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June 2011

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Weather Delays Planting

Volume 15, Issue 4

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Marsh Valley Ag Days

Idaho Farm Bureau

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Solar Thermal System Shows Promise


When Did Food Become So Complicated? By Bob Stallman AFBF President

Sustainability. Organic. Biotech. Big Ag. Local. Pure. These are just a few labels being tossed around freely to discuss something that I’ve always thought of as a pretty simple and straight-forward concept: Eating. There is no doubt that a handful of people aspire to dictate what is placed on America’s dinner tables.

Inaction on Trade Agreements Hurting Economy, Trading Status By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

Agriculture exports are essential to the prosperity of the overall U.S. economy, and especially to rural communities. Unfortunately, our

Equal Access to Justice Act Reform Proposed By Rick Keller CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

Wyoming’s sole representative in the U.S. House of Representatives, two-term Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis (R) has introduced the Government Litigation Savings Act, a bill to reform the Equal Ac2

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

The Ag Agenda Unfortunately, in meeting their objective, these self-subscribed food activists are turning the simplicity of food into a complex political agenda. All Shapes and Sizes Food. Everyone is talking about it. From food activists to the Prince of Wales—who recently made a U.S. visit for the sole purpose of telling us how to farm—everyone has an opinion on how food should be ability to trade openly in the world marketplace is in jeopardy. There are more than 600 bilateral and regional trade agreements in place or under negotiation worldwide. Sadly, the U.S. has a share in fewer than 25 of these trade deals. Of great importance are three trade agreements with Korea, Colombia and Panama that have been stalled in Congress for several years. Now, as the administration and Congress sit idly by, we are losing almost $2.5 billion per year in agriculture exports. cess to Justice Act (EAJA). The following summary of her recent Dear Colleague letter explains what she is seeking to do. In 1980 Congress passed the EAJA as a means to help individuals, small businesses and non-profit organizations recover attorney’s fees and costs associated with suing the federal government. Congress intended EAJA to remove a barrier to justice for those with limited access to the resources it takes to sue the federal government. When operating correctly, EAJA reimburses individuals and small businesses

produced in the U.S. I am an ardent believer in open debate. It’s one of the cherished rights we have as U.S. citizens. But, the advocates of the food debate are using an all-or-nothing approach, without taking into consideration consumer demand and need. Many argue that all U.S. food should be sourced locally, if not produced individually for See STALLMAN, page 28

So, why is this important for the average person? Agricultural trade is not only critical to farmers and ranchers. It is important for the U.S. economy and the creation of American jobs. Every $1 billion in agricultural exports supports 9,000 U.S. jobs including those of transportation workers, food processors, packers, longshoremen and even sales and marketing professionals. By passing all three trade agreements, Nearly 22,500 new U.S. jobs could be See PRIESTLEY, page 28 when they “prevail” in a suit against the federal government. EAJA is funded by a permanent appropriation. Payments are taken out of both agency budgets and the U.S. Treasury through the Judgment Fund. Unfortunately, Congress and the agencies halted tracking and reporting of payments made through EAJA in 1995. During these 15 years of operating without any oversight, some environmental organizations began to systematically subvert EAJA to meet their own See KELLER, page 28


Volume 15, Issue 4 IFBF OFFICERS President ....................................Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President .................................. Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President ............................... Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................ Shelley Scott Bird ........................................................... Pocatello Chris Dalley ........................................................Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ............................................Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................ Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant ................................................... Oakley Rick Pearson .................................................... Hagerman Mike Garner............................................................... Declo Curt Krantz ............................................................ Parma Mike McEvoy..................................................... Middleton Tracy Walton ....................................................... Emmett Marjorie French ............................................... Princeton Bob Callihan ......................................................... Potlatch Louis Kins ........................................................... Kootenai Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Austin Tubbs............................................................... Malad STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ........................ Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Member Services ................................... Ray Poe Dir. of Commodities ............................. Dennis Brower Commodity Assistant .................................. Peggy Pratt Membership Assistant ............................... Peggy Moore Market Information Assistant . ................ Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager ........................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager ....................... Kendall Keller Dist. III Regional Manager ................... Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ................... Russ Hendricks Dist. V Regional Manager ....................... Bob Smathers Director of Governmental Affairs ............ Kent Lauer Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs .... Dennis Tanikuni Range/Livestock Specialist........................... Wally Butler Director of Public Relations .............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................. Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager .................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise ............................ Shawna Yasuda Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID GEM STATE PRODUCER USPS #015-024, is published monthly except February, May, August and November by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201.

Most tractors remained in sheds or stuck in mud throughout the Palouse region and in many other parts of the state throughout May. Wet weather has delayed planting by several weeks and is expected to reduce harvested yields. Photo courtesy of Robert Blair

Weather Issues Expected to Reduce Wheat Harvest

By Jake Putnam

Palouse farmers are struggling this spring with wet weather that has delayed planting by several weeks. Thousands of acres of farmland - some of the most productive land anywhere - are likely to sit idle this season as crop insurance deadlines have now passed. Instead of sprouting spring wheat, peas and lentils, farmer Robert Blair of Kendrick sees only mud when he looks at his fields. “We missed our planting deadline for wheat on May 15th and legumes May 20th,” said Blair. Although the Kendrick farmer will harvest 500 acres of winter wheat in August, he’ll leave a thousand acres fallow because of the mud.

POSTMASTER send changes of address to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, Idaho, and additional mailing offices.

A steady series of storms across the Palouse left record rainfalls this spring, and kept equipment from the fields during the most critical weeks of the 2011 planting season.

Subscription rate: $6.00 per year included in Farm Bureau dues.

According to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Idaho farmers planted 78 percent of the state’s spring wheat crop by May 15th, well below the fiveyear average of 91 percent for that date. This year’s final acreage numbers could be drastically affected by farmers not meeting the deadlines and opting not to plant in 2011.

MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: A tractor stuck in a field about four miles north of Nez Perce. The farmers were custom seeding spring wheat. Crops are behind throughout Idaho. Many North Idaho fields will not be planted this spring due to excess moisture. Photo by Conrad Arnzen

“I’m not planting anything,” said Blair, “and here’s the trade-off; if I plant a crop this late in the season, those acres affect my proven yield. But if I don’t plant it doesn’t affect my average. Basically it doesn’t get held against you. In other words it’s a free pass for a year.  But my revenue is drastically reduced in what could be a good market year and that’s what I’m fighting.” See WHEAT LOSS page 4 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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WHEAT LOSS

Continued from page 3

Blaine Jacobsen of the Idaho Wheat Commission surveyed Idaho growers after the deadlines had passed. Their numbers showed that more than 80 percent of Idaho’s spring wheat still got planted. “My best guess is that 20 percent will shift to another crop or not get planted at all,” said Jacobsen. While the U.S. Department of Agriculture is updating acreage totals, market insiders now say that the 2011crop won’t reach the lofty 2010 level. “That’s because of three factors reducing the size of our harvest,” said Jacobsen. “Late spring of course, but also we’re getting reports of winter kill in southeastern Idaho in places like the Arbon Valley, Bonneville and Caribou counties. The wet weather hung on so long that the fields need reseeded. The third factor is the stripe rust, it’s a disease related to the wet spring and could cut into the crop.” Jacobsen warns that the NASS projections are high because they didn’t fully take into consideration the duration of the wet spring. He says with the three factors on the table, cutting NASS’s projection by 11 percent is a more realistic. “No doubt, even though acreage projections are up, the 2011 harvest is smaller than last year. But, over a ten-year average it’ll be a decent year, but not as close in acres as it could have been,” Jacobsen said. Near Kendrick, Blair has a lot of time on his hands, the rain keeps him indoors and he contemplates the costs of too much rainfall. After the deadline passed he surveyed the local damage. “Primeland Co-op told me that 40 percent of their acres this year won’t get planted. That’s unprecedented around here,” he said. “My 96-year old aunt says that in all the years spent on this farm that she hasn’t seen anything like it.” Jacobsen says these are sobering times for producers. Many are reluctant to fall back on crop insurance. “All the growers that I deal with would rather plant the crop and harvest it and make their living that way. 4 #

Especially in a year when wheat prices are healthy, they just want to do it the way it should be done,” he said.

plant because of mud should contact their insurance company to discuss policy requirements related to their coverage.

Crop insurance and federal programs will help many Idaho farmers stay in business, Jacobsen said. “But it’s nice to have a safety net when nature works against you. “We can’t afford to lose these producers. It’s a food security and national security issue when it comes right down to it. We need these producers to feed the nation and the world.”

“The producer’s insurance company will make the final determination of acres eligible for prevented planting payments,” he said.

In Spokane, Washington the director of the USDA Risk Management Agency says they’re busy this season and report a number of farmers missed the deadline but planted, with pro-rated coverage. “Farmers still planted during the late planting period,” said RMA Director Dave Paul, “and that’s going on for a couple more weeks but they’re working with a production guarantee that’s reduced by 1 percent per day for each day they planted after that date.” Paul says if a farmer’s final planting date is May 20th, and they plant 10 days late, if they had a hundred bushel guarantee, it would be reduced to 90 bushels. He says another option is to leave the acreage idle and receive a full preventative planting payment. Those preventative payments would be 60-percent of their production guarantee. “All farmers have to do is give their insurance companies notice within 72 hours after the final planting date or the late planting period, and then the process with the company begins. The company will determine the maximum number of eligible acres for preventative planting and make payments on eligible acres. The good thing is that farmers can put a cover crop on the land or leave it fallow,” said Paul. Paul adds that farmers with double cropping history can receive full prevented planting payment within the guidelines of their policy and farmers who are unable to

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

The USDA Risk Management Agency says high altitude farmers face the greatest challenge in the North and Southeast Idaho. Meanwhile Idaho producers affected by the wet spring are mulling over the options for the rest of the year. Some have replanted but face lower yields, and others have opted to take their lumps with hopes of returning next year. Blair says in the hundred year history of his farm they’ve never failed getting a crop in, but adds this is a once in a lifetime event. He says there’s a mountain of paperwork to show for it. “We’re dealing with the mercy of Mother Nature here, we may not get another drop of rain, we just don’t know. Dealing with all of this uncertainty is depressing, too depressing to drink,” he said.

Correction

An article in The Idaho Farm Bureau Spring Quarterly, published in early May, inadvertently left out contact information in an article about a new book detailing the history of Weston, Idaho. The book can be purchased at the following locations: From author Dr. Jay D. Schvaneveldt (PO Box 152, Weston, Idaho 83286). Also, at UMC 2905, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, (435) 797-1521, or by e-mail: drjay.s@aggiemail.usu.edu  The book can also be found at the Preston Citizen office in Preston, Idaho, Woodward’s Country Store in Weston, the USU Book Store in Logan, Utah, and the Cache Valley Visitors Bureau in the Historic Court House at 199 North Main in Logan.


Cool, Wet Weather Gives Rise to Stripe Rust Expanding reports of stripe rust continue in commercial wheat fields. Affected fields include the varieties ‘Brundage’ soft white winter wheat, and ‘Malcolm’, soft white winter wheat, Stephens (SWW), and lower levels are being reported in Moreland (HRW), WB 528 (SWW), WB 470 (SWW), but it is expected that other susceptible winter and spring varieties will also begin to show symptoms soon. Stripe rust has also been found in the Aberdeen area on the University of Idaho’s research farm. The infected plants were at the jointing growth stage. New leaves were not yet showing infection; the disease was occurring on lower leaves likely as a result of an infection that started last fall. Infected plants that were covered by an insulating layer of snow car- A fungal disease, stripe rust is causing ried the fungus through problems for wheat producers this spring. the winter and is the cur- Photo Courtesy of University of Idaho rent source of the disease. On the Aberdeen research station, Brundage had about 30 percent affected leaves throughout the plot, while Moreland about 5 percent of the leaves affected. Active and abundant spores were seen on infected plants. Stripe rust was prevalent throughout the winter wheat variety trials. Resistant varieties should not need fungicide applications. Growers should scout all wheat fields and should never assume that resistant varieties will always be resistant, as the prevalent strains of the fungi can change, affecting different varieties. The weather has been very conducive for infection and rapid spread. It is imperative to protect susceptible varieties with a fungicide as yield losses to this disease can be significant. Both strobilurin (Quadris, Headline) and triazole (Caramba, Tilt, Proline, Folicur, Prosaro) fungicides are equally effective in protecting

against subsequent stripe rust infections, as are mixed mode-ofaction fungicides (TwinLine, Quilt, Quilt Excel, Stratego). However, if stripe rust is currently in your crop, it is recommended that you include a triazole fungicide for the slightly curative activity. Fungicide ratings for stripe rust from the mid-west are: Excellent = azoxystrobin (Quadris), pyraclostrobin (Headline), metconazole (Caramba), tebuconazole (Folicur), and fungicide mixes rated Excellent for stripe rust includes prothioconazole and tebuconazole (both found in Prosaro), and the strobiluron / triazole mixes line, Twinline, Quilt or Quilt Xcel. Rated very good was propiconizole (Tilt), and the mix of propiconazole and trifloxystrobin (Stratego). In the 2011 Pacific Northwest Plant Disease Management Handbook, Bumper was additionally listed for an effective foliar fungicide. This information is provided only as a guide. Other fungicides may also be labeled and effective against stripe rust. Inclusion in this list is not intended as a product endorsement and exclusion from this list is not meant to imply other products are ineffective. Additional information and pictures are available on the Cereals Extension website for southern and southeast Idaho: http://www. extension.uidaho.edu/scseidaho/disease/disease_index.htm

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Marsh Valley

Fourth grade students from throughout Bannock County visited Marsh Valley High School in mid-May for Bannock County Farm Bureau, Marsh Valley FFA Ag Day. The children learned how wheat is harvested, how flour is made from wheat and how to make bread.

Students at Marsh Valley Ag Day learned about the many uses of TIG welding.

Rocky Mountain Power officials showed students the dangers associated with power lines. The demonstration showed students how power lines can arc to objects that get too close including trees.

FFA Students at Marsh Valley High School showed local elementary students how a plasma cutter works and what it is used for. Each student was given a steel cutout of one of their initials.

Ag Day

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011


Fourth grade students from Bannock County learn how bees pollinate crops and how honey is harvested from hives.

Local volunteers teach students about noxious weeds during Marsh Valley FFA / Bannock County Farm Bureau Ag Day.

Students participate in an activity that teaches them about soils and how elements interact to create optimum conditions for crop production.

Students handle a newborn lamb during Marsh Valley Ag Day.

Marsh Valley FFA students teach a group of younger kids about horses and cattle during Marsh Valley Ag Day.

Hog production was another component students learned about during Marsh Valley Ag Day. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Calf feeding time at Webb Dairy in Raft River. Farmworkers bottle feed up to 1,600 calves, twice each day. The water is heated with an innovative solar thermal system. Photo by Jake Putnam

Solar Thermal System Pays Off for Raft River Dairy By John Thompson The owners of Webb Dairy and Heglar Creek Farms have conclusively proven the effectiveness of a solar thermal system used to heat water and recently installed a second system on their Raft River dairy. After one year of using the system on their calf ranch, where up to 1,600 calves are bottle-fed twice each day, the new system reduced propane usage by 4,588 gallons, based on the prior year’s usage. Mike Garner and his partners in the dairy and farm operation, Mark, Todd and Scott Webb, are pleased with the savings and have recently installed a second solar thermal system to heat water for their milking parlor. The calf ranch uses about 1,800 gallons of hot water (160 degrees) per day, while the dairy used about 1,200 gallons of hot water per day. “There’s no question about the savings and it’s a fairly simple system that requires very little maintenance,” Garner said. “That’s what I like about it. The only thing you re8

ally have to watch is the ph in the water. If it gets too high you add some neutralizer.” Glycol in the system also needs to be monitored to make sure it doesn’t get too hot, which can make it less efficient in heat transfer, he said. The new system on the dairy has a heat dump, or radiator that cools the glycol if it gets too hot. Garner said optimum temperature in order to maintain the rubber liners in the water tanks is 170 degrees. They were hoping for energy savings of 60 percent on the system and Garner said he thinks that level is achievable. Based on 2009 numbers, Garner expects about a six year payoff on the system installed for their calf ranch. Garner said the angle of the collectors is critical. At the latitude of their Raft River operation, optimum angle is 42 degrees. Several dairymen from Magic Valley, Utah and Washington have looked at the Webb Dairy system and expressed interest.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

Barry Smith, co-owner of Timberline Heating and Cooling, in Orem, Utah, installed the system at Webb Dairy. He said there is a lot of interest in the technology and he believes it has a future in many other applications including residential. “I think renewable energy sources are definitely the future and we are seeing a lot of interest in solar thermal right now, especially in applications like dairy farms that rely on propane,” Smith said. “As fossil fuel costs go up our country has got to find other alternatives.” However, one difficulty with solar thermal systems in residential applications is on hot days the system has to be able to dump heat. Smith said when excess energy is created with photovoltaic, wind or other “green energy” systems the power can be sent back onto the grid, but when solar thermal produces an excess of hot water it has to be managed on-site. To manage excess hot water some homeowners are installing swimming pools, but Smith said


Solar thermal panels on top of a dairy barn in Raft River are part of a money saving system that heats water for use in the milking parlor. A similar system on another part of the farm saved the operation 4,588 gallons of propane over the last year. Photo by Jake Putnam

that doesn’t work for everyone. Another option, he explained is a drain-back tank. The way it works is when the system meets demand it shuts off and dumps the hot glycol into a tank where it can cool. He added that solar thermal systems that heat homes with radiant floor heat and provide hot water for in-home use are expensive for existing homes. However, on new construction, the price of a solar thermal system can be cost effective when included in a mortgage.

panel. The glycol collects heat as it travels. The glycol is piped into the barn and into large water tanks inside copper coils where it heats the water inside the tank. As it cools the glycol is pumped back out through the tubing into the manifolds and is replaced with hot glycol. The system is integrated with an existing propane-fired boiler if they need additional heat.

Pipes that carry food-grade glycol to a tank where water is heated up to 160 degrees. Photo by Jake Putnam

“I think with the cost of fuels and also the number of people looking to go green that solar is a great source with lots of potential,” Smith said. “We don’t tap even a small fraction of possibilities from the sun so as this grows it will be refined and get better. Over the next few years it is an exciting, growing industry and you will see a lot more of it in the future.” A solar thermal system works by circulating pressurized, food grade glycol through copper tubing which runs inside of manifolds at either end long glass solar tubes assembled in a

Workers milking cows at Webb Dairy near Raft River. The water they use for washing the cows and for sanitizing the barn comes from a solar-powered system that has shown significant energy savings. Photo by John Thompson

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Patten Named New District 1 Field Rep. By Jake Putnam Pocatello—The Idaho Farm Bureau Federation named Justin Patten of Blackfoot the new Southeastern Idaho Regional Manager – District 1. Kendall Keller was transferred the District II Regional Manager position and Dennis Brower was promoted to Director of Commodities and Marketing, replacing Gary Fuhriman who retired.

School ag program and joined the FFA,” he said. “I learned a lot and graduated from the

program and then went to Utah State and graduated from there in 2000 with my bachelors in

District II Regional Manager Kendall Keller says Patten brings excitement and the perfect skill-set to the Farm Bureau. “His agriculture and education background are tools needed in this job. He built the Snake River High School’s FFA program from nothing to one of the best programs in the state. He’s a perfect fit for the Farm Bureau,” Keller said.

“I’ve always been interested in agriculture and ag policy, “said Patten. “Farmers and Ranchers are great people to work with because they’re down to earth. This is my dream job. It’s a great transition into a job where I can make a difference.”

Patten will work out of the Farm Bureau Home Office in Pocatello and continue to reside in Blackfoot with wife Brenda and three sons, Emmett 8, Ethan 7, and two-year old Garrett. 

Patten has farming in his blood, growing up in the Southwest Idaho.  He worked almost every childhood summer on his grandfather’s farm and later worked his way through Utah State University and the University of Idaho where he received a Master of Education degree. Throughout that time he was employed at Christensen Farms in Parma. Member Services Director Ray Poe says Patten is just what the Federation was looking for. “He has an agriculture and education background. He has experience in the field because he’s been teaching the past decade, and the Blackfoot community loves him.” Patten is familiar with the FFA program and is an experienced welding teacher. “I went through the Kuna High 10

agriculture education. I taught at Snake River and got my masters from the U of I and have taught at Snake River ever since.”

“Much of the job, as I see it, is addressing government rules and regulations and keeping an eye on the environmental groups that encroach on the rights of producers and I’ll be working on that non-stop,” Patten said.

“Farmers and Ranchers are great people to work with because they’re down to earth. This is my dream job. It’s a great transition into a job where I can make a difference.”

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

Patten says he’s excited to meet the farmers of his district. “I want to get out in the field and meet all the people I can. I’ve been on farm tours and looking at different operations. I’m seeing some very progressive farming and it’s exciting to see the new technology being implemented.” Patten begins his tenure at Farm Bureau in mid-June. He can be reached at jpatten@ idahofb.org.


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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Focus on Agriculture Fabulous Florida Agriculture

By Erik L. Ness

rain per year, it’s tough to hold water in beach-like soil…and then there are so-called “storm events” that sprinkle the local crop production vernacular with terms like “except in a hurricane year.”

Farmers and ranchers are rightly proud of their businesses, as well as the agricultural heritage and the unique agrarian cultures within their own states. When they venture out of state for regional or national meetings, a popular agenda item is usually a tour of other farms and ranches. Agriculture is so dominated by diversity that these food and fiber producers—experts in their own fields—are always anxious to learn what’s up on the other side of the fence.

The sub-tropical climate has many advantages for farmers, including being able to produce the highest quality citrus year-round. It also has many challenges that come with its meteorological and political climate. Bugs and pests thrive in such environs and producers also have to contend with frost, drought, hurricanes, development, energy costs, labor issues, water worries, pestilence and bureaucratic regulations. Strickland recently pointed out to a congressional committee on Capitol Hill that growers also have to deal with “pseudo-scientific trade barriers.”

The same can be said of anyone who works in agriculture. Recently a group of agriculture communicators the Agricultural Relations Council gathered in Florida to explore the state. Visitors quickly learned that in discussions of Florida agriculture the word “diverse” becomes cliché. Florida’s farmers and ranchers are producing 280 different crops and products on 43,000 commercial farms. Where else can you get off the tour bus in an orange grove, in the center of a ranch and get chased by an alligator? This look at Florida agriculture also included an organic farm with a community supported agriculture business structure and a historic ranch in the south central part of the state, far from the swollen winter populations of Florida’s well-developed coastlines. At the Longino Ranch, the tour was met by a friendly contingent of ranchers, growers and agriculture leaders who were very proud to tell the kaleidoscopic story of agriculture in the Sunshine State. Jim Strickland, president of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association, told the fascinating tale of how in 1521 Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon brought the first cows to this country. Known as “cracker cattle,” the breed has 12

been preserved as a living part of American history. “We’re real proud that we had the first cattle on the continent,” Strickland noted. Today, Florida ranchers and dairy producers maintain the largest cattle herd east of the Mississippi River. Strickland, a Farm Bureau member in Florida, says it’s “very common” for ranching operations to also maintain citrus groves with a constant eye on vital diversification. Longino Ranch runs primarily Brangus cattle and has extensive orange and grapefruit orchards, commercial timber, hunting opportunities, sod, swamp cabbage and is also the adopted home of the gopher tortoise, many of which have been relocated from populated areas to this remote ranch for preservation. While cropping and livestock areas see between 50 of 60 inches of

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

Despite these pesky problems Florida farmers are number one in the nation in the production of citrus, snap beans, fresh market tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, sugarcane and a number of other commodities. These growers proudly produce 76 percent of the nation’s citrus crop, a $9 billion bonanza for the state. There is also a thriving aquaculture industry turning out aquatic plants, tropical fish and clams. Throughout the on-going economic challenges, Florida agriculture has been a stabilizing influence on the entire state. It’s easy to see why a lot of folks in the U.S. think of Florida as just ‘gators and ‘glades, astronauts and Mickey Mouse, but a side trip off the interstate reveals the manifold and historic world of agriculture in fabulous Florida. Erik Ness is a regular contributor to AFBF’s Focus on Agriculture commentary series. He is a media consultant and a retired staff member of the New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau.


Dane Rauschenberg Competing in 2011 Ironman for Team Beef sponsor of the Ironman 70.3 Boise because of the importance of high-quality protein for athletes. Athletes spend hours training in preparation for the event – repairing and rebuilding fatigued muscles is critical for peak performance. Beef helps rebuild and maintain muscle mass, provides energy and is a nutrient powerhouse. As part of the sponsorship, beef will be available to athletes following the race in the BEEF recovery zone in the post-race food area.

The Idaho Beef Council is proud to announce that Dane Rauschenberg, extreme athlete and author, will be making his debut Ironman at the Ironman 70.3 Boise as part of Team Beef. Rauschenberg has accomplished such feats as running the Sawtooth relay as a solo athlete and running 52 marathons in 52 weeks. Rauschenberg currently lives in Salt Lake City. He runs and designs marathons around his speaking schedule and is always planning his next adventure. His book, See Dane Run, is currently available at www.seedanerun.com “I have found that what fuels me to the finish is a diet of high-quality protein in the form of lean beef. Being able to make my inaugural Ironman debut with Idaho’s Team Beef is a privilege that I hope to continue,” says Rauschenberg. 2011 will be the third year that beef has been the official protein sponsor of the Ironman 70.3 Boise. In 2009, the Idaho Beef Council signed on to be a category-exclusive

Team Beef is a group of Idaho athletes who understand the need for high quality protein in repairing and rebuilding their fatigued muscles from the extreme training that occurs when training for an Ironman competition. Last year, more than 65 athletes ran for Team Beef in the Ironman 70.3 Boise. “The Idaho Beef Council and the beef ranching and farming families of Idaho are committed to health and wellness,” said Traci O’Donnell, Executive Director of the Idaho Beef Council. “We believe an active lifestyle is a healthy lifestyle and this sponsorship provides us the opportunity to showcase beef as a nutrient-rich, premier lean protein - a key part of a well-balanced diet - in an environment that cultivates the importance of an active lifestyle. There is no better way to experience the Power of Protein than through an Ironman, the ultimate endurance test.” The fourth annual Ironman will be on June 11th at 12 pm. The race will start at Lucky Peak reservoir and end in downtown Boise, at BODO. For more information on Dane Rauschenberg or Team Beef, please contact the Idaho Beef Council at (208) 376-6004 or by emailing beefcouncil@idbeef.org.

You and Beef: Lean and Fit In 2010, noted marathoner, Dane Rauschenberg ran 202 miles of the American Odyssey Relay – solo, in just more than 50 hours. This is in addition to his accomplishments of running more than 126 lifetime marathons with a personal best time of 2:49:36. This May, in celebration of Physical Fitness Month, Rauschenberg discussed his training approach and the importance of protein, specifically lean beef, in his training diet. What does Dane love about lean beef? Some of his favorites include a nice Top Sirloin steak on the grill with rice and vegetables as a meal to fuel him. He often enjoys a Steak Caesar Salad the night before a race and recommends getting protein within an hour after running to better rebuild and repair muscle. In fact, after crossing the finish line of his solo 202 mile race, the first thing Dane ate was a steak! About the Idaho Beef Council: The Idaho Beef Council was created in 1967 by the Idaho legislature as a marketing organization for the Idaho beef industry, and to support a national beef marketing effort.  As a qualified state beef council under the Beef Promotion and Research Act, the Idaho Beef Council is responsible for collecting the $1.50 per-head checkoff on all cattle marketed in Idaho and distributing funds to state and national programs for the promotion of beef. See TEAM BEEF page 38

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011


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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

15


Balsam Woolly

Adelgid

By Yvonne Barkley

Introduced pests have long been the source of epidemic outbreaks of both insects and diseases of forest trees. Over the years the trees of North America have been besieged by white pine blister rust, gypsy moth, Dutch elm disease, and chestnut blight. One of these introduced species of pests that has long caused mortality in the true firs of Idaho is the balsam woolly adelgid (Adelges piceae). Balsam woolly adelgid (BWA) was introduced to eastern North America from Europe at the turn of the 20th century, and has spread throughout the United States and Canada. First reports of balsam woolly adelgid in the West were made around 1929. Balsam woolly adelgid was first found in Idaho

in 1983 at one urban site in Coeur d’Alene, and five forested sites east of Moscow in Latah County. Since then, BWA has spread throughout much of the state.

True firs are the only known hosts of BWA, with a range of susceptibly. European species such as silver fir (Abies alba) are able to support large populations and remain relatively unharmed, while North American species of fir, such as subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa), are highly susceptible and die readily. Most mortality has been in forested environments, but damage is also common in urban areas. In other parts of the west (coastal Oregon and Washington), grand fir is highly susceptible; however in Idaho, BWA rarely causes mortality in grand fir. Asian firs are intermediate in susceptibility

Figure 2 - White waxy covering looks woolly.

Photo by Robert L. Anderson, USDA Forest Service

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), not being a true fir, is not susceptible at all. In some areas of the West, BWA is highly destructive and has caused significant mortality to large tracts of native Pacific, grand, and subalpine fir to the point that, in some areas, firs are slowly being eliminated from the ecosystem. As with many other pests, BWA can be found in association with other insects and diseases attacking subalpine fir. This complex includes BWA, western balsam bark beetle, and Armillaria root rot, and is known as the “SAF complex.” Damage caused by these agents look similar from afar, and can easily be confused. Life cycle. Balsam woolly adelgid are part of a group of insects that are closely related to aphids. Probably the most significant aspect of the balsam wooly adelgid ‘s success in North America is that the entire population of this species of pest is female. Balsam woolly adelgid reproduces parthenogenetically, meaning there is no mating or fertilization; it only takes one to form a new colony. There are between two and four generations of adelgids per growing season, depending on locality and elevation. In the mountainous areas of the West, two generations are most common.

Activity begins in April when overwintering nymphs begin development. These nymphs are about 1/32nd inches long, amber colored, flattened, and fringed with whitish wax. Nymphs develop through three instars and mature sexually to begin laying eggs around June. As the nymphs mature to adults they produce a wax-like covering that resembles wool. Adults and eggs are protected by this waxy, woolly layer covering them. Adults are approximately 1/16th inches long and wingless. They are purple to black in color under their white woolly layer and remain attached to the tree by their deeply penetrating mouth parts for their entire adult lives. Eggs begin hatching in June into active, amber-colored crawlers, the only stage of the life-cycle in which this pest is mobile. Their small size allows crawlers to travel great distances, being transferred from tree to tree by wind, rain, animals and humans. In forest situations wind dispersal is thought to be the principal means of transfer from one host tree to another. Once a crawler has found a


which causes abnormal cell division resulting in swelling, or “gouting”, of twigs and branches. Gouting appears as stunting of the terminal growth as well as distinct swellings around the buds and branch nodes (see Figure 1). Larger and older trees or overcrowded stands are usually attacked first, though all sizes of trees are vulnerable.

Figure 1 - Biological control of BWA by the predacious Syrphid fly . Photo by Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service.

suitable site, it sinks it’s long, sucking mouth parts into the outer bark and begins sucking sap from the tree. Crawlers transform into a flattened, waxfringed resting stage known as neosistens. In colder areas of its range this is the only stage that will survive winter temperatures and thus overwinters in this stage. In the non-overwintering generations, the neosistens stage can last from two to eight weeks. Following the neosistens stage are two forms that closely resemble adults,

Figure 4 - Trunk attack.

followed by the final adult stage of the life-cycle. This latter part of the cycle, which includes the two pre-adult and adult stage, are called the sistentes. By late September, the second generation of adults begins to lay eggs and do so as late as mid- November. Damage. Balsam woolly adelgid feed on the stems, branches, and twigs of their host species. During feeding they inject a growth substance into the outer bark

Photo by Jerald E. Dewey, USDA Forest Service.

Feeding can be concentrated on the stems or in the crowns. In the West, stem attacks are more common on the best sites and crown attacks more common on poorer sites. BWAs can also concentrate their attack in heavy, mass infestations along the trunk of a host tree, with 100 to 200 adelgids per square inch of bark surface. The stems of trees under heavy attack form reddish, irregular growth rings, which disrupt water conduction to the crown and often results in mortality within two to three years of attack. With crown attacks, trees decline over a number of years and growth is slowed. Old needles drop and are not replaced by new ones, and cone and seed production is greatly reduced. Control. There are several predators of the balsam woolly adelgid, including ladybird beetles,

syrphid fly larvae, and green lacewings. Though predators are often present, they have not been able to achieve economic levels of control. Systemic chemical control is feasible in home landscape and other urban settings, but not across large tracts of forestland. Special thanks to Stephen Cook, Insect Ecologist, University of Idaho and Tom Eckberg and Neal Kittelson, Lands Program Specialists – Forest Health, Idaho Department of Lands for their extensive review of this article. For more information about BWA and SAF Complex you can go to: USDA Forest Service Forest Insect and Disease Leaflet 118: Balsam Woolly Adelgid at: http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/nr/ fid/fidls/fidl-118.pdf Idaho Department of Lands Management Guide for Balsam Woolly Adelgid at: ht t p://w w w.fs.usda.gov/ I nter net / FSE _ DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5187218. pdf Yvonne Barkley is an associate extension forester for the University of Idaho. She can be reached at yvonnec@uidaho. edu

Figure 3 - Gouting.

Photo by William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Grain Marketing with Clark Johnston

Market Volatility Creates Opportunity have experienced. We are projecting an additional 4 million acres above last year with yields about 3 bushels under trend line numbers. If all the stars line up and we really do produce a 14 plus billion bushel crop we will be able to meet the projected demand for the year but, we aren’t going to build enough stocks, if any, to help ease the challenges that will face us.

Clark Johnston

Volatility in the futures markets is here to stay and there really isn’t much we can do about it. We talk about it, we complain about it and we even try to understand it. The fact of the matter is that this same volatility that has us at times scratching our heads also gives us the opportunities we need in the market to buy or sell our commodities at a profitable margin. Let’s take for instance July corn. Starting on the 2nd of January the futures moved $1.08 higher then changed direction on the 4th of March moving $1.16 lower. Now I know, I know, I know that hindsight is perfect but, let’s learn from history and implement this in our plan. If you are a buyer of corn, the market gave you another opportunity to buy your corn at the same level as the first week of January. The futures then moved a $1.57 higher and then reversed to trade back down $1.05 lower. I know that I have talked about this before but, it is worth repeating again. Just look at the fundamental numbers and we can see that we are not swimming in corn or wheat. The new crop corn numbers are fairly aggressive considering the spring that we 18

The wheat markets are also facing some challenges for the upcoming year. Two years ago the stocks to use ratio for all wheat was in the mid to high 40 percentile. This year we moved that number down into the low to mid 30’s. The way things look right now we could very well move that number at the end of this crop year into the teens. Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and the east slope of Colorado have and are experiencing a major drought. The wheat that has been harvested is good quality there just isn’t much of it. The yields are running about one third to one half of an average crop as well as a larger than normal amount of acres being abandoned. This sets the stage for the basis on milling quality wheat to be stronger than we have seen in the past few years. Spring wheat is somewhat different as these areas have experienced wetter than normal conditions. North Dakota, Montana and all of western Canada have all seen planting delays that in some areas have jeopardized the wheat crop for this year. This past year we have had very strong basis levels for milling wheat and this year looks to be the same. We would anticipate for the protein discounts to remain close to the current levels into this new crop. This past winter there were some very competitive bids for 13 protein wheat into some local flour mills. We expect this to be the case again this year. Soft white wheat has had some disease

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

problems in some of the fall varieties. The spring planting experienced widespread delays across the state. From the northern region down to the southeast part of the state producers were challenged with too wet and too cold conditions. The markets should remain strong as we have seen the feed markets remain competitive with the flour mills in their bids. As long as corn remains strong look for soft white to work into these alternative markets. I guess to make a long story short this spring has had its challenges. The markets will remain volatile and we need to be mindful of just what we are trying to accomplish in our pricing. When we look back at this spring and we try to determine if the markets were trading the technical indicators or the fundamental numbers I think it will be safe to say the markets were being run by Mother Nature and there really isn’t much we can do about that. Clark Johnston is a grain marketing specialist who is on contract with the Idaho Farm Bureau. He is the owner of JC Management Company in Northern Utah. He can be reached at clark@jcmanagement. net


Bannock County Notice The Bannock County Farm Bureau is sponsoring a domestic drinking water test for private wells this spring and throughout most of the summer. The Bannock County Farm Bureau Board will cost share in the tests. The two tests being offered are for coliform (bacteria) and nitrates. Cost is $14 and $15 respectively.

Members must pick up the test bottles, pay for them and return the samples. They will receive a receipt and when they return the receipt to the Bannock County Farm Bureau Office at 200 West Alameda in Pocatello they will be reimbursed $10 per test.

Private household drinking wells are the only wells eligible. No city water will be test The tests will be done Monday thru Thurs- ed. Testing will begin on June 15 and run day only. Bannock County Farm Bureau through August 31. For more information members can pick up the tests at IAS En- contact Kim Madrid-Acosta at 233-9442. viroChem, at 3314 Poleline Road in Pocatello.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Study Suggests Idaho Caught in Low-Skill, Low-Wage Jobs Trap By Bill Loftus

failure to recruit enough highly paid jobs.

ally and Idaho in 2009 was $11,000.

MOSCOW – Idaho’s workforce earns nearly $11,000 less for each employee than the national average. That hurts both workers individually and the state, which suffers lower tax revenues to support basic services, a retired University of Idaho agricultural economist’s analysis shows.

The consequence, Cooke said, is that Idaho’s 660,000 jobs, essentially lose out on some $7.2 billion a year in wages each year compared to the national average. Idaho lags nearly $8 billion behind Colorado, where workers average $12,000 more a year.

With another agricultural economics graduate student, Chen Chen, Cooke took an in-depth look at Colorado, which weathered the recession better than Idaho.

Economic data suggests that Idaho is caught in a low-skill, low-wage trap, said agricultural economist Stephen C. Cooke, who retired from the University of Idaho in December. He began studying the issue a decade ago. “Why are wages so low in Idaho? That’s the question I’m trying to answer,” Cooke said. The answer is complex, he added, but key components include lack of a priority on educating the state’s workforce and a 22

The economy of the Rocky Mountain region in general can be characterized as caught in a low-skill/low-wage economic gap, Cooke wrote in the journal “The Review of Regional Studies” with co-author Bharathkumar A. Kulandaisamy, an agricultural economics graduate student. Their article was published earlier this year. Their research analyzed 81 economic sectors and concluded the gap between average annual wages nation-

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

Colorado provides a comparison and a lesson in two very different job environments. Idaho is adding jobs in lowwage sectors but shedding them in highwage sectors. Colorado is the opposite. Compared to Colorado, the big three growing job sectors in Idaho include outpatient health care services, agriculture and administrative and support services. The best examples of the last sector are call centers, Cooke said. See JOB STUDY page 27


County Happenings LEFT: Jefferson County Farm Bureau’s Woman of the Year Award was presented to Orillia Bazil during the county’s annual Farmer – Merchant Banquet. She received a plaque and a corsage. Her husband James was also recognized during the banquet, receiving a Farmer of the Year Award.

The Jefferson County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee made a generous donation to the Ronald McDonald House charity this year. Pictured are Committee members left to right: Marcene Ferguson, Arlene Cordingley, Sharon Moser, Carma Lufkin, Orillia Bazil and Afton Ellis. LEFT: Marcie Parkinson, a second grade teacher from Harwood Elementary School will be sponsored by the Jefferson County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee this year to attend the State Ag in the Classroom workshops in Pocatello on July 7 and 8. She will earn one credit from the University of Idaho for her attendance and receive materials and training that can be used in the classroom.

Students from Harwood Elementary School use supplies from the Little Red Barn. The Barn travels throughout elementary schools in Jefferson County and is sponsored by the Jefferson County Farm Bureau. The Barn includes animals, farm equipment, books, puzzles, videos, and handouts to help children learn where food and fiber come from.

IFBF Range Specialist Wally Butler spoke at a recent Clearwater/Lewis County Farm Bureau meeting on grazing issues and the Western Legacy Alliance. Neal Crescenti, Program Manager for grazing, farming and conservation with the Idaho Department of Lands was also present and spoke on state grazing leases and IDL’s mission with regard to grazing lands. He said that overall IDL is looking for ways to diversity grazing lands to generate additional revenues for the state endowment. That means that there could be multiple leases given for a single piece of land.  “It’s possible Jefferson County Farm Bureau’s Ag Baby of the Year is Parker to have leases for grazing, recreation and communications that overlap if they are Kenneth Davis, born March 22 at Madison Memorial Hospital. compatible in a given area.” Crescenti said IDL is currently writing a business plan He weighed eight pounds, five ounces. His parents are Aaron and that will help them chart the future direction of the agency. Future grazing leases will be 20 year leases. Currently there are 1,200 grazing leases in the state. Linda Davis. He received a quilt, baby supplies and clothes. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Idaho Agriculture: Good for Family, Community & State Essay Contest Winners Announced

Ashley Wells, a student at New Plymouth Elementary, with her essay titled “Raising Beef” placed first District IV of the Idaho Farm Bureau Women’s Leadership Committee Essay Contest and also claimed first place overall in the state competition. She received a $125 check. Second place overall went to Ariana Bails of Sawtooth Elementary in Twin Falls. Third place overall was won by Delaney Uhlenkott of Prairie Middle School in Cottonwood. Other district winners included Jenessa Stokes of Franklin County and Merritt Philps of Custer County. Following is Wells’ essay: I live on a 110 acre calf ranch. My mom’s boss has about 1,000 calves on our property. About 12 miles from our house is another calf ranch my mom’s boss owns. A lot of these calves are Holsteins, but some are beef cows. Later in the school year my mom said that my brother and I could take our class to both my place and the other calf ranch, called Shadow Butte. We hope to better educate the students on how the stores get the meat and where they get it from. How it all works: the Holsteins come into the calf ranch as day olds and stay in a hutch until they are about 60 days old. Once they leave the hutch, they go to a group pen for about 2 weeks. From the group pen they come to my place for about 4 weeks so they can adjust to big pens. After my place they go to a feedlot for 16 months. After the feedlot we send them to

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The Women’s Leadership Committee’s essay contest has just completed its 13th year. It all began in 1999 as a writing contest for 6th graders to ponder agriculture and its often forgotten connection to today’s world. Thanks goes to those teachers implementing the essay contest into their curriculum.

a kill plant to be slaughtered for meat. At the calf ranch, the employees give the babies milk twice a day, once in the morning at 7 and again at 5 in the afternoon. During the day the calves get a bucket of grain and another of water. They also need straw to sleep on, so about every 7 days they get new straw. To keep them healthy they are given vaccines against numerous diseases, such as pneumonia and salmonella. Since all the calves have to be steers, not bulls, we have to castrate them. They also have to be dehorned, so the employees burn the horns off at about 50 days old. Each calf lives in its own hutch, so every calf much be cared for individually. It takes a lot of time to take care of the calves each day. On the beef cow side we usually buy heifers and breed them. After they calve, we wait two months to breed them again. When the calves are between 400-500 pounds, we

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

sell the bull calves and keep the heifers as replacements for the older cows. Calving time with the beef cows can be interesting. Today we came home and had to pull a calf. We had to separate off the heifer, run her into the feedlot, and put her in the squeeze chute. We pulled the calf, she had a huge heifer. I got to dry off the calf, dip its navel and tag its ear. Some of my jobs during calving season are: tagging calves, dipping navels with iodine, checking cows both day and night, bringing cow up, and branding cows and calves. At the calf ranch my jobs are: washing buckets, loading calves, unloading calves, branding calves, cleaning the office, and shipping calves and counting calves. I have learned a lot from living on a calf ranch, but most importantly calf ranches give a lot of people jobs and food on the table.


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Part of Bannock County Farm Bureau President Jim Guthrie’s farm was flooded by the Portneuf River in mid-May. Rivers throughout the state are running at or above flood stage and are expected to get higher in early June. Photo by John Thompson

Snowpack in Eastern Idaho’s major basins is well above average this spring. Continued rain and cold weather has prolonged runoff and flooding is expected in many areas. Snowpack totals in the Snake Basin above Palisades Reservoir were at 230 percent of normal on May 24. Photo by Steve Ritter

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011


JOB Study

Continued from page 22

Agricultural workers actually fare quite well because they earn more than the national average and the number of jobs is growing, he said. Idaho’s declining job sectors include professional, scientific and technical services; management of companies and enterprises and mining.

A Message For Our Dairy Farm Customers

Analyzing economic data from 2001 to 2009, Cooke said, “We found Idahofocusesitseconomicdevelopmentonlow-skilljobs,whichbring low wages, and we have significantly lower wages and employment in the high skill sectors relative to the United States and Colorado.” The analysis showed that Idaho workers tend to be over-employed, which means they occupy jobs that typically require higher education levels. The problem for Idaho and its workers is they earn less as a result.

At Idaho Power, our goal is to provide you with fair-priced electricity safely, reliably and responsibly. We work hard to resolve electric service issues for the benefit of our customers and communities. Stray voltage may be one of these issues. If you are concerned about neutral-to-earth voltage levels on or near your property, please contact your Idaho Power agricultural representative to arrange a free on-site investigation. Blackfoot & American Falls Area Dennis Elison 208-236-7744 delison@idahopower.com Mini-Cassia Area Daniel Moore 208-736-3215 dmoore@idahopower.com Twin Falls, Jerome & Gooding Area Gerald Orthel 208-736-3430 gorthel@idahopower.com

Mountain Home & Boise Area Tim Fenwick 208-388-6366 tfenwick@idahopower.com Nampa & Caldwell Area Mike Liechty 208-465-8626 mliechty@idahopower.com Payette & Ontario Area Cortney Forsberg 208-642-6546 cforsberg@idahopower.com

Education spending alone cannot improve Idaho’s average wage, said Cooke. “It’s important, but alone it’s not sufficient. You have to do several things, including recruit jobs in high-wage sectors.” Bringing companies that need educated, skilled workers to Idaho is hard without the educated workforce in place, however. Without high paying jobs, Idaho’s college graduates often go out of state, Cooke said. Idaho’s economy does have strengths. tinction of very high job growth, but it tion of low wages,” Cooke said. That cent job growth in Idaho compared to

“Idaho has the disalso has the distinctranslated to 7 per2 percent nationally.

“I think that what this shows is that education is good because it makes you a lot of money,” Cooke said. “It’s a means to an end, it’s not the end. It’s about the kind of economy and society we want to live in.” Generally the highest-paying jobs require a college education. Cooke said Idaho has one of the largest education gaps, meaning the difference between the number of jobs requiring a college degree and the number of college graduates, among the five Rocky Mountain States. Neighboring Utah gained on Colorado during a recession because it continued to invest in education and produce college graduates, Cooke said. That helped Utah gain more highly-paid workers when the economy improved. Like a lighter, more nimble race car passing a heavier, faster race car in a curve, adding graduates helped Utah’s smaller economy outpace Colorado’s larger economy in an economic downturn. Cooke and Kulandaisamy’s paper in the Review of Regional Studies journal published by the Southern Regional Science Association is available online at bit.ly/iP9XDm. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Stallman

Continued from page 2

household consumption. With the global population expected to reach 9 billion in the next 35 years, and with the U.S. as a major global food resource, do we really want to backpedal and wipe the slate clean of years of food advancements that allow us to help feed a hungry world? Although I am a conventional farmer, I admire agriculture’s many facets. Organic, local, biotech-free, no-till, etc., are all important and have their place in the bigger picture. Agriculture comes in all shapes and sizes from a local farm stand to a large operation. I think National Public Radio summed it up best in a recent segment: “To [many]

this is what the future should be—fruits and veggies grown on small farms, nearby the city. But, get over it. This isn’t the future—not if we want to feed everyone.” Where’s the Farmer? Somehow during this food debate, the farmer has been shunned. There have been several major food summits held recently in Washington, D.C. Speaking on the panels were food activists and national thought leaders. Unfortunately, no farmers were invited to participate. Who knows food better than those who grow and raise it? Because of the hard work of U.S. farmers and ranchers, Americans today have more food choices and spend less of their disposable income on food than practically anyone else on earth.

Americans are living longer than ever before because today’s food system allows for better nutrition and food safety. Family-owned farms make up more than 97 percent of our nation’s farms. They include small-scale and large-scale operations, as well as organic, traditional, notill and biotech, among other production methods. The fact is, whatever label you attach to them, they are getting the job done.   The food revolution that is being sought by some may indeed come to pass, but it will not happen without genuine consumer demand and resulting market signals. And it surely won’t happen without the input of America’s food providers—farmers and ranchers.

Priestley

Continued from page 2 could be created.

Passing these trade agreements also means leveling the playing field. Currently, U.S. products going into these countries face exorbitant tariffs just to get into these markets. Yet, while we pay tariffs of up to 160 percent to sell to the Colombia and Panama markets, they receive duty-free access to the U.S. market for their goods. In Korea, tariffs of up to 500 percent are placed on U.S. goods. Passing these trade agreements would immediately eliminate most of these tariffs.

Further, each day that goes by without passing the agreements provides more opportunity for other countries to negotiate their own deals. For example, while we urge the administration and Congress to expedite passage of these trade deals, the European Union is moving forward with its own Korea agreement, hoping it can beat us to the punch. Australia, Chile and Canada are also moving in and taking potential U.S. market share in the three countries. Our market share in Colombia has plummeted from 46 percent to 24 percent in the past several years. In Korea, the market

share for Chilean wine has increased from 2.4 percent to 21.5 percent, while ours has decreased from 17.1 percent to 10.8 percent. Panama has already completed an agreement with Canada which includes beef, potato products and processed foods, while we are left out in the cold. As long as Congress fails to act on the pending trade deals our role as a major trading partner diminishes, as well as opportunity for U.S. job creation. That’s why it’s critical we urge Congress to pass the Korea, Colombia and Panama trade agreements today.

KELLER

Continued from page 2 litical agenda. Contrary to Congressional intent, these groups have hijacked EAJA to create a cottage industry of tax-payer funded litigation that advances their own narrow environmental agenda. Open court documents show that environmental groups repeatedly sue the federal government not on substantive grounds, but on canned procedural motions. The intent is twofold: to grind the work of land management and other federal agencies to a halt, and to fund their ever increasing ap28

petite for litigation on the backs of taxpayers. Harmed in the process are the individuals, small businesses, energy producers, farmers and ranchers, who must pay out of their own pocket to defend the federal government against repeated attacks from environmental groups, while simultaneously paying those same groups with their tax dollars.

tracking and reporting requirements, and institutes targeted reforms to EAJA that will reduce the tax-payer funded litigation these groups have enjoyed for years. The bill returns EAJA to the original intent of Congress to help individuals and small businesses during a once-in-a-lifetime need to battle the federal government in court.

The Government Litigation Savings Act will put a halt to the abuses by deep-pocketed environmental groups. It reinstates

The Idaho Farm Bureau supports Representative Lummis in her efforts to bring justice to the Equal Access to Justice Act.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011


Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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AFBF Estimates 3.6M Acres Hit by Floods WASHINGTON, D.C., May 23, 2011 – After learning firsthand from state Farm Bureaus about recent flooding devastation in the southern United States the American Farm Bureau Federation now estimates that nearly 3.6 million acres of farmland has been impacted by the natural disaster. On a Farm Bureau nationwide call late last week, states also reported an estimated 40 percent of this year’s rice crop has been affected.  Arkansas topped the list with a million acres affected, including 300,000 acres of rice and 120,000 acres of wheat.  Illinois was estimated to have 500,000 acres of farmland under water, with Mississippi and Missouri coming in at 600,000 and 570,000 acres, respectively.  Tennessee reported 650,000 acres and Louisiana was pegged at 280,000 acres.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

“There is no doubt about it, the effect of the flooding on farmers and ranchers is being felt deeply across the south,” said AFBF Chief Economist Bob Young. “One is reminded of the ’93 or ’95 floods in terms of scale of affected area.” But, said Young, it’s critical that the government acts quickly to rebuild the levees and allow producers to make plans for the future.  “In many of these areas, agriculture is the major economic driver for the region,” said Young.  “While some may be able to get a crop in the ground this year, we need to also think about the longterm economic health of these farms and communities.” Without the levees in place to protect homes and farms however, it may be hard to make those investments, added Young.


Notice for Horse Owners

A recent disease outbreak of Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHV-1) has been traced to horses who attended the National Cutting Horse Associations’ Western National Championships in Ogden, Utah on April 30 - May 8, 2011.  Horses who participated in this event may have been exposed to this EHV-1 virus. Idaho Equine Hospital has seen two horses with clinical signs consistent with this neurologic herpes that attended that show. One horse came into that clinic for a routine procedure, went back home and then became symptomatic. That horse has since been euthanized. The other horse came back from the cutting horse show, became symptomatic at the barn it lives at and has also been euthanized.

We are encouraging owners of horses who participated in the Ogden, Utah event (and any additional horses who may have come in contact with these horses) to isolate and monitor their horses for clinical signs of disease.  A rectal temperature in excess of 102F commonly precedes other clinical signs.   Therefore, we are urging owners to take temperatures on each individual horse(s) twice a day.  If a temperature above 102F is detected contact your veterinarian immediately.   Laboratory submission of nasal swabs and blood samples collected from the exposed horse can be utilized for virus detection and isolation. The EHV-1 organism spreads quickly from horse to horse and the neurologic form of the virus can reach high morbidity (sickness) and mortality (death) rates. The incubation period of EHV-1 is

typically 2-14 days.  In horses infected with the neurologic strain of EHV-1, clinical signs may include: nasal discharge, incoordination, hind end weakness, recumbency, lethargy, urine dribbling and diminished tail tone.  Prognosis depends on severity of signs and the period of recumbency.  There is no specific treatment for EHV-1.  Treatment may include intravenous fluids, anti-inflammatory drugs and other appropriate supportive treatment. Currently, there is no equine vaccine that has a label claim for protection against the neurological strain of the virus. Vaccination will NOT stop a horse from contracting EHV-1 neuro herpes, but it MAY lessen the severity of this disease in horses becoming infected. The virus is easily spread by aerosol (airborne) transmission, horse-to-horse contact and contact with nasal secretions on equipment, tack, feed and other surfaces. People can spread the virus by means of contaminated hands, clothing, shoes and vehicles. However, horses with severe clinical signs of neurological EHV-1 illness are thought to have large viral loads in their blood and nasal secretions and therefore, present the greatest danger for spreading the disease. Immediate separation and isolation of identified suspect cases and implementation of appropriate bio-security measures are key elements for disease control. Please contact me with any questions and/or concerns. Sincerely – Steve Hardy DVM Cell: 890-0800 or Office: 286-7828

American farm bureau federation news

Corn Supply Tight Despite Projected Record Crop The Agriculture Department projects a record U.S. corn crop this year, but despite the expected increase in production, American Farm Bureau Federation economists emphasize that stocks are still tight and corn farmers will need strong yields to meet demand and build supplies to more comfortable levels. USDA released its May World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates today which pegs U.S. corn production at 13.5 billion bushels in 2011. If realized, this would be the largest U.S. crop ever, outdoing the record 13.1 billion bushel corn crop in 2009. “It’s important to remember that this is a

preliminary estimate from USDA. A lot can change from now until harvest,” explained Todd Davis, AFBF crops economist. “We still don’t know the impact late planting in Corn Belt states east of the Mississippi will have on this year’s corn crop. We’re going to need a warm summer with timely rains to realize this 13.5 billion bushel corn crop.” USDA projects U.S. corn farmers will plant 92.2 million acres this year, 5 percent more than last year and 7 percent more than planted in 2009. If realized, this would be the second highest planted corn acreage in the United States since 1944, behind only the 93.5 million acres planted in 2007, according to USDA.

Davis notes that USDA projects an average yield of 158.7 bushels per acre in its May estimate for the 2011 corn crop, which would be slightly lower than the long-run trend of 162 bushels per acre and the 2009 record yield of 164.7 bushels per acre. “The lower yield estimate reflects this year’s later planted crop,” Davis said. USDA still sees a very tight supply situation for the 2011/2012 crop year. “For the corn crop harvested this fall, USDA projects a stocks-to-use ratio of 6.7 percent. This is a very tight supply, representing just 25 days of use,” Davis said. “Because of tight stocks and strong demand, USDA projects high prices for this year’s harvest at $5.50 - $6.50 per bushel.”

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Idaho Prospective Plantings for 2011 All wheat planted in Idaho is expected to total 1.49 million acres, up 6 percent from last year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Spring wheat plantings are expected to be 640,000 acres, 2 percent more than last year. Winter wheat seedings, at 830,000 acres, increased 11 percent from the 2010 crop. Durum wheat seedings are expected to total 15,000 acres, down 5,000 acres from 2010. Idaho farmers intend to seed 390,000 acres of field corn in 2011, up 22 percent from last year. If realized, this will be a new record high. Barley seedings are expected to total 500,000 acres, up 10,000 acres from last season. Oat seedings are expected to be 60,000 acres, down 14 percent from last year. Dry bean planting intentions decreased 33 percent from last year to 90,000 acres. Dry bean estimates include chickpeas, which are grown primarily in North Idaho. Chickpea planting intentions totaled 48,000 acres, down 9 percent from 2010. All hay expected to be harvested, at 1.37 million acres, is down 7 percent from 2010. Sugarbeet plantings are expected to total 177,000 acres, up 4 percent from last year. Lentil acreage is expected to be 45,000 acres, down 18 percent from 2010. Dry edible pea acreage, at 25,000 acres, is expected to be down 19 percent from last year. Austrian winter pea acres are 32

expected to total 6,000 acres, down 45 percent from 2010. Canola acres are expected to total 19,000 acres, down 3 percent from 2010. Onion Acreage Intentions Onion acreage planted in Idaho is expected to be 9,500 acres, up 3 percent from the 2010 acreage of 9,200 and up 6 percent from the 2009 acreage of 9,000, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Producers in Malheur County, Oregon are expected to plant 11,500 acres, up 2 percent from last year. Total storage acreage in Washington is estimated to be 22,000 acres, unchanged from last year. SARE Grants Available Western SARE announces the release of five Calls for Proposals for 2012 funding. Grants range from $15,000 to $200,000. Full descriptions of the grant programs and the Call for Proposals can be obtained by calling 435.797.2257 or at http://www.westernsare.org/ Grants/Types-of-Grants.  Western SARE, a USDA program, annually awards competitive grants to help sustain agriculture, the environment and rural communities. Producers are actively involved in every funded project. The five grant programs are: Research and Education grants, which range between $20,000

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

and $200,000, are available to agricultural researchers for applied research involving farmers and ranchers. Producer grants provide up to $15,000 for an individual producer and $25,000 for three or more producers to conduct onfarm research. Professional + Producer grants are available to agricultural professionals working with producers; the limit is $50,000 and five or more producers must be involved.  Professional Development Program grants, ranging between $30,000 and $100,000, are designed to help agricultural professionals train other professionals in sustainable agriculture concepts. Graduate Student grants, worth up to $25,000, are used to assist students in their graduate research projects. Idaho Winter Wheat Production Up Idaho’s 2011 winter wheat production is forecast at 62.4 million bushels, 7 percent higher than last year, and 10 percent above the 2009 crop, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Based on May 1 conditions, yield is estimated at 79.0 bushels per acre, down 3 bushels from last year. Acres expected to be harvested are set at 790,000 acres, an increase of 80,000 acres from 2010.

Idaho’s May 1 hay stocks totaled 280,000 tons, down 64 percent from the May 1, 2010 total of 775 tons, and down 38 percent from 2009. Nationally, winter wheat production is forecast at 1.42 billion bushels, down 4 percent from 2010. Based on May 1 conditions, the United States yield is forecast at 44.5 bushels per acre, down 2.3 bushels from the previous year. Expected grain area totals 32.0 million acres, up 1 percent from last year. As of May 1, thirty-four percent of the United States winter wheat crop was rated in good to excellent condition, 34 points below the same week in 2010, and heading had reached 33 percent in the 18 major producing States, 4 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average. Hard Red Winter, at 762 million bushels, is down 25 percent from 2010. Soft Red Winter, at 427 million bushels, is up 80 percent from last year. White Winter is up 3 percent from last year and now totals 235 million bushels. Of this total, 11.7 million bushels are Hard White and 224 million bushels are Soft White. All hay stored on farms May 1, 2011 totaled 22.2 million tons, up 6 percent from a year ago. Disappearance from December 1, 2010-May 1, 2011 totaled 79.9 million tons, compared with 86.3 million tons for the same period a year ago.


Idaho Potato Stocks Down from Last Year Potato stocks held by growers, dealers, and processors in Idaho on May 1 totaled 30.0 million cwt, 8.5 million cwt less than on hand May 1, 2010. This is the lowest May 1 stocks level since 1991. Disappearance, at 84.4 million cwt is down from last year’s 94.0 million cwt. Stocks in the 10 Southwest counties totaled 1.30 million cwt, down from last year’s 1.70 million cwt. The Other counties’ stocks, at 28.7 million cwt, were down from the 36.8 million cwt stored on May 1, 2010. Processors in Idaho and Malheur County, Oregon used 6.61 million cwt of 2010 crop raw potatoes during April, down 4.2 percent from April 2010. Processors in Idaho and Malheur County, Oregon have used 52.8 million cwt of 2010 crop raw potatoes to May 1, down 5.9 percent from last year. Idaho potatoes accounted for 45.9 million cwt of the total processed. The remaining 6.90 million cwt were produced in other states.

Website Promotes Nutrient Stewardship There’s a new online resource aimed at helping farmers boost yields, manage input costs and maintain soil health. The website, www.nutrientstewardship.com, is a collaborative effort of the fertilizer industry aimed at increasing awareness of 4R nutrient stewardship, a site-specific, scientific framework that addresses farmers’ use of the right fertilizer source at the right rate, the

right time and the right place.  Bureau of Labor. “The share of income has increased from 11 “Nutrient stewardship is a top or 12 percent to almost 13 perpriority for the entire fertilizer cent … a very clear indication industry,” said Ford West, TFI that people are spending more president. “The new website on food.” streamlines our industry’s efforts to promote awareness and adoption of science-based Local Products in School fertilizer best management Meals Encouraged practices, while also creating Kevin Concannon, USDA una brand for the 4Rs that will dersecretary, announced today allow the agriculture commuthat USDA’s child nutrition nity to speak with one voice programs are implementing regarding its commitment to new rules designed to encourenvironmental stewardship and age use of local farm products sustainability.” in school meals. Consumers Cope with Rising Food Prices The results from a new poll released by the Center for Food Integrity indicates consumers are coping with the rising cost of food by changing their shopping behaviors. The poll, posted on the organization’s Best Food Facts website (www.bestfoodfacts.org) shows that 37 percent of the respondents are clipping coupons, 32 percent are buying fewer name brand items and 17 percent are shopping at discount/warehouse stores in an effort to keep the household budget in the black. Best Food Facts interviewed Dr. Helen Jensen, an economics professor at Iowa State University, about the survey results and her thoughts on how American families are dealing with the higher cost of food. In addition to the options listed in the survey, Jensen suspects people are also cutting back on food eaten or prepared away from home. “Clearly, rising food prices are increasing their share of budget spent on food,” Dr. Jensen said, citing statistics from the U.S.

The final rule, published in the “Federal Register,” will let schools and other providers give preference to unprocessed locally grown and locally raised agricultural products as they purchase food for the National School Lunch, School Breakfast, Special Milk, Child and Adult Care, Fresh Fruit and Vegetable, and Summer Food Service programs. The rule is part of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 signed into law by President Barack Obama and one of the key provisions to bolster farmto-school programs across the country. Website on ‘4Rs’ of Nutrient Stewardship A new website that provides information about nutrient stewardship to farmers based on the “4Rs” Right fertilizer source at the Right rate, at the Right time and in the Right place, is now online. The site, www. nutrientstewardship.com, describes the importance of these steps and offers practical advice and information on how to implement a 4R plan. “Nutrient management is important because nutrients are

the second largest input expense in corn production,” said Dr. Howard Brown, GROWMARK manager, agronomy services. Brown noted that nutrients impact farmers’ profitability as well as plant nutrition and growth. USDA Surveys on 2011 Ag Outlook With the 2011 growing season now in full swing, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) will spend the first two weeks of June surveying thousands of farmers across Idaho to get a clear indication of the production and supply of major commodities for the year. The information provided will be compiled into one publicly accessible report and maintain confidentiality of individual farmer information. “In March, U.S. farmers reported that they have planted or intend to plant more acres of corn, wheat and cotton this crop season and fewer acres of soybeans. Now with most of the crop actually in the ground, we are reaching out to producers to find out what they actually planted,” said Vince Matthews, Director of the NASS Idaho Field Office. Through two major mid-year surveys, the June Agricultural Survey and the June Area Survey, NASS will gather data on what crops have been planted and what commodities are in storage. This information will provide a comprehensive picture of how things are shaping up in 2011 for the U.S. agriculture industry. “For the agricultural survey, we contact producers by mail, phone or personal visit. We ask

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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them to provide information on their total acreage, acres planted to specific commodities – including biotech varieties, and quantities of grains and oilseeds stored on-farm,” said Matthews. “For the area survey, we visit randomly selected tracts of land and interview the operators of any farm or ranch on that land. We collect information on crop acreage – including biotech crops, as well as grain stocks, livestock inventory, cash rents, land values, and value of sales.” This information is a critical component of several key national reports, including the annual Acreage report and the quarterly Grain Stocks report, both to be released on June 30. Survey data also contribute to NASS’s monthly and annual Crop Production reports and various other crop and livestock-related publications, including USDA’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates. USDA to Adopt Recommendations on Diversity USDA will move quickly to adopt most recommendations from a two-year study on the agency’s history of discrimination, according to Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. Making rural development programs more accessible for women and appointing a chief diversity officer in state offices are among the recommendations of the assessment by consulting firm Jackson Lewis. The study, which cost $8 million, was ordered after the administration pledged to bring “cultural transformation” to the agency, which has been charged with discrimination cases many 34

consider to be among the most egregious ever filed against the federal government. One year ago, Vilsack announced a “New Civil Rights Era for USDA” and began addressing a backlog of 11,000 equal employment opportunity complaints filed against the agency. Closing discrimination claims made by Hispanic, black, female and Native American farmers, many of which are decades old, also has been a priority according to Vilsack. The federal government has offered settlements in all the cases. Pending equal employment opportunity claims at USDA currently total just over 450, the lowest number since officials began keeping track. Cattle Industry Suffers $58.7 Million in Death Loss Idaho cattle producers lost an estimated 93,000 head of cattle and calves from all causes in 2010, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. Losses were valued at $58.7 million. Losses from predators accounted for 6,100 head, 6.6 percent of the total. Nonpredator losses accounted for 86,900 head, 93.4 percent of the total. Predator losses were valued at $3.32 million. Wolves accounted for 30.0 percent of the cattle lost to predators and 47.4 percent of the calves. Coyotes accounted for 26.9 percent of calves lost to predators. Non-predator losses were valued at $55.3 million. Respiratory problems were the largest cause of non-predator deaths, accounting for 25.6 percent of the cattle lost and 33.9 percent of the calves. The second largest non-predator cause was digestive problems, accounting

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

for 13.4 percent of the cattle and 24.9 percent of the calves. Cattle and calf losses from predators and non-predator causes in the United States totaled 3.99 million head (excluding Alaska) during 2010. This represents 4.3 percent of the 93.9 million cattle and calves in the United States at the beginning of 2010. Losses of cattle weighing more than 500 pounds totaled 1.73 million head or 43.4 percent of total losses. Calves weighing less than 500 pounds lost to all causes totaled 2.26 million head or 56.6 percent of total losses. Cattle and calf losses from animal predators totaled nearly 220 thousand head during 2010. This represented 5.5 percent of the total deaths from all causes and resulted in a loss of $98.5 million to farmers and ranchers. Coyotes and dogs caused the majority of cattle and calf predator losses accounting for 53.1 percent and 9.9 percent respectively. Cattle and calf losses from non-predator causes totaled 3.77 million head or 94.5 percent of the total losses during 2010. Respiratory problems represented the leading cause of non-predator deaths, accounting for 28.0 percent, followed by digestive problems at 13.4 percent. This report is released every five years as a cooperative effort between the National Agricultural Statistics Service and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service – Wildlife Services and Veterinary Services. Confidence in Food Safety The Food Marketing Institute’s U.S. Grocery Shopper Trends report, released this week, shows consumer confidence

in food safety is at its highest point in seven years, with 88 percent of shoppers “completely” or “somewhat” confident in the safety of food at the supermarket. “Supermarkets have built consumer trust by taking extensive measures to safeguard food sold in grocery stores,” said Leslie Sarasin, FMI president and CEO. “By working closely with suppliers to ensure safety standards are met, by training staff on best practices for safe food handling and educating consumers about food safety, retailers are a critical link in the safety of the food supply.” FB Urges Senate to Support Rural Schools American Farm Bureau Federation President Bob Stallman wrote to members of the Senate Tuesday urging them to support rural education by cosponsoring S. 946, the Office of Rural Education Policy Act. “Rural schools face unique challenges and are often able to provide unique benefits to their students,” Stallman told the senators. “The challenges faced by rural schools are diverse and can include small enrollments, federal and state education funding inequities, geographic isolation, challenges in recruiting and retaining effective teachers and leaders, and limited access to advanced courses.”  S. 946 establishes an office of rural education policy inside the current office of elementary and secondary education at the Department of Education. The office of rural education policy director will establish a clearinghouse for issues faced by rural schools, among other responsibilities.


Cattle Outlook May 20, 2011

Retail beef prices set a new record last month. The average price of choice beef in grocery stores during April was $4.821 per pound, up 7.4 cents from March and 38.1 cents higher than in April 2010. This was the fourth consecutive month with record beef prices. The 5 area average price for slaughter steers in April was $119.80/cwt, a record for the fifth consecutive month. The farmers’ share of the retail beef dollar was 51.1% in March and 52.1% in April. These were the first months above 50% since January 2006. USDA’s May Cattle on Feed report today said the number of cattle placed on feed during April was up 9.9% and the number marketed during April was down 2.7%, leaving the May 1 on feed inventory up 7.4%. The trade forecast was for the number of cattle on feed to be up 6.5% at the start of May. Pasture conditions are not good for springtime which is one reason the number of cattle being placed on feed is so high. In mid May only 52% of U.S. pasture and range conditions were rated good or excellent. A year ago, 64% of pastures were rated good or excellent. Pasture conditions are especially bad in the southern plains. Pastures rated poor or very poor account for 71% of the pastures in Texas, 80% in New Mexico, and 50% in Oklahoma. Boxed beef prices are slightly higher after five weeks of decline. Friday morning the choice boxed beef carcass cutout value was $175.08/cwt, up 24 cents from last week. The select carcass cutout was up 52 cents from the previous Friday to $171.46 per hundred pounds of carcass weight.

Fed cattle prices are lower for the fourth week in a row. The 5-area daily weighted average price for slaughter steers sold through Thursday of this week on a live weight basis was $108.36/cwt, down $4.81 from last week. Steers sold on a dressed weight basis this week averaged $176.75/cwt, $6.40 lower than the week before. This week in 2010 the average 5-area live price for steers was $97.05/cwt and the carcass price was $154.70/cwt. This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 654,000 head, up 0.2% from the week before, but down 4.5% compared to the same week last year. The average steer dressed weight for the week ending May 7 was 816 pounds, up 1 pound from the week before and 10 pounds heavier than for the same week in 2010. Cash bids for feeder cattle around the country this week were mostly $1 to $4 lower than last week. However, Oklahoma City prices were $2 to $3 higher on stocker cattle and steady on feeder cattle with price ranges for medium and large frame #1 steers: 400-450# $151-$166.50, 450-500# $150-$162, 500550# $147-$158.50, 550-600# $137-$147, 600-650# $135$144.50, 650-700# $126-$140.50, 700-750# $127.75-$134.25, 750-800# $123.50-$131, 800-900# $119.75-$130 and 9001000# $118-$122.75/cwt. The June fed cattle futures contract ended the week at $104.975/cwt, down $4.03 from last week’s close. The August contract closed out the week at $107.10/cwt. From University of Missouri

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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Farm Bureau Members Pay Less For Choice Hotels!

FARM BUREAU COMMODITY REPORT

GRAIN PRICES

4/27/2011

5/24/2011

N/A 9.08-9.13 12.28 304-306.75

8.05 9.07-9.17 12.42 303.25-303.75

N/A + .01 to + .04 + 14 - .75 to - 3.00

7.80 8.00 10.85 12.00

8.00 7.90 10.97 12.00

+ .20 - .10 + .12 Steady

7.50 7.89 11.14 10.25

7.90 7.69 11.51 11.56

+ .40 - .20 + .37 + 1.31

7.50 7.86 10.62 10.25

7.55 7.75 10.70 11.50

+ .05 - .11 + .08 + 1.25

11.50 6.90

11.61 6.97

+ .11 + .07

Barley

7.60 205.00

7.75 211.50

+ .15 + 6.00

LIVESTOCK PRICES

4/27/2011

Portland:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Corn

Ogden:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

A $40 room will be closer to

Pocatello:

$32 A $60 room will be closer to

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Burley:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Nampa:

White Wheat (cwt) (Bushel)

$48 A $90 room will be closer to

Feeder Steers

Under 500 lbs 135-178 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

$72 1.800.258.2847

Farm Bureau Discount Code

00800286

Lewiston: White Wheat

advanced reservations required

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs Over 700 lbs

Cows

Utility/Commercial Canner & Cutter

Stock Cows Bulls

Slaughter

BEAN PRICES: Pinto Pink Small Red

5/23/2011

Trend

Trend

123-174 93-137 90-118

125-176 114-151 93-139 90-110

- 10 to – 2 - 9 to – 23 Steady to + 2 Steady to – 8

112-169 97-147 88-132 83-116

112-156 97-149 88-122 98-105

Steady to – 13 Steady to + 2 Steady to – 10 + 15 to – 11

85-119 72-106

70-116 65-97

- 15 to – 3 - 7 to – 9

52-85 46-75

52-83 46-76

Steady to – 2 Steady to + 1

800-1500

850-1500

+ 50 to steady

60-104

60-100

Steady to - 4

29.00-30.00 30.00-32.00 N/A

30.00 30.00-32.00 N/A

+ 1.00 to steady Steady N/A

Compiled by the Idaho Farm Bureau Commodity Division 36

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011


IDaho Hay Report

May 20, 2011 USDA Market News

Compared to last week, Premium and Supreme Alfalfa steady in a light test. Fair and Good Alfalfa steady in a light test. Trade slow with good to very good demand. Several rain storms where reported across the trade area this last week. Some dairies are still contracting on a limited basis. Retail/feed store/horse steady. Buyer demand good with light supplies. Tons Price Alfalfa Domestic Cattle Large square 4x4x8 Premium/Supreme 500 250.00-250.00 Fair 60 160.00-160.00 Utility/Fair 350 155.00-155.00

Wtd Avg 250.00 160.00 155.00

Tons Price Alfalfa Retail/feed store/horse 2-3 tie small sq bales Premium 120 165.00-180.00

Wtd Avg 172.50

Other hay: 500 Tons: Domestic Cattle Good/Premium Alfalfa Large square 4x4x8 new crop 500 tons 190.00 FOB. Price quotes are FOB, unless otherwise stated.

POTATOES FOR PROCESSING May 17, 2011 IDAHO---Open-market trading by processors with growers was inactive. All contracts have been agreed on and signed for both the Dehydrated and French Fry growers. Planting continues as weather allows. According to NASS, Processors in Idaho and Malheur County, Oregon used 6.61 million cwt of 2010 crop raw potatoes during April, down 4.2 percent from April 2010. Processors in Idaho and Malheur County, Oregon have used 52.8 million cwt of 2010 crop raw potatoes to May 1, down 5.9 percent from last year. Idaho potatoes accounted for 45.9 million cwt of the total processed. The remaining 6.90 million cwt were produced in other states.

5 Year Grain Comparison Grain Prices................05/23/2007...................05/21/2008.................. 05/22/2009................. 05/24/2010..................05/24/2011 Portland: White Wheat..................... 5.62............................... 7.75 .............................5.90 ............................4.70 ............................ 8.05 11% Winter...................5.43-5.53........................... 9.71 ..............6.61-6.71 ................. 4.98-5.06 .........9.07-9.17 14% Spring........................ 5.93................................N/A ............................8.40 ............................6.40 ..........................12.42 Barley (ton)..................160-175.00...........................N/A .............N/A ................. N/A .......................N/A Corn.............................. .167-171.00................... 256-259.75....................184.75-185 .............169-170.25...................303-303.75 Ogden: White Wheat..................... 5.07...............................8.85 ..............................4.74 ............................4.07............................. 8.00 11% Winter....................... 4.58...............................8.25 ..............................5.70 ............................3.89 ........................... 7.90 14 % Spring...................... 4.98............................... 9.78 .............................7.25 ............................5.14 ........................... 10.97 Barley................................. 7.30...............................9.80 ..............................6.64 ............................6.14 ........................... 12.00 Pocatello: White Wheat.....................4.80............................... 8.15 .............................4.60 ............................3.85............................. 7.90 11% Winter....................... 4.37...............................8.10 .............................5.35 ............................3.69 ........................... 7.69 14% Spring........................4.86..............................10.35...............................7.00 ............................5.25 .......................... 11.51 Barley.................................6.80..............................10.00 .............................6.40 ..........................6.35 .......................... 11.56

Burley: White Wheat..................... 4.77...............................8.03 ..............................4.77 ............................3.94............................. 7.55 11% Winter....................... 4.33............................... 7.78 .............................5.74 ............................3.72 ........................... 7.75 14% Spring........................ 4.72................................N/A ............................7.13 ............................5.01 ........................... 10.70 Barley.................................6.80...............................9.50 ..............................6.00 ..........................5.25 .......................... 11.50 Nampa: White Wheat (cwt)...........7.13............................... 11.58...............................8.08 ............................6.33............................ 11.61 (bushel)........... 4.28...............................6.95 ..............................4.85 ............................3.80............................. 6.97 Lewiston: White Wheat..................... 5.25...............................7.35 .............................5.65 ............................4.50............................. 7.75 Barley............................... 150.50...........................186.50 ..........................106.50...........................111.50......................... 211.50 Bean Prices: Pintos...........................23.00-24.00...................32.00-33.00..........................N/A..............................30.00............................ 30.00 Pinks............................22.00-23.00........................32.00...............................N/A..............................30.00.......................30.00-32.00 Small Reds...................23.00-25.00..........................N/A.................................N/A..............................30.00..............................N/A ***

IDAHO Milk production up 4.6 Percent May 18, 2011 Idaho milk production during April 2011 totaled 1.08 million pounds, a 4.6 percent increase from the same month last year, but down 0.6 percent from March 2011, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. March milk production was revised to 1.08 million pounds, up 2 million pounds from the preliminary level. Average milk production per cow in April 2011 was 1,870 pounds, up 20 pounds from last year’s level. The average number of milk cows during April was 576,000 head, up 19,000 from April 2010, and unchanged from March 2011.

Milk production in the 23 major States during April totaled 15.5 billion pounds, up 1.7 percent from April 2010. March revised production at 15.8 billion pounds, was up 2.4 percent from March 2010. The March revision represented a decrease of 6 million pounds or less than 0.1 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,834 pounds for April, 9 pounds above April 2010. The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.43 million head, 97,000 head more than April 2010, and 8,000 head more March 2011. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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5 Year livestock comparison .....................................05/23/2007...................05/21/2008.................. 05/22/2009................. 05/24/2010..................05/23/2011 Under 500 lbs................ 105-131 ......................100-125.........................102-127 ....................115-141 .................... 125-176 500-700 lbs....................100-130 ........................98-131 ..........................92-128 ........................97-139 .......................114-151 700-900 lbs.....................95-120 .........................85-121 ..........................82-117 ......................90-114 ....................... 93-139 Over 900 lbs...................80-104...........................72-102............................75-93 ..........................85-101.......................... 90-110 Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs................100-125..........................96-118 ..........................94-121 ....................95-133 .......................112-156 500-700 lbs..................... 97-131 ..........................94-124 ..........................88-109 .......................87-124 ....................... 97-149 700-900 lbs..................... 91-107...........................83-109...........................71-106...........................75-106..........................88-122 Over 900 lbs....................85-99 ...........................77-99 ..........................85-90 .......................... 80-93 ........................98-105 Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs.................73-103............................50-75 ...........................48-72 ..........................74-101.......................... 70-116 Over 700 lbs....................52-82 ...........................48-72 ...........................52-69 .......................... 64-87 ..........................65-97 Cows Utility/Commercial........... 41-70.............................34-60.............................40-59.............................41-75............................52-83 Canner & Cutter..............29-57.............................21-53..............................31-52............................ 35-64............................46-76 Stock Cows......................525-875 ......................550-870 ......................650-1010....................... 650-975 .....................850-1500 Bulls – Slaughter............56-79.............................48-76.............................46-67........................... 53-88 ........................60-100

Idaho Cattle on Feed Up 10% from Previous Year May 20, 2011 Cattle and calves on feed for the slaughter market in Idaho from feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head on May 1, 2011 totaled 230,000 head, up 10 percent from the previous year, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. The cattle on feed inventory is up 5 percent from April 1, 2011. Placements of cattle in feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head during April totaled 34,000 head, up 7,000 head from April 2010 placements. Marketings of cattle from feedlots with 1,000 head or more during April totaled 23,000 head, up 2,000 head from a year ago. Other disappearance totaled 1,000 head during April. Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 11.2 million head on May 1, 2011. The inventory was 7 percent above May 1, 2010. Placements in feedlots during April totaled 1.80 million, 10 percent above 2010. This is the second highest placements for the month of April since the series began in 1996. Net placements were 1.74 million head. During April, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 450,000, 600-699 pounds were 310,000, 700-799 pounds were 490,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 545,000. Marketings of fed cattle during April totaled 1.81 million, 3 percent below 2010. Other disappearance totaled 59,000 during April, 35 percent below 2010. This is the lowest other disappearance for the month of April since the series began in 1996.

TEAM BEEF

Continued from page 13

Did You Know?

1. Beef is a nutrient powerhouse that helps active Americans “protein up” to provide the fuel to finish. 3-oz of lean beef gives you nearly half of your Daily Value for protein for about 150 calories on average. In fact, you’d have to eat three cups of raw spinach, nearly nine 3-ounce servings of Atlantic farmed salmon, or nearly three 3-oz chicken breasts to get the same amount of iron found in one 3-oz serving of beef.1 2. Eating lean beef as part of a balanced diet and being physically active can be part of the solution to maintaining a healthy weight. Beef plays an important role in overall health, including a role in weight control. A substantial body of evidence shows the nutrients in lean beef, such as protein, iron and B-vitamins, help maintain a healthy weight, build muscle and fuel physical activity. 3. According to Dane, there are no secrets to running. Take it slow if you haven’t done it in while (left, right, repeat) and learn your body’s limits. 4. There’s a race for everyone who wants to run. Rauschenberg says that joining a Team BEEF in your state is a great opportunity for novice and veteran runners alike. Teams across the country are building relationships in fitness communities and spreading the word about the importance of beef in the diet. Rauschenberg himself will in Idaho running his debut Ironman at the Ironman 70.3 Boise as part of Team Beef. To learn more about Idaho’s Team Beef or Rauschenberg, please visit www.idbeef.org or call the Idaho Beef Council at (208) 376-6004.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011


Classifieds

Animals

Household

Recreational Equipment

APHA horses for sale. Stallion Service fee: $400. LFG. Quality conformation. Super disposition. Good bloodlines. Some rideable. Caldwell, Id 208-454-2454

Restored antique oak furniture, tables, chairs, cupboards, dressers, washstands, desks, filing cabinets. Burley, Id. 208-678-2036 or 4312036

Purebred Icelandic breeding stock; can be registered; member of ISBONA; horned or polled; ram lambs or ewe lambs; all twins or triplets. From fast-growing lines; $300.00 each. Many colors and patterns. North of Moscow, ID. Call 208-858-2103

Miscellaneous

2007 Wildwood sport fifth wheel. 32 ft long, toy hauler. Bunkbeds in the back raise up to load four wheelers and motorcycles. Super clean. 5 beds-can sleep 10, fifth wheel hitch for truck, generator, outside shower, fuel station, cd player with surround sound. Asking $21,500.00 Pocatello, Id. Call Adam 208-757-9213

ASCA registered Australian Shepherd pups. Working line since 1968. Full satisfaction guaranteed. All four colors available now. Boise, Id 208-484-9802 Our alpaca herd has grown! We’ve been raising them for 17 years. Will consider all decent offers. Purchase a female and breed her to one of our males. We’ll deliver for the cost of the fuel. 208-407-2406

Farm Equipment Round Baler, pull type. ’95 Chevy truck, more farm equipment. Call for more info. Bellevue, Id. 208-720-2960

Water Distiller with Ozone Energizer Bulb. Takes distilling water one step further to ‘Energized Distilled Water’. Filer, Id. 208326-4735 5 wheel truck dolly, harrows-hydraulic cart 54 ft, car dolly. 208-897-5258 th

Real Estate/Acreage 20 acres pasture or cropland near Silver Creek, in Blaine County. No irrigation cost, sub-irrigated, seasonal creek. Beautiful location in valley. Great for horses &/or cattle. 208-788-5160, please leave message. 19.89 acres six miles N.E. of Priest River, Id. Rolling terrain, private rd., timbered, seasonal creek, power and phone, many great bldg. sites. Nature at its best, very quiet. $40K down, $49,900. Call for terms. 208-290-0034

Idaho ‘Spud Sack Darner Machine’ used in TF Globe Seed. Paid $100 from shed. Needs museum. Age proof via parts-postal stamp & instructions. Repairman verified and works. Good on Antique Roadshow or Spud Museum in Blackfoot. Condition shows importance earned. Phone 208-934-5912, 539-2090 or 837-6213

49 acres or 20 acres near Silver Creek in Blaine County. Pasture or cropland. Beautiful location, near fishing, hunting, and Sun Valley. Available with small home and steel shop, or pasture only. Call 208-788-5160 or 7202960, leave message.

Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime

1986 Peterbilt 359, Big Cam Engine, $15,000; 2000 Wabash Reefer w/Whisper Unit, 48 ft x 102 inches, Air ride spread, clean and light weight, All aluminum wheels, $25,000. Burley, Id 208-312-0196

Vehicles

SEND US YOUR CLASSIFIED AD FREE TO IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS! send

to: dashton@idahofb.org

Wanted Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338. Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258

DEADLINE DATES:

ADS MUST BE RECEIVED BY JUNE 20 FOR NEXT ISSUE.

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Non commercial classified ads are free to Idaho Farm Bureau members. Must include membership number for free ad. Forty (40) words maximum. Non-member cost- 50 cents per word. You may advertise your own crops, livestock, used machinery, household items, vehicles, etc. Ads will not be accepted by phone. Ads run one time only and must be re-submitted in each subsequent issue. We reserve the right to refuse to run any ad. Please type or print clearly. Proof-read your ad.

Mail ad copy to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848 or email Dixie at DASHTON@IDAHOFB.ORG Name: __________________________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________ City / State / Zip: __________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________________ Membership No. ___________________ Ad Copy: ________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2011

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June 2011, Volume 15, Issue 4