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June 2012 • Volume 16, Issue 4

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Idaho Farm Bureau

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4-H Trail Ride

Dairy Policy

USDA Celebrates

Fundraiser

Changes Possible

150 Years


Immigration War Hitting too Close to Home

The Ag Agenda

By Bob Stallman AFBF President

Labor shortages have been a significant challenge to U.S. agriculture for as long as I can remember. On my rice farm in Texas growing up, it seemed we were always running short of farmhands when it came time to harvest.

curity concerns and state versus federal authority questions to I-9 audits and government-caused labor delays under the H2-A program, finding a reliable agriculture workforce is becoming more and more difficult.

But now, unlike the simpler days of my youth when we could just hire teenagers and retirees, farmers and ranchers are facing new challenges with labor issues. From border se-

From the Border to the Court Farmers and ranchers in states like Mississippi and Arizona are currently caught in the crosshairs of

Can Food Production Keep Up With Population Growth? By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

An article by Reuters News Service recently posed the question; “Can we feed 9 billion people?”

By 2050, 70 percent of the earth’s civilization will live in cities and global population will reach 9 billion from the current 7 billion. The discussion about how we will feed that many people is diverse and impor-

CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

of 18, youth will have seen 16,000 simulated murders and 200,000 acts of violence. Then there are the numerous news channels that report bad and negative news around the clock. No wonder we become frustrated when we turn on the television.

At times it seems there is little of value to watch on television. Recent studies reveal that 64 percent of all television programs have sexually related material, an average of 4.4 scenes per hour. By the age

In the midst of all the negative and bad, I wish to put in a plug for a wonderful television series on public television, America’s Heartland. Shown weekly on air and daily online, this nationally-distributed

America’s Heartland Well Worth Recording By Rick Keller

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It’s an important question to consider and there are major differences among academic experts on the best methods of increasing production of food to meet global demand.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

an immigration battle that’s been waged over state versus federal control. Arizona took their case for state authority (based on legislation S1070) all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court in May and is expecting a decision later this month. In the meantime, other states are waiting in the wings to determine the impact the court’s decision will have on them. See STALLMAN, page 8 tant, but also misunderstood, which the Reuters article makes clear. Academics from around the world suggest that up to 30 percent of the current world food supply is either thrown away, eaten by pests or spoils on its way to market. Lack of infrastructure to transport food to market is a serious problem in many parts of the world. Rising energy costs add to the problem and in order to transport food to people who need it, efficient See PRIESTLEY, page 7

program is the most prominent offering of positive stories about American agriculture. America’s Heartland has given hundreds of farm and ranch families across all 50 states the opportunity – in their own words – to share the diverse story of agriculture with consumers. America’s Heartland is personal, with a unique ability to emotionally connect urban and rural viewers. It portrays more than the essentials of See KELLER, page 8


Volume 16, Issue 4 IFBF OFFICERS President ....................................Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President .................................. Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President ............................... Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................ Shelley Scott Bird ........................................................... Pocatello Chris Dalley ........................................................Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ............................................Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................ Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant ................................................... Oakley Rick Pearson .................................................... Hagerman Mike Garner............................................................... Declo Curt Krantz ............................................................ Parma Mike McEvoy..................................................... Middleton Tracy Walton ....................................................... Emmett Marjorie French ............................................... Princeton Bob Callihan ......................................................... Potlatch Louis Kins ........................................................... Kootenai Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Cody Chandler........................................................Weiser STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ........................ Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Member Services ................................... Ray Poe Dir. of Commodities ............................. Dennis Brower Commodity Assistant .................................. Peggy Pratt Membership Assistant ............................... Peggy Moore Market Information Assistant . ................ Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager ........................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager ....................... Kendall Keller Dist. III Regional Manager ................... Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ................... Russ Hendricks Dist. V Regional Manager ....................... Bob Smathers Director of Governmental Affairs ............ Kent Lauer Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs .... Dennis Tanikuni Range/Livestock Specialist........................... Wally Butler Director of Public Relations .............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................. Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager .................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise ................... Julie Christoffersen Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID GEM STATE PRODUCER USPS #015-024, is published monthly except February, May, August and November by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201. POSTMASTER send changes of address to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, Idaho, and additional mailing offices. Subscription rate: $6.00 per year included in Farm Bureau dues.

MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: May lambs at the Ron – Da – Voo Ranch in Emmett. Photo by Steve Ritter

Mary Blackstock is the coordinator for the annual Wilson Butte Cowboy Trail Ride held in Owyhee County. Held in May, this year’s event was the 9th annual. A fundraiser benefits Owyhee County 4-H programs.

Trail Ride Promotes 100 years of 4-H By Jake Putnam Photos by Steve Ritter MARSING - Mary Blackstock of Owyhee County has lived and breathed 4-H green for more than three decades. On this day in early May, she dons a Stetson, spurs and with horse in tow and she’s ready to ride. “My name is Mary Blackstock,” she repeats over and over to each truck and horse-trailer in the lush, grassy pasture in the shade of Wilson Butte. “Welcome to the 9th Annual Cowboy Trail Ride.”  But this event is much more than a trail ride, it’s a 4-H fundraiser and more than 200 riders came from all over the state to help raise money. They also showed up for a touch of horseback fellowship. “I think it’s absolutely wonderful for Ted and Mary to share their land with all these kids,” said Idaho Farm Bureau President Frank Priestley. Priestley drove from Preston to attend. “You watch the kids and adults and they’re all smiles. There are so many places for them to get out and ride. I’s a chance to get out, open the horses up and enjoy the day with friends and family.” See TRAIL RIDE page 4 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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TRAIL RIDE

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“Sure, it’s a fundraiser, but also a learning experience for the kids,” said Blackstock. “I always think of the 4-H pledge that says head, heart, hands and health and sure enough that all comes into play with the kids and it’s what they now believe in.”  The Cowboy Trail Ride also donates cash to “Toys for Tots”, “Vets for success,” and other Idaho groups. Over the past decade the event has raised more than $12,000 for 4-H and other organizations.  That’s why Blackstock is still involved and she has a long history in the organization, having spent seven years in a riding club then 25 as a club leader. “It’s very important for the kids to interact, not only with peers, but the world,” she said. “The 4-H program gets kids learning how to speak in front of people, how to give demonstrations, pride in taking care of their animals. What’s more important, it teaches responsibility.” Former riding club members showed up in droves, they mixed in with younger members some on Shetland ponies. Blackstock says 4-H creates a bond that binds country folk together and helps kids make the transition to adulthood. “It’s an awesome program and does great for the kids,” she said. “I’m so proud of the kids when they do well. To see a shy kid come in barely talking and then improve each year. Well by the senior year they’re

Cowboys and cowgirls of all ages participate in the 9th Annual Wilson Butte Cowboy Trail Ride. 4 #

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012


confident, ready to take on the world but then they have to leave. It’s sad for them to go because it’s a great program.” The Cowboy Trail Ride included a barbecue, a fun run, and even a live band. Organizers say it was a celebration that also marks an important state milestone.  “This year is the 100th anniversary of 4-H in Idaho,” she said. “It started way back in 1912.” She says her group also takes part in other activities besides horseback riding. “The kids started out with farming, gardening, there’s everything, rabbits, horses, beef, swine, sheep, rocketry, anything a kid wants to do,” said Blackstock. “We want them involved and going for anything that interests them, even sewing and other livestock projects. We let them do it all and cultivate other interests.”

A large group of 4-H supporters attended the 9th Annual Wilson Butte Cowboy Trail Ride in Owyhee County this year and recognized the organization’s centennial anniversary in Idaho.

At the end of day, with live music playing, awards were handed out for trail ride accomplishments. One young woman received a jar of honey for traveling the farthest, coming all the way from Germany. The coveted oldest rider award went to Mildred Bryant. “I’m Mildred Bryant and I’m 80 years old and I ride all the time. It was a beautiful ride,” she said. She agreed the event was a fitting way to celebrate a hundred years of Head, Heart, Hands and Health.

Food and live music were part of the day’s festivities. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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Farm bill negotiations currently underway would change the dairy program through supply management and margin insurance. Farm Bureau file photo

Congress Mulls Changes to Dairy Programs By John Thompson Increasing operating costs and market volatility clobbered the U.S. dairy industry with close to $10 billion in losses in 2009. With Farm Bill negotiations now underway in Congress, many dairy operators are ready to kick current government support programs to the curb in place of a new margin insurance approach. The margin insurance plan stems from legislation written last year by Congressman Mike Simpson (R-Idaho) and Congressman Collin Peterson (D-Minnesota). The Dairy Security Act has the support of the U.S. Senate Agriculture Committee and is moving forward as part of Farm Bill negotiations. The program is voluntary and its goal is to ensure a margin between the 6

prices of milk and feed. If the national margin falls below $4 per hundredweight for two consecutive months, the subsidy would kick in and cover 80 percent of historic production. Farmers can also purchase additional coverage. The new proposal has the support of most large dairy farmers and the organizations that represent them. The Idaho Dairymen’s Association, Milk Producers of Idaho and groups representing producers in the western states support the idea of margin insurance. However, organizations representing small dairy producers in the Midwest and Northeast would rather stay with the Milk Income Loss Contracts (MILC) and they oppose a supply management program that would require milk processors to hold two

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

to four percent of producers’ milk checks, diverting the money to USDA to use for the purchase of dairy products for food assistance. They say the new program would harm small communities and supply management would create problems for processors in milk deficit regions. Brad Wells, a dairyman from Bear Lake County says the current programs work better for small dairies. “It gives us more control because we grow nearly everything we feed,” he said. “I understand the other side because a lot of big dairies buy all of their feed and that can really hurt when prices are high.” Wells milks about 60 head. The MILC program is also supported by dairy farmers in the northeast and was preserved in the last


Farm Bill by powerful congressmen and senators from that region. Dairy farmer Kristie Dorsey, wrote recently in the Nampa Tribune that the Dairy Security Act will protect farms against market volatility that is certain to reappear, encourages farmers to trim production when the market is oversupplied and is vital to the future of the dairy industry. “Much of the current dairy safety net was designed in the 1930’s and doesn’t reflect the economics of dairy production in the 21st century,” Dorsey wrote. “Now the ball is in Congress’ court. It must include the Dairy Security Act in the farm bill. To do otherwise is to doom dairy farmers to a repeat of what they went through three years ago.” Dr. Scott Brown, an expert on dairy policy

with the University of Missouri recently testified before the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Livestock Dairy and Poultry in support of the Dairy Security Act. Brown’s research shows the extremely high feed costs and low milk prices in 2009 caused a 43 percent reduction in milk receipts in comparison to the previous year – a plunge in farm gate returns that severe had never been seen in the dairy industry before. “This recent cycle of record high and low milk receipt changes has left the industry searching for mechanisms to help stabilize producer finances,” according to Brown’s testimony. “The volatility dairy producers have experienced in the last few years often made what appeared to be good financial decisions turn into tough financial results when the markets for feed and milk

products moved so quickly.” Brown said the program hinges on how the margin is defined. “One way to look at the construction of the margin is to compare the milk price used in the margin calculation relative to the feed components of corn, soybean meal and alfalfa. The relative movements in these two parts of the margin calculation are critical.” Brown added that under his analysis the new program is expected to stabilize producer finances and depending on the level of farmer participation, is expected to pay out only a small percentage of the time. Read more about Brown’s analysis at http://nmpf.org/files/file/DSA2011MU. pdf

Preistley

Continued from page 2 systems are critical.

In the food processing sector, some methods that create efficiency are being taken away. For example the recent controversy over lean finely textured beef (LFTB) or Pink Slime as it has been referred to by the media, has reduced the amount of ground beef available and increased the price. In this instance we had a proven, safe, regulated process in use since 2004, that no longer exists due to hype created by the media and others who either don’t understand, or perhaps don’t care that increasing grocery bills means going without to some families. The experts quoted in the article suggested that people who live in apartment buildings could grow vegetables in pots on their porches, that people should eat less meat and dairy products, and that governments should spend less on farm subsidies. They also suggested a global ban on bio fuel subsidies. The main problem we see with all of these arguments is that while we all can and should work to end hunger, one country can’t force its sovereignty onto another. During and after World War II a lot of Eu-

ropeans went hungry. Since then those governments have enacted subsidies and other farm supports to ensure a steady food supply. Countries that don’t do the same leave their farms vulnerable, not competitive in the global market, and in competition with foreign governments. This is one of the reasons we see such little to progress in World Trade Organization (WTO) negotiations. One of the biggest misunderstandings in this discussion lies behind the assertion that if we eat less meat and dairy products it reduces demand for grain and somehow keeps people from going hungry. This incredibly flawed argument assumes that if demand for grain drops farmers will convert that acreage to vegetables. What doesn’t make sense is that in the U.S. at least, we don’t have a shortage of vegetables and growing less grain will have no impact on that fact. For instance, consider the potato industry, which is considered a “mature” industry similar to almost every other perishable fruit or vegetable. When demand levels are constant or inelastic, changes in price have little impact on the quantity in demand. So if the quantity of potatoes produced exceeds the quantity of potatoes the market wants (demand)

the price will drop. If the quantity of potatoes produced drastically exceeds demand, and there are no other external factors, such as a diversion program, the market will implode and the price will fall well below cost of production – all the way to zero in some instances. Many people don’t understand that overproduction of perishable crops often leads to falling prices and in some cases bankrupt farms. Arguably the most critical factor in fighting hunger is the ability to maintain profitable farms. Our nation is blessed with an abundance of good farm land and skilled producers, but many countries are not. As long as we can protect our farms from overzealous regulations, burdensome taxes and dubious attempts to frighten consumers, those farms can and will be passed along to the next generation and the production of food will keep up with the demands of a growing population. Finding creative and innovative methods of purchasing and transporting U.S. produced farm commodities around the globe to meet the demand of less fortunate people will remain a challenge. As will helping people in those countries produce their own food.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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Stallman Continued from page 2

For Arizona farmers, S1070 is only a band aid that has been applied over the festering, underlying problem of border security and of reforming the visa program to enable farmers to get the temporary and seasonal

Made up of Farm Bureau leaders and staff from across the nation, the work group is looking at all parts of the equation, including options that provide a secure workforce, allows portability, addresses the needs of all commodities and limits bureaucratic red tape. workers needed for their farms.  Farmers and ranchers who live along the Mexican line deserve a secure border and a major component of that is having a visa program that allows a legal flow of workers back and forth across the border so border security

officials can concentrate their resources on the illegal activities.

agriculture faces losing millions of dollars in productivity due to labor shortages.

The American Farm Bureau Federation supports federal jurisdiction, as well as increased presence and cooperation of all branches of law enforcement on both sides of our borders, to eliminate border issue challenges facing many of our members, like theft, drug and human trafficking, as well as illegal crossing. We must secure our borders by the most technologically advanced means possible and in a way that has minimal impact on farmers and ranchers. 

In hopes of finding a workable solution that meets the needs of our members, Farm Bureau created a work group charged with looking at labor challenges more closely and how best to use our policy to resolve them. Made up of Farm Bureau leaders and staff from across the nation, the work group is looking at all parts of the equation, including options that provide a secure workforce, allows portability, addresses the needs of all commodities and limits bureaucratic red tape.

Stepping off the Fence

Everyone is affected by the ensuing immigration battle playing out in our nation. Unfortunately, no one feels its impact more than farmers and ranchers living and working on our borders, as well as those who are continually faced with labor shortages on their farms.  Band aids will not work. Congress must get to the root of the problem by providing a guest worker program that works for the entire agricultural sector.

With proposed implementation of mandatory E-verify (a system that allows businesses to determine the eligibility of their employees to work in the U.S.) in our near future, an agricultural guest worker program that addresses farmers’ unique needs has become a necessity. AFBF will only support a mandatory E-verify program if there is a workable solution for agriculture.    Absent that solution, if E-Verify is implemented,

Keller

Continued from page 2 food and shelter; its stories also tell about love for families and generations to come.

including Washington DC, Los Angeles, Phoenix, Orlando, San Francisco, Detroit, Tampa and Denver.

Started in 2005, the show is now in its seventh season. The audience includes more than a million people each week on more than 240 public television stations covering 60 percent of the United States. It airs in 20 of the top 25 U.S. TV markets,

Locally, it is seen on Idaho Public Television stations Saturdays at 3:00 p.m. MDST and 2:30 PDST. The airing is not convenient for most in agriculture, but it is well worth recording on TiVo or your DVR to view at a more opportune time.

I encourage you to record and watch America’s Heartland. It will give you a sense of heroism as you belong to agriculture and contribute to the well-being of the nation and the world. 8

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

(I find the 30 minute format works great to review during the lunch hour.) Since its inception, America’s Heartland has completed 150 half-hour episodes that take us all across this great country airing more than 700 stories. Providing food, fuel, and fiber for America and the world is an act of passion for hard work, excellent products, as well as commitment to food safety, sustainability, environmental stewardship and animal welfare on the part of our farmers and ranchers, big or small, mainstream or specialized.

America’s Heartland is underwritten by the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture, Farm Credit, various national commodity groups, and the National FFA organization. The Idaho Farm Bureau is an underwriter for the show on Idaho Public Television stations. I encourage you to record and watch America’s Heartland. It will give you a sense of heroism as you belong to agriculture and contribute to the well-being of the nation and the world.


Focus on Agriculture What Went Right on Youth Farm Labor Proposal By Lynne Finnerty

owned farms.

You know the saying, “…and the crowd goes wild!” often uttered after someone shoots a basketball straight into the net? When the Labor Department announced recently that it was withdrawing its proposal to limit the types of farm work that minors could do and whose farms they could work on, the response from farm country was instantaneous. Farm families had scored the winning basket. The crowd went wild! The sense of relief was palpable.

It’s tempting to just sit back and relish this victory. But it’s important to look at what really worked, just as a winning team will review video of the game.

“This is great news!” someone commented on the American Farm Bureau Federation’s page on Facebook. “Many farms, including our own, are family run and it should be the decision of the parents of the children working on the farm whether they are old enough to work. We are thankful for this decision as I’m sure many are!” “Grassroots efforts work!” said another. The Labor Department’s proposal would have barred anyone under 16 years old from using power-driven equipment, in addition to other restrictions, and limited the parental exemption to farms that are wholly owned by a parent. After Farm Bureau and others pointed out that the proposed rule could make it illegal for young people to use even a battery-powered screwdriver and did not take into account the way that many farms are organized nowadays, with ownership shared by several family members, the Obama administration withdrew it. DOL said the decision was made in response to thousands of comments expressing concerns about the effect of the proposal on small, family-

The first thing that worked was that all of agriculture used the same playbook. The administration didn’t get conflicting messages from different farm groups or agricultural sectors. Everyone came together behind one rallying cry: the child labor rule had to go! Second, farmers and ranchers never gave up. Even after submitting more than 10,000 comments on the proposed rule and after the comment period ended, farmers and ranchers kept expressing their opposition on social media websites, in newspaper and magazine articles and even on Capitol Hill. The din from farm country was relentless, much like the noise one might

hear at a basketball game when the fans are letting their team know that they’re behind them all the way. Finally, farmers told their personal stories about how the proposal would affect their farms and their families. Some harked back to when they were young and learned important life lessons by doing farm work—lessons that helped them become better farmers and responsible adults, lessons that they want to impart to their own children. Even if someone didn’t grow up on a farm, he could probably relate to that. Farmers talked about shared values and made a connection with the public. So, what should we set our sights on next, and how can farmers and ranchers apply the lessons learned to win more victories? Game on! Lynne Finnerty is the editor of FBNews, the American Farm Bureau Federation’s newspaper.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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USDA Recognizes 150 Years community development, natural resource conservation, international trade, credit, and a host of other issues, the USDA still fulfills Abraham Lincoln’s original vision — touching the lives of every American, every day in almost every way.

Dick Rush is the state executive director of the USDA Farm Service Agency in Idaho.

By Dick Rush One hundred and fifty years ago, in the midst of a great Civil War, President Lincoln signed legislation to establish a Department of Agriculture in order to “acquire and to diffuse among the people of the United States useful information on subjects connected with agriculture, and to procure, propagate and distribute among the people new and valuable seeds and plants.” Armed with these broad mandates, the “People’s Department,” as he called it, set about to serve American farmers and a mostly rural American landscape. At that time, almost half of all Americans lived on farms, compared with about 2 percent today. The population in 1862 was then about 31.4 million and today, that number has increased tenfold to almost 313 million people. Over the last 150 years, through the department’s work on food science, agricultural research, nutrition assistance, bio-fuel production, economic and

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By any measure, it’s been a very successful 150 years for USDA. Americans benefit from safe, abundant and reasonably priced food. We produce 85 percent of what we consume and therefore enjoy food security. Our food, fuel and fiber industries provide employment for more than 20 million Americans. Agricultural exports continue to post significant trade surpluses which, in turn, have generated almost 1 million jobs alone.

is closely aligned with technological innovations and better suited to respond to 21st century agricultural challenges. The challenges ahead are many, both for USDA and American agriculture, but by focusing on a strong safety net for farmers and ranchers, supporting policies that encourage sustainable

productivity, and by promoting vibrant markets that help feed consumers at home and abroad, the “People’s Department” will continue to help create jobs, support working families, strengthen rural communities, and build on the success and productivity of the America’s farmers and ranchers.

As we look to the decades ahead, USDA must continue to contribute to the strength and health of the nation by becoming a more modern and effective service provider. We must tighten our belt, just as many Americans are doing with their household budgets. In the past few decades, American agriculture has become one of the most productive sectors of our economy, thanks to farmers, ranchers and growers adopting technology, reducing their debt and effectively managing risk. USDA is adopting these same lessons in its Blueprint for Stronger Service, announced by USDA secretary Tom Vilsack earlier this year. The Blueprint for Stronger Service aims to build a modern and efficient service organization that

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

Lining ditches with concrete helped make delivery of irrigation water more efficient and was one of the many things USDA helped farmers with here in Idaho over the years. Photo Courtesy of USDA Farm Service Agency


The lifeblood of America . They’re the humble heroes who rise before dawn and battle the elements. They put clothes on our backs and food on our tables. Their genuine values and tireless work ethic are an inspiration to us all. We appreciate all that America’s farmers do and invite you to join us in saying thanks at www.fbfs.com/SayThanksToAFarmer. FB02-ID (3-12)

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Essay Contest Winners Congratulations goes to JT Thurgood of Kershaw Intermediate School in Sugar City for being declared the state winner in the 2012 Essay Contest. You can read his essay “Why Idaho Agriculture Puts a Grin on My Face” below. JT’s entry also placed first in District II.

Third place in the state goes to Emeli Anderson of Mountain View Elementary in Bannock County. She also submitted the winning essay in District I followed by Lincoln Taylor of Downey Elementary in second place and Lexie Thurgood also at Mountain View Elementary in third.

Emma Gehring of Prairie Elementary in Cottonwood placed second in the state and first in District V. District second place went to Taylor Lustig of Summit Academy in Cottonwood followed by Clint Miller a home schooler from Sagle.

Other District II winners included second place to Nicholas Dizes of Challis Elementary and Madison Fillmore of Kershaw Intermediate in Sugar City received third place.

Molly Trujillo of Popplewell Elementary in Buhl received first place honors in District III followed by Terra Robinson of Kimberly Middle School and in third went to Selina Gonzalez also of Popplewell Elementary. First place in District IV went to Savannah Stoneman of Westside Elementary in Payette. Home schooler Hunter Beus of New Plymouth received second place followed by Dakota Lower of Westside Elementary in Payette in third.

Why Idaho Agriculture Puts a Grin on My Face By JT Thurgood You may wonder why agriculture can make a boy like me, who does not live on a farm, smile. There are a lot of things I like about Idaho and the things that are made here, main agriculture products, beef, potatoes, and wheat, make up one of my favorite meals, HAMBURGERS and FRENCH FRIES. I see a juicy, tender, hamburger when I see a cow in a field, and I love it! Beef is one of the best things in the world. There are two kinds of cows raised in Idaho. Beef cows and dairy cows. Beef cows are used for their meat and make a good burger. Dairy cows produce milk. I love milk, especially with three scoops of chocolate powder. My uncle has a dairy farm. It is really big, I see black and white spots on cows everywhere, and I like to feed the new calves, it is really cool. But if I had to choose one kind of cow over the other, it would be beef. I like beef better because it can be made into a juicy hamburger. Wheat is a food that has been around for thousands of years. There are many different ways to prepare wheat. Sometimes my mom cooks wheat for breakfast! I hate that nasty mush in the morning. But it works in bread, especially in my mom’s homemade bread.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

But my favorite way to eat wheat is in a BUN. A soft glorious white bread creation. A hamburger on a bun is just a perfect combination. I really like it when the bun is grilled. Idaho is famous for potatoes. We grow our own potatoes in our garden. Some of my friends dads are potato farmers. So I know a lot of time and hard work is put into growing and harvesting them. But what I like to do is eat them, baked and mashed are great. But I love French Fries the most, they are delicious dipped in fry sauce. If you want a really good hamburger and fries, go to Five Guys Burgers and Fries. I am not trying to advertise but I love it. My favorite burger there is the bacon burger with barbeque sauce. On the wall in every Five Guys is a sign that tells where their potatoes are from. One time when I was in Utah I went to Five Guys and saw the potatoes were from Hamer, Idaho. I think the people in Utah may enjoy Idaho potatoes as much as I do. I do not live on a farm, but I still love Idaho’s agriculture. Potatoes, beef, and wheat are my favorites of Idaho agriculture. Together they make the best meal in the world, a hamburger and French fries, my favorite! That is why Idaho’s agriculture makes my smile. If I had my way, I would smile every day.


Mini-Grants Awarded The IFBF Women’s Leadership Committee is pleased to announce the 2012 winners of the Mini-Grant. The grant program began in 2010 for special projects of county women’s committees. The purpose of the program is to assist those smaller counties with projects they would otherwise not be able to complete. This year two counties will be receiving grants.

A Message For Our Dairy Farm Customers

At Idaho Power, our goal is to provide you with fair-priced electricity safely, reliably and responsibly. If the quality and reliability of your electric service fails to meet your expectations, or if you have questions or concerns about stray voltage, please contact your Idaho Power agricultural representative.Idaho Power’s agricultural representatives have the skills and resources to address your concerns. If necessary, they can arrange for an on-site investigation so that we can resolve any electric service issues quickly. Blackfoot & American Falls Area Dennis Elison 208-236-7744 delison@idahopower.com Mini-Cassia Area Daniel Moore 208-736-3215 dmoore@idahopower.com Twin Falls, Jerome & Gooding Area Gerald Orthel 208-736-3430 gorthel@idahopower.com

Mountain Home & Boise Area Tim Fenwick 208-388-6366 tfenwick@idahopower.com Nampa & Caldwell Area Mike Liechty 208-465-8626 mliechty@idahopower.com Payette & Ontario Area Cortney Forsberg 208-642-6546 cforsberg@idahopower.com

Brenda Steinebach, Benewah County’s Women’s Chairman, will receive funds to publish and distribute “Code of the New West” to prospective residents with information on rural Benewah County and make the document available on the internet website. The project fills the need to educate new comers to the county and correct prevalent misunderstandings. Sherrill Tillotson, Bannock County Women’s Chairman will be using the grant to provide garden boxes for third grade classrooms in ten county schools to grow vegetables. The project promotes farm to family/school cooperation while it builds hand-on knowledge of plant growth.

Celebrating 50 years with low-interest rate loans.

IDAHO FARM BUREAU FINANCIAL SERVICES

To celebrate our 50th anniversary in 2011, we’ve reduced interest rates on new (and many other) loan products. Ask us today about loans for:

Cars Motorcycles Boats ATVs Home Improvements More! Call us toll-free at 1-888-566-3276 or contact the IDFBFS office nearest you: Pocatello: 239-4259 Boise: 947-2521 Caldwell: 455-1526. Apply for a loan anytime online by visiting www.idfbfs.com.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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How Prepared Are You for a Wildfire? By Yvonne Barkley Fire in the Forest! When we hear these words we look to the horizon for the tell-tale plumes of smoke. Living and playing in the wildland/urban interface (WUI), where the urban environment meets the wild, provides many benefits, but also increased risks and responsibilities. While fire is an important part of our forest and rangeland ecosystems, when it destroys homes and threatens lives, this natural agent of renewal becomes an agent of disaster. As a homeowner, there are things to know and do to ensure that living and playing in the WUI continues to reap benefits and not disasters. All firewise principals revolve around decreasing, rearranging, and eliminating fuels and applies to both your home and out buildings and your landscape. Most homes destroyed in wildfires ignite from flaming brands and embers (commonly called ‘red snow’) that land and start flammable objects on fire - and the biggest flammable object on your property is your house. Red snow can come in from 16

as far as a mile away from the flaming front of a fire and land in the nooks and crannies of your house and outbuildings. They usually land and, if you are lucky, go out. But they can also smolder for long periods of time and then break into flames long after the fire fighters have left the site. On the other hand, homes that are not vulnerable to ignition will not readily burn in a wildfire. Lean, Clean, and Green Good news! A lush and wellmaintained landscaped provides the best fire protection. The goal of a firewise landscape is to start at the house and work your way outward, keeping the area immediately adjacent to the house lean and clean and all of the landscape green. The first 30 feet are the most important, with a goal of treating all of your landscape out to 100 feet.

flammable materials such as concrete or clay roof tiles, fiberglass asphalt composition shingles, or metal. Routinely remove accumulated plant debris such as conifer needles, branches, and bark, paying special attention to where the siding meets the roof around dormers, chimneys, and pipes, gutters, under porches and decks, and Plug openings with noncombustible materials; screen chimneys and attic openings and install approved spark arresters on all chimneys. Enclose eaves, soffits, vents, fascia, and basement openings with nonflammable materials. All screening, including those on windows, should be metal not vinyl. Vinyl products melt at even low temperatures. Double pane windows and tem-

pered glass lessen the chance of windows breaking and allowing embers to enter your home. Replace plastic skylights as well. Identify flammable objects close to your home like wicker or wood patio furniture, cushions, door mats, window boxes, planters, wicker baskets, dried flower arrangements, newspapers, hammocks, garbage cans without lids, and BBQ propane tanks. Be prepared to move the items into an enclosed area at the first sign of wildfire. That broom leaning against the house is a great source of ignition if an ember lands in the bristles. Landscape - start at the house and work outward. Store firewood away from structures.

Your Firewise checklist Don’t wait until you smell smoke to start preparing for a wildfire. The time to review firewise recommendations is right now. Tick the boxes that do not need attention, and get to work on the rest! Buildings - start at the roof and move down to the foundation. Replace highly flammable roofing materials, like wood shakes and shingles, with non-

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

Pine needles and other debris should be cleared from roofs and gutters to prevent forest fires from spreading to homes.


An example of a lush, fire wise landscape.

Break up contiguous fuels—such as where a wooden fence attaches to the house or wooden stairs leading to a wooden deck – and replace flammable fences and sheds around buildings, propane tanks, and woodpiles with nonflammable materials. Park boats, campers, and recreational toys in an enclosed area behind closed doors or cover them and park away from your home. Remove flammable plants like junipers from around foundations. Concentrate plant materials in islands surrounded by nonflammable walls and/or well-watered or short grass. Trim tree branches 10-15 feet away from power lines and chimneys. Eliminate ladder fuel configurations. This is when plants are arranged like the rungs of a ladder, from the smallest to the tallest—dead leaves in grass, to small shrubs, large shrubs, small trees and large trees. Ladder fuels often move ground fires into the tallest trees, resulting in much more dangerous crown fires. Water - a well-watered landscape is a fire resistant landscape. Make sure hoses, sprinklers and/or your irrigation equipment are well maintained;

concentrate irrigation efforts in the areas immediately surrounding your home. Not able to water your lawn regularly? Keep the grass short. Dependent on a well for your water supply? Purchase a gas-powered generator to provide back-up power to the pump if you lose power. Consider developing an emergency water supply. Pools and ponds are great for backup water supply. Make sure back-up sources of water are well marked and accessible to firefighters. Maintenance - yearly maintenance is needed to keep your firewise landscape effective. Keep plant litter to a minimum by regular pruning, mowing, raking and removal. Don’t forget plant litter that accumulates in corners or along foundations on roofs and in gutters. Keep trees thinned 10-feet apart or grouped into islands and shrubs thinned or mown. Control weeds - many species are highly flammable. Protection and evacuation -fire-fighting equipment needs to get in and you need to

get out. Clearly mark entrances to your property with nonflammable signs, making sure vegetation does not obstruct signs. Vegetation should be cleared 10 feet from along roadsides and driveways. Establish two ways to access your property in the event that one route is threatened. Roads should be wide enough for two-way traffic, or have turnouts. Establish an evacuation plan that includes an arranged place for your family to meet. Many shelters do not accept animals, so make plans for your animals as well. If the fire is getting close and/or there is an evacuation order, LEAVE EARLY! Most deaths are a result of waiting until it is too late to get out. Websites with Additional Resources. U-Idaho Extension Forestry – www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry/content/fire Idaho Firewise – www.idahofirewise.org eXtension Wildfire Information Network – www.extension.org/surviving_wildfire Yvonne Barkley is an associate extension forester for the University of Idaho. She can be reached at yvonnec@uidaho.edu

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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Governor Otter: China Trade Mission a Success By Jake Putnam BOISE - In the closing days of the 2012 Idaho Legislature Idaho Governor Butch Otter took heat for his upcoming Trade Mission to China. Some lawmakers wanted him to scrap the trip; but Otter stood firm. Last month China’s third largest dairy struck a deal with a Latah County biotech Company that could mean millions in trade dollars. BioTracking of Moscow manufactures dairy pregnancy tests. The Chinese have been looking for ways to improve production efficiency in their growing dairy industry and they may have found the answer to their problems in Idaho.  Chinese dairy representatives heard the pitch from the Idaho company with an assist from Governor Otter who helped set up the meeting with the Shanghai Bright Dairy Company.   Otter told Chinese executives how Bio Tracking’s tests measure the presence of a protein produced when cows become pregnant. Dairymen know that early information can dramatically improve milk productivity and BioTracking’s pregnancy test is 99 percent accurate saving millions of dollars in production costs. Otter’s pitch was so effective that they may have landed a contract, “I’d love to hire him,” said Garth Sasser of Moscow’s BioTracking. Otter says that businesses like Bio Tracking constantly innovate and improve production to stay in business, it’s a survival 18

tool and that information is worth millions in the marketplace and trade missions make economic sense. Otter said he appreciates trade concerns with China. “I don’t agree with their conclusions, but I understand their concerns,” Otter said. “That does not mean that China is going to have a position of autonomy in Idaho.” “Usually the resistance with doing business with China is because they’re a communist country and some lawmakers didn’t want to do business with quote unquote “the enemy”, I’m reminded that Hans Morgenthau once said many, many years ago ‘that when food doesn’t cross borders, troops will.’” 

the United States,” said Otter.  Otter declared the April mission a success in an interview on the Farm Bureau’s Saturday morning show on KID AM radio in Idaho Falls. He said on the show that there are other deals in the works. “We went because there were at least 16 companies and organizations that wanted to go on the Mission to China and all  the companies had good contact, made good progress on entry or expansion into the Chinese market.” Jeff Sayer of the Department

of Commerce said seven other companies picked up orders, while others made contacts and are following up and checking out potential markets. One of those companies is Intermountain Auto Recycling of Rigby. The small, family-run operation employs 20 people. Intermountain buys junk cars from owners. They remove the hazardous chemicals and materials from the old cars then pull the parts and sell the shell as scrap. It’s the scrap steel that drew the company to make the trip.

Otter adds that when countries are engaged in trade, they build trust. “When we’re going to deliver a product and when it arrives and it’s exactly as promised by the person that made the sale, then you have a deal. The more business we do with these other countries including China, we find that we can eliminate that middle man, and a certain amount of trust builds and then they’re trade partners not enemies.” “If we were not exporting to China, our third highest trade partner at roughly a half billion dollars a year, that’s a lot of cash into the state economy. You also have to figure that every year we have a number of jobs that are tied into the export market and it makes sense. We need the markets because we simply wouldn’t be consuming all that produce and product in

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

Cheese and other processed foods like French fries are among Idaho’s most important trade commodities. Farm Bureau file photo


bucks can go in and create awareness for the specialty market,” Dean says.  “People always want a choice and that’s where we come in.” Megan Ronk of the Department of Commerce says the trade mission draws companies large and small.  “Some of them are new to international trade, so this is a fact-finding trip for them,” she says. “Others have more longstanding relationships and experience in the market.” Either way, they’ve embarked on the trip with significant aspirations; business visions that might with luck bolster Idaho employment.” The Port of Lewiston helps make Idaho a more efficient competitor in world markets.

Farm Bureau file photo

“The steel’s already ending up there,” said manager James Boone, “but right now it’s going through two middlemen at least.  We’re trying to skip through the middleman and get to the end user.” The timing was great for Intermountain because Chinese import laws changed early this year according to Boone and that makes direct transactions possible.  They used the trade mission to meet with factories and recycling centers, all with the future in mind.

“If we get the profit margins we expect, we think we could broker scrap from other automotive recyclers in Idaho,” Boone says. “And we would increase our own scrap production as well.”  If all goes well they’ll make more money because of the trip. Boise-based Moxie Java also went on the mission. Rick and Stephanie Dean own the successful coffee shop franchise. “The China market is definitely underserved with coffee, and it’s becoming more popular,”

Dean said.  “The population is large.  I think we have some things that would give us a competitive advantage over there.” Dean said the China trip was a way to meet with potential franchise owners, and figure out how Moxie Java can fit into the country’s growing thirst for specialty coffee.  He says  Starbucks has been there since 1999, and now has 750 shops across mainland China, but there’s always room for competition. “We’ve always felt that Star-

Idaho’s Commerce Department reports exports totaled a record $5.89 billion in 2011.  According to a press release, the department says exports were up more than 14 percent last year compared to 2010.

Idaho exports account for roughly ten percent of Idaho’s Gross State Product and more than 30,000 jobs statewide.   Idaho is one of only 17 states to maintain a trade surplus with the world.

Idaho’s top exports include; semiconductors (memory chips), industrial equipment, precious and semi-precious metals, agriculture commodities, processed food, fertilizers, paper products and personal care products.

“Exports are a strategic way for Idaho to retain and expand our core manufacturing, agricultural and services base,” said Jeffery Sayer, director of the Idaho Department of Commerce.

“You have to remember that the more conversation, the more trade the more indication we have that people throughout the world the better it’s going to be,” said Governor Otter. Otter borrowed a famous quote a few years back during a trade mission to Cuba that pinpoints his trade philosophy: “To change the culture, the philosophy of country like Cuba, we need to fly over with a B-52 bomber and drop millions of Sears Roebuck catalogues because when they open them up they’ll figure out what they don’t have and there’ll be a good turn around.”

Demand for Idaho products continues to be strongest from trading partners in North America and Asia Pacific. In 2011, nine out of ten of Idaho’s top export destinations were from these regions, including:  Canada, Taiwan, China, Singapore, South Korea, Japan, France, Mexico, Malaysia and the Philippines. Source: Idaho Department of Commerce

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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Vehicles shown with optional accessories. Avoid operating Polaris RANGERs on paved surfaces or public roads. Riders and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Drivers of RANGER vehicles must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license. Warning: ATV’s can be hazardous to operate. For your safety: Avoid operating Polaris ATV’s on paved surfaces or public roads. Riders and passengers should wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Polaris ATV models are for riders aged 16 and older. Be sure to take a safety training course. For safety training information in the U.S., call the SVIA at (800) 887-2887, see your dealer, or call Polaris at (800) 342-3764. In Canada, see your local dealer. ©2011 Polaris Industries Inc.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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County Happenings Custer County Farm Bureau Names Ranch Woman of the Year Custer County Farm Bureau (CCFB) recently recognized Bonnie Hansen as Ranch Woman of the Year. Bonnie Lee Bass was born in Missoula, MT, grew up in Idaho Falls, and graduated from Idaho Falls High School. At Idaho State University she earned a B.A. in Art. Bonnie and Cliff Hansen were married in 1965 and in the fall of 1968 purchased the Cottonwood Ranch north of Shoshone. Bonnie had been working on a master’s degree in Art in Madison, WI when she married Cliff but she rose to the new challenge of farming and ranching. Their new ranch was run down and cows had been in the house while rodents had taken up permanent residence. The newlyweds tore up the ground, irrigated with a tow-pump, and began a massive cleanup project. Bonnie’s creativity and hard work helped reclaim the house and make it a home. Sharlene was born in the spring of 1969 and the family lived year round on the Cottonwood Ranch from 1969 to 1975. In the fall of 1970, Chuck and Mattie Hansen began bringing their cattle to the Cottonwood Ranch for the winter and Cliff and Bonnie began building their own herd. Cliff was doing construction work around the state, so Bonnie ran the ranch full time, changing pipes, caring for livestock, and working on ranch improvements. In 1975, Bonnie and Cliff moved to Stanley year round and Sharlene began school. Bonnie took on the job of irrigating in Stanley that year and kept summer pastures green ever since. In 1977, Bonnie and Cliff purchased the Challis ranch were they currently live. This ranch was also in disrepair. Once again they removed trash and improved the property. Bonnie helped with all phases of ranching including winter calving and maintained a flock of chickens.

Morgan Miller is Young Achiever in Agriculture Custer County Farm Bureau (CCFB) President Rod Evans DVM presented the Young Achiever in Agriculture Award to Morgan Miller at the recent CCFB Annual Meeting and Banquet. Morgan is the daughter of Mike and Sharlene Miller. Morgan works hard on the ranch having always enjoyed the physical, get dirty aspects of ranch life. She has enjoyed branding since she was little. She is great help working and sorting cows and loves the opportunity to ride for cows under the Sawtooths. Not one to do just the romantic riding for cows, she began changing sprinkler pipes at an early age and has been Dad’s main summer irrigator for the last two years. A junior at Challis High School, Morgan is a good student and is involved in numerous school activities. She has served as class Vice-President, student body historian, and is currently Junior Class President. She has participated on the Envirothon Team and was inducted into the Leah O’Keefe Chapter of National Honor Society. Morgan has participated in Custer County 4-H Program for six years. She took a market swine project the first three years and market beef the last three years. At Custer County Fair she was named Intermediate Round Robin Champion Showman in 2010. In 2011 she won second place Senior Beef Showman. Other interests that occupy Morgan include hunting, fishing, skiing and snowshoeing. Presenting this award President Evans said “Morgan has demonstrated to our Board of Directors that she has a deep-rooted appreciation for agriculture in Custer County and we hope this encourages her to continue to be an advocate for agriculture.” 22

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012


Grain Marketing with Clark Johnston

Using Markets to Your Advantage example, just recently the technical indicators were showing that we were approaching some support levels in the wheat market and at the same time the funds were holding record short positions in the wheat market. The stage was set and the market was now just looking for a reason to buy wheat. The reason came in the form of a weather forecast calling for 10 days of hot and dry conditions in the wheat growing regions of the US along with the forecast for drought conditions in the former Soviet Union.

Clark Johnston

By Clark Johnston There are a few things we can count on every spring that will move the market either higher or lower. These are weather conditions and they appear every spring just as regular as clock work. It is usually too hot or too cold, too wet or too dry or any combination. These happen every year and make it difficult at times to know just what to do in our decision making process. There are two things that are important to remember when making our decisions. The first is that we should make our marketing decisions based on the current news and what we know. (Don’t try to outguess the market) The second is that we should make our hedging decisions based on what we don’t know or the unknown in the market. The different indicators for us to watch not only in the spring but throughout the year are the historical movements or the seasonal trends, the fundamentals and the technical indicators in the markets. For an

In just a few days the futures moved back up to the same levels we experienced in the first of February. Now any one of these indicators by themselves probably wouldn’t have moved the market that far that fast but, when all three were in the market at the same time the market moved. This rally in the market gave the producers another opportunity to sell wheat at the levels we had seen before the selloff this spring. Now I don’t know if the futures will move higher or lower on any given day but, when we continue to see the carry charge in the wheat market and real possibility of the corn market replacing the inverse in some of the deferred months to a carry charge the long term outlook looks to be bearish. This isn’t necessarily all bad when marketing your wheat it just means that your opportunities for better prices will be in the deferred months. It looks as though it is going to be important for you to continue to look into those months rather than just watching the nearby bids. Remember, when marketing we need to base our decision on what we know and what we know from carry charge markets is that the trade

feels we have enough product to make it through the year. If the futures settle in with the carry market (and it appears for now as if they will) it will be important to continue to watch the technical indicators in the market. These will be a great asset to you when determining just when to sell or when not to sell during the months ahead. However, using a technical indicator in helping you is not without its challenges. The first is to choose one that you like or have confidence in, second is to identify your points to either buy or sell and third, you will need patience to wait for the right time to make your move and last but not least, Don’t get caught up in trying to day trade your commodities. Just in case you missed that last statement, Don’t get caught up in trying to day trade your commodities. Recently we have experienced a considerable selloff in the heating oil market. Historical charts show us that 8 of the past 10 years heating oil futures have traded steady to higher from now through the end of October. We are also seeing some technical support in the market. It could be a good time to look at purchasing your diesel fuel for use through the fall. For additional help in any of these areas don’t hesitate to contact us at the Idaho Farm Bureau. We will be happy to help you with any questions you may have. Clark Johnston is a grain marketing specialist who is on contract with the Idaho Farm Bureau. He is the owner of JC Management Company in Northern Utah. He can be reached at clark@jcmanagement. net

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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Snowpack Level Below Normal; Reservoirs Full By Jake Putnam Memorial Day weekend brought fresh snow to the high country in some parts of Idaho but snowpack levels are well below last year’s according the Natural Resources Conservation Service. NRCS Hydrologist Ron Abramovich is studying statistics from sites across Idaho. In the Bogus Basin there’s a marked difference. “Last year we had 89 inches of snow depth on the ground in May, this year we have just 50, so we’re well below average,” Abramovich said. “But with holdover and heavy rain at times nearly all of Idaho’s major reservoirs are full and most will have average levels for the summer.” Abramovich says the spring thaw with high inflows were worrisome in May. If not for a cold snap that slowed runoff there could have been flooding in some areas.  April produced record-setting melt rates during a 90-degree heat wave. Southwest Idaho basins lost an inch a day, an all-time record that quickly filled Lucky Peak Reservoir.  Operations hit critical mass at one point because of the heat and rain but water managers anticipated storage problems and sent much of the surging water down the Boise River. There was minor flooding along Boise’s greenbelt then some flooding in Star but disaster was effectively averted.  Abramovich says subtle climate changes are making it harder for reservoir managers to forecast high country snowpack. They have to figure out how much water to hold, how much to release all on a day to day basis during the spring.  Abramovich says those hot days in April with heavier than normal rains have a volatile unpredictability and are becoming more common. Water managers across the state were ready, but those predictions are getting tougher.  “Many think climate change means higher temperatures,” said Abramovich. “It’s 24

Cutline – Snow survey – Ron Abramovich with NRCS checks snow depth and water content recently near Mores Creek Summit. Photo by Steve Ritter

more complicated than that, it’s a roller coaster ride and as unpredictable as the stock market.” Abramovich says that state water managers have more than a hundred years of meticulous records to base their predictions and the records reveal that in the old days runoffs started in early April, now its late March.

back in the late 1970’s, a 30-year drought gripped Idaho. Winters were cold and water scarce. That’s changed with wet months in the early fall and late spring. Not to mention the fact that stream flows are three weeks earlier than years past.

Water record research shows that starting

See SNOW SURVEY, page 29

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

 Abramovich sees some proof. This spring


County Happenings Gooding/Lincoln County FB Awards Scholarships Jennifer Perry is the daughter of Bill and Christine Perry of Gooding. During her high school years she participated in the Idaho Syringa Girls State, Hugh’O Brien Youth Leadership Conference, Health Occupation Student of America, the 4-H Know Your Government conference and completed a certified nursing assistant program. Jennifer plans to attend Boise State The Gooding /Lincoln County Farm Bureau recently awarded a $1,000 University or Carroll College and agriculture scholarship to Daniel Flick and a $750 non-agriculture scholarship major in nursing. to Jennifer Perry. Daniel Flick is the son of Toby and Patty Flick of Gooding. While in high school he was active in the Gooding FFA Chapter. He has participated in national soils and meats competitions. He has also achieved the honor of Eagle Scout. Daniel plans to attend the University of Idaho and major in mechanical engineering. Tracy Walton of Walton Farms (right) in Emmett with his Farm Bureau Insurance agent, Stu Barrett.

As a company founded by Idaho farmers and ranchers over 60 years ago, we understand that each farm and ranch is unique. That’s why our agents visit you at your farm or ranch in person every year. This firsthand look at your operation can help us tailor a policy to fit your particular farm or ranch. Visit www.idfbins.com to have your local Farm Bureau Insurance agent or Crop Specialist (listed at right) visit your farm or ranch.

ARDEN ANDERSON EAST IDAHO PHONE: 208-569-7708

TORY BAILEY SOUTH IDAHO PHONE: 208-678-0431

RON BAUNE EAST IDAHO PHONE: 208-520-2635

KIM BORGEN NORTH IDAHO PHONE: 208-791-2126

BENJI GRAYBEAL We know Idaho. We grew up here. facebook.com/fbmidaho twitter.com/fbmidaho

WEST IDAHO PHONE: 208-994--2864

SEAN YOUNG WEST IDAHO PHONE: 208-587--8484

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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Dust off your cowboy boots and hat and come join us for a day of family fun on June 30th

Events: Mutton busting * obstacle course goat roping * calf branding * pie eating contest * hide pulling * chicken run * many more fun games Time: Fun starts at 1:00, we will eat at 5:00 Dinner will be provided. County YF&R chairmen are asked to bring a dessert to share Bring your chairs and blankets for the B-B-Q Place: Guthrie’s Arena, Inkom Questions call: Cody & Britney Chandler - 549-0091 Cole & Lynette Smith – 847-0473 Doug & Heather Barrie – 523-6097 Morgan Brune – 308-6603 Luke & Amber Pearce – 278-3272 Drew & Markita Brammer 509-330-1230 Kendall Keller – 681-3045 Peggy Moore – 239-4271 26

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012


New Zealand Farm Tour Planned The Idaho Farm Bureau will be conducting their annual agricultural tour February 27 – March 12, 2013. This year’s tour will take us to New Zealand. We are working with a group of farmers and ranchers, a national agricultural organization, and a farm tour company in organizing this tour. This tour will be escorted by Gary & Sandy Fuhriman. We have scheduled visits to a variety

of farms and ranches as well as barbeques with New Zealand producers. We will also hold discussions with farm organization officials concerning common interests between the two countries. The tour will visit points of interest such as the Bay of Island, Mt Cook National Park, a thermal reserve, the Maori Arts and Crafts Institute along with many other activities on both the

North Island and the South Island. The number of people on this tour will be limited and is already over half filled. Reservations will be taken on a 1st received basis. For additional information call Gary at 208 241-0243 or Launa at TTS Travel at 208 232-4812. They will send you the details of the tour.

American farm bureau federation news

Multi-Legged Stool Best Approach for Farm Bill WASHINGTON, D.C.,– American Farm Bureau Federation President Bob Stallman at a hearing today on Capitol Hill reemphasized his organizations’ support of a single commodity option and a strong crop insurance program in the 2012 farm bill. Speaking before the House Agriculture Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management, Stallman said he was confident AFBF’s approach could easily provide a safety net that meets regional and commodity differences, while also staying within the budget. “Continuation of a multi-legged stool remains the best approach for providing a fair and effective safety net, which should consist of a strong crop insurance program, continuation of the current marketing loan provisions and a catastrophic revenue loss program,” said Stallman. The purpose of the hearing was to review commodity programs and crop insurance options for 2012

farm bill. Stallman’s testimony was based on the premise that the House Agriculture Committee will draft farm legislation that reduces spending by $23 billion over the next 10 years, with proportional cuts of $15 billion in commodity program reductions, $4 billion in conservation program reductions and $4 billion in nutrition program reductions. In its farm bill proposal, AFBF has prioritized: (1) protecting and strengthening federal crop insurance funding and not reducing funding for that program; (2) developing a commodity title that encourages producers to follow market signals rather than making planting decisions in anticipation of government payments; and (3) refraining from basing any program on cost of production. “As a general farm organization, we place

high priority on ensuring the bill benefits all American agricultural commodity sectors in a balanced, coordinated manner,” said Stallman. “Conceptually, our proposal can cover all specialty crops that have crop insurance available, but we thought it best to walk before we run.” AFBF’s proposal covers apples, tomatoes, grapes, potatoes and sweet corn. “The new farm bill must ensure that producers continue to take production signals from the marketplace rather than enticing them to chase federal program benefits,” continued Stallman. “Approaches that allow producers to pick and choose between various program options would impose severe challenges and drive production decisions.” Stallman also said that AFBF continues to oppose payment limits and means testing of farm program benefits in general.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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Exclusively For Farm Bureau Members Members can pick up discounted tickets from one of the following Farm Bureau county offices: Boise - Nampa - Caldwell - Meridian - Coeur d’Alene - Post Falls - Idaho Falls Pocatello - Blackfoot - Mountain Home - Rexburg - Rigby - American Falls - Malad

Regular Price For Evening Show (Ages 12-59)

$10

Farm Bureau Price

$7.50

Regal Riverstone Stadium 14 Coeur D’Alene

Regular Price For Evening Show (Ages 12-64)

$9.50 $9.75

Farm Bureau Price

$7.50

Some restrictions apply. Contact a Farm Bureau county office listed above for details. Prices subject to change.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012


Snow Survey

Continued from page 24

on the Boise River at Twin Springs, stream flows hit an astonishing 12,500 CFS in early May. “That’s the second highest flow recorded on the Boise river this time of year. The measurements come from a stream gauge placed a hundred years ago above Arrowrock Dam. 

and no spring and summer,” says Abramovich. “But this year we’re a month ahead of schedule and it’s just a greater degree of climate variability that is what we’re seeing.” Abramovich says that variability is a continuing concern for water managers who have to regulate reservoir levels.

Across the state it’s a lot of the same story. Water managers at Jackson Lake released 4,000 cubic feet per second to free up storage for the spring thaw. Reservoirs on the Upper Snake are still full with most of the basin getting snowfall over Memorial Day weekend. 

Northern Idaho saw drought conditions throughout most of the winter only to see heavy rains from March to May. Coeur d’Alene Lake is storing twice its normal summer capacity as inflows exceeded the maximum outflow at Post Falls which causes the lake to back-up. Dworshak Reservoir is currently at 69% full but will be full by July.

“We still had 22 inches of snow water in the Bogus Basin north of Boise. At Mores Creek the average for May 1st is 21 inches, we peaked April 1st at 31 inches so we lost just 10 inches and there’s still snow melting in the higher elevations. We’ve lost snowpack in June but it’s stayed longer than we thought. Again, it’s a good thing we have reservoirs to buffer stream flows,” said Abramovich. The changes have enlightened the NRCS. “Last year we got an extra month of winter

“We had normal moisture but it’s still kind of dry,” said farmer Robert Blair of Kendrick. “In March we had six inches of rain and looking like a repeat of last year.  It settled down some but in May we had almost two inches of rain. The big thing right now are cold temperatures, it’s just above freezing every morning. We need heat it’s too cold up here.” “We still had 22 inches of snow water in

the Bogus Basin north of Boise. At Mores Creek the average for May 1st is 21 inches, we peaked April 1st at 31 inches so we lost just 10 inches and there’s still snow melting in the higher elevations. We’ve lost snowpack in June but its stayed longer than we thought. Again, it’s a good thing we have reservoirs to buffer stream flows,” said Abramovich. The changes have enlightened the NRCS. “Last year we got an extra month of winter and no spring and summer,” says Abramovich. “But this year we’re a month ahead of schedule and it’s just a greater degree of climate variability that is what we’re seeing.” Abramovich says that variability is a continuing concern for water managers who have to regulate reservoir levels. Overall Abramovich says the Gem State should have enough water this year. But south of the Snake River Basin farmers and water managers are worried.  Reservoirs, including Owhyee, Salmon Falls, and Oakley, are relying on last year’s water storage. That means there could be less water for next year and beyond.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

29


30

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012


American farm bureau federation news

Soybean Crop Increases, But Supply Dips to Historic Low WASHINGTON, D.C – There are going to be more soybeans grown across the United States this year, but that increase will be dwarfed by the amount of soybeans that will be used and exported. The scenario will mean U.S. soybean supplies will fall to a mere 16 days of inventory, according to American Farm Bureau Federation analysts.

age prices is pegged at $13 per bushel, which would eclipse the 2012 record of $12.35 per bushel, Davis explained.

“Corn production will outpace stronger demand and that will likely result in lower prices, but those prices will Davis said there are several factors lead- help fuel the robust demand we see ing to this perfect storm for soybeans. both domestically and abroad,” Davis South American soybean production explained. continues to decline, with Argentina’s Davis said 2012-2013 ending stocks for production reduced by 91.8 million the domestic corn supply will be at 1.88 bushels and Brazil’s production reduced billion bushels. That is an increase of According to the Agriculture Depart- 36.7 million bushels from April. Ac- more than 1 billion bushels. The stocksment’s World Agricultural Supply and cording to Davis, as the harvest wraps to-use ratio is projected to increase to Demand Estimates report for May 2012, up in South America, the market is now 13.7 percent, which is the largest since this year’s soybean crop is projected at grasping a better understanding of how 2009-2010. Davis said that because of 3.205 billion bushels, an increase of their drought cut into production. On the the large increase in corn stocks, the 149 million bushels from 2011. That world level, ending stocks for soybeans U.S. marketing-year average price is boost, however, is not projected to keep will be the tightest they have been since projected to decline sharply to $4.60 up with strong demand from exports, the 2007-2008 marketing year, 53.24 per bushel, compared to the 2011-2012 which are expected to increase by 190 million metric tons, or a stocks-to-use price of $6.10 per bushel. million bushels and the crush use of ratio of 15.5 percent. But there was a little surprise in the latsoybeans, which will increase by 10 This report also carried significant est report, according to Davis. million bushels. news on the corn side, Davis said. The “There was a curveball regarding old“When all is said and done, our end- 2012 U.S. corn crop is now projected crop corn,” Davis said. “The May report ing stocks of soybeans will drop to at 14.8 billion bushels, which would be actually increased ending stocks of last just 145 million bushels,” said AFBF a record if realized. That is 2.4 billion year’s crop by 50 million bushels. This Senior Economist Todd Davis. “That bushels more than what was harvested came as a fairly significant surprise, as equates to a 4.4 percent stocks-to-use in 2011. pre-report estimates projected a decline ratio, which is just over a two week sup- USDA projected a record 2012 yield of in stocks due to stronger demand. Acply of soybeans at the end of the year. 166 bushels per acre based on the rapid cording to the report, that demand nevThat will tend to be a bullish factor and pace of planting and crop emergence, er materialized because the amount of should keep soybeans positioned as the according to Davis. Demand for corn corn used for feed was reduced by 50 market driver.” is also projected to increase due to in- million bushels to reflect a greater use Prices will reflect soybean stocks being creased feed use (up 900 million bush- of wheat in feed rations.” projected at historically low levels. The els) and exports that should increase by 2012-2013 U.S. marketing year aver- 200 million bushels. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

31


County Happenings

Winners in the Jefferson Speech contest from Rigby: Amanda Hale, Tanner Fonnesbeck, Garrett Richins, Ashlena Grant, Maranda Page, Kolton Barnes and James Facer.

Food Check-Out Week – Jerry Petersen, Neil Jensen

Food Check-Out Week – Cindy Quinn of Grant received one of the balloons with money in to help with her groceries.

Jefferson County Ag Baby this year was awarded Woman of the Year for Jefferson to Clint and Eva Kinghorn of Rigby. Standing: Sharon Moser, Carma Lufkin, Arlene County 2012 is Melissa Ann Briggs. Farm Bureau Women’s committee Arlene Cordingley, Sharon Cordingley, Orillia Bazil. Sitting are Eva Kinghorn, Moser, Orillia Bazil, and Carma Lufkin prepare to hand out mother, and Ag Baby Clara Kinghorn. balloons with money to help shoppers with their groceries.

32

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012


Primary Nesting Season Reminder

BOISE - The Farm Service Agency (FSA) reminds Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) participants that maintenance and management activities on CRP acres must be completed outside of the primary nesting season, which began on April 1st and continues through August 1st.  Exact dates are listed in individual conservation plans. “Some conservation plans may vary so CRP participants are encouraged to review their current conservation plan,” said Dick Rush, State Executive Director. “Participants must not engage in any maintenance or management activities during this critical nesting season without prior written approval from the County Committee.”  Participants with maintenance issues that require attention prior to the end of nesting season must contact the county FSA office for permission prior to performing any spot spraying or spot mowing on CRP acres. Failure to contact the county FSA office prior to any maintenance on CRP acres during nesting season may result in payment reductions or possible contract termination. For questions or more information about maintenance and management activities of CRP acres, please visit your local FSA county office. For a list of offices in Idaho go to  http:// www.fsa.usda.gov/id .

Idaho Prospective Plantings for 2012

All wheat planted in Idaho is expected to total 1.34 million acres, down 9 percent from last year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Spring wheat plantings are expected to be 540,000 acres, 16 percent less than last year. Winter wheat seedings, at 780,000 acres, decreased 5 percent from the 2011 crop. Durum wheat seedings are expected to total 15,000 acres, up 4,000 acres from 2011. Idaho farmers intend to seed 350,000 acres of field corn in 2012, unchanged from last year. Barley seedings are expected to total 590,000 acres, up 70,000 acres from last season. Oat seedings are expected to be 80,000 acres, up 14 percent from last year. Dry bean planting intentions increased 37 percent from last year to 130,000 acres. Dry bean estimates include chickpeas, which are grown primarily in North Idaho. Chickpea planting intentions totaled 65,000 acres, up 27 percent from 2011. All hay expected to be harvested, at 1.33 million acres, is down 1 percent from 2011. Sugarbeet plantings are expected to total 183,000 acres, up 4 percent from last year. Lentil acreage is expected to be 33,000 acres, up 18 percent from 2011. Dry edible pea acreage, at 24,000 acres, is expected to be up 50 percent from last year. Austrian winter pea acres are expected to total 8,000 acres, up 2,000 acres from 2011. Canola acres are expected to total 29,000

acres, up 53 percent from 2011.

Honey Production Up 20 Percent

Idaho honey production in 2011 from producers with five or more colonies totaled 3.13 million pounds, a 20 percent increase from 2010, according to a report issued on March 30th by the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Honey producing colonies are estimated at 87,000 colonies, down 10,000 colonies from last year. Yield per colony averaged 36 pounds, up 9 pounds from 2010. Producer honey stocks were 1.88 million pounds on December 15, 2011, an increase of 59 percent from the previous year. The average honey price per pound was 178.0 cents, up 17 cents from a year ago.

Milk and Meat Animal Cash Receipts

Idaho cash receipts from marketings of milk during 2011 totaled $2.43 billion, 28 percent more than 2010. Producer returns averaged $18.40 per hundredweight, 23 percent higher than 2010. Marketings totaled 13.2 billion pounds, 4 percent above 2010. Marketings include whole milk sold to plants and dealers and milk sold directly to consumers. Cattle and calves cash receipts from marketings in Idaho increased 17 percent from $1.18 billion in 2010 to $1.38 billion in 2011. Idaho cattle and calf

marketings totaled 1.29 billion pounds in 2011, down 4 percent from 2010.

Red Meat Production Down 76 Percent

Commercial red meat production at Idaho packing plants for April 2012 totaled 3.4 million pounds, down 76 percent from April of last year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Accumulated red meat production for the January-April 2012 period totaled 13.6 million pounds, down 76 percent from the comparable period a year earlier.

USDA Wants Public Input on Report Timing

Joe Glauber, USDA’s chief economist, announced last week that the department is reviewing release times for several major statistical reports due to recent changes in market hours by major commodity exchanges. The reports are the World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates; Acreage; Cattle; Cattle on Feed; Crop Production; Grain Stocks; Prospective Plantings; Quarterly Hogs and Pigs; and Small Grain Summary. Briefs continued on page 34

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012


USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service and the World Agricultural Outlook Board, the USDA entities responsible for the reports, will post a Federal Register notice in the coming weeks requesting public input. The current release times of 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. ET will remain in effect until further notice.

DNA Barcodes to Track Insect Crop Damage

Barcodes may bring to mind the sales tags and scanners found in supermarkets and other stores. But USDA scientists are using “DNA barcodes” to monitor insects that damage crops as diverse as wheat, barley and potatoes, and to make pest management decisions. In DNA barcoding, scientists sequence a designated part of an organism’s genome and produce a barcode from it for a systematic comparison with the sequenced DNA of other closely related species. DNA barcodes are being developed on a wide range of plants and animals as part of a global effort to catalogue the diversity of life on Earth. Matthew Greenstone, an Agricultural Research Service entomologist at the agency’s Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Laboratory in Beltsville, Md., is using DNA barcodes 34

in an unconventional way: to identify insect predators best equipped to control the Colorado potato beetle, which is the single-most damaging insect pest of potatoes in the eastern U.S.

in its sugarcane sector, which has contributed to below-average recent harvests. Attractive world sugar prices will, at times, draw a significant portion of the country’s harvest away from ethanol production.

U.S. Leads World in Ethanol Exports

USDA Launches New Water Quality Initiative

A new study by Hart Energy shows the U.S. has taken the lead in ethanol exports, vaulting over its main competitor Brazil. The study also dismisses the notion that goals of two programs in the U.S. can be achieved. Biofuels volumes required by the federal Renewable Fuel Standard and California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard do not match with the realities of commercialization and availability, Hart Energy maintains, and changes in these policies will be necessary in the next few years. The study examines the public policies, market developments and economics of the ethanol industry in the two countries, which produce 80 percent of the world’s supply. The outlook contends renewable fuel mandates in the U.S. will also create opportunities for increased production of corn-based ethanol and biodiesel. Hart Energy projects Brazilian ethanol exports will see wide fluctuations and only return to their 2008 peak in 2019. A combination of factors hinders the Latin American giant, including insufficient investment

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack on Tuesday announced the launch of a new National Water Quality Initiative committed to improving one to seven impaired watersheds in every U.S. state and territory. The initiative is part of the administration’s White House Rural Council, which is working in partnership with farmers, ranchers and forest owners to improve conservation of working lands in rural America. The 157 selected watersheds were identified with assistance from state agencies, key partners and USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. NRCS will make available at least $33 million in financial assistance to farmers, ranchers and forest landowners this year to implement conservation practices to help provide cleaner water for their neighbors and communities. Funds from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program will be used to provide financial and technical assistance to producers for implementing conservation practices such as cover crops, nutrient management, filter

strips and terraces. All eligible applications must be submitted by June 15 to be considered for this fiscal year’s funding opportunity. However, NRCS accepts applications for financial assistance on a continuous basis throughout the year. Producers can view an online map or check with their local NRCS office to see if they are located in a selected watershed. This summer, NRCS will notify all applicants of the results of the competitive selection process and begin developing contracts with applicants approved for funding.

Scrap Metal Prices Prompt Farmers to Clean Up, Cash In

Spring is planting season, but some farmers are harvesting profits from old junk that’s been lying around their buildings and fields, sometimes for decades. They’re selling scrap metal to recycling businesses and earning cash while cleaning up their farms. “We’ve just got so much metal lying around,” said Dennis Baker, a corn grower in Virginia. “It’s been accumulating for years and years, and every day you find something that’s got to be thrown away. Right now, with the price of metal, it just pays a little extra income from the farm.” Eugene Bare, marketing director for Recycle Management LLC, encourages farmers to


check outbuildings for metal items that may have been tucked away years ago. “There’s substantial money that’s just sitting in the way, just locked up in scrap junk that’s sitting around these places,” Bare said. “Farmers can cash in big right now.” - From Virginia FB

Proposed BSE Risk Standards for Trade

The American Farm Bureau Federation supports the Agriculture Department’s proposal to align U.S. risk standards for bovine spongiform encephalopathy with the system used by the World Organization for Animal Health, the organization said in comments submitted recently to the department. Under the proposed rule USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service would adopt the same criteria and categories OIE uses to identify a country’s BSE risk status. The OIE risk categories are negligible, controlled and undetermined risk. APHIS would base its import policy of bovines and bovine products from a particular country on that country’s risk classification, as determined by OIE’s risk evaluation, as long

U.S.-Colombia Agreement In Effect

The U.S-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement recently went into effect. “U.S. agricultural exporters receive duty-free access on more than half of the products we

as certain conditions are met, such as the removal of specified risk materials. The rule allows the importation of boneless beef from any country meeting food safety equivalency standards, and places the tightest restrictions on countries with the highest risk of BSE. “The proposed rule will allow the U.S. to trade base decisions on beef imports on the actual risk of BSE,” Farm Bureau wrote. The rule would also allow APHIS to conduct its own assessment when deemed necessary, such as when a country is not yet classified by the OIE for BSE risk and requests that APHIS conduct a risk evaluation using criteria equivalent to that used by OIE. Farm Bureau “supports this proposed rule as an international harmonization of veterinary health rules that will improve and expand trade in animal products,” the group said.

Farmland Values Remain at Record Level

Strong prices for crops and continued higher farm income caused farmland values to soar

currently export to Colombia and virtually all remaining tariffs will be eliminated within 15 years,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack in a statement. Estimates show that the tariff reductions will expand total

during the first quarter of 2012. Farmland sales were strongest in the Plains but also described as firm in the Midwest Corn Belt, according to information compiled by the Federal Reserve. Non-irrigated cropland in the Plains increased 25 percent in value compared to one year ago, while irrigated farmland was worth 32 percent more. The year-over-year percentage increase in irrigated farmland was the largest ever in the 30 years the survey has been conducted. Compared to one year ago, farmland values in the Corn Belt were up 19 percent compared to the prior year. Honors for Work with Consumers The U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance received national recognition for its groundbreaking campaign to help improve the dialogue with consumers about how their food is grown and raised. USFRA, along with its agency partner Ketchum Public Relations, won the prestigious Gold SABRE Award for Excellence in the Associations category. The entry, titled “Since When Did

U.S. exports by more than $1.1 billion, supporting thousands of additional American jobs while increasing the U.S. global domestic product by $2.5 billion. For U.S. agriculture, the agreement with South America’s third-largest economy achieves two key trade objectives: it im-

Agriculture Become a Dirty Word?,” highlighted the strategies, execution and messaging used for the public launch of USFRA at the September 2011 Food Dialogues Town Hall. USFRA’s Communications Advisory Committee and Ketchum began their work together in March of 2011. Since that time they have worked together to create a movement that focuses on bringing the voice of farmers and ranchers to conversations centered on food and food production. Over the past 14 months, USFRA and Ketchum have implemented many successful events and tools to help farmers and ranchers have that conversation, and explain the importance of continually improving today’s agriculture. Today’s news remains filled with stories questioning the integrity of the entire food production chain, and USFRA, in response, has initiated recently the “Grow What You Know” Rapid Response System that allows farmers and ranchers to be alerted of topics in the media that lack a farmer and rancher voice.

mediately provides vastly improved access to Colombia’s market and it levels the playing field with respect to third-country competitors. Farm Bureau supports full implementation of the agreement.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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FARM BUREAU COMMODITY REPORT GRAIN PRICES

Portland:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Corn

Ogden:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Pocatello:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Burley:

White Wheat 11.5 % Winter 14% Spring Barley

Nampa:

White Wheat (cwt) (Bushel)

Lewiston:

White Wheat

4/26/2012

5/29/2012

7.05 7.14-7.40 9.21 267-269.75

6.90 7.28-7.43 9.10 256-257.25

- .15 + .14 to + .03 - .11 - 11.00 to – 12.50

6.30 5.98 7.61 10.00

6.10 6.03 7.52 10.00

- .20 + .05 - .09 Steady

6.05 5.46 7.44 10.41

6.00 5.84 7.49 10.42

- .05 + .38 + .05 + .01

6.15 5.78 7.51 10.00

6.05 6.11 7.49 10.00

- .10 + .33 - .02 Steady

10.17 6.10

9.75 5.85

- .42 - .25

6.90

6.50 204.50

- .40 + 13.00

Barley 191.50

Trend

LIVESTOCK PRICES 4/25/2012

Feeder Steers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs Over 700 lbs

Cows

Utility/Commercial Canner & Cutter

Stock Cows Bulls

Slaughter

BEAN PRICES: Pinto Pink Small Red

5/22/2012

145-195 137-185 120-151 104-121

140-197 130-177 120-157 95-132

- 5 to + 2 - 7 to - 8 steady to - 6 - 9 to + 11

151-189 135-168 109-137 99-115

131-182 121-169 108-141 90-127

-

75-122 75-110

75-135 75-106

steady to + 13 steady to - 4

64-85 55-77

64-86 55-78

steady to + 1 steady to + 1

900-1450

950-1300

+ 50 to - 150

72-102

75-102

+ 3 to steady

48.00-50.00 45.00-48.00 N/A

50.00 45.00-48.00 N/A

+ 2.00 to Steady Steady Steady

Compiled by the Idaho Farm Bureau Commodity Division 36

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

Trend

20 to - 7 14 to + 1 1 to + 4 9 to + 12


IDaho Hay Report

May 25, 2012 USDA Market News Tons: 1000 Last Week: 3300 Last Year: 3790 Compared to last week, Old Crop Supreme Alfalfa weak in a light test. First test of Supreme Alfalfa New Crop reported this week so trends not available on new crop. Trade slow with light to moderate demand. Retail/feed store/horse not tested this week. Buyer demand good with light to moderate supplies. All prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise stated. Tons Price Wtd Avg Comments Alfalfa Large Square Supreme 200 200.00-200.00 200.00 New Crop 400 140.00-155.00 147.50 Old Crop Fair/Good 200 165.00-165.00 165.00 200 150.00-150.00 150.00 Rain Damage

Alfalfa hay test guidelines, (for domestic livestock use and not more than 10% grass), used with visual appearance and intent of sale Quantitative factors are approximate and many factors can affect feeding value. ADF Supreme <27 Premium 27-29 Good 29-32 Fair 32-35 Utility >35

NDF <34 34-36 36-40 40-44 >44

RFV TDN-100% TDN-90% CP-100% >185 >62 >55.9 >22 170-185 60.5-62 54.5-55.9 20-22 150-170 58-60 52.5-54.5 18-20 130-150 56-58 50.5-52.5 16-18 <130 <56 <50.5 <16

RFV calculated using the Wis/Minn formula. TDN calculated using the western formula.Values based on 100% dry matter, TDN both 90% and 100%.

POTATOES FOR PROCESSING May 15, 2012 IDAHO---Open-market trading by processors with growers was slow. Open-market prices paid to growers for Russet Burbank potatoes, storage-run, bulk, per cwt, less dirt, rot and green tare, F.O.B. growers storage unless otherwise stated: French-Fry quality 10.00.

5 Year Grain Comparison

Grain Prices................05/21/2008...................05/22/2009...................05/24/2010..................05/23/2011..................05/29/2012 Portland: White Wheat......................7.75 ..............................5.90 ..............................4.70 ............................8.05 ........................... 6.90 11% Winter........................9.71 ..............6.61-6.71 ...................4.98-5 06 .................9.07-9.17 ........... 7.28-7.43 14% Spring.........................N/A ............................8.40 ..............................6.40 ...........................12.42 ............................9.10 Corn...............................256-259.75 .....................184-185 ................. 169-170.25 ...............303-303.75 .............256-257.25 Ogden: White Wheat..................... 8.85 .............................4.74 .............................4.07 ............................8.00.............................. 6.10 11% Winter.......................8.25 .............................5.70 ..............................3.89 ............................7.90 ........................... 6.03 14 % Spring.......................9.78 ..............................7.25 ..............................5.14 ...........................10.97............................. 7.52 Barley................................. 9.80 ..............................6.64 ..............................6.14 ...........................12.00............................ 10.00 Pocatello: White Wheat......................8.15 ..............................4.60 ..............................3.85 ............................7.90............................ 11% Winter....................... 8.10 ..............................5.35 ..............................3.69 ............................7.69 .......................... 14% Spring....................... 10.35..............................7.00 ..............................5.25 ...........................11.51............................ Barley................................10.00 ............................6.40 ...........................6.35 .........................11.56...........................

6.00 5.84 7.49 10.42

Burley: White Wheat..................... 8.03 .............................4.42 ..............................3.94 ............................7.55............................. 11% Winter........................7.78 ..............................5.47 .............................3.72 ............................7.75 ........................... 14% Spring.........................N/A ............................6.98 ..............................5.01 ...........................10.70............................ Barley................................. 9.50...............................6.00 ..............................5.25 .........................11.50..........................

6.05 6.11 7.49 10.00

Nampa: White Wheat (cwt)..........11.58...............................8.08 ..............................6.33 ...........................11.61............................ 9.75 (bushel)......... 6.95 ..............................4.85 ..............................3.80 ............................6.95............................. 5.85 Lewiston: White Wheat..................... 7.35 ..............................5.65 ..............................4.50 ............................7.75............................ 6.50 Barley...............................186.50...........................106.50 ........................111.50...........................211.50........................ 204.50 Bean Prices: Pintos...........................32.00-33.00..........................N/A...............................30.00.............................30.00............................ 50.00 Pinks.................................32.00...............................N/A...............................30.00........................0.00-32.00..................45.00-48.00 Small Reds..........................N/A ..............................N/A...............................30.00.............................. N/A................................N/A ***

IDAHO Milk production up 2.9 Percent May 18, 2012 Idaho milk production during April 2012 totaled 1.11 billion pounds, a 2.9 percent increase from the same month last year, but down 1.5 percent from March 2012, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. March 2012 milk production was revised up slightly to 1.13 billion pounds. Average milk production per cow in April 2012 was 1,920 pounds, up 50 pounds from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s level. The average number of milk cows during April was 577,000 head, up 1,000 from April 2011. Milk production in the 23 major States during April totaled 16.0 billion pounds, up

3.3 percent from April 2011. March revised production at 16.4 billion pounds, was up 4.3 percent from March 2011. The March revision represented a decrease of 5 million pounds or less than 0.1 percent from last monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,875 pounds for April, 40 pounds above April 2011. The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.53 million head, 94,000 head more than April 2011, and 4,000 head more than March 2012. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

37


5 Year livestock comparison .....................................05/21/2008...................05/22/2009...................05/24/2010..................05/23/2011..................05/22/2012 Under 500 lbs................100-125 .......................102-127..........................115-141 ....................125-176 ....................140-197 500-700 lbs.....................98-131 .......................92-128 ..........................97-139 .......................114-151........................ 130-177 700-900 lbs.....................85-121 .........................82-117 .........................90-114 ......................93-139 ...................... 120-157 Over 900 lbs...................72-102............................75-93 ..........................85-101...........................90-110.......................... 95-132 Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs................. 96-118 .........................94-121...........................95-133 ...................112-156.........................131-182 500-700 lbs.....................94-124 .........................88-109 .........................87-124 ......................97-149 .......................121-169 700-900 lbs.....................83-109...........................71-106............................75-106.......................... 88-122.........................108-141 Over 900 lbs....................77-99 ...........................85-90 .........................80-93 ......................... 98-105..........................90-127 Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs..................50-75 ...........................48-72 ..........................74-101...........................70-116.......................... 75-135 Over 700 lbs....................48-72 ...........................52-69 ...........................64-87 ......................... 65-97 ........................75-106 Cows Utility/Commercial...........34-60.............................40-59.............................41-75............................ 52-83............................64-86 Canner & Cutter.............. 21-53.............................31-52..............................35-64............................46-76............................55-78 Stock Cows......................550-870 .....................650-1010........................650-975 .................... 850-1500......................950-1300 Bulls – Slaughter............48-76.............................46-67.............................53-88.......................... 60-100..........................75-102

Idaho Cattle on Feed down 7 Percent from Previous Year

May 18, 2012 Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in Idaho from feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head on May 1, 2012 totaled 215,000 head, down 7 percent from the previous year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The cattle on feed inventory is down 4 percent from April 1, 2012. Placements of cattle in feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during April totaled 28,000 head, down 6,000 head from April 2011 placements. Marketings of cattle from feedlots with 1,000 head or more during April totaled 36,000 head, up 13,000 head from last year. Other disappearance totaled 2,000 head during April. Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.1 million head on May 1, 2012. The inventory was 1 percent below May 1, 2011. Placements in feedlots during April totaled 1.52 million, 15 percent below 2011. Net placements were 1.44 million head. During April, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 355,000, 600-699 pounds were 250,000, 700-799 pounds were 380,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 536,000. Marketings of fed cattle during April totaled 1.82 million, slightly above 2011. Other disappearance totaled 78,000 during April, 30 percent above 2011.

Cattle Outlook May 25, 2012 USDA’s latest Cold Storage report said there were 517.5 million pounds of beef in cold storage at the end of April. That is up 2.9% from the month before, up 16.8% from a year ago, and the most of any month since December 2006. USDA says 96% of corn acres had been planted by May 20. That compares to an average of 81% planted on that date and 75% planted on May 20, 2011. The first condition report of the year says 77% of the corn crop is in good or excellent condition. The Crop Progress report says 76% of the soybean crop was planted by May 20 compared to an average of only 42% on that date. The May cattle on feed report said the number of cattle on feed May 1 in feed yards with a capacity of 1,000 head or more was down 0.6% from a year earlier. This is the first time the on-feed number has been below year-ago since May 2010. April placements were down 14.8% from a year earlier, the smallest for any April since 2002, and the lowest for any month since June 2009. Large feed yards have gained market share causing a disparity between marketings and fed cattle slaughter. April marketings from large feed yards were up 0.4%. Steer and heifer slaughter for April was down 4.3%. Over the last 15 months, marketings from the large lots included in the monthly cattle on feed surveys have averaged 4 percentage points above steer and heifer slaughter. The choice carcass cutout value was higher this week. On Friday morning, the choice boxed beef carcass cutout value was $194.71/cwt, up $2.20 from the previous Friday. The select carcass cutout was down $1.20 from the previous week to $186.09/cwt of carcass weight.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

Fed cattle prices were very slightly lower this week. Through Thursday, the 5-area average price for slaughter steers sold on a live weight basis was $121.27/cwt, down 16 cents from last week, but up $16.16/cwt from the same week last year. Steer prices on a dressed basis averaged $193.50/cwt this week, also down 16 cents from a week ago, but up $22.94 from a year ago. Steer dressed prices are below the choice cutout value for the first time since the week ending on November 18. This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 636,000 head, down 0.8% from the week before and down 5.6% from a year ago. The average dressed weight for steers for the week ending on May 12 was 835 pounds, up 3 pounds from the week before, up 13 pounds from a year ago, and above a year earlier for the 18th week in a row. Oklahoma City feeder cattle prices were mostly $2 to $6 higher this week with the ranges for medium and large frame #1 steers: 400-450# $206-$216, 450-500# $189, 500-550# $186-$196.50, 550-600# $177-$189.50, 600-650# $162-$174, 650-700# $159.50-$168, 700-750# $154.50-$160, 750-800# $149-$158, 800-900# $141-$151.50, and 900-1000# $131.50-$144.25/cwt. Cattle futures ended the week lower. The June live cattle contract settled at $117.65, down $1.67 from the previous Friday. The August contract lost $2.82 this week to end at $119.10. From University of Missouri


Classifieds

Animals

Real Estate/Acreage

Wanted

ASCA registered Australian Shepherd pups. Working line since 1968. Full satisfaction guaranteed. All four colors available. Boise, Id 208-484-9802

Unique 78+ acres with 360 panoramic view 13 minutes from Boise; large Master; Gas Appliances; nicely landscaped, 2 ponds, fruit trees, barn, out buildings. $378K www. krueger-ranch-for-sale.com for pictures. 208891-3033

Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338.

For Sale two city lots in Homedale ID, I will carry with low down payment and $395 per month. Great location, corner lot. Trades welcome. Contact Michael 208-389-9200

Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258

Farm Equipment Challenger MT 755, 2209 hrs, annual service checks by Western States, 1000 hrs on 25” tracks, Trimble auto steer and sprayer control, clean one owner, $152,000.00; John Deere Combine 9610, 2208 hrs, 1629 separator hrs, 25’ platform, JD Grain GPS monitoring system, $85,000.00. deegt@aol. com or call 208-220-3335 Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime

Household Oak, 2 slate pool table with net pockets. $500. Pocatello, Id 208-241-8384

Miscellaneous RV Park, power, water, sewer. Rent monthly for $325 or seasonally (4mo) for $300 monthly. We are a small park located just 2 miles from the Lincoln Boat Ramp, on Beautiful Lake Roosevelt. 208-664-2361. Boat storage units also available.

Ideal Ranch for horses in King Hill, ID. Log home, 99 acres. Borders BLM. Two ponds, springs, Clover Creek runs through ranch. 8 stall horse barn, tack room, indoor arena. Shop, wild life, quiet. More details phone 208-989-6795

Recreational Equipment Winnebago Adventurer 2002. 32 ft., 2 slide outs, 33,100 miles, gas. Ford – V10 Triton. $36,500 obo. Chester, ID 208-709-5732

Vehicles 2000 Freightliner Truck 374,000 miles runs great. 2002 Ravens 48ft. step deck trailer, new brakes, tires 40% left. Call Dale Reisinger 208-890-5255 or 208-365-4525

FREE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS

send to: dashton@idahofb.org

FREE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS

send to: dashton@idahofb.org

DEADLINE DATES:

ADS MUST BE RECEIVED BY

June 20 FOR

NEXT ISSUE. FREE CLASSIFIEDS Non commercial classified ads are free to Idaho Farm Bureau members. Must include membership number for free ad. Forty (40) words maximum. Non-member cost- 50 cents per word. You may advertise your own crops, livestock, used machinery, household items, vehicles, etc. Ads will not be accepted by phone. Ads run one time only and must be re-submitted in each subsequent issue. We reserve the right to refuse to run any ad. Please type or print clearly. Proof-read your ad.

Mail ad copy to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848 or email Dixie at DASHTON@IDAHOFB.ORG Name: __________________________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________ City / State / Zip: __________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________________ Membership No. ___________________ Ad Copy: ________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2012

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June 2012, Volume 16, Issue 4