soybean products are all expected to grow due to improved market access.

AFBF Statement on Trans Pacific Partnership WASHINGTON, D.C., June 21, 2012 – “The American Farm Bureau Federation supports the addition of Canada as a negotiating partner in the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement. As a major U.S. trading partner, Canada will bolster the reach of the TPP negotiations for U.S. agriculture. “As the second-largest U.S. agricultural

export market, with more than $18 billion in sales in 2011, Canada is crucial to U.S. agriculture. Both our nations will benefit from Canada being a TPP partner, and through sharing in improved sanitary and phytosanitary standards for agricultural trade and expanded market access with TPP nations.

“It’s important that new entrants to the TPP recognize this is a comprehensive agreement and that individual sectors should not be excluded from the negotiation. Both Canada and Mexico being invited to join the TPP provides opportunity to strengthen trade relationships, address remaining barriers and improve the competitiveness of the North American market.”

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012


Global Seed Company, University of Idaho Agree on Novel Wheat Pact The Idaho State Board of Education recently approved an innovative agreement between the University of Idaho and Limagrain Cereal Seeds, one of the world’s largest seed companies, that expands graduate education in agriculture and wheat variety development opportunities.   “This agreement is important to meet the needs of Idaho’s wheat growers and our ability to serve agriculture both in Idaho and in the Northwest,” said College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Dean John Hammel.   “We have had detailed discussions for more than a year with the Idaho Wheat Commission, Limagrain Cereal Seeds and others to make sure this agreement works for all parties,” said Donn Thill, Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station director in the college at Moscow.   Limagrain Cereal Seeds will contribute to research and education endowments for the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences to fund wheat-focused research and two $20,000 graduatelevel assistantships annually.   The research endowments will help fund field studies by college faculty members focused on better ways to grow wheat on the Palouse surrounding Moscow, Thill noted.   A July 9 field day at the college’s Palouse Research, Extension and Education Center

Parker Farm east of Moscow will offer wheat growers and the public a chance to explore the collaboration at the ground level with officials from the university, company and other groups. Hundreds of plots of Limagrain Cereal Seeds wheat varieties and breeding lines and those developed by the college will be on display.   “From the Limagrain Cereal Seeds standpoint, we’re really excited about the opportunity to partner with the University of Idaho and by extension with the Idaho Wheat commission,” said Jim Peterson, vice president for research for Limagrain Cereal Seeds at Fort Collins, Colo.   “We feel we bring some unique things to the table, a global germplasm base, some modern technologies and the opportunity to partner with the researchers and extension at the University of Idaho to really bring better information and better products to the growers of Idaho,” said Peterson.   He previously worked as Oregon State University’s wheat breeder and has strong ties to the University of Idaho, where his uncle Chuck Peterson, an agricultural engineer and biodiesel pioneer served as College of Engineering dean.   The Idaho Wheat Commission will participate in the collaboration in a formal advisory role. Cathy Wilson, the commission’s director of research collaboration, will serve as an ex-officio

member of a joint universitycompany steering committee that will meet four times a year.   “Myexperienceshowsthatwhere there is collaboration, there is opportunity,” Wilson said.   On Jan. 6 in Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s office, Peterson of Limagrain Cereal Seeds joined an Idaho Wheat Commission announcement of endowments that will total $2 million to support the university’s wheat research.   The agreement was previewed by the State Board of Education during its April meeting in Moscow.  

The non-exclusive agreement between the university and Limagrain means the two will develop and market some wheat varieties together under the trade name Varsity Idaho. The company and university will continue to develop varieties independently, collaborate with other parties and market varieties separately.   The strength of the agreement, Thill said, is that it provides the university with a tie to the company’s vast collection of germplasm from throughout Europe and its scientific and marketing expertise.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

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An Idaho Farm Bureau Member Benefit.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012


Life on the Range

Bar H Bar guests ride the range almost every day, keeping cattle on the move and ensuring that pastures don’t get overgrazed.

Guest Riders Learn About Ranch Life

Article and Photos by Steve Stuebner

On a frosty September morning in the Bear River Valley, the Harris Family is preparing to gather 350 yearlings from a large pasture next to their corrals. Mark Harris leads the charge on his palomino, “Frosty”. “Heya! Hah! Hah!” Harris and his fellow hands on horseback shout as they herd the cattle across the spacious meadow toward the corrals. Three of the riders -- two men from New York and a woman from Indianapolis - are paying guests who love to ride horses at the Bar H Bar Ranch. All three of them are return guests. “I always wanted to do this,” said Patrick Marinelli, who is retired from ConEdison and lives in Long Island, New York. “To come out West and do things just like the cowboys did 150 years ago is just fantastic. It’s a wonderful experience.” Adds Missy Logie of Indianapolis, “This,

for me, is riding heaven. I can be in the saddle 6-7 hours a day and for me, that’s my perfect day.” The Bar H Bar Ranch in Soda Springs, owned by the Harris Family, was one of the first ranches in Idaho to embrace the guest ranching experience in the early 1990s. The concept was just budding then.

“We’d have friends come out and chase cows with us, so the idea was kind of out there, and then the movie City Slickers come out and that just added to it,” said Mark Harris, one of two Harris brothers who manage the Soda Springs part of the operation with his wife, Cheryl, his brother Wade and his family, and their father, McGee, and mother, Janet. Indeed, City Slickers, the 1991 comedy starring Billy Crystal, popularized the notion of taking a vacation out West and participating in a real cattle drive. The movie was part of what got Marinelli and his friend, Dominick Mancuso, a retired New

York Police Department lieutenant, interested in the concept.

“I must confess that I watch that movie every time before I come out here to the Bar H Bar Ranch,” Mancuso says with a chuckle. Turns out that Marinelli’s daughter is married to Mancuso’s son, and when their kids heard that both fathers wanted to go to a guest ranch out West, they got them together. The two have been coming to the Bar H Bar Ranch for the last three years in a row. They usually stay for 10 days. “The Harris family takes only 6-8 people at a time, which is really nice,” Marinelli says. “At other ranches, they take more people, and there can be a lot of competition for getting to do what you want to do. Here, it’s more intimate and personal.” The Harrises marketed their services by advertising in Cowboys & Indians magazine, See LIFE ON THE RANGE page 32

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

31


Life on the range

Continued from page 31

Mark Harris and his son Lane help move cattle on the Bar H Bar Ranch in Bear Lake County.

Gene Kilgore’s Ranch Vacations guidebook, and they were listed as a top guest ranch by National Geographic Traveler magazine in 1995. They’ve been booked solid ever since. Logie, who has her own horse in Indiana and rides regularly, says it is a good idea for guests to have horseback riding experience. That way, they can hit the ground running, so to speak, and not get saddlesore. She notes that they herd cattle in topsy-turvy terrain in the mountains; it’s not a leisurely trail ride. So the horseback riding can be challenging and demanding, and that’s how she likes it. “It’s a good thing to know how to ride,” she says. “I’ve never really felt like they’re entertaining me. They have jobs to do and things that have to be done every day -pushing cattle from one pasture to another, 32

finding the escapees and putting them back where they belong, branding, mending fences, we do it all.” It’s not a dude ranching experience at the Bar H Bar, the guests note. They come to work on a real working ranch, and the Harrises put them to work. “They have a family meeting every morning to figure out what they’re going to do for the day, and you join in whatever activity you’d like to do,” says Marinelli. “Every day is something different.” The Harrises have found that limiting the number of guests per week ensures that everyone has something to do. The Bar H Bar is a large operation, with more than 10,000 deeded acres of private land, 30,000 acres of grazing allotments on the CaribouTarghee National Forest and 2,000 cows to

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

manage. Two of Mark Harris’ brothers run a hay farm in Malta, where the yearlings over-winter to stay out of the extreme cold in the Bear River Valley. “We have snow here till the first of May,” Harris says with a twinkle in his eye. “It’s a short summer.” Logie loves riding in the mountains to move cattle around because it’s a sporting riding experience. “All of these horses are so well trained,” she says. “When you point them toward a cow, they know what to do. You just need to hang on and go along for the ride.” It’s real handy to have extra hands to move cattle around in the national forest, extra labor that they don’t have to pay for, Harris says. “In the summer months, we ride through each group of cattle every week or


Dominick Mancuso and Patrick Marinelli are New York residents and repeat customers for the last six years on the Bar H Bar Ranch in Bear Lake County.

every other week and just check ‘em,” he says. “We’ve cut down on our death loss considerably. In the last five years, we’ve had zero death loss.” That’s because they’re in contact with the cattle more frequently, and they can detect animals with hoof rot, pneumonia or other diseases that can cause serious problems, and provide medical attention. “It also helps us manage our pastures better, too,” Harris says. “We’re out there, we can see what kind of shape they’re in, and if we need to move ‘em, we move ‘em,” Harris says. “We push the cattle off the riparian areas and that helps us with our rapport with the Forest Service and the creek bottoms look better.” As proof of the improved livestock management, Harris notes that an environmental group petitioned a species of fish, the Bonneville cutthroat trout, for listing as an endangered species. The fish resides in

the Caribou-Targhee National Forest and on the Harris’s private land bordering the Bear River. Research studies by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service showed that the fish did not need to be listed. “We must be doing something right,” Harris said. “At the very base of their philosophy is taking care of the environment,” Logie says. “As ranchers, there is nothing more important than using the right amount of grass, the right amount of water, and having this ranch be here for future generations of their own family.” One of the side benefits of running a guest ranch is that the Harris Family teaches people about the lifestyle of being a rancher and what is involved in operating a real-life working ranch, and ultimately, the guests fall in love with the whole experience. “When they come to the ranch, they get

an education. We’re able to be with them for a week, and they’re able to learn what it takes to manage a cow, to grow a steak, see what it takes to run a ranch,” Harris says. “When they leave, we like to think that person leaving is another advocate for agriculture.” And the guests give back to the Harrises in the form of friendship. “It takes the doldrums out of what we do,” Harris says. “Every day is a new adventure; every week is a new adventure. Stupid things happen to people and it’s funny and you have stories to tell. But it’s fun. Lots of fun.” “They don’t miss a thing,” Logie says with a chuckle. “Mark just pointed out that my spurs were upside down. I’m not going to hear the end of that.” The tagline on the Bar H Bar web site says it all: “Come as a guest. Leave as a friend.”

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

33


Big Victory on Labor Issue

Idaho Potato Stocks Up 3 Percent

Potato stocks held by growers, dealers, and processors in Idaho on June 1 totaled 18 million cwt, 500,000 cwt more than on hand June 1, 2011. Disappearance, at 109 million cwt is up 14 percent from last year’s 95.5 million cwt. Processors in Idaho and Malheur County, Oregon have used 71.5 million cwt of 2011 crop raw potatoes to June 1, an increase of 20 percent from last year. Idaho potatoes accounted for 63.3 million cwt of the total processed, up 22 percent from last year. The remaining 8.23 million cwt were produced in other states. Processing in Idaho and Mal-

heur County during April and May totaled 14.9 million cwt, an increase of 12 percent from the same period last year.

Idaho May Red Meat Production Down 74 Percent

Commercial red meat production at Idaho packing plants for May 2012 totaled 3.6 million pounds, down 74 percent from May of last year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Accumulated red meat production for the January-May 2012 period totaled 17.2 million pounds, down 75 percent from the comparable period a year earlier.

A proposal that would have prevented many young people from working in agriculture has been officially withdrawn by the Labor Department, spurred by an outpouring of concern from farmers and ranchers nationwide, Newsline reports.�� “After reviewing the over 10,000 comments they decided that it was not the best approach to regulate farm safety,” said Kristi Boswell, AFBF labor specialist. “The reaction of the withdrawal has been awesome. Everyone is excited that the administration listened to the farmers and ranchers across America and took the common sense approach and withdrew the regulation, and we look forward to working with the agencies to promote farm safety. This was a great victory for agriculture.”

Strengthening Agriculture’s Infrastructure

Ag Exports Forecast at $134.5 Billion

USDA has raised this year’s agricultural export forecast to $134.5 billion, up $3.5 billion from the February forecast, but $2.9 billion below last year’s exports. The department’s latest Outlook for U.S. Agricultural Trade shows agricultural imports at a record $107.5 billion; however, the trade balance for 2012 is a surplus of $27 billion. Grain exports are forecast up from February indications, with increased values for wheat, rice and feed and fodders more than offsetting a reduction for 34

coarse grains. Also up in terms of either value, volume or both: oilseeds, tree nuts, cotton and livestock, poultry and dairy. Exports to Mexico, Canada and China are raised, while exports to the European Union are down $1.5 billion due to increased grain and oilseed competition. Continued economic turmoil in Europe also is placing pressure on exports to the region. Asian markets show strong but slowing growth. “The main risk to world growth is a significant spillover of the Eurozone problem to North America and Asian financial institutions and markets,” the report said.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

Western SARE is sponsoring a conference December 3-5, 2012. The Strengthening Agriculture’s Infrastructure: Adding Value, Breaking Down Barriers, Increasing Profits conference will be held in Portland, Oregon at the Embassy Suites Hotel. The agenda, registration info, etc. is at http://westernsare.org/infrastructure.

New Farm Safety Resources Available Online

A new farm-related educational resource has been added to a national website that offers everyone from beginning farmers to veteran growers answers to hundreds of farm-related safety

and health questions. The easyto-navigate format features information from a consortium of 74 land-grant universities. The website provides tips on farm safety and health issues ranging from grain bin entrapments to safe handling of beef cattle. Articles on the site cover a range of topics including safety recommendations when baling and handling big round hay bales; confined-space hazards and gas monitoring of manure pit gases; youth ATV safety; and hearing loss.

Use of Science in Regulating Antibiotics

AFBF and a coalition of agricultural organizations sent a letter to Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-N.Y.) recently, regarding her support for severely restricting antibiotic use in livestock and poultry production. The coalition cited several published, peer-reviewed risk assessments showing any threat to human health from antibiotic use in livestock and poultry production is negligible, and pointed out many of the bacterial illnesses becoming resistant to antibiotics in human medicine have little or no link to antibiotic use in food animals. The coalition also noted in the letter that a stringent federal approval and regulatory process for antibiotics is already in place. In February, Slaughter asked food company representatives to submit to her by June 15 their purchasing policies related to antibiotic use in food animals. She is the primary author of the Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act (H.R. 965), which seeks to ban the use in livestock and poultry production of several


classes of antibiotics employed for preventing and controlling diseases and for promoting nutritional efficiency.

Record Land Demand Expected to Continue

Demand and sales of farmland has hit record-highs this year and the pace is likely to continue through the rest of the year, according to Farmers National Company, which provides agricultural services. Predictions about the continued strength of demand for farmland is tempered by economic unpredictability in Europe, the continued potential for inflation here in the U.S. and the possibility of changes to the law that would increase capital gains taxes. Farm Bureau supports eliminating capital gains taxes and, until that can be accomplished, supports cutting the capital gains tax rate to help farm and ranch businesses improve productivity and remain competitive in the world market.

EPA Proposes Dust Standard

As part of its normal five-year review required by the Clean Air Act, the Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed retaining the current standard for coarse particulate matter (PM10), which includes dust from unpaved rural roads and on-farm activities. The American Farm Bureau Federation fought any tightening of the PM10 standard. Tightening the standard for fine particulate matter (PM2.5), or soot, also is on the table. However, the PM2.5 standard mainly deals with cars and factories,

not farms. There will be a nine-week comment period on the proposed revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter. AFBF will file comments.

at all USDA Service Centers throughout the U.S. or at the RMA Web site address: http:// www.rma.usda.gov/tools/ agent.html.  

EPA Gives Final ApLivestock Programs proval for E15 Available in the Pacific EPA recently gave its final apNorthwest proval to the sale of E15, fuel

The Risk Management Agency’s (RMA) Spokane Regional Office would like to remind Pacific Northwest livestock producers of the livestock risk management programs available in all counties in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. The Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) program for Fed Cattle, Feeder Cattle, Lamb and Swine and the Livestock Gross Margin (LGM) program for Swine will begin sales for the 2013 crop year July 2, 2012 and continue through June 30, 2013; or until the maximum underwriting capacity is reached.  LRP coverage protects the policyholder from downward price risk during the insurance period. LGM provides protection against the loss of gross margin (market value of livestock minus feed costs). LRP and LGM do not cover any other peril (e.g., mortality, condemnation, physical damage, disease, individual marketing decisions, local price deviations or any other cause of loss).

 Cattle, swine and lamb producers are encouraged to contact a local livestock insurance agent to learn additional details. Federal crop insurance program policies are sold and delivered solely through private crop and livestock insurance companies. A list of livestock crop insurance agents is available

made of 15 percent ethanol. The agency’s approval of fuel companies’ misfueling mitigation plans was the last regulatory hurdle before retailers could sell E15 fuel for use in vehicles made in 2001 and later. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack trumpeted the news in a prepared statement. “This gets us one step closer to giving the American consumer a real choice at the pump,” he said. “The public has a right to choose between imported oil and home-grown energy and today’s action by the [EPA] advances that goal.” AFBF supported the increase from E10 to E15.

EPA Regulation of Greenhouse Gases Will Burden Farmers

Many of America’s farmers and ranchers will face economic challenges due to the Environmental Protection Agency’s plan to regulate greenhouse gases, the American Farm Bureau Federation told a House subcommittee on Tuesday. Carl Shaffer, president of the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, testified on behalf of AFBF before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power.

other large emitters to comply with GHG regulatory requirements will be passed on to the consumers of those products, including farmers and ranchers,” Shaffer said. “The end result is that our nation’s farmers and ranchers will be forced to contend with higher input costs to grow food, fiber and renewable fuels.”

Favorite Farmers’ Market Contest Returns

Farmers’ market shoppers across the country can once again vote for their favorite markets. The contest, run by the American Farmland Trust, continues all summer long and is designed to promote the role that farmers’ markets play in keeping farmers on the land. All 7,175 markets that are listed in the U.S. Agriculture Department’s National Farmers’ Market Directory are part of the contest. According to the contest rules, people can vote for as many participating farmers’ markets as they choose, but can only vote for each market once. Voting runs through midnight on Sept. 3, when one small, one medium, one mid-size and one large market will win the title of “America’s Favorite Farmers’ Market” for 2012.  The winning markets will be featured in the media and will be honored at local celebrations organized by American Farmland Trust. http://action.farmland.org/site/ PageNavigator/Americas-Favorite-Farmers-Markets/best_ local_farmers_market_vote

“Costs incurred by utilities, refiners, manufacturers and Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

35


FARM BUREAU COMMODITY REPORT GRAIN PRICES

Portland:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Corn

Ogden:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Pocatello:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Farm Bureau members pay up to 20% less than “Best Available Rate”.

Burley:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Nampa:

White Wheat (cwt) (Bushel)

LIVESTOCK PRICES Feeder Steers

Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs Under 700 lbs Over 700 lbs

Cows

Utility/Commercial Canner & Cutter

Bulls

For Super 8 call 800-889-9706

6.90 7.28-7.43 9.10 256-257.25

7.33 7.63-7.93 9.38 282-284.25

+ + + +

.43 .35 to + .50 .28 26.00 to + 27.00

6.10 6.03 7.52 10.00

6.60 6.51 7.84 10.20

+ + + +

.50 .48 .32 .20

6.00 5.84 7.49 10.42

6.25 6.06 7.95 10.10

+ .25 + .22 + .46 - .32

6.05 6.11 7.49 10.00

6.36 6.11 7.51 9.50

+ .31 Steady + .02 - .50

9.75 5.85

10.60 6.36

+ .85 + .51

7.10 204.50

+ .60 Steady

Lewiston:

Stock Cows

Call Toll-Free: 877-670-7088

6/25/2012

White Wheat 6.50 Barley 204.50

Holstein Steers

Farm Bureau Discount ID# 61810

5/29/2012

Slaughter

BEAN PRICES: Pinto Pink Small Red

Trend

5/22/2012

6/18/2012

Trend

140-197 130-177 120-157 95-132

140-189 131-169 119-155 110-134

Steady to - 8 + 1 to - 8 - 1 to – 2 + 15 to + 2

131-182 121-169 108-141 90-127

135-165 129-161 114-141 89-125

+ 4 to - 7 + 8 to - 8 - 6 to steady - 1 to - 2

75-135 75-106

75-129 75-112

steady to – 6 steady to + 6

64-86 55-78

65-86 55-79

+ 1 to steady steady to + 1

950-1300

1000-1300

+ 50 to steady

75-102

75-104

Steady to + 2

50.00 45.00-48.00 N/A

50.00 45.00-48.00 N/A

Steady Steady Steady

Compiled by the Idaho Farm Bureau Commodity Division 36

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012


IDaho Hay Report

Jun 22, 2012 Tons: 7180 Last Week: 4750 Last Year: 18,620 Compared to last week, Premium Alfalfa steady to weak in a light test, firm for both domestic and export. Trade slow to moderate with moderate to good demand, especially for export hay. Most areas received some frost this week so cuttings are still way behind. Retail/feed store/horse not tested this week. Buyer demand good with light to moderate supplies. All prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise stated. Tons Price Wtd Avg Comments Alfalfa Large Square Premium 1210 155.00-180.00 178.14 250 200.00-200.00 200.00 Export 350 150.00-150.00 150.00 Old Crop Good/Premium 800 150.00-150.00 150.00 Rain Damage Good 70 170.00-170.00 170.00 Fair/Good 2000 130.00-130.00 130.00

Alfalfa/Grass Mix Large Square Fair/Good

2500

138.00-138.00

138.00

Delivery

Alfalfa hay test guidelines, (for domestic livestock use and not more than 10% grass), used with visual appearance and intent of sale Quantitative factors are approximate and many factors can affect feeding value. USDA Market News Supreme Premium Good Fair Utility

ADF <27 27-29 29-32 32-35 >35

NDF <34 34-36 36-40 40-44 >44

RFV TDN-100% >185 >62 170-185 60.5-62 150-170 58-60 130-150 56-58 <130 <56

TDN-90% >55.9 54.5-55.9 52.5-54.5 50.5-52.5 <50.5

CP-100% >22 20-22 18-20 16-18 <16

RFV calculated using the Wis/Minn formula. TDN calculated using the western formula.Values based on 100% dry matter, TDN both 90% and 100%. Source: USDA Market News, Moses Lake, WA.

POTATOES FOR PROCESSING Processing of 2011 Potato Crop up 20 percent from Last Year

June 13, 2012 Processors in Idaho and Malheur County, Oregon have used 71.5 million cwt of 2011 crop raw potatoes to June 1, an increase of 20 percent from last year. Idaho potatoes accounted for 63.3 million cwt of the total processed, up 22 percent from last year. The remaining 8.23 million cwt were produced in other states. Processing in Idaho and Malheur County during April and May totaled 14.9 million cwt, an increase of 12 percent from the same period last year.

5 Year Grain Comparison

Grain Prices................06/24/2008...................06/23/2009...................06/23/2010................. 06/28/2011..................06/25/2012 Portland: White Wheat......................N/A................................5.75 ..............................4.53 ............................6.70 .............................7.33 11% Winter........................N/A............................6.15-6.30...........................6.57...........................7.43-7.64....................... .63-7.93 14% Spring....................... 10.91............................... 7.78 ..............................N/A..............................10.53 ...........................9.38 Corn.............................. 293-296.25....................... 171.75.........................161-161.25...................286-288.50...................282-284.25 Ogden: White Wheat......................7.70 ..............................4.64 ..............................4.00 ............................6.60............................. 6.60 11% Winter....................... 8.77 .............................5.28 ..............................3.76 ............................6.34 ........................... 6.51 14 % Spring...................... 9.58 ..............................6.62 ..............................5.29 ............................9.48 ............................ 7.84 Barley................................. 9.60 ..............................6.86 ..............................6.30 ...........................11.75............................ 10.20 Pocatello: White Wheat......................7.15 .............................4.55 ..............................3.70 ............................6.00............................ 11% Winter.......................8.30 .............................4.74 .............................3.59 ............................5.96 .......................... 14% Spring.........................9.18 ..............................6.43 ..............................5.21 ............................9.56 ........................... Barley................................. 9.00 ............................6.65 ............................5.94 .........................11.35...........................

6.25 6.06 7.95 10.10

Burley: White Wheat..................... 6.95 ..............................4.35 ..............................3.70 ............................6.20............................ 11% Winter....................... 8.14 ..............................4.99 ..............................3.73 ............................6.06 .......................... 14% Spring........................ 8.87 .............................6.28 ..............................5.05 ............................9.36 ........................... Barley................................. 9.50...............................5.75 ..............................5.25 .........................11.25............................

6.36 6.11 7.51 9.50

Nampa: White Wheat (cwt)......... 12.08.............................. 7.75 .............................6.08 ............................9.58 ........................... 10.60 (bushel)........... 7.25 ..............................4.65 ..............................3.65 ............................5.75.............................. 6.36 Lewiston: White Wheat.....................8.25 .............................5.45 .............................4.25 ............................6.40...............................7.10 Barley................................211.50............................126.50 ........................111.50...........................216.50..........................204.50 Bean Prices: Pintos................................33.00...............................N/A......................... 28.00-30.00.......................30.00............................ 50.00 Pinks...................................N/A.................................N/A...............................30.00.......................30.00-32.00..................5.00-46.00 Small Reds..........................N/A.................................N/A...............................30.00.............................. N/A.........................45.00-46.00 ***

IDAHO Milk production up 2.5 Percent June 18, 2012 Idaho milk production during May 2012 totaled 1.17 billion pounds, a 2.5 percent increase from the same month last year, and up 6.3 percent from April 2012, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. April 2012 milk production was revised to 1.04 billion pounds, down 4 million pounds. Average milk production per cow in May 2012 was 2,030 pounds, up 50 pounds from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s level. The average number of milk cows during May was 578,000 head, the same level as May 2011.

Milk production in the 23 major States during May totaled 16.4 billion pounds, up 2.1 percent from May 2011. April revised production at 16.0 billion pounds, was up 3.5 percent from April 2011. The April revision represented an increase of 38 million pounds or 0.2 percent from last monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,924 pounds for May, 22 pounds above May 2011. The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.52 million head, 77,000 head more than May 2011, but 3,000 head less than April 2012. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

37


5 Year livestock comparison .....................................06/24/2008...................06/23/2009...................06/22/2010..................06/27/2011..................06/18/2012 Under 500 lbs................120-130 ........................94-124 .........................101-140 ....................125-161 ....................140-189 500-700 lbs.....................94-125 .......................88-115 ..........................97-132 .......................112-152.........................131-169 700-900 lbs..................... 88-119 .........................77-107 ..........................85-110 .....................102-140.........................119-155 Over 900 lbs...................88-107............................80-86 ...........................88-98 ......................... 95-108......................... 110-134 Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs................103-120..........................85-113............................97-132 ...................115-153........................ 135-165 500-700 lbs..................... 94-117 .........................83-114 ..........................87-125 ......................91-136 ...................... 129-161 700-900 lbs..................... 87-110............................74-94 ...........................73-90 ..........................82-121..........................114-141 Over 900 lbs................... 81-101..............................N/A ..........................N/A ........................82-105..........................89-125 Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs..................55-74 ...........................48-74 ..........................65-102...........................65-115..........................75-129 Over 700 lbs....................50-70 ...........................45-60 ...........................65-81 .......................... 65-95 ........................ 75-112 Cows Utility/Commercial...........38-68.............................33-53.............................43-68........................... 52-83............................65-86 Canner & Cutter..............29-57.............................22-45.............................35-60........................... 40-72............................55-79 Stock Cows......................650-850 .....................570-1080....................... 700-900 .................... 850-1500.....................1000-1300 Bulls â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Slaughter............47-72.............................43-67.............................47-84........................... 60-95 ........................ 62-107

Idaho Cattle on Feed down 9 Percent from Previous Year

June 22, 2012 Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in Idaho from feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head on June 1, 2012 totaled 210,000 head, down 9 percent from the previous year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The cattle on feed inventory is down 2 percent from May 1, 2012. Placements of cattle in feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during May totaled 29,000 head, down 7,000 head from May 2011 placements. Marketings of cattle from feedlots with 1,000 head or more during May totaled 32,000 head, down 3,000 head from last year. Other disappearance totaled 2,000 head during May. Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.1 million head on June 1, 2012.The inventory was 2 percent above June 1, 2011. Placements in feedlots during May totaled 2.09 million, 15 percent above 2011. Net placements were 1.99 million head. During May, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 520,000, 600-699 pounds were 365,000, 700-799 pounds were 530,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 672,000. Marketings of fed cattle during May totaled 2.02 million, 1 percent above 2011. Other disappearance totaled 100,000 during May, 23 percent above 2011.

Cattle Outlook June 22, 2012 It is getting dry in too many places. USDA says only 63% of the corn crop was in good or excellent condition on June 17.That compares to 66% good or excellent the week before and 70% a year ago. The Crop Progress report says 56% of the soybean crop was rated good or excellent on June 17 compared to 60% a week earlier and 68% a year ago. Nationally, 28% of pastures were rated poor or very poor in mid June. That compares to 27% poor or very poor the week before and 25% a year ago. Preliminary data indicate retail beef demand may have rebounded in May after a 1.8% decline in April. Export demand for beef was down 9.9% in April. Fed cattle demand was down 5.6% in April and down 0.3% in May.Thus far, 2012 domestic meat demand appears little changed from January-May 2011. Cattle slaughter during the first five months of 2012 was down 2.8%. Beef cow slaughter was down 7.2%, steer slaughter was down 2.1% and heifer slaughter was down 4.2%. The sharp drop in both heifer slaughter and beef cow slaughter may indicate the early stage of herd rebuilding. However, January-May dairy cow slaughter was up 4.4% compared to last year leaving combined beef and dairy cow slaughter down only 1.7%, less than the drop in steer slaughter and down less than the decline in the January 1 cow inventory (which was down 2.2%). The beef carcass cutout value was lower this week. On Friday morning, the choice boxed beef carcass cutout value was $196.90/cwt, down $1.68 from the previous Friday. The select carcass cutout was down 96 cents from the previous week to $180.44/cwt of carcass weight. The choice-select spread is now a strong $16.46/ cwt.

38

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JuLY 2012

Fed cattle prices were also lower this week. Through Thursday, the 5-area average price for slaughter steers sold on a live weight basis was $117.80/cwt, down $1.68 from last week, but up $5.63/cwt from the same week last year. Steer prices on a dressed basis averaged $187.97/cwt this week, down $3.35 from a week ago, but up $9.11 from a year ago. This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cattle slaughter totaled 649,000 head, down 0.6% from the week before and down 5.9% from a year ago. The average steer dressed weight for the week ending on June 9 was 848 pounds, down 2 pounds from the week before, up 19 pounds from a year ago, and above a year earlier for the 22nd week in a row. Oklahoma City feeder cattle prices this week were mostly $1 to $5 lower with medium and large frame #1 steers selling for: 400-450# $187.50, 450-500# $185-$189, 500-550# $176-$179, 550-600# $169.25-$178.25, 600-650# $160-$167, 650-700# $149-$166, 700-750# $150-$155, 750-800# $145-$153.75, 800-900# $140-$150, and 900-1000# $130-139.75/cwt. Fed cattle futures ended the week higher. The June live cattle contract settled at $116.90, up 75 cents from the previous Friday. The August contract also settled at $116.90. October ended the week at $121.20 and December at $124.62/cwt. Provided by: University of Missouri


Classifieds Animals

Miscellaneous

Wanted

2012 Purebred, registerable Icelandic lambs, horned or polled, Moorit or black. Excellent breeding stock. All are twins or triplets. Parents are on site. Reasonably priced. Call: 208-858-2103

Antique McCormick Deering Seeder - $ 350.00, Antique Monarch Wood Cookstove – $ 400.00. Gooding, Id 208-934-4117

Our church is looking for a used grand piano. If you know of one please call 208538-4074

ASCA registered Australian Shepherd pups. Working line since 1968. Full satisfaction guaranteed. All four colors available. Boise, Id 208-484-9802

Real Estate/Acreage

If you’ve been longing for alpacas but couldn’t pay $$$, think again! I have pregnant females that you should see. Enjoy the same joys and pleasures that I have had with these delightful animals. Caldwell, Id. 208-407-2406 Morgan horses for sale, saddle trained. Stallion service offered. Lenore, Id. www. creamridgemorgans.com or 208-476-7221. 10-year old big grey gelding. Unregistered Quarter horse. Ranch broke. Easy to catch and shoe. Good to ride. Arimo, ID 208254-3628.

Estate Sale: 109 Pine Hollow Road, Stevensville, Montana. 18 irrigated acres, 1960 3 bdrm, 2 bath house with 1 car garage and deck, hay shed, 2110 sq. ft. shop. Was asking $495,000. Price reduced to $295,000. 208-232-8796

Recreational Equipment Camp trailer – 1990 Terry 27 ft. selfcontained, very good shape. Equalizer hitch comes with. $4,600. Bennington/Montpelier, Id. 208-847-1262 1989 Kit Travel Trailer. $2200. Inside is in very good condition. Pocatello, Id 208-2418384

Farm Equipment Morbark PS-8 portable post peeler, with 353 Detroit Diesel engine, 40 HP electric motor. Challenger MT 755, 2209 hrs, annual service checks by Western States, 1000 hrs on 25” tracks, Trimble auto steer and sprayer control, clean one owner, $152,000.00; John Deere Combine 9610, 2208 hrs, 1629 separator hrs, 25’ platform, JD Grain GPS monitoring system, $85,000.00. deegt@aol. com or call 208-220-3335 Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime

Vehicles 2010 Zhong Moped, 150cc, $1800. Low miles. Pocatello, Id 208-241-8384 1958 Edsel 4-door car. Needs restored, all parts there, body good. $500. Lewiston, Id. 208-743-5501 1989 Chevy Silverado Pickup 4WD Automatic, 107,000 miles – $ 2,500.00. Gooding, Id 208-934-4117 1933 Ford 2-door Sedan with motor tran, rear end-wheels, tires. $4000. Lewiston, Id 208-743-5501

Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338. Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258

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July 2012, Volume 15, Issue 5