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September 2011 Volume 15, Issue 6

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Sheep Industry Encourages Expansion

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Idaho Grower Assumes Top Wheat Industry Post

Idaho Farm Bureau

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County Fair Livestock Interest Flourishing


Tightening our Belts, Pulling up by our Bootstraps

The Ag Agenda

By Bob Stallman AFBF President

The U.S. economy has taken a hit recently. The unemployment rate stands at 9 percent, our country’s credit rating was just downgraded from AAA to AA+, the national debt is at an all-time high and lawmakers can’t seem to agree on the best way to get us out of this financial hole. The current situation affects all Americans, whether they’re farm-

Feds Drop Feral Horse Castration Plans By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

Plans to gather, castrate and release several hundred free-roaming stallions on Wyoming rangeland were ditched recently in the face

“Mr. President, Don’t Pooh-Pooh Our Concerns” By Rick Keller CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

Collectively, U.S. agriculture is faring well in these tough economic times. With the cheap U.S. dollar, low interest rates, foreign demand, and generally good commodity prices, most farmers are optimistic about where they are. However, 2

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

ers, teachers, wait staff or construction foremen. No one is immune. But, our country has been at the bottom of the financial barrel before and pulled itself up by the bootstraps. With some perseverance, consensus and common sense—we can again. Make it Meaningful While the debt ceiling bill that President Obama signed in Au-

of opposition from environmental groups who contend that birth control is a threat to the long-term survival of the herds. Plans generated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management were challenged in court by the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, the Western Watersheds Project and others. In spite of proven biological data that shows feral horse populations can double every four years and are extremely destructive to fragile there are dark clouds in view that could easily dampen a positive outlook for the future. During President Obama’s Midwest bus tour last month, a farmer expressed concerns over proposed regulations impacting agriculture. The President pooh-poohed the apprehensive farmer’s worries by telling him he shouldn’t believe everything he hears. The farmers concerns are justified. The Obama administration has spent

gust will keep our nation moving forward, even harder work lies ahead. It’s now in the hands of the congressional deficit reduction “super committee” to find ways to reduce our annual deficit spending. Like most Americans, Farm Bureau wants to see a meaningful reduction in our deficit and put the country back on track to fiscal soundness. We support the need for deficit reSee STALLMAN, page 32 desert ecosystems, the environmental groups’ threat of a lawsuit was enough to cause the BLM to withdraw their plans and continue with traditional management plans wherein horses are gathered and transported to holding facilities where they await adoption. The current program results in a small percentage of successful adoptions and costs the federal government in excess of $25 million per year. The BLM’s original plan was to See PRIESTLEY, page 32 the last three years establishing directives and regulations that negatively affect farmers and ranchers in rural America, with no end in sight. Included below is a list of proposed rules, directives and actions impacting rural America since President Obama’s inauguration that have been identified by Senator Pat Roberts (R-Kan.), ranking member of the Senate Committee on Agriculture: See KELLER, page 38


Volume 15, Issue 6 IFBF OFFICERS President ....................................Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President .................................. Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President ............................... Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................ Shelley Scott Bird ........................................................... Pocatello Chris Dalley ........................................................Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ............................................Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................ Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant ................................................... Oakley Rick Pearson .................................................... Hagerman Mike Garner............................................................... Declo Curt Krantz ............................................................ Parma Mike McEvoy..................................................... Middleton Tracy Walton ....................................................... Emmett Marjorie French ............................................... Princeton Bob Callihan ......................................................... Potlatch Louis Kins ........................................................... Kootenai Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Austin Tubbs............................................................... Malad STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ........................ Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Member Services ................................... Ray Poe Dir. of Commodities ............................. Dennis Brower Commodity Assistant .................................. Peggy Pratt Membership Assistant ............................... Peggy Moore Market Information Assistant . ................ Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager ........................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager ....................... Kendall Keller Dist. III Regional Manager ................... Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ................... Russ Hendricks Dist. V Regional Manager ....................... Bob Smathers Director of Governmental Affairs ............ Kent Lauer Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs .... Dennis Tanikuni Range/Livestock Specialist........................... Wally Butler Director of Public Relations .............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................. Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager .................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise ................... Julie Christoffersen Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID GEM STATE PRODUCER USPS #015-024, is published monthly except February, May, August and November by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201. POSTMASTER send changes of address to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, Idaho, and additional mailing offices. Subscription rate: $6.00 per year included in Farm Bureau dues.

MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: Dean Combe of Eagle picks sweet corn that is soon headed to the Western Idaho State Fair. Dean’s son Jordan is a partner in the operation. Photo by Steve Ritter

Workers pick 85 dozen ears of sweet corn at Combe Farms near Eagle. The corn was donated to the Western Idaho State Fair 4-H Appreciation Dinner for exhibitors. Photo by Steve Ritter

Family Sweet Corn Business Thrives By Jake Putnam On the back roads of Idaho sweet corn is ripe, and on the Combe family farm on Beacon Light Road north of Eagle they’re charging a bit more this year than last. “Everyone else is charging $4 dollars a dozen, it’s time we did,” said 17-year-old Jordan Combe, who handles marketing for the family operation. “We’ve been stuck at $3 a long time, it’s about time we changed,” he said. “We were losing money I think. People don’t care; they don’t seem to notice the price change.” See CORN page 4 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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CORN

Continued from page 3 The Combe corn operation is a labor of love that’s spanned 45 years and in the southwest Idaho produce market, their corn is coveted by fresh food devotees. “Jordan and I have been doing this since he was five years old,” said father Dean Combe. “He’s 17 right now and I have been doing this for 45 years. I started out with my oldest son and the next and soon we worked all down the line until Jordan. He’s been at it 12 years now.” Dean and Jordan start planning for the season right after harvest each fall. The father-son team studies all the seed available on the market and can quote market prices going back decades. While price is important, taste is their priority. Their favorite variety is Incredible sweet corn. “We started out with golden jubilee when my older boys were in it, and the last six years, Jordan and I got interested in a seed called Incredible,” said Dean. “We looked at the new seed because my nephew told me about it. He said it does well in sand and these fields are sandy. And it grows good and people really love it because it lives up to its name because it’s incredible.” The four-acre corn operation will produce three thousand dozen ears, according to Dean. And the corn operation has a unique life of its own. The modest family veggie stand off Highway 16 brings out fanatical foodies that drive from Payette and Boise for the sweet corn, and they’ve done it for decades. “It works very well. We have more customers now than we have ever had and each year it keeps getting better. If you have tender corn people keep coming back,” added Dean. Jordan Combe handles the marketing and has free rein to experiment. “We put the corn on Craigslist and we’ve announced it at church. We have signs everywhere on the surrounding roads and most importantly friends tell friends,” said Jordan. 4 #

17-year-old Jordan Combe is in charge of marketing sweet corn for his family’s farm operation near Eagle. Photo by Steve Ritter

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011


As the 2011 season got underway the decision to raise their prices by 50-cents a dozen cast a dark cloud over the operation. With high input costs the Combe’s had to raise prices to operate in the black. “One customer thought it was too much and he turned around on the first day we raised our price and brought it back, he said he thought it was too much. Jordan gladly gave his money back and he took off after that. It was a bit nerve wracking the first day but it’s been nothing but positive ever since,” said Dean.

“It works very well. We have more customers now than we have ever had and each year it keeps getting better. If you have tender corn people keep coming back,”

“All the kids that participate in 4-H feast on our corn,” said Dean. “They love it and it’s good for them. We’ve been doing this since 2005. The kids are a big part of the fair so this is their celebration and we’re pleased to have our corn singled out for the annual event.” Each year the Combes give back to the community. They supply the corn at the Western Idaho State Fair 4-H appreciation dinner for the exhibitors. They consider it an honor to be asked and their corn is the centerpiece of the annual feast. “All the kids that participate in 4-H feast on our corn,” said Dean. “They love it and it’s good for them. We’ve been doing this since 2005. The kids are a big part of the fair so this is their celebration and we’re pleased to have our corn singled out for the annual event.” Jordan Combe will graduate next year with real world marketing experience. He’s run a farm and thriving retail operation. At the same time the Combe family corn is gaining a market niche and is thriving despite higher prices and tough economic climate.

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Managers of Combe Farms prefer the Incredible sweet corn variety because it grows well in sandy soils and is tender. Photo by Steve Ritter

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A band of sheep graze across Midvale hill in Washington County. The band is owned by Shirts Sheep Company of Homedale. Photo by Steve Ritter

Sheep Industry Announces ‘Let’s Grow’ Program By John Thompson The U.S. Sheep Industry Association (ASI) wants ranchers and perspective ranchers to ramp up production to take advantage of a robust market. Processors, food service providers, garment companies, grocery stores and a rapidly growing nontraditional market are clamoring for a greater supply of domestic lamb and wool. Lamb prices are at an all-time high and wool prices are the best they’ve been in over 20 years. ASI is calling on sheep producers, both large and small, from east to west, to grow the flock by two ewes per operation or by two ewes per 100 by 2014. They encourage sheep producers to increase the average birthrate per ewe to two lambs per year and increase the harvested lamb crop by 2 percent – to 110 percent. 6

This would result in 315,000 more lambs and 2 million more pounds of wool for the industry to market. Processors, feeders and other companies that purchase lamb are supportive and have voiced concern about the production chain’s ability to meet demand. ASI President and Idaho rancher Margaret Soulen Hinson said lamb production has dropped off in both Australia and New Zealand and demand is brisk worldwide. “I would say people should take a hard look at it right now,” Soulen Hinson said. “For existing cattle operations, many can add sheep to the mix without necessarily needing to cut cattle numbers. We run both and it’s a great combination, you get better utilization out of your lambs and sheep are very profitable right now.” ASI Executive Director Peter Orwick said

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

the U.S. flock has dropped from 12 million head in 1993 to 7 million head today. A quarter of the production stopped in 1993 when the National Wool Act was phased out. This opened the floodgates for imported lamb from mainly New Zealand, and Australia. They quickly took advantage of 40 percent of the U.S. market. Drought has hurt sheep production in Australia and while New Zealand has continued to export lamb to Europe, sheep ranchers there have shifted to dairy to meet Chinese demand for powdered milk. “We have to get more lamb production in place to service grocery and restaurant chains,” Orwick said. “There is no question if we don’t increase numbers we run the risk of not being able to stock the grocery stores and restaurants. Growth of farm flocks is needed and ex-


pected. However, many of Idaho’s large sheep operations were already in an expansion phase and buying breeding stock is difficult at the present time. Orwick said, however unfortunate, that drought in Texas and New Mexico has forced the sale of many flocks from those states. “Ewes from that part of the country are being put on trucks and shipped all over the country right now,” Orwick said. “So they are becoming available.” ASI’s new website at www.growourflock. org/twoplus outlines specific strategies producers can use to increase lamb production. It states: “By implementing pre-breeding and pre-lambing management tools like flushing, teaser bucks, cross breeding and nutrition, increasing the average birthrate per ewe to two lambs per year can become a reality. And although the industry will never do away with predator and disease issues, there are mortality reduction tools out there for those experiencing problems.” The website also recommends an SID Handbook available from ASI. In 2011, two major announcements to carry American lamb in grocery stores occurred: Kroger, one of the nation’s largest grocery store chains, launched an American lamb branded campaign and Super Walmart made a commitment to exclusively carry

American lamb in its stores. In addition, nontraditional market channels, which include on-farm sales, farmers markets and small processors serving ethnic communities, have grown exponentially. In fact, one-third of the U.S. lamb crop has moved outside the traditional industry infrastructure to feed this nontraditional lamb market. “We just flat can’t keep up with the demand for lamb right now,” Orwick said. “The emerging non-traditional market is buying a full third of total lamb production. It’s sold direct to consumers at farmer’s markets and other outlets.” “As an industry, we must supply the traditional market channel to keep American lamb in the nation’s largest grocery store chains and restaurants all while meeting the emerging demand for American lamb in the nontraditional markets,” according to an ASI press release. Wool is also a big part of the robust demand. The U.S. military, the largest domestic consumer of U.S. wool, utilizes washable wool products. Equipment that makes washable wool products is operating at a plant in South Carolina. The equipment was purchased in Europe and is being used for a variety of domestically produced wool products that are reaching the military and commercial markets.

Washable wool products are gaining popularity in all kinds of outdoor sports because of wool’s moisture-wicking ability. It’s also fire resistant and does not carry odors like other fabrics. Soulen Hinson said numbers of small farm flocks are growing. For people interested in raising sheep, she recommends getting to know someone with experience. “Find a mentor or a partner, someone who runs sheep and spend some time with them,” she said. “Many ranchers are willing to help, and ASI is also developing a mentoring program.” Orwick recommended contacting state sheep associations to get experience and contacts. Learn more about The Idaho Woolgrowers Association at www.idahowool.org. “We have a lot of confidence in the lamb market,” Orwick added. “It has matured in the last five years and is much different now than it was in the 90’s. Since 2002 the lamb market has not looked back. We’ve seen steady increases for nine years in a row. It’s not a flash in the pan. The fundamentals are real solid and people are increasing efficiencies both at the ranch level and the research level.”

The American Sheep Industry Association (ASI) is encouraging ranchers and perspective ranchers to increase lamb and wool production to keep up with a rapidly growing market. Photo by Steve Ritter

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Boundary County Man Charged in Bear Killing By John Thompson BONNERS FERRY – A Boundary County man pleaded not guilty on August 23, to federal felony charges of killing a grizzly bear near his home in early May. Jeremy Hill, 33, shot the bear three times on Mother’s Day in his backyard with a .270 rifle. According to news reports, the bear was an adult sow. There were two presumed two-year-old juveniles with her. They dispersed into the forest after the first shot was fired. Darrell Kerby, a family acquaintance and former mayor of Bonners Ferry, said Hill and his wife Rachel have six children ages 14 to eight months, some of whom were playing in the yard at the time the bears were sighted. Immediately after the shooting, Hill contacted the Idaho Fish and Game Department. An investigation and attempt to trap the other two bears by the state agency followed, but the bears apparently left the area and have not been seen since. Idaho Fish and Game Spokesman Mike Keckler said the carcass was confiscated and results of the investigation were turned over to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). “Recognizing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has jurisdiction over endangered species we turned the evidence over to them,” Keckler said. “We did not make a call on whether it was justified or not. It’s a federal matter because it involves an endangered species.” In Portland, Oregon, USFWS Spokesman Joan Jewett said she could not comment due to the fact that the case is active. However, she said the decision on whether to prosecute is up to the U.S. Attorney’s office, which initiated the case. U.S. Attorney Wendy J. Olson announced the charges in Boise, in early August. Hill faces felo-

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ny charges that carry a potential fine of $50,000 and up to one year in jail. Hill is an excavation contractor. His family lives near Porthill, about 25 miles north of Bonners Ferry near the Canadian border. Kerby, who served for over 20 years as a public servant in Boundary County, is concerned that the incident will erode public trust in federal agencies. He added that the grizzly bear habitat designation (ESA) has limited access to timber on federal lands which has adversely affected the Boundary County economy. “This is an injustice to a hardworking family whose honesty is being rewarded with a federal felony charge,” Kerby said. “We have tried to work alongside with recovery (grizzly) efforts and educate people so that our timber economy can get back to normal. My biggest fear and that of this community is the heavy hand of government will come down because they can – not because they are in search of justice.” Kerby added that there has not been a human / bear conflict resulting in a dead bear in Boundary County since 2004. “That’s a long time without an interaction,” he said. “I think it’s because we have a good education program at the local level but this court action could undo all that.” The Boundary County Commission sent a letter in support of Hill to Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter on August 2. The letter was also sent to members of Idaho’s congressional delegation. The letter states that as a member of the Kootenai Resource Initiative, Boundary County has cooperated in grizzly bear management for several years with the goal of recovery in order to delist the animals and reduce regulations on nearby National Forests. The incident occurred more than five miles outside of the grizzly bear recovery zone, according to

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

the letter. Further, the letter states “We feel that at all costs this man (Hill) has the obligation and responsibility to protect his children. This is not some flagrant or malicious act. We urge you to do all that is in your power to have this matter settled. We must assist and protect the ability of the average citizen to protect his family when they are in danger.” On a somewhat happier note, one of the pigs in the family pig pen near where the three bears were first sighted and raised as a 4-H project by Jeremy’s daughter Jasmine Hill, fetched nearly $20,000 at auction during the Boundary County Fair on August 20. According to a local news website, newsbf. com, the pig was sold 15 times and then given back to Jasmine Hill. The report states the community showed its support to the family of a man who stood up to defend his wife and six children. The pig, Regina, weighed 254 pounds and brought an initial bid of $4.50 per pound. Fodge Mill, the buyer then turned the hog and she was purchased by North Idaho Energy Logs, Pluid Logging, South Hill Lockers, Three Mile Café (twice) Chante Kramer (twice), Oxford (twice), the Bennett Brothers, Akins Harvest Foods, Escrow Inc., ESCO, and a local doctor, Mark Barker, matched the $5 per pound price that was settled at. Further the report states there were a lot of tears shed during the auction. The auctioneer is quoted saying; “I’m not sure what’s going on here, but I can tell it’s something pretty special.” Hill’s trial is slated for October 4 in Coeur d’ Alene before U.S. District Court Judge Edward Lodge. There were about 70 people who attended the arraignment.


Two new varieties of winter barley are making lasting impressions on growers for their heavy yields. Farm Bureau File Photo

Winter Barley Yields Off the Charts By John Thompson Unconfirmed reports out of the Magic Valley allege some growers are harvesting winter malt barley that is hitting the 190 bushels per acre mark. IFBF was unable to contact any of the growers in the area to confirm the reports, but a University of Idaho cereal specialist reported that both Charles and Endeavor varieties have yielded 190 bushels per acre in trials and 150 to 170 bushels per acre is a reasonable range. Dr. Juliet Marshall, UI cereal cropping specialist and agronomy and plant pathologist, said Charles, named after the late Dr. Charles “Chuck” Murphy, former USDAARS National Program Leader for Small Grains at the Aberdeen Research Center, typically yields in the 150 bushels per acre range. Both varieties are accepted by the American Malting Barley Association as having adequate malt quality and brewing characteristics. However, both varieties are susceptible to winter kill and snow mold. Dr. Marshall says they do better from Aberdeen west, due to elevation, and they do not recom-

mend planting the winter malt barley varieties in the Upper Snake River Plain. In spite of that, some growers have had good success in that area. There are approximately 11,000 acres in production this year in Idaho. “Both varieties have been in the field now for about four years,” Dr. Marshall said. “It has not been consistently good because of winter kill and snow mold problems. Some years it comes through fine and you get 175 bushels, but other years you will only get in the 120 range.” Dr. Marshall said a Declo area grower reported yields this year ranging between 170 and 180 bushels per acre, which she called a “very good, reasonable range to expect in that area.” Charles has good malt characteristics but Endeavor should equal or better it for yield and has better malt characteristics, she said. Other varieties are in the development pipeline that are expected to have better winter tolerance. Seed for both varieties is available but has been in high demand, she said.

“Individual growers experience with these varieties varies tremendously,” she said. “Those that like it and can handle it will see yields of 175 bushels per acre very easily. It is being grown all over eastern Idaho but is better suited for the Magic Valley. Aberdeen is the northern limit in elevation where we would suggest that it be grown.” A UI Extension fact sheet on two-row winter malt barley states that previously all winter barley varieties were feed grains. Growers are interested in winter malt varieties because the yield potential significantly outpaces that of spring barley. In addition, winter varieties are likely to require less irrigation over the length of a growing season. In trials, during years where winter kill was not an issue, winter varieties averaged over 25 bushels per acre more than spring varieties. Charles is a selection from a cross with “Bearpaw” a Montana State University variety and a numbered variety. Pedigree selection was followed for maturity, height, lodging resistance, resistance to shattering and favorable head type. Charles was elevated and replicated at Aberdeen from 1998 to 2004.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Focus on Agriculture Agricultural Biotechnology Driven by American Innovation By John Hart Throughout history, a spirit of innovation has characterized the United States of America. From the Lewis and Clark Expedition to the space race to the computer age, Americans have always been innovators. And innovation has always found a home on the American farm. Take a look at a modern combine or tractor, and you will see American innovation at its best. But innovation on the farm doesn’t end there. It can be found in the seeds farmers plant and in the products they use to protect their crops and nurture their livestock. However, the hallmark of American innovation may well be found in agricultural biotechnology. Thanks to the wonder of biotechnology, more farmers now plant insect-resistant seeds that require far fewer chemical inputs than conventional varieties. Because of the use of biotech seeds, farmers can increase productivity per acre and reduce the need for pesticides. In addition, the adoption of biotechnology has encouraged the use of no-till cultivation, which reduces both herbicide use and greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, biotechnology ensures a more affordable and reliable supply of food and fiber for consumers. 10

The evidence is clear that biotech crops currently on the market are safe to eat and pose no environmental harm. In testimony in June before a House Agriculture subcommittee reviewing the opportunities and benefits of agricultural biotechnology, Dr. Roger Beachy, president emeritus of the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis, Mo., drove home the point that biotech crops are safe. “Since regulations were first put in place for the products of agricultural biotechnology in 1987, more than 2 billion acres of crops have been grown and harvested in a least 29 countries around the world,” Dr. Beachy testified. “These crops have been grown by 15.4 million farmers, 14.4 million of who are small, resource poor farmers in developing countries. The harvests of these crops have been consumed in billions upon billions of meals by humans and livestock around the world for the better part of two decades now. In all this vast experience, we have not a single consequence of a novel, negative consequence for health or the environment—not one.” Many scientific bodies attest to the safety of biotech crops. Studies by The National Research Council confirm that there has

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

not been a single instance of harm to human health or the environment due to the use of biotech seeds. In Europe, the Joint Research Centre has concluded that biotech products currently on the market in the European Union are safe. Based on the evidence to date, the benefits of commercialized biotech crops far outweigh the risks. After a thorough and rigorous safety and environmental review, U.S. regulatory agencies have proven that biotech sugar beets and alfalfa are safe for commercialization, yet the use of these valuable products has been challenged in court. The potential for feeding a hungry world through biotechnology is nearly limitless. Agricultural biotechnology is safe, sustainable and serves consumers by ensuring an abundant food supply. It is time to invigorate America’s innovative spirit by renewing our commitment to agricultural biotechnology, removing the regulatory hurdles that stand in the way and continuing to make consumers aware that biotech crops are not only safe but desperately needed. John Hart is director of news services for the American Farm Bureau Federation.


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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Goats graze on Leafy Spurge near the Weiser River.

Using goats for targeting grazing of noxious weeds Article and photos by Steve Stuebner

control.”

The use of goats to control noxious weeds is increasingly being embraced as an effective, non-toxic method of weed control in Idaho and elsewhere.

Prior to goat grazing, big meadows along the Weiser River were smothered by yellow Leafy Spurge. Herbicide sprays and biological controls couldn’t stop the spread. The noxious weed not only out-competes native plants, forbs and grasses, it also contains a milky sap that can blind people.

Ray Holes, a former Whitebird cattle rancher, has been a leader in the targeted grazing industry, building up his goat herds so he can meet the growing demand. Nine years ago, Washington County was one of the first places to try goat-weed control in Idaho to control Leafy Spurge, a ubiquitous noxious weed that had spread into the Weiser River canyon in the early 1970s. That year, the goats worked 1,200 acres. This year, they’ll graze 10,500 acres of state, county and private land, including areas along the Weiser River. “Leafy Spurge is one of the worst noxious weeds in Washington County,” says Bonnie Davis, Washington County Weed Superintendent. “It has a substantial root system that can run as deep as or deeper than 30 feet. That makes it extremely difficult to 12

Looking for solutions, Davis invited Ray Holes to give a presentation about using goats to control noxious weeds. Holes had experimented with goats on his own ranch to control yellow star thistle, a prolific noxious weed that produces long, nasty thorns. “We were spending $20,000 a year to control yellow star, and we couldn’t get ahead of it,” says Holes. “We decided to get the goats, thinking that maybe we could break even on our costs if they would eat the yellow star. We found out they did a lot more than that. They ate the yellow star, they ate the brush and a lot of other weeds we had. It ended up being a much better deal.” When Holes first talked to the Washington

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

County Weed Control Board, local ranchers were cynical. They were worried that the goats would consume forage intended for their cows. “It was a tough sell in our county. We’re basically a cattle county,” Davis says. But Holes explained that the goats would increase the forage for livestock by reducing Leafy Spurge and other weeds. It’s called targeted grazing. “In the long-term picture, if it’s done correctly, it provides more forage,” Holes says. “That’s the whole idea of it.” Holes convinced the weed board to give it a try. It helped that he has been a lifelong rancher himself. Peruvian herders keep the goats on the move, Holes points out, so they primarily eat the weeds and move on, leaving the grass underneath for cattle. But timing is everything. The goats are released on the range in May, when Leafy Spurge is most palatable.


“These goats get turned on to the flavor of Leafy Spurge, and it’s like caffeine or chocolate -- they’ll actually seek it out over the other vegetation,” Davis says with a smile.

built a white, covered structure, similar to a barn, to give the nannies and their babies a place to stay out of the rain or snow right after the “kids” are born.

The goats stop Leafy Spurge from spreading by eating the top of the plants; prevent the seed head from blooming, and the root system shrinks over time, killing off many of the plants.

Peruvian herders keep the nannies in a little pen with the newborn kids. They put iodine on their navel, make sure the nannies are nursing, and the nannies and kids are doing OK. Then, after 12 hours or so, they’re moved outside for mixing into larger groups to make room for more newborns coming in.

“We’ll never eradicate it but we’ve controlled it and contained it in numerous areas,” Davis says. “I’m very proud of this. I’m known as the goat lady.” If Davis is the goat lady, Holes is the goat king. He’s been building up his goat herds as he’s received more grazing contracts from private landowners, county weed offices, state agencies, Native American tribes, the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service and other federal agencies. Nowadays, his goat herds number 7,000 head; they are controlling weeds and other targeted grazing projects in 5 western states (California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana). “I see it really taking off,” Holes says. “We’ve never advertised, and we’re the largest in the nation. It’s all been word of mouth.” He winters the animals near Hermiston, Oregon. In the spring, he sets up a big goat “kidding” operation where thousands of nannies give birth to 2-4 kids apiece. He’s

Holes learned from a few Texas goat ranchers that the younger nannies need to be grouped with older nannies when they’re out grazing because the older nannies know what to do. The young ones would be lost without elder leaders, he says. “If you put a bunch of young nannies together, they don’t know who to follow,” he says. “They need a leader, a matriarch.” From the time when goats have kids, he gradually mixes the goat families into bigger groups with a mix of older nannies and young ones so they will graze together well as a unit. Over a matter of days, a group of 4 is blended with another group of 4, and then it expands to a group of 16, 32, etc. “That’s how you create a band of goats,” he says. Holes sells surplus goat kids for meat. Each nanny can support only 1 or 2 kids when they’re out grazing in the field. Goat meat is popular with ethnic groups, and prices have been lucrative. Goat meat is actually the most widely consumed food item in the world.

Ray Holes and his family help manage a large herd of goats that are used for targeted grazing on noxious weeds.

“They’re the hottest thing on the market,” he says. “The same set of goats that were going for 60-80 cents per pound are now going for 1.80 - 2 dollars per pound, which is a huge difference, and it’s basically because of demand.”

The Hermiston-Tri Cities, Washington area is now the home base for Holes’ goat grazing operation. In the early spring, grass seed farmers hire Holes to graze on grass seed fields, plus the area doubles as his kidding operation. The weather is much milder than it is in Idaho, and the location is more central to Holes’ grazing contracts. For five years, Holes commuted back and forth to Idaho, but now he’s moved his wife, Lisa, and three children (all under the age of 5) to Kennewick, Wash. The family always has been an integral part of the goat grazing operation; they travel along with Ray in a semi-truck when they ship goats all over the West. “I call it the Romper Room on 18-wheels,” says Lisa Holes. “My Mom teases us about being gypsies, and what a lifestyle we have. We go pretty much wherever Ray goes.” Often times, Lisa says, Ray Jr. and the other kids will ride with Ray in the semitruck, and she’ll tag along behind in one of their other vehicles, towing along a camp trailer for Peruvian herders. They have 12 herders that keep watch over the goat herds all over the West, and so they often need to resupply the herders, making sure they have plenty of food and other supplies, and food for the herding dogs and focus on their primary task at hand -- keeping watch over the goats. “Feeding 12 guys for 12 months out of the year is a big job,” she says. Both Ray and Lisa Holes are happy that they can keep the family together despite the spread-out nature of his business. “One thing I’m so happy that worked out is we managed to integrate our family into our livestock background and range lifestyle,” she says. “That was really important to both of us.” Ray has a lifelong background in cattle ranching and Lisa came from the big game hunting and outfitting background in the Kamiah, Idaho, area, handling horses and pack stock. “I knew I wanted to be a stayat-home mom, and I wanted my children to be with their dad, and it’s worked out perfectly,” she says. See GOAT GRAZING page 35

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Actual email received by the Farm Bureau Member Benefits Department: I just wanted to share my success story that I had with the Sears Commercial benefit from my Federation discount. I’m remodeling my kitchen which means new appliances. My husband and I were able rack up savings of about $700.00 off the list prices of our appliances. On top of this savings we are also getting a nice sum of cash back as a rebate from Sears Commercial. The process was simple and the shipping very affordable ($65 total). I just wanted to let you know that I found great value in this benefit and thanks for the work you do coordinating these benefits! Thanks. Erica Catt Step 1

Members go to sears.com and find the product(s) they are interested in and write down the product/model number(s).

Step 2

Members email the product number(s) to Farm Bureau’s designated contact at Sears Appliance Select: wgill03@searshc.com for a quote. To receive this pricing a member must include their Farm Bureau membership number and Farm Bureau discount code CU068062 in the email.

Step 3

After receiving a quote (allow 2-3 business days), members can then choose to use a credit card to purchase the discounted item(s) and it will be delivered via a custom freight company.

THIS OFFER IS NOT AVAILABLE THROUGH SEARS RETAIL OR DEALER STORES. All manufacturer warranties apply with the option to purchase extended Sears Protection Agreements. Installation is not included with delivery.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

For more information call (208) 239-4289


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

15


BLACK COTTONWOOD Article and photographs by Chris Schnepf A number of both native and introduced cottonwoods (species in the genus Populus) can be found in Idaho. This article focuses on the most widespread cottonwood species in Idaho: black cottonwood. (Populus trichocarpa). Identification Black cottonwood’s most distinctive characteristic is its large, mostly smooth-edged leaves. The leaves are dark green on top and whitish with some occasional rusty staining on the underside. Black cottonwood leaves also tend to be spear-shaped lower in the tree and more triangular higher in the tree. In the fall, the leaves turn bright yellow, similar in degree to other species in the genus such as aspen (Populus tremuloides). Black cottonwoods also have thick, resinous, fragrant buds nearly ¾” long. When these buds break, they emit a pleasant, sweet smell that fills the air in the spring. Black cottonwood bark is thin, light colored, and

smooth when the tree is young, but thickens, darkens, and develops deep furrows as the tree ages. Ecology & Silviculture Black cottonwood is found from Alaska to southern California, mostly west of the continental divide. It is the largest American tree in the genus Populus, and the largest hardwood tree in western North America. There were once Cottonwoods in the lower Columbia River floodplain 200 feet tall and 9 feet in diameter! The Idaho state record black cottonwood (located in Bonner County) is 113 feet tall and 96 inches in diameter. Cottonwoods don’t get very old compared to some of our conifers, but can live up to 200 years. Black Cottonwood is found throughout Idaho, especially on moist sites along streams and lakes. Cottonwoods sometimes form large groves in floodplains. They are very shadeintolerant, so you will do not usually see young cottonwoods coming up in the understories of these groves, but there is of-

Black cottonwood leaves are dark green on top and whitish underneath. 16

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

ten enough light to support a variety of more shade-tolerant shrubs and other plants. In northern Idaho, cottonwoods are also commonly found midslope, especially on north-facing slopes. Cottonwoods produce lots of seed. Seed is produced on female trees in strings of capsules. The capsules open when ripe to release tiny seeds borne aloft on cottony tufts, upon which the seeds spread far and wide. Cottonwoods are dioecious - individual trees are either male or female in terms of their flowers. People planting cottonwood as a landscape tree often prefer to take a cutting from male tree, to avoid the prodigious amount of cotton female trees put out. Cottonwood is not very fire resistant – its strategy is to put out lots of far-spreading seed every year to take advantage of moist disturbed sites whenever and wherever they are available. Cottonwood seeds require a moist seedbed for germination. Cottonwood also reproduces readily vegetatively. Trees in this family (which also includes willows) are usually artificially reproduced with cuttings, pieces of stemwood .5 to 1.5 inch diameter cut into lengths of 8 inches to 8 feet and pressed into the soil with buds pointing up to produce a new tree. Sometimes these cuttings are rooted in a container at a nursery and planted as “rooted cuttings”. Cottonwoods can also be regenerated from stump sprouts (a technique known as “coppice”). A young black cottonwood

tree grows very fast. When it is crossed with other species in its genus, the resulting trees (hybrid poplars) can grow even faster (a phenomenon known as “hybrid vigor”). Hybrid poplars planted here are typically a cross between black cottonwood and another Populus species (e.g., crosses with eastern cottonwood – P. deltoides – are often referred to as “TD” hybrid poplars, in reference to the crossed species’ scientific names). On the right sites, with no competing vegetation, young hybrid poplars commonly grow 10 feet in height in one year. Cottonwoods often naturally hybridize with other species in the same genus at the edge of their ranges. For example, the “lanceleaf” cottonwoods found in southeastern Idaho are a naturally occurring hybrid of plains cottonwood (P. occidentalis) and narrowleaf cottonwood (P. angustifolia). A whole host of insects and diseases feed on Populus species but they are not usually managed for much, except in hybrid poplar plantations where leaf rusts, boring insects and other pests can cause serious man-


agement problems. Deer, elk, and other ungulates are a much bigger problem for anyone trying to regenerate cottonwood, as they will happily munch on cottonwood foliage, buds, and shoots. Physically protecting cottonwoods from browse is often essential when attempting to regenerate poplars. In some sites, beavers can also cause extensive damage to cottonwoods. Benefits Native Americans used the inner bark of the cottonwood for food and horse fodder, and made medicines from the tree’s resins. They also used cottonwood for firewood, especially where no other tree was available. Cottonwood has many values as a living tree. Cottonwood is sometimes used as a fast growing tree for windbreaks and shelterbelts. The city of Hayden, Idaho irrigates hybrid poplars to soak up nutrients as part of the city’s wastewater

Plantation-grown crosses black cottonwood with other species (hybrid poplars) have many uses.

treatment, to help reduce nutrient contributions to the Rathdrum Aquifer and Spokane River. Cottonwoods are very beneficial to wildlife. Their soft wood makes them easily excavated by primary cavity nesters (e.g. woodpeckers), which are then used by secondary cavity nesters such as wood ducks, owls, and raccoons. Beavers use cot-

tonwoods both as food (eating the bark of younger trees) and as a source of construction material for dams. Cottonwoods are also common nesting sites for many birds, including great blue herons, which form large shared nesting sites called “rookeries.” Cottonwoods are valuable components of vegetation along streams, providing shade and fish habitat where they tip into streams. Cottonwood wood is relatively soft (the term “hardwood usually refers to broad-leaved trees, irrespective of the wood density), but it nevertheless has many uses, including corestock for plywood, baskets, crates, pallets, and boxes. Cottonwood wood also has short, fine fibers, which make it a good species for pulp to create high quality book and magazine papers.

Great Blue Herons often build their nests in black cottonwood trees. This rookery was photographed on the Clearwater River upstream from Lewiston.

Because of their impressive growth rates, plantation-grown hybrid poplars have also been studied closely for a variety of uses. Most of the original hybrid poplar research in the Pacific Northwest focused on

trees grown for biofuels. In the early 1990’s that focus shifted to hybrid poplar for pulp and paper production. When pulp prices dropped over the last decade, the emphasis shifted to hybrid poplar use for solid wood products, veneers, and core-stock for plywood. Currently, hybrid poplar comes up in discussions of uses for all of these products. Conclusion Black cottonwood is a very valuable tree on many levels. In drier parts of Idaho, black cottonwoods near local streams and rivers are the only native trees around, making them something of an “oasis” tree to many people. A great deal has been written about cottonwoods. To learn more about this species and its hybrids, start with the references listed below. Chris Schnepf is an area extension educator – forestry – for the University of Idaho in Bonner, Boundary, Kootenai and Benewah counties. He can be reached at cschnepf@uidaho.edu

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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National Association of Wheat Growers President Wayne Hurst. Photo by Steve Ritter

Q & A With NAWG President Wayne Hurst By Jake Putnam Wayne Hurst runs a large family farm in Burley where he grows wheat, sugarbeets, potatoes, dry beans and forage crops. Hurst was recently appointed president of the National Association of Wheat Growers. The Idaho Farm Bureau’s Jake Putnam caught up with Hurst in the heat of the of the 2011 Harvest. Q - How’s the 2011 crop shaping up thus far? A – “This year’s wheat crop is at least average, maybe better than average. We had a very wet spring in the Pacific Northwest. While other parts of the country experi18

enced extreme drought others suffered through catastrophic floods. Here in southern Idaho we’re in between. We received heavier than normal rainfall for wheat. Some other crops like cool, wet weather and that’s what we experienced. Then things got warm and dry in June and July, which is fine, we had the irrigation to keep the crop going and right now we’re halfway through our wheat and grain harvest, and they’ve been above average, quality looks real good, we are also enjoying good market prices.” Q - So you’re two weeks late? A – “At least two weeks late, we normally harvest at the end of July and the first half

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

of August, so here we are, it’s late August and we are just getting into it three weeks late. We’ve been harvesting for a week now.” Q - Is there a sweeter word than ‘harvest’ to the American farmer? A – “It’s always fun to harvest. It’s a time to reflect on everything that went into producing the crop. We work closely with nature and try to produce the best crop that we can. It’s always gratifying to have a healthy harvest. There’s been a few times when we’ve had weather issues and the harvest wasn’t rewarding. The toughest times are when we finish harvest knowing that you’re not going to pay all of your


“If you love foreign oil, you’ll love foreign food. We see the need for a good domestic food supply and we support the safety net we have in place right now.” bills. That’s a real tough time. There are some farmers in the country that are experiencing that right now. Places where the weather has not been fair at all. I’m talking Texas, Oklahoma, and parts of Kansas and Colorado. They have some very grim times right now and I feel for them. In general harvest is a time where you can gather what the earth has provided you with. It’s exciting, gratifying and fulfilling to see a crop come in.” Q - What’s the biggest challenge facing agriculture today? A – “Right now farmers are looking at the budget talks on Capitol Hill. Frankly they’re concerned about the cuts and still having a safety net. It affects us and we’re worried. Also foreign policy is important to wheat growers. You can do everything right and plant your crop but there are foreign policy decisions that can deal us a very tough blow. I’ve experienced very low commodity prices. As an individual American farmer I cannot compete against foreign subsidized farmers. Many of our competitors are heavily subsidized. We need to have mechanisms in place to protect us against extreme weather or extreme crop prices. We have a good safety net in place right now and with these current talks on the Hill, it’s important to remember that food security is critical to our nation’s security. But we have to warn the American public that if you love foreign oil, you’ll love foreign food. We see the need for a good domestic food supply and we support

the safety net we have in place right now.” Q - So balancing the budget concerns farmers nationwide? A – “I believe Idaho farmers and wheat farmers of the nation want Washington to get their financial house in order. But we can’t do it on the backs of farmers alone. If you take a hundred dollar bill and the bill represents the entire federal budget, two dollars of that goes to the USDA budget. Only 25 cents of that 100-dollar bill goes to American farm programs and farmers, we cannot balance the budget on that 25 cents. We will take our cuts along with everyone else and we want things to be corrected but it can’t be done at the expense of farm safety. That’s very important. We also have some onerous EPA rules and regulations that we have to deal with. We have to work with tight budgets to stay profitable, their rules and regulations are getting more expensive, pesticides and fertilizer rules are spiraling out of control and we’re paying for it. Q - These issues all play into your goals as NAWG President? A – “We work closely with our committees and members and our goal is to develop good farm policy that provides a solid safety net for wheat growers across the country. Also to make sure that we have policy in Washington that is not adverse to growing wheat. We want solid environmental policy and we want to promote trade.”

“Trade is extremely important to our wheat growers. Half of our wheat is exported every year. Approximately 20 percent of the world’s calorie supply comes from our wheat. We want to make sure that we have a stable world food supply, for the world and our country.” Q - And that brings us back to Trade? A – “We’re hopeful that the free trade agreements will be ratified by Congress and signed by the President. Some of our neighboring countries have access to Columbia. We used to supply 70 percent of Columbia’s wheat, now the Canadians can ship in wheat duty free and we’re losing market share. Subsidized prices in Canada will dictate that. We hope Congress will ratify and the President will sign the agreements sooner than later. Columbia is a solid trading partner and they like our wheat.” “Rail transportation is also huge to wheat farmers. Farmers complain that they need railcars to get wheat to market. We ship a lot of our wheat by rail and they are important partners. The problem is that we are dealing with a big monopoly. Furthermore we’re served by just one railroad throughout most of the country, and they have monopoly power. All we want is reliable service with decent rates. The railroads are charging high rates because they can, yet we need them. We’re hoping the federal government will exercise its authority and monitor more closely and help us with better rates and service.”

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Farm Bureau Members Pay 25% Less For Paint

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Farm Bureau discount code

9061-3888-8

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Rookie of the Month: Brooks Latimore Schmitt Agency

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

Agent of the Month: Rhett Price Schmitt Agency

Agency of the Month: Dean Schmitt Schmitt Agency


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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County Happenings

The new Latah County Farm Bureau office is under construction in Moscow. Expected completion date is December 20.

Photo by Bob Smathers

Minidoka County Farm Bureau President, Larry Johnson, center, recently awarded scholarship checks to Melanie Ahern, left, and Chelsi Phillips, right. 22

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011


New members: Tony & Jennie McClain family enjoying the summer picnic for new members. 2011 Oneida County Farm Woman – Sharon Harris

2011 Oneida County Scholarship Winner – Nathan Giason picture with President Reed Stanley

2011 Oneida County Farm Family – Brant & Bonnie Howard Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Regulations regarding hauling farm commodities from farms to local markets will not change in the near future, according to a recent announcement from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

D.O.T. Backs Away From New Farm Regulations By John Thompson Comments submitted by farmers and ranchers from across the nation achieved the desired results regarding proposed changes to agricultural regulations and commercial license provisions. The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) recently announced they have no intention to propose new regulations governing transport of agricultural products and that the agency has released guidance to states so they clearly understand common-sense exemptions “to allow farmers, their employees, and their families to accomplish their day-to-day work and transport their products to market.” Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, in early August, said the department “had no intention of instituting onerous regulations on the hardworking farmers who feed our country and fuel our economy.” 24

American Farm Bureau President Bob Stallman praised the agency’s common sense approach. “Operating and moving the machinery necessary to tend and harvest crops and care for livestock is a vital part of farming and ranching,” Stallman said. “Long established protocols are in place at the state and local levels to ensure that safety is paramount, and that farmers are able to do their jobs and transport their goods to market.” According to an FMCSA press release after hearing from concerned farmers earlier this year, FMCSA initiated this review to make sure states don’t go overboard in enforcing regulations on agricultural operators, and to ensure consistent access to exemptions for farmers. No regulations will be proposed for any new safety requirements or changes to the rules governing the transport of agricultural products, farm machinery, or farm supplies to or from a farm.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

“Farmers deserve to know that reasonable, common sense exemptions will continue to be consistently available to agricultural operations across the country, and that’s why we released this guidance,” said LaHood. This guidance – which does not impose any new rules on farmers – follows the Federal Register public notice which FMCSA issued on May 31, 2011, asking farmers, farm organizations and the public to give input on the agency’s longstanding safety rules. “We want to make it absolutely clear that farmers will not be subjected to new and impractical safety regulations,” said U.S. Transportation Deputy Secretary John Porcari. “The farm community can be confident that states will continue to follow the regulatory exemptions for farmers that have always worked so well.” See D.O.T. REGS, page 34


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Presents The 16th Annual Tour Hosted by: Gary & Sandy Fuhriman

Hawaiian Island Cruise December 31, 2011- January 7, 2012 Join us onboard the Norwegian Pride of America for an exciting cruise around Hawaii. This unique 7-day itinerary will overnight in Maui and Kauai as well as visit the islands of Oahu and the Big Island of Hawaii. With this agenda we will have nearly 100 hours in port to discover waterfalls, active volcanoes, black, green, and white sand beaches, historic sites and unspoiled nature. This cruise will take place the week prior to the American Farm Bureau Annual Meeting that will be held in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 8-10, 2012. For more information and to register for this exciting cruise, call:

Gary Fuhriman - (208) 241-0243 Launa Walquist - (208) 232-4812 26

Space is limited with rates starting at: Inside $1,808.00 Obstructed Oceanview $1,769.00 Balcony (BF Category) $2,319.00 Balcony (BC Category) $2,379.00 Balcony (BB Category) $2,399.00 Balcony (BA Category) $2,419.00 All rates are per person double occupancy and include: cruise fare, port charges, government taxes and Hawaii Taxes.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011


Grain Marketing with Clark Johnston

A Season for Merchandising buyers over the past few weeks. With the unknown factors still lingering in the corn crop the feeders have once again become buyers of wheat that for one reason or another works better into the feed market than into the milling markets. This has mainly been low protein red wheat and wheat that has had contrasting classes. For the most part the bids at the flour mills have kept soft white out of the feed channels at least for now.

Clark Johnston

There is a season for everything. We have our spring work, summer and fall work as well as winter projects. We also have our season for merchandising. Yes I said a season for merchandising and unlike the other seasons the merchandizing season lasts at least twelve months and is ongoing. At the risk of sounding like a geek, merchandising is the most exciting of all. With all of the news and the outside influences that add to the volatility selling and/or purchasing our products is a full time job. Let’s just look at Chicago December Wheat futures over the past few weeks. Since the first of July the market rallied $1 higher then it corrected back down 60 cents just to then turn back to the upside and put the 60 cents back into the market by the third week of August. Granted we weren’t close to the highs we experienced back in April and May but, the market still gave us some additional opportunities to add to our bottom line. The uncertainty in the markets has also opened up additional markets for us to sell our wheat into. Let’s look at the additional feed markets that have been aggressive

Looking forward we can make the argument that this year doesn’t look much different than last when looking at the projected end of the year numbers. The spring weather took its toll in some regions of the country and still looms ever greater as we move towards corn harvest. Last year there was a rather large reduction in the corn yield from the August projections to the final report. In the August report this year the projected stocks to use ratio at year end was 5.5 percent. If we experience another reduction in the corn yields this year we could see additional needs for rationing the crop. Currently we are seeing the possibility for China to increase their imports of corn this year in order to meet the demand for additional hog production. Overall we currently have a good idea of the projected demand on our production while the real unknown remains actual production. When we look at the possibility of a shorter crop and increased demand we could very well find ourselves becoming just a little greedy when it comes to merchandising our crop this year. It will be important that we continue to be as unemotional as we can when making our decisions. Continue to look for the quick moves higher in the market as indications that the market is possibly making an emotional move and does it gives us the opportunity we have been waiting for? This is why it remains important to have our plan in place and review it often. If or when the market moves

a specific amount we sell at least a few bushels. When we have the specific objectives in place it helps us to remove the emotion from our decision. On the flip side the feeders have very possibly a larger challenge this year than last. This year all feed prices have the potential to move much higher than last year. Having a hedging program in place whether with futures, options or in the cash market will be important as we try to manage risk in the market. Using futures as your substitute purchase is a good program as a feeder. If you don’t currently have a hedging program in place now is a good time to get started even if it is on a small percentage of your needs. In the months ahead the market will continue to present us with the opportunities to price our feed and the hedging program will give you some additional flexibility when making your decisions. For example when the market reacted to the USDA report and sold off you would have had the opportunity to simply buy the futures to hedge yourself against the market moving back higher. When purchasing commodities it is always important to remember that you may not be excited about the price paid but, it may be the best the market is willing to give you during this time frame. Clark Johnston is a grain marketing specialist who is on contract with the Idaho Farm Bureau. He is the owner of JC Management Company in Northern Utah. He can be reached at clark@jcmanagement. net

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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ShowTime FFA Exhibitors show sheep during the Canyon County Fair.

Jennifer Benton of the Dry Lake 4-H Club shows her steer Holy Cow at the Canyon County Fair.

Article and Photos by Steve Ritter Late summer and early fall is fair season across America. From big state fairs, like Indiana and Iowa that attract hundreds of thousands of guests, to small county fairs where everybody knows everyone, fairs dot the landscape. In Idaho the month of August is packed with more than 25 county fairs, as well as regional fairs in Coeur d’ Alene, Boise and Blackfoot. From the beginning the fair has been a 28

showcase of human skills. From the blueribbon canned vegetables or the prettiest cake, to ceramic art, exhibit halls are colorful and creative.

agers, ages 8 to 18, work with their animals year around in preparation for 10 minutes in the show ring and a chance to win a blue ribbon.

4-H Clubs and FFA (Future Farmers of America) chapters are also mainstays at fairs.

“I love 4-H because it’s very character building. It teaches you discipline and responsibility that you can use the rest of your life,” says Jennifer Benton of the Dry Lake 4-H club. Benton showed her Angus steer Holy Cow at the Canyon County Fair. “It’s so much fun--a chance to dress up like a cowgirl. You don’t get to do that every day,” she said.

The young people involved in the two organizations mostly show the animals. Chickens, pigeons, goats, rabbits, sheep, pigs, dairy cows and beef steers are brought to the local fair for show. Children and teen-

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011


at the Fair Exhibits at the Canyon County Fair.

Swine judge Brent Dame chats with Rose Kienitz as she shows her pig Casper at the Gem/Boise County Fair.

The Canyon County Fair is one of the bigger county fairs in Idaho. It’s held in late July and runs a full week at the fairgrounds in Caldwell. Down the road 20 miles the Gem/Boise County Fair experienced an increase in livestock entrants. “A huge growth,” says Melissa McDaniel, 4-H coordinator for the fair. “Staycations--people want to stay home. They don’t want to go to Disneyland; they can’t afford it. So they get their kids in youth programs and they focus towards the

fair. So this year we have actually grown.” 4-H and FFA clubs also teach leadership and community involvement skills that extend throughout a person’s life. Idaho 4-H clubs attract more than 33,000 participants, while almost 4,000 high school students participate with FFA chapters across the state. Susi Larrocea-Phillips has been the leader of the Crafty Critters 4-H livestock club for the past 13 years. The club, the oldest in Ada County, has been in existence for more than 50 years.

“It’s been a roller-coaster trend,” she said. “You can see the necessity of the fair for the kids, but also what I have seen is the necessity of the kids to the fair. They see the importance of agriculture. It’s a draw for people to come and see what the kids have done with the animals.” Children and animals at the local fair: A winning combination for everybody and a formula for healthy and sustainable local events that benefit America.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Farm Bureau Members Pay Less For Choice Hotels! A $40 room will be closer to

$32 A $60 room will be closer to

$48 A $90 room will be closer to

1.800.258.2847

Farm Bureau Discount Code

$72

00800286

advanced reservations required

Exclusively For Farm Bureau Members Members can pick up discounted tickets from one of the following Farm Bureau county offices: Boise - Nampa - Caldwell - Meridian - Coeur d’Alene - Post Falls - Idaho Falls - Pocatello Regular Price For Evening Show (Ages 12-59)

Farm Bureau Price

Regular Price For Evening Show (Ages 12-64)

Farm Bureau Price

$10

$7.50

Regal Riverstone Stadium 14 Coeur D’Alene

$9

$7.50

Some restrictions apply. Contact a Farm Bureau county office listed above for details. Prices subject to change.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011


My American Farm Site Expands With New Game WASHINGTON, D.C., - As far as professions are concerned, farming and ranching are among the most challenging. A new interactive online game offered by the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture, “The Ultimate Challenge,” delivers key lessons about agriculture while providing a fun gaming experience. The Ultimate Challenge is the newest addition to the foundation’s “My American Farm” free online educational gaming platform. Sponsored by Pioneer Hi-Bred, a DuPont business, My American Farm has been growing in popularity since its launch in January of this year. To play The Ultimate Challenge game, students select a “farmer” avatar and take on the challenge of building a virtual farm as they play each of the games on My American Farm. However, in true board-game fashion, players will also experience several “curve ball” and “quick challenges” that provide important information about

the impact America’s 2.2 million farms and ranches have on their daily lives. “The Ultimate Challenge gives students an opportunity to see and experience the story of agriculture from gate to plate,” said Curtis Miller, director of education for the foundation. “Further, it does so while sharing accurate and up-to-date messages about agriculture.” To find The Ultimate Challenge and take advantage of other My American Farm resources, games and activities, visit www. myamericanfarm.org. My American Farm is supported by a generous donation from title sponsor Pioneer Hi-Bred, a DuPont business. Three years ago, Pioneer pledged $500,000 to support the development of the game.  An additional $35,000 pledge was recently made to support the development of a mobile kiosk version of the game and grants to support the mobile kiosk’s use. This donation reflects the company’s recently announced

commitment to focus on meeting four emerging global trends, one of which is increasing food production. Pioneer Hi-Bred, a DuPont business headquartered in Des Moines, Iowa, is the world’s leading developer and supplier of advanced plant genetics, providing highquality seeds to farmers in more than 90 countries. Pioneer provides agronomic support and services to help increase farmer productivity and profitability and strives to develop sustainable agricultural systems for people everywhere. Science with Service Delivering Success™. The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture is the 501(C)(3) affiliate of the American Farm Bureau Federation. The foundation fulfills a mission of building awareness, understanding and a positive public perception about agriculture through education.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Stallman

Continued from page 2

our country has been at the bottom of the financial barrel before and pulled itself up by the bootstraps. With some perseverance, consensus and common sense—we can again. deficit reduction and tackling the nation’s rising debt. Agriculture will do its part toward this end goal, but reductions need to be made wisely. It is likely that any comprehensive plan to reduce deficit spending will include cuts in programs that assist farmers, ranchers and communities in rural America. But, as farm bill expenditures in this country

represent less than one-half of 1 percent of the federal budget, balancing the budget or resolving the nation’s financial woes can’t be accomplished by focusing on agriculture or by disproportionately cutting agriculture funding.

Reduce Wisely When it comes to tightening the budget, U.S. farm policy has already led the way. In contrast to other programs, the cost of farm policy has sharply decreased over the past 10 years, is consistently under budget and has been the subject of three separate rounds of cuts in the past six years, totaling roughly $15 billion in savings. Agri-

culture has always contributed to deficit reduction in the past when called upon. Farm Bureau will work with the House and Senate agriculture committees as they develop a blueprint for agriculture spending. Our goal will be to retain the integrity of the farm programs that serve America’s farm and ranch families. Our priority is to have enough money left when all is said and done to write a viable farm bill that ensures an effective safety net for America’s farm and ranch families, furthers research, provides conservation measures and secures the nation’s food supply. Getting back on financial track will require everyone to buckle down on spending. Working together, pulling up those bootstraps, we can do this.

Priestley

Continued from page 2

gather up to 900 horses from the White Mountain / Little Colorado herd management areas between Rock Springs and La Barge. The agency planned to castrate all of the stallions it could capture and release 177 of them back to the range as geldings. The rest of the horses were to be sold, adopted or sent to long-term holding facilities in the Midwest. The withdrawn castration plan, which appears to be a reasonable way to control the fast-growing population was challenged on the basis that it violates federal law. A spokesman for the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign told the Associated Press that castration and release would cause irreparable harm to horse populations. A BLM spokesman said although the agency no longer plans to castrate and release the stallions, it will move forward with plans to gather and relocate the same number of animals (900) as determined in

32

the original management plan. The State of Wyoming contends that the BLM needs to abide by its longstanding legal agreement to keep feral horse populations in check to protect rangelands. The position adopted by these extreme environmental groups flies in the face of common sense and proven biological data. It also costs taxpayers a tremendous amount of money that no doubt could be put to much better uses. The Western Watersheds Project (WWP) paints itself as a protector of fragile desert ecosystems. This group has publicly stated time and time again that livestock grazing harms rangelands and should be done away with on public lands. Yet when it comes to feral horses, they take a completely opposite position. Feral horses are overpopulating rangelands in several western states. They compete for forage with wildlife and livestock and if left unmanaged, as these ex-

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

treme environmental groups seem to support, are a long-term threat to the survival of many wild plants and animals. The BLM’s plan to use castration as a management tool deserves a chance at the very least. Castration is cheaper and more effective than using chemical birth control methods on mares to limit their reproduction. What stands out to us in this instance is the unreasonable position adopted by environmental groups to realize the problem and work toward a solution. For a group like WWP that claims to want to protect desert ecosystems how can they ignore the impact of feral horses? For the other groups that claim castration is a long-term threat to survivability of these feral herds, there are no facts to support that claim. The argument is disingenuous at best and only serves to perpetuate a huge problem borne by the tax dollars of a populous that deserves better.


Idaho Spring Wheat Production Decrease 5 Percent

Based on conditions as of August 1, Idaho’s spring wheat yield is forecast at 76.0 bushels per acre, unchanged from the July 1 forecast and down 2 bushels per acre from 2010, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Production of 45.6 million bushels from 600,000 harvested acres is down 5 percent from last year. Idaho’s winter wheat yield of 80.0 bushels per acre is up 1 bushel per acre from last month and down 2 bushels per acre from last year. Producers expect to harvest 770,000 acres of winter wheat with a total production of 61.6 million bushels, up 6 percent from last year. Barley production is forecast at 44.1 million bushels, up 2 percent from last year’s 43.2 million bushels. Harvested acreage, at 490,000, is 20,000 acres more than last year. The expected yield of 90.0 bushels per acre is unchanged from last month and down 2 bushels from last year. Sugarbeet production is expected to total 5.70 million tons from 178,000 harvested acres, up 8 percent from a year ago. Sugarbeet yield of 32.0 tons per acre is up from last year’s 31.0 tons per acre. Alfalfa hay production is estimated at 4.49 million tons, a 5 percent decrease from 2010. The expected yield for alfalfa is at 4.4 tons per acre, up from last year’s 4.2 tons per acre. Other

hay production is expected to total 770,000 tons, up 8 percent from last year. Yield for other hay is estimated at 2.20 tons per acre, up from 2.10 tons per acre last year. Oat yield is forecast at 74.0 bushels per acre, down 2 bushels from last month and down 10 bushels from last year. Oat production from 15,000 harvested acres is expected to total 1.11 million bushels, down 34 percent from a year ago. Dry bean production is expected to total 1.47 million cwt from 84,000 harvested acres, down 42 percent from last year. Yield is forecast at 1,750 pounds per acre (clean basis), down 150 pounds from last year. Chickpeas, grown primarily in North Idaho, are included in the dry bean estimates. This year’s chickpea planted acreage accounts for 50 percent of Idaho’s dry beans. Idaho apple production is estimated at 60 million pounds, unchanged from 2010. Prune and plum production is expected to total 2,500 tons, down from last year’s 2,700 tons. Idaho hop producers are expected to harvest 2,288 acres with a yield of 2,400 pounds per acre and production of 5.49 million pounds in 2011.

Idaho 2010 Apple Production

Idaho’s 2010 utilized apple production totaled 60 million pounds, up 15 million pounds from 2009, but down 25 million pounds from 2008, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The final value

of Idaho’s 2010 apple crop was $13.9 million, $4.12 million above 2009’s value. Fresh market sales accounted for 40 million pounds of the 2010 crop, up 10 million pounds from the 2009 crop, while processing accounted for 20 million pounds, up 5 million pounds from 2009. Processing of Idaho’s apple crop accounted for 33 percent of Idaho’s utilized production for the 2010 and 2009 crop.

2011 Idaho Barley Varieties

Conrad (B5057) remains Idaho’s leading malt variety for 2011. Conrad (B5057) accounted for 21.8 percent of all barley planted and 28.8 percent of the total malting variety acres. The leading feed variety was Baronesse, accounting for 7.9 percent of all barley planted. Baronesse accounted for 32.3 percent of the feed/food variety acres. Malting Varieties: Malting varieties accounted for 75.5 percent of all barley acres in 2011, up 1.8 percentage points from last year. The leading malting variety was Conrad (B5057) accounting for 21.8 percent of all barley acres, up 1.3 percentage points from last year. The second largest malting variety was AC Metcalfe with 16.8 percent of the acreage. Moravian 69 (C69) was third with 10.7 percent, Merit 57 (B2657) was fourth with 4.8 percent and Harrington was fifth with 4.4 percent of all barley acres. Feed/Food Varieties: Feed/

Food varieties accounted for 24.5 percent of all barley acres in 2011, down 1.8 percentage points from last year’s 26.3 percent. Baronesse continues to be the leading feed variety, accounting for 7.9 percent of all barley acres, down 1.7 percentage points from a year ago. Champion is the second largest feed variety with 3.7 percent of the barley acreage followed by Criton with 3.0 percent of the acres. Medallion is fourth with 0.8 percent and Xena is the fifth largest feed variety with 0.8 percent of all barley acres planted.

Idaho Farm Real Estate Values and Cash Rents

Idaho farm real estate values, a measurement of the value of all land and buildings on farms, averaged $2,050 per acre for 2011, down 2.4 percent from 2010, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The average value for cropland in Idaho decreased from $2,470 per acre to $2,460 per acre. The average value of pasture decreased from $1,250 to $1,220 per acre. Idaho irrigated cropland cash rents in 2011 averaged at $168 per acre, an increase from $160 in 2010. Non-irrigated cropland cash rents were $55 per acre, down from $60 in 2010. Pasture rent averaged $16 per acre, up from $14 last year.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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USFRA ‘Farmer Activation’ Activities Launched

The start of the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance’s “farmer activation” activities, the first phase of the USFRA’s communications plan was launched recently. The alliance’s revamped website, www.usfraonline.org, went live and advertisements about the alliance will start appearing in agricultural web sites and media outlets.

farmers and ranchers to get engaged. In the “Get Involved” section, http://usfraonline.org/materials-to-share/, the movement video, “Raise Our Voices,” is available, as are banner ads and print advertising. In addition, farmers can tell USFRA what they want Americans to know about their food and sign up to take a survey that will be publicized in connection with alliance events, such as a national Town Hall meeting scheduled for September.

The new site offers a number of resources for alliance affiliates, supporters and individual

USFRA Announces Movement to Address Food Concerns

The U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance, comprised of prominent national, regional and state agricultural groups and their partners, today announced plans to lead a conversation with Americans, addressing concerns about their food, where it comes from and how it’s raised. This movement will give farmers and ranchers a voice in traditional and social media conversations about agriculture—where it doesn’t exist now—as well as with key in-

fluencers who are shaping the “good food/bad food” debates in popular culture. Farmers and ranchers will ask consumers about their greatest concerns with today’s food production practices and share the agriculture community’s dedication to continuously improving how food is raised in order to provide healthy choices for people everywhere. “No matter the cause, a knowledge and credibility gap has formed between the American people and their food,” said Bob Stallman, chairman of USFRA and president of the American Farm Bureau Federation.

D.O.T. REGS

Continued from page 24

“FMCSA is pleased with the input we’ve received from the agricultural community and members of Congress. We received about 1700 comments and the vast majority called for us to preserve the guidance that leaves states to carry out the farm exceptions as they have for many years.” said FMCSA Administrator Anne Ferro.  “We want to make crystal clear that we are not imposing any new regulations.”

public roads. The guidance released today, which is based on that input, clarifies three critical issues:

Earlier this year, farm groups came to FMCSA with concerns that some states might not allow exemptions to Commercial Drivers License (CDL) requirements for certain farm operations using “cropshare” leasing.

Interstate vs. intrastate commerce. Since the difference between the two has been determined by the U.S. Supreme Court and other Federal courts, FMCSA has limited flexibility to provide additional guidelines.  The Agency has concluded that new regulatory guidance concerning the distinction between interstate and intrastate commerce is not necessary.  Generally, the states and the industry have a common understanding on this point.  To the extent that fact-specific questions arise, the Agency will work with the States and the industry to provide a clarification for the specific scenario. 

When FMCSA investigated, there appeared to be wide differences among states in how the “for-hire” and related agricultural exceptions were being applied. In order to ensure consistency, FMCSA asked state officials to cease all new entrant safety audits on farmers engaged in “cropshare” leasing and issued the public notice soliciting input that would provide insight on the complex use of farm equipment on

Commercial Driver’s License. Federal regulations allow states to make exceptions to Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) regulations for certain farm vehicle drivers such as farm employees and family members, as long as their vehicles are not used by “for-hire” motor carriers. Some states have questioned whether this exemption applies to drivers who work for “crop share” or similar arrangements. FMCSA’s

34

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

notice includes guidance to ensure consistent application of the exemption. After considering the public comments, the Agency has determined that farmers who rent their land for a share of the crops and haul their own and the landlord’s crops to market should have access to the agricultural CDL exemptions given by the states.   Implements of Husbandry. In a perfect world, farm vehicles would only operate on farms, while commercial trucks would operate on public roads. The reality is that farm equipment that is not designed or intended for everyday use on public roads is often used for short trips at limited speeds. This creates a gray area for classification. After considering the public comments, FMCSA has determined that most States have already adopted common sense enforcement practices that allow farmers to safely move equipment to and from their fields.  In areas where farm implements are common, the enforcement community and the agricultural community have achieved a mutual understanding of which safety regulations should apply to farm equipment on their public roads.


Cattle Outlook August 19, 2011 International beef trade continues to be a big factor in this year’s record cattle prices. During the first half of 2011, 10.3% of U.S. beef production was exported and imports equaled 8.1% of production. U.S. beef exports during June were up 19.6% while beef imports were down 16.7% compared to a year ago. The biggest foreign buyer of U.S. beef in June was Japan. This is the first month Japan was number one since December 2003. Prior to 2004, Japan was consistently the largest foreign buyer of U.S. beef. Then BSE came along and they stopped buying for two and half years. The top 4 foreign destinations for U.S. beef thus far in 2011 are Mexico, Canada, Japan and South Korea. The top three suppliers of beef to the U.S. are Canada, New Zealand and Australia. Pasture conditions are not good this summer. In mid-August 96% of Texas pastures and 91% of Oklahoma pastures were rated poor or very poor. Nationally 39% of pastures are in poor or very poor condition. A year ago, 18% were so rated. Boxed beef prices were sharply higher again this week. Friday morning the choice boxed beef carcass cutout value was $186.86/cwt, up $7.30 from last week. The select carcass cutout was up $7.77 from the previous Friday to $183.84 per hundred pounds of carcass weight. Choice boxed beef cutout value is up 8% in the last two weeks.

Despite the strong cutout value, fed cattle prices dipped a bit this week. The 5-area daily weighted average price for slaughter steers sold through Thursday of this week on a live weight basis was $114.04/cwt, down $2.08 from last week. Steers sold on a dressed weight basis this week averaged $183.21/cwt, $1.56 lower than the week before. This week last year, slaughter steers averaged $98.60/cwt on a live weight basis and $154.55/cwt of dressed weight. This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 657,000 head, down 0.6% from the week before and down 2.1% compared to the same week last year. The average steer dressed weight for the week ending August 6 was 846 pounds, up 1 pound from the week before, 2 pounds heavier than for the same week in 2010, and above year-earlier for the 35th consecutive week. Cash bids for feeder cattle around the country this week ranged from $2 lower to $5 higher than the week before. Oklahoma City auction prices this week were $2 to $5 higher with price ranges for medium and large frame #1 steers: 400-450# $148-$155.75, 450-500# $145-$154, 500-550# $143-$152, 550-600# $138.25-$149.50, 600-650# $130-$144, 650-700# $136.50-$142.50, 700-750# $137.25-$142, 750-800# $135-$136.25, 800-900# $128.75-$129 and 900-1000# not enough for a market test. The August fed cattle futures contract ended the week at $114.30/cwt, down $3.60 from last week’s close. October lost $4.95 to end the week at $115.50/cwt. December live cattle settled at $117.32/cwt, down $5.35 from the previous Friday. From University of Missouri

GOAT GRAZING

Continued from page 13

Ray Holes, meanwhile, will continue to show other ranchers and land managers that goat grazing is a promising and environmentally sustainable way to control noxious weeds. “The idea that you’re killing weeds because you put spray on them is a fallacy, and it’s broke a lot of people trying to do it,” he says. “When I take the goats and put them in a truck and dump them out, they go to work. There’s no big question if they’re going to do it, and you’re in business.” As the goat-weed control practice of targeted grazing becomes more widely accepted, Holes hopes that state and federal land managers will provide 50 percent cost-share funds for goat-weed control, as they do for spraying weeds with herbicides. Right now, the playing field is not level, he notes. The Society of Range Management has provided forums for goatweed control in its national meetings. That’s been helpful to convince land managers about the benefits and how to set up grazing contracts, Holes says. “At the top end, everyone in Washington D.C. is excited about it, and at the bottom end, on the ground, there are a lot of people excited about it, and in the middle, there’s a vague void where agency folks don’t have a lot of direction,” he says. “Eventually, I think they’ll get it sorted out.” In the meantime, Holes is racking up more and more examples where goat-weed control is working around the West -- a rare bright spot in the war against noxious weeds.

Farm Bureau Members get $930 to $1,520 off of six selected models

HERITAGE SAFE CO. For order information call Joel Benson at 208-239-4289 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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Farm Bureau Members Pay Less To See Clearly

FARM BUREAU COMMODITY REPORT GRAIN PRICES

Portland:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Corn

Ogden:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Pocatello:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Burley:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Nampa:

White Wheat (cwt) (Bushel)

Lewiston:

White Wheat Barley

LIVESTOCK PRICES

7/22/2011

8/24/2011

6.86 7.60-7.80 10.12 303.50-310.00

N/A 8.25-8.44 N/A 316.50-319.25

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs Over 700 lbs

Cows

Utility/Commercial Canner & Cutter

For information go

Stock Cows

to www.idahofb.org

Bulls

and click on member benefits or call Joel at (208) 239-4289. 36

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

Slaughter

BEAN PRICES: Pinto Pink Small Red

N/A + .65 to + .64 N/A + 13.00 to + 9.25

6.80 6.80 8.58 12.00

7.25 7.45 9.02 12.45

+ + + +

6.75 6.28 9.11 11.67

6.90 7.44 8.67 11.67

+ .15 + 1.16 - .44 Steady

6.85 6.50 8.43 13.00

7.00 7.18 8.65 12.50

+ .15 + .68 + .22 - .50

10.00 6.00

10.50 6.30

+ .50 + .30

6.70 215.50

6.85 221.50

+ .15 + 6.00

7/22/2011

8/23/2011

Trend

Feeder Steers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Trend

.45 .65 .44 .45

132-169 120-154 107-139 116-127

130-188 119-153 107-137 110-121

- 2 to + 19 -1 steady to – 2 -6

125-160 115-140 101-128 N/A

115-167 112-148 103-130 85-109

- 10 to + 7 - 3 to + 8 +2 N/A

75-95 75-100

75-110 70-104

steady to + 15 - 5 to + 4

60-86 55-74

63-84 55-74

+ 3 to – 2 Steady

N/A

675-1200

N/A

76-96

60-94

- 16 to - 2

35.00-36.00 N/A N/A

40.00 N/A N/A

Compiled by the Idaho Farm Bureau Commodity Division

Steady N/A N/A


Fair/Good Fair

IDaho Hay Report

Fri Aug 19, 2011 All classes of hay traded firm, except Fair Alfalfa selling mostly steady. Buyer demand good to very good for all classes of hay on mostly light supplies. All prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise stated. Alfalfa Large Square Supreme Premium/Supreme Good

Tons

Price Range

2000 3500 1000 3000 600 120

245.00-245.00 230.00-230.00 220.00-220.00 200.00-200.00 230.00-230.00 235.00-235.00

Wtd Avg 245.00 230.00 220.00 200.00 230.00 235.00

Comments

Export Organic Del

Utility/Fair Small Square Premium Timothy Grass Small Square Premium Good/Premium Wheat Straw Large Square Good

500 4550 1500 1000

210.00-210.00 180.00-190.00 205.00-205.00 170.00-170.00

210.00 185.00 205.00 170.00

500

240.00-240.00

240.00

Retail/Stable

200 100

300.00-300.00 285.00-285.00

300.00 285.00

Retail/Stable Retail/Stable

12,000 12,000

50.00-55.00 65.00-70.00

Del

50.83 65.83 Del

POTATOES FOR PROCESSING August 16, 2011 IDAHO---Open-market trading by processors with growers was inactive. French-Fry plants are using new crop Shepodys from Malheur County Oregon and Western Idaho. The quality is good with good gravities and sugar. The size is reported to be on the small side with these first early fields. There are reports of some Powdery Scab showing up on the early Shepodys because of the wet cold spring.

5 Year Grain Comparison Grain Prices................08/23/2007...................08/26/2008...................08/21/2009................. 08/20/2010..................08/24/2011 Portland: White Wheat..................... 7.20...............................8.20 ..............................4.82 ............................6.38 ............................N/A 11% Winter................... 7.07-7.33.......................9.03-9.23 ....................5.09-5.25 ..................6.56-6.60 .........8.25-8.44 14% Spring........................ 7.29...............................9.86 ..............................6.12 ............................ N/A .........................N/A Barley (ton)........................N/A .................225.00 ................N/A ................. N/A .......................N/A Corn...............................170-176.75....................252.50-253.....................151-152.75...................183-188.75................ 316.50-319.25 Ogden: White Wheat..................... 6.07...............................7.23 ..............................4.40 ............................5.60.............................. 7.25 11% Winter....................... 6.27............................... 8.16 .............................4.22 ............................5.54 ........................... 7.45 14 % Spring...................... 6.33...............................8.65 ..............................4.96 ............................6.04 ........................... 9.02 Barley.................................8.60...............................9.25 ..............................5.50 ............................6.25 ...........................12.45 Pocatello: White Wheat..................... 5.90...............................6.88 ..............................4.30 ............................5.40............................. 11% Winter....................... 5.97...............................7.67 .............................4.06 ............................5.15 ........................... 14% Spring........................ 6.09...............................8.42 ..............................4.86 ............................6.17 ........................... Barley.................................8.50...............................9.00 ...........................5.21 ..........................6.25 ..........................

6.90 7.44 8.67 11.67

Burley: White Wheat..................... 5.80...............................6.55 ..............................4.10 ............................5.29............................. 7.00 11% Winter....................... 6.06............................... 7.81 .............................4.09 ............................5.48 ........................... 7.18 14% Spring........................6.04...............................8.28 ..............................4.74 ............................6.07 .......................... 8.65 Barley................................. 7.25...............................9.50 ..............................5.00 ..........................6.00 ......................... 12.50 Nampa: White Wheat (cwt)......... 10.43............................. 11.82...............................6.70 ............................9.50............................ 10.50 (bushel)......... 6.26................................7.11 .............................4.00 ............................5.70............................ 6.30 Lewiston: White Wheat..................... 6.83...............................8.05 ..............................4.60 ............................6.30............................ 6.85 Barley............................... 201.50...........................212.50 ..........................106.50...........................126.50......................... 221.50 Bean Prices: Pintos................................25.00........................34.00-35.00..........................N/A............................... N/A..............................40.00 Pinks...................................N/A.................................N/A.................................N/A..............................30.00..............................N/A Small Reds..........................N/A.................................N/A.................................N/A..............................30.00..............................N/A ***

IDAHO Milk production up 4.8 Percent August 18, 2011 Idaho milk production during July 2011 totaled 1.19 billion pounds, a 4.8 percent increase from the same month last year, and up 5.3 percent from June 2011, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. June milk production was revised to 1.13 million pounds, up 6 million pounds from the preliminary level. Average milk production per cow in July 2011 was 2,050 pounds, up 50 pounds from last year’s level. The average number of milk cows during July was 582,000 head, up 13,000 from July 2010, and up 4,000 head from June 2011. Milk production in the 23 major States during July totaled 15.4 billion

pounds, up 0.8 percent from July 2010. June revised production at 15.4 billion pounds, was up 1.3 percent from June 2010. The June revision represented a decrease of 5 million pounds or less than 0.1 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,824 pounds for July, 5 pounds below July 2010. The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.47 million head, 93,000 head more than July 2010, and 8,000 head more than June 2011. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

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5 Year livestock comparison .....................................08/24/2007...................08/25/2008...................08/21/2009................. 08/20/2010..................08/23/2011 Under 500 lbs................105-143 ......................98-130 .........................90-132 ...................101-150 ....................130-188 500-700 lbs....................105-137 ........................98-126 .........................87-115 ........................95-130 .......................119-153 700-900 lbs..................... 98-118 .........................95-115 ..........................81-100 ......................95-114 ...................... 107-137 Over 900 lbs...................85-108...........................81-109.............................85-92 ......................... 85-100..........................110-121 Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs................100-130..........................94-114 ..........................95-116 ....................93-140 .......................115-167 500-700 lbs.....................99-124 ......................... 91-111 .........................85-108 .......................90-118 .......................112-148 700-900 lbs..................... 94-112...........................88-106............................77-93 ..........................89-107......................... 103-130 Over 900 lbs...................80-105...........................85-105 ..........................78-85 .......................... 70-97 ........................85-109 Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs.................67-102............................45-77 ...........................52-80 .......................... 65-92 ........................ 75-110 Over 700 lbs....................55-85 ...........................55-79 ............................44-70 .......................... 60-83 .........................70-104 Cows Utility/Commercial...........42-60.............................36-67.............................35-55.............................47-69............................63-84 Canner & Cutter.............. 31-51.............................38-57.............................20-46............................37-67............................ 55-74 Stock Cows......................450-850 ......................650-850 ...................... 650-850 .....................700-900 .....................675-1200 Bulls – Slaughter............42-64.............................48-75.............................42-62............................60-80 ..........................60-94

Idaho Cattle on Feed Up 3% from Previous Year

August 19, 2011 Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in Idaho from feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head on August 1, 2011 totaled 195,000 head, up 3 percent from the previous year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The cattle on feed inventory is down 9 percent from July 1, 2011. Placements of cattle in feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during July totaled 24,000 head, down 29 percent from July 2010 placements. Marketings of cattle from feedlots with 1,000 head or more during July totaled 41,000 head, down 2,000 head from a year ago. Other disappearance totaled 3,000 head during July. Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 10.6 million head on August 1, 2011. The inventory was 8 percent above August 1, 2010. This is the third highest August 1 inventory since the series began in 1996. Placements in feedlots during July totaled 2.15 million, 22 percent above 2010.This is the highest placement total for the month of July since the series began in 1996. Net placements were 2.09 million head. During July, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 625,000, 600-699 pounds were 405,000, 700-799 pounds were 498,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 625,000. Marketings of fed cattle during July totaled 1.91 million, slightly above 2010. This is the second lowest fed cattle marketings for the month of July since the series began in 1996. Other disappearance totaled 67,000 during July, 40 percent above 2010.

Keller

Continued from page 2 · GIPSA Rule Impacting Livestock Producers, which could eliminate the use of many alternative marketing arrangements in the livestock industry. · NPDES permits which will require 5.6 million applications by 365,000 applicators to apply pesticides. · National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Ozone, where the vast majority of counties with ozone monitors would be considered nonattainment. This will limit the ability of farmers to manage crop residue on their farms. · PM 10/Dust – EPA is preparing to reconsider its large particulate matter standard. This is problematic because the current standard is already difficult for many rural counties, especially in the West, to meet. Working and harvesting farm fields is an inherently dusty business, as is driving down rural dirt and logging roads. · Water Quality Standards Rulemaking—adopts a presumption that all U.S. waters should be fishable and swimmable and requires state decisions to be approved by EPA, taking away state authority. · Climate Change – proposed new greenhouse gas regulations will increase the cost of virtually every input used in agriculture and forestry production. · Clean Water Act Strategy – the Administration announced 38

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

· ·

· ·

new “guidance” expanding the waters bodies included under the Clean Water Act. Spray Drift Policy – a proposed rule that counters decades old EPA policies that acknowledge small levels of spray drift are unavoidable. Prior Converted Cropland – the moment agricultural use ceases on a prior converted cropland, the PCC designation is no longer applicable, allowing for costly wetlands delineation. Atrazine – an unscheduled re-review of atrazine, which was favorable, reviewed by the EPA in 2006. Arsenic and Dioxin Risk Assessments – EPA is considering assessments that will cause virtually all soils to exceed the EPA’s target risk ranges. This means rice, wheat, corn meal, peanuts, apples, lettuce, carrots, onions, sugar, and tap water would be considered unsafe. Since 2000, the incidence of dioxin contamination has dropped 90 percent.

Mr. President, please do not be condescending and disregard a farmer’s concern. His single concern over burdensome regulations is a collective concern of all farmers. Please be educated on what your agencies are doing to us and then do something meaningful to reduce their effects.


Classifieds Animals

Vehicles

Yummy pasture fat lambs ready for delivery September through October. Blackfoot, Id. Call 208-684-5352.

1987 Chev. Crew Cab 1 ton. 512 cu. In. New T-400, G.V. OD. 4:56 Posi. Weld Wheels, Bridgestone tires 80%, Extra 120 gallon tank. Previous race car hauler. $6,500. Would trade for nice gas forklift 6,000 lb capacity. Northern, ID. Questions? call 208826-3240

America’s oldest breed. Morgan horse stock for sale and stallion service. Our foundation stallion is a Western Working National Champion. 208-476-7221 or www. creamridgemorgans.com Chinchillas. Still have about 30 breeders for sale. Mostly blacks, charcoals and beiges. $1500 for entire heard or individual animal $50 to $80 each. Parma area. 208-6741110 APHA Broodmares. Excellent bloodlines. Great conformation. Super dispositions., Hard reduction. Great prices. Stallion Service Available-$400 fee LFG. Caldwell, ID. 208454-2454

Farm Equipment Dozer blade for D4 or D2; Dakota; 9’ wide, 69” inside C-frame; 3-position angle. $2,000. Latah County. 208-669-0806 Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime

Wanted Box Tops for Education to help our small, country Southside Elementary. Thank you for helping our students! Liz Robinson, 1440 Dufort Rd, Sagle, Id 83860 Gliderider float tube by Wood River. Please call 208-278-3832 Push thatcher and/or push aerator. Grangeville, Id. 208-852-1996 Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338. Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258

Miscellaneous Fresh Local-grown produce. Veggies are grown  without pesticides. All kinds of vegetables and fruit plus locally baked artiesian breads and more.Grown and sold at 20498 Allendale, Wilder ID 208-2503131

FREE CLASSIFIED ADS

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send to: dashton@idahofb.org

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SEND US YOUR CLASSIFIED AD FREE TO IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS! send to: dashton@idahofb.org FREE CLASSIFIEDS Non commercial classified ads are free to Idaho Farm Bureau members. Must include membership number for free ad. Forty (40) words maximum. Non-member cost- 50 cents per word. You may advertise your own crops, livestock, used machinery, household items, vehicles, etc. Ads will not be accepted by phone. Ads run one time only and must be re-submitted in each subsequent issue. We reserve the right to refuse to run any ad. Please type or print clearly. Proof-read your ad.

Mail ad copy to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848 or email Dixie at DASHTON@IDAHOFB.ORG Name: __________________________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________ City / State / Zip: __________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________________ Membership No. ___________________ Ad Copy: ________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ Idaho Farm Bureau producer / September 2011

39


Pocatello L & K Carpet One Floor & Home 129 North Second Avenue (208) 233-6190

Idaho Falls Carpet One Floor & Home 405 West 17th Street (800) 227-7381 or 529-1951

Boise Neef's Carpet One 1507 Main Street (208) 343-4679

Lewiston Skelton's Carpet One Floor & Home 222 1st Street (208)746-3663

Neef's Carpet One 9601 West State Street (208) 947-1800 McCall Lake Fork Design Center 13872 Highway 55 (208) 634-4599 Coeur D’Alene Panhandle Carpet One Floor & Home 739 West Appleway Avenue (866) 497-5088

Ponderay Sandpoint Furniture Carpet One Floor & Home 401 Bonner Mall Way (208) 263-5138 Twin Falls Pioneer Carpet One Floor & Home 326 2nd Avenue South (866) 497-8176 or 734-6015

Carpet

Laminate

Vinyl

New Idaho Farm Bureau Member Benefit Some stores will have designated staff to handle Farm Bureau members so members should identify themselves at the beginning of the process. This will prevent them from having to switch staff in the middle of the selection process. If you have any questions, call 208-239-4289.

Ceramic Tile

Area Rugs

Hardwood

September 2011, Volume 15, Issue 6  

Idaho Grower Assumes Top Wheat Industry Post Sheep Industry Encourages Expansion September 2011 Volume 15, Issue 6 Idaho Farm Bureau County...

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