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Fall 2015  Volume 15,   Issue 4

The Essential Onion – page 4

Chevon: The Most WidelyConsumed Red Meat – page 6

Word Search, Farm Facts, Photo Contest – Inside


The Ag Agenda

Local Efforts Protect Species and Respect Landowners By Bob Stallman

President American Farm Bureau Federation

We recently sponsored a poll concerning the Endangered Species Act, and it opened our eyes. As it turns out, farmers and ranchers aren’t alone in thinking there’s something not quite right with the Endangered Species Act. More than 60 percent of Americans told pollsters they, too, think it needs an overhaul. And they’re right. With a recovery rate of less than 2 percent, the ESA

has failed to achieve its primary goal of recovering at-risk species.

In early October, the Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ordered the EPA to stop enforcement nationwide of the Waters of the United States rule. In doing so, the Cincinnati-based court recognized that this rule has serious flaws and cannot go forward until the courts have had an opportunity to understand its effect on farmers, ranchers and landowners of all kinds.

“The judges expressed deep concerns over the basic legality of this rule,” said American Farm Bureau President Bob Stallman. “We’re not in the least surprised: This is the worst EPA order we have seen since the agency was established more than 40 years ago. The court clearly understood our arguments.”

There are many things we can do to make environmental policy better, but local control is near the top of the list. Americans trust local and state government to protect the environment far more than they trust Washington to get the job done. Right now, farmers and ranchers across the country are working with local groups and ofSee STALLMAN, page 12

The President’s Desk

Court Halts WOTUS Enforcement

By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

The decision expands a stay that a North Dakota judge imposed in August, the day before the rule took effect, and that only applied to 13 states. While farmers and ranchers are confident the See PRIESTLEY, page 12

Inside Farm Bureau

U.S. The Most Generous Nation in the World By Rick Keller CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

2

According to the international nonprofit organization Charities Aid Foundation, the United States is ranked the world’s most generous nation. The Foundation looks at three measures: monetary giving, volunteering and helping of strangers in a typical month. In the U.S., 68 percent of the population donated to charity, 79 percent helped strangers and 44 percent did volunteer

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

work. The calculations are mostly based on a per capita basis. When the latest annual total tons of food aid deliveries are calculated, the U.S. far surpasses any other country. The U.S. donated 3.1 million tons of food and came in second with 400,000 tons. The EU ranked third with 300,000 tons of food aid. Russia is a dismal 40,000 tons. For almost seven decades, the U.S. has played See KELLER, page 27


Volume 15, Issue 4

IFBF OFFICERS President ................................... Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President ...................................Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President ............................... Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................Shelley Mark Harris ................................................. Soda Springs Chris Dalley ....................................................... Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ........................................... Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant .................................................. Oakley Rick Pearson ................................................... Hagerman Rick Brune............................................................Hazelton Luke Pearce ............................................. New Plymouth Cody Chandler....................................................... Weiser Tracy Walton ........................................................ Emmett Marjorie French ............................................... Princeton Alton Howell ................................................ Careywood Tom Daniel ............................................... Bonners Ferry Judy Woody ................................................................ Filer Cole Smith ...................................................... Montpelier STAFF Dir. of Organization............................... Dennis Brower Director of Admin. Services ........................ Cara Dyer Commodities & Marketing Assistant ........... Peg Pratt Member Services Assistant ..................... Peggy Moore Public Relations Assistant ........................ Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager ........................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager .............................. Zak Miller Dist. III Regional Manager .................. Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ..........................Brody Miller Dist. V Regional Manager ....................... Bob Smathers Dir. of Governmental Affairs ................Russ Hendricks Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs .... Dennis Tanikuni Director of Public Relations .............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................ Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager ..................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise .......................... Julie Araquistain Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Assistant Treasurer.................................. Tyler Zollinger

Contents Features

Onions; an oftenoverlooked staple of the American diet PAGE 4

Idaho Preferred celebrates harvest PAGE 10 Fall Harvest Marketbasket Survey PAGE 34

Goat meat becoming more popular PAGE 6 Harvesting with lawmakers PAGE 8

Photo Contest PAGE 38

Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID

IDAHO FARM BUREAU QUARTERLY USPS #022-899, is published quarterly by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201. POSTMASTER send changes of address to: IDAHO FARM BUREAU QUARTERLY P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, ID and additional mailing offices. Subscription: $4 a year included in Farm Bureau dues. MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: Shay Myers is an employee at Owyhee Produce in Nyssa, Oregon. The company packs several varieties of onions and asparagus. Photo by Steve Ritter

DEPARTMENTS The Ag Agenda: Bob Stallman............................................................. 2 The President’s Desk: Frank Priestley.............................................. 2 Inside Farm Bureau: Rick Keller......................................................... 2 University of Idaho Forestry............................................................. 18 Word Search........................................................................................ 24 Farm Facts............................................................................................. 28 Classifieds ............................................................................................ 42

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

3


Onions might be a common sight at supermarkets, but these vegetables are anything but ordinary. Photo by Steve Ritter

The Never-Absent, Often Overlooked Onion By Carrie Veselka A stroll through the produce section at almost any grocery store shows an inconspicuous display of onions with their subdued brown and yellow skins. The canned food aisle also produces the usual collection of beans, soups, and spaghetti sauces. But a quick peek at these ingredient lists shows an intriguing constant: onions. This never-absent, often-overlooked vegetable with its unappealing fumes is an important ingredient in most of the dishes we enjoy. Onions have been a staple food source since ancient times. No one is exactly sure when or where onions originated, but many researchers believe that onions were around long before farming or even writing was invented, according to the National Onion Association. 4

Researchers have discovered that onions were grown in China up to 5,000 years ago, and they show up in ancient writings from India around the same time. Ancient Egyptians worshiped the onion because they believed it symbolized eternity with its spherical shape and many layers. Onions were a popular dish at feasts, used in sacred ceremonies and copiously used in the mummification process as well. Their hardiness and long storage life kept onions a hot item on the ancient menu and kept it alive through the years. In the Middle Ages physicians prescribed onions as a cure for everything from fever and headaches to hair loss. It is also believed that onions were in attendance at the first Thanksgiving feast, according to the National Onion Association. Commercial onion farming has been in

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

Idaho for several generations, since the JC Watson Company established one of Idaho’s first onion packing houses in 1912. Today it is still family-owned and still in business. Thanks to the prevalence of good land and good climate for onion growing, the IdahoEastern Oregon Onion Committee was established in 1957 in accordance with Federal Marketing Order No. 958 in the Agriculture Marketing Agreement Act of 1937. Their main function is to ensure that all of the onions sold in Southwestern Idaho and Eastern Oregon meet a uniform standard of quality and size before distribution. Southwestern Idaho and Oregon’s Malheur County is a prime growing region for onions. According to the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee, onions respond to soil quality, the amount of sunlight, and the latitude and longitude of their growing


Onion harvest in full swing near Parma. Photo by Steve Ritter

area in the same way as grapes grown for wine. According to the Committee, “The rich volcanic soils and dry climate that produce outstanding potatoes also produce some of the finest onions in the world, with a unique combination of mild flavor, large size, and tight, dry skins.” According to Sid Freeman, an onion producer in Canyon County, there are more layers to onion production than meet the eye. Freeman, who grows Spanish Sweet Yellow Onions and a few red onions, said onions are a specialized crop. “With the technologies we have today and the varieties that we have, (onions) have a bit longer shelf life than they used to, but their shelf life is still of a finite amount, so the marketing of the crop is critical,” said Freeman. “You’ve got to stay right on top

of that and make sure that you can produce a good quality crop that will store well, otherwise you could still lose part of your crop in storage.” Freeman said onions are complex and require extra focus and dedication. “Growing onions has a lot of intricacies that a lot of crops do not have. I like the science behind growing onions,” said Freeman. Some of the science he referred to is methodologies; drip irrigation, for example, which allows him to plant crops on rolling hills where previously, quality onion production was not possible. Other science is the use of fertilizers and pesticides on his crops that he can distribute through the irrigation system. “It’s very challenging.” Freeman said every year is different, that harvest can always go either way, but this

year Mother Nature cooperated and harvest was a success. According to the Idaho-Eastern Oregon Onion Committee, over one hundred billion pounds of top-quality red, white, and yellow onions are shipped from the southwestern Idaho and eastern Oregon growing region each season, making it the secondlargest onion growing region in the country at about 18,000 acres planted per year. Washington leads the nation in onion production on about 24,000 average acres per year. California is ranked third, Georgia fourth and New York fifth. According to the National Onion Association, U.S. farmers produce about 6.2 billion pounds each year. This accounts for about four percent of the world’s annual supply. Approximately 170 countries grow onions See ONIONS p. 36

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

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Gabriel Aguayo fits a Boer goat for showing at the Eastern Idaho State Fair. Photo by John Thompson

Got Your Goat?

The Newcomer to Idaho’s Meat Market By Carrie Veselka Goat meat is the most widely consumed red meat in the world outside of the United States and is rapidly gaining popularity here. Goat meat, also called chevon (pronounced chiffon) on the cooking channels and ritzy restaurant menus, is starting to work its way into the American diet. Rob Stokes, who runs a grass-fed livestock operation just outside Vale, Oregon says the market for goat meat has picked up over the last few years. “We sell to some of the local food stores in Boise and the Treasure Valley like Whole Foods and the Boise co-op,” said Stokes. Stokes said they sell anywhere from four to five goats per week in the Treasure Val6

ley. A large part of their herd also goes to a market in California.

conscious, looking for more nutritious alternatives.

They also sell meat at the Boise Farmer’s Market, the Nampa Farmer’s Market, and to various Treasure Valley restaurants.

“Goat, nutritionally, is probably one of the healthier meats out there, even more than chicken as far as fat content and percent of protein per pound of product,” said Stokes. “So customers that are looking for an alternative to pork or beef turn to goat.”

Stokes said that their ground goat meat and kabob meat is the most popular. They also make goat sausage that is becoming more popular with consumers. Stokes said the market is changing for several reasons, the most notable being price. “The market’s changed just because the cost of protein is high,” said Stokes. In some areas the price of beef is out of people’s budgets, so customers are looking for another source. Consumers are also becoming more health

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

Stokes said goat meat is an acquired taste for some. Its growth in popularity might have something to do with the growth of the percentage of the population that is familiar with it. “A lot of our servicemen and women that come back from overseas and have eaten goat in Afghanistan or Iraq kind of have a taste for it, kind of like it, so they come back looking for that kind of product,” said


Boer goats at the Eastern Idaho State Fair. Photo by John Thompson

Stokes. “Plus a lot of the refugees and immigrants into this country in the last ten years are from countries where goat is a staple product in their diet.” Goats are also gaining popularity as show animals. Clara Askew, who breeds and sells Boer goats near Nampa, said that the number of students interested in goats as 4-H projects is increasing every year. “We try to get the kids started in it and they get hooked with the wethers (the goat version of a steer) and they end up buying does and starting to raise their own.” “It’s amazing how much (the market) has grown,” said Askew. “Five years ago at the Canyon County Fair, there were six wethers and now they have to have three classes of wethers because there are so many of them. It’s amazing how much it’s grown. People are finding out that they are easy to handle, they are smarter than sheep, and a lot less expensive to raise than cattle.” Gabriel (Gabe) Aguayo, originally of Port-

land, Oregon travels around the country preparing show stock for fairs, breeding shows, and other similar venues. He is hired by other breeders but co-owns his own herd as well. He specializes in Boer goats, the most popular and well-known meat goat breed. In his career of about nine years of working with show stock, Aguayo has noticed an increase in the number of goats being sold to for 4-H projects, especially in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. There are a lot more participants in the meat goat category now than there were even five years ago, according to Aguayo. Aguayo’s favorite thing about working with goats, especially in the show ring, is the unexpected, usually unnoticed artistry behind everything. “It’s kind of like artwork to me,” he said, “because it’s not just what the goat’s doing, this is a team effort. It’s what your goat’s doing, it’s what you’re doing, it’s what your team outside of the ring is doing and all those little things,

but it’s my favorite thing because it has excitement and passion. It’s artistry to me because of the teamwork and how all of this has to fit together. Raising goats as either a hobby or a side business is also growing in popularity. Kelly Haun of Wilder, said she started raising goats about five years ago when her son wanted to raise one as a 4-H project. “At that point, Boer goats were very new, it was difficult to find a breeder,” said Haun. “It was something he really wanted to do to be different, which was really something since he was only six years old at the time. He opened the door to some really wonderful opportunities and our whole family enjoys goats now. I’m grateful that he had the idea.” One big reason goats are growing in numbers is their low-cost upkeep and their ability to integrate peacefully with other liveSee GOATS p.25

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

7


State legislators and Farm Bureau members take a tour of the Seminis seed processing plant outside Nampa.

Corn Seed Harvested in Nampa, Lawmakers get Firsthand Look By Jake Putnam Sweet corn seed harvest is going full speed ahead in Nampa. At the Seminis seed processing plant in Nampa, trucks loaded with seed send up great clouds of dust as they drive through the gate at a dizzying pace. Workers here are putting in 12-hour days until the harvest is done. 8

The Idaho Farm Bureau hosted lawmakers at Seminis seed for their annual “Harvesting with Idaho Farm Bureau” event on September 16. “Our idea was to invite legislators from Treasure Valley urban areas to come and learn about all the different aspects of Idaho Agriculture,” said Idaho Farm Bureau Legislative Affairs Director Russ Hendricks.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

Agriculture is big business in Idaho, with cash receipts of $9.76 billion, and ranks as the third-largest agriculture state in the West. Economists say that agriculture is by far Idaho’s largest industry. Last year the state had a 17 percent increase over 2013. “This year we focused on genetic modified organisms and lately that’s a hot topic of discussion,” said Hendricks. “We gave lawmakers a glimpse to see how the crops are processed from the seed to harvest.


A guide answers lawmakers’ questions during the tour.

More importantly, we gave them a chance to talk to scientists and decide for themselves about GMO crops.” The group of lawmakers from the Idaho House and Senate donned hard hats and toured the vast Seminis campus south of Nampa at the height of seed harvest. They watched the truckloads of seeds come through the gates, where crews unloaded, shucked the corn seed and then watched corn stripped from the cob and subsequently dried, cleaned, packaged and shipped. Representative Joe Palmer of Meridian attended the annual harvest tour and came away impressed. “I’ve been on several of these and it’s a great learning experience,” said Palmer. “These tours remind us not only of the di-

versity of agriculture operations in Idaho but all the supplemental industry that agriculture supports, why this is the seed capitol of the US and right in our backyard.” Representative Gary Collins of Nampa has lived in Canyon County most of his life but has never seen seeds processed. “The value of a tour like this is tremendous,” said Collins. “I was raised on a farm so I have roots here, but it’s changed so much and dramatically.” Collins says the importance of agriculture continues to grow in Idaho. “It’s staggering to think most of nation’s sweet corn seed comes from this facility,” said Collins. “But I’ve always known that Canyon County is important to the United

States because of these seed crops.” Crop revenues in Idaho are estimated at $3.8 billion, which is up slightly from last year’s $3.54 billion. Livestock revenues are estimated at $5.9 billion, which is up from 2013, and despite a national downward trend, cash receipts from milk are also up from 2013. Hendricks said the tour was more than show and tell, it also drove home a few key points. “These tours are great because not only do we showcase agriculture to our lawmakers, we get to show them what’s important to Idaho,” said Hendricks. “More importantly, we think that if farmers are to continue we all need to understand and know agriculture intimately.”

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

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Leah Clark stands next to a display of Idaho Preferred products.

Idaho Preferred Month Comes to a Close By Jake Putnam The fruit and vegetable display just outside of an East Boise supermarket is colorful and striking with its bright red apples, orange peaches, yellow and white onions and big brown potatoes. A shopper passes, picks up a half dozen peaches and says, “I love this time of year!”

”This is the height of harvest season in Idaho, so our retailers have put up displays and done a good job of identifying and promoting local products while they’re in season,” said Clark. “Consumers can look around, look for the signs and support farmers by buying local food.”

Supermarkets across the state have put up displays as part of Idaho Preferred month to honor the growing number of farmers, ranchers and gardeners that share a passion for selling fresh Idaho produce.

Preferred month has become a part of the Idaho landscape, so much so that for the 9th year in a row Idaho Governor Butch Otter has declared September Idaho Preferred month. And this Idaho Preferred campaign is proving to be a successful tool for farmers, according to Clark.

“September is Idaho Preferred month and this is the reason you see here at this supermarket,” said Leah Clark, marketing specialist at the Idaho Department of Agriculture.

“It’s funded in part through membership fees,” said Clark. “We provide the marketing opportunities, events and activities that producers use just for a membership fee,” added Clark.

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Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

“The 2015 Fall Idaho Preferred campaign builds on past campaigns to increase consumer awareness,” said Mona Teffteller, an agency partner at the Drake Cooper ad agency in Boise. “We’re seeing more demand and purchase of Idaho products.” The ads hit the Gem State with supplemental funds from the USDA Specialty Crop grant program and ran August through September. The Preferred campaign proved successful, bringing in more than 600,000 consumer impressions, according to Clark. Supermarkets played a key role by not only putting up Preferred produce displays outside stores, but information about products and the farmers that grew them. “It’s not just these live displays, we have print advertising, broadcast and social media properties like a Facebook page,


Meyers’ Boise State brand onions not only display the blue Idaho Preferred label but BSU’s blue and orange, using Idaho Preferred marketing suggestions to the max.

along with food and trade shows and direct consumer events like this,” said Clark. “There’s a lot of opportunity with the breadth of products and we take advantage of all our marketing opportunities.”

“We want people to start thinking about how easy it is in Idaho to have fresh produce and when they go to the grocery store their food is just a day off the family farm,” said Clark.

There was a time when Idaho was known for one thing, its famous potatoes, but that’s just one of a staggering 185 different agricultural products produced in Idaho.

Onion farmer Shey Meyers is an Idaho Preferred member and says the program is a huge help for Idaho farmers.

“We’re really lucky here in Idaho that we have such a huge variety of produce; peaches, apples, plums, pears, peas, green beans and sweet corn,” said Clark. “It’s just endless.” Idaho has a long growing season, starting in the spring with asparagus, strawberries, Bing cherries and apricots. Raspberries ripen in the summer while peaches, plums, pears and corn are available in the fall along with apples, onions, dry beans and local meats harvested year-round. And that’s not all. Idaho processors also specialize in breads, dairy products, wine, nursery plants and specialty foods like jams, jellies, pickled vegetables and more.

“It allows us market exposure and opportunities that we wouldn’t have otherwise,” said Meyers. “I like to tell others that it’s helpful because the programs push us. In other words it’s some of the marketing things we should do, but wouldn’t do because they’re not placed in front of us. Having Idaho Preferred help us with opportunities just makes it easier.” The nearly 300 Idaho Preferred members are local farmers and companies that sell quality Idaho food and products. In order to use the blue and gold label, growers, producers and processors must meet strict criteria for their products, the most important being that all fresh fruits and vegetables must be grown in Idaho.

Consumers also benefit from Idaho Preferred because when they buy local, they get fresher, tastier food because it takes less time to get from the fields to the kitchen table. When people buy Idaho nursery items, they get plants that are raised in our climate and are more likely to thrive in the backyard. As more Idaho crops make it to market and appear on prominent display at local grocery stores, Clark says the Idaho Preferred programs makes food choices easy for shoppers. A 2012 Consumer Market Research study conducted by the University of Idaho showed that over 50 percent of consumers are aware of the Idaho Preferred mark and 65 percent have seen the Idaho Preferred television ads. “There’s no reason why you shouldn’t be eating local produce right now,” said Clark, “It’s harvest, it’s Idaho-grown and all so good.”

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

11


STALLMAN

Continued from page 2

ficials to prove it is possible to protect species and respect property owners at the same time. And here again, most people agree with us. In the poll, conducted for AFBF by Morning Consult, only 31 percent of those surveyed actually think the federal government should be taking the lead in recovery efforts. Why? Because state and local wildlife management programs are getting results that the feds haven’t. Most recently, the greater sage grouse and the Sonoran desert tortoise were spared from ESA listings thanks to the ef-

forts of farmers and ranchers, landowners, and state wildlife agencies across the West. They saved these at-risk animals, and they did it without sacrificing their local businesses and economies. So instead of stepping in where others are getting the job done, 69 percent of Americans think the federal government should offer resources to third parties to boost these efforts. It’s time for the federal government to give credit where it’s due and reward the hard work private businesses and landowners are putting into conservation efforts.

These state plans work because they are created by officials and business owners who know the local landscape far better than any federal agency does. And while federal plans and listings burden landowners with costly permits and red tape, state-led plans actually create incentives for landowners to enhance habitats on their land.

landowners face wrong-headed restrictions that actually discourage creating habitat for endangered species lest the simple presence of protected wildlife means they can no longer use part or all of their own land. Neither farmers, ranchers, businesses nor anyone else should face extinction themselves for stepping up to protect local wildlife.

The outdated ESA stands in the way of greater success. Fixing it means focusing on what actually works instead of piling on more permitting requirements that hurt business but do nothing to protect wildlife. Today,

Real recovery is possible, but not without a common-sense, science-based approach to preserving wildlife and protecting private property rights. The ESA should be modernized, and Congress must take the lead.

we must remain vigilant against government overreach. We intend to do just that and we thank

all those who helped turn back this threat.

PRIESTLEY Continued from page 2 courts will strike down this rule, cases like this almost always take years to win—and stays don’t last forever, Stallman noted. “So we again ask the Senate to pass legislation to nullify this rule just as the House has already done. Farmers and ranchers cannot afford to wait.” Idaho farmers, ranchers and concerned citizens stepped up to help fight the overzealous EPA overreach. A petition drive led in Idaho by the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation garnered thousands of signatures last year. We would like to take the opportunity to thank all of those Idaho citizens who took the time to learn about the issue and then used their power to influence the decision. However, we must always stay vigilant in guarding our private property rights from government agencies seeking to take away the use of our land and water. Typically when our president is a Democrat we see 12

similar moves by federal agencies bent on testing their authority and taking control of private land in various ways. In this instance, the EPA attempted to expand its authority over water use. The Clean Water Act uses the word “navigable” to define water that the agency can regulate. What that means, loosely, is water that can be navigated in a boat and water that drains into waters that are navigable. EPA attempted to regulate water in stock ponds and standing water in other areas that does not drain into navigable waterways. This is a big threat to agriculture across the nation, but especially in the West where water is the lifeblood of agriculture. Farm Bureaus across the nation, including Idaho, worked hard to make their voices heard. We utilized messaging in social networking and various other forms of reaching citizens in this modern, fast-moving, technological world of today. It worked, but as we stated earlier,

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015


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Elk, deer and other large herbivores live off of new growth that sprouts after a fire. Photo by Ron Mahoney

Wildfires and the Forest Ecosystem By Randy Brooks It seems that there have been a lot of natural catastrophes lately. Epic flooding in the south this past spring and summer, tsunamis on the other side of the world, and wildfires in the west are just a few occurrences. Although not all fires are natural, many are a result of Mother Nature in the form of lightning activity. The Carlton Complex fire in Washington State last year and the Clearwater Complex, Teepee Springs and Soda Fires in Idaho this summer have raised many questions as to what effect fire has on the ecosystem. Historically, people believed that all fires were detrimental because they blackened landscapes and burned trees while in fact, plants and animals evolved together with fire, making it a necessary element in the survival of many ecosystems. Throughout time, natural selection and adaptations have acted on plant and animal life to result in fire-dependent ecosystems. Many plants depend on fire to heat and scar their seeds as a process 18

for germination. Burned out trees provide useful shelter for birds, reptiles, and small mammals. Decaying trees release nutrients into the soil and serve as a base for new plants to sprout. Much of the plant life in the United States has evolved

Fire: is it the end or the beginning? Photo by Ron Mahoney

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

to use fire directly as a catalyst for reproduction or benefited by the nourishment left in its path. Fire-dependent ecosystems are an interesting study in the way plants and animals have evolved to profit from such a destructive natural phenom-


Over the ages, many plant-animal ecosystems have developed a dependence on wildfire. Photo by Ron Mahoney

enon. Fire is an important management tool for production agriculture. Excess wheat and barley stubble is often burned to ease tillage practices. This practice saves time and fuel costs, especially considering high fuel prices. Kentucky bluegrass growers burn grass to stimulate seed production. Forest land owners burn vegetative cover to decrease tree seedling competition. Fire also reduces bugs and unwanted vegetation. Removal of brush by fire improves range conditions and, in turn, grass production. Prescribed burns prevent forest fires by clearing out vegetation like small trees, shrubs and brush, which can eventually fuel a much larger fire. Fire fighters can allow lightning fires to burn with less

danger if fuel materials within the immediate vicinity of buildings, campgrounds and homes are cleared away. Curtailing fuels also reduces the intensity of wildfires, which leads to easier management because they become more predictable and less powerful. Fire serves many positive purposes in plant and animal life in ecosystems, but it can also damage communities just as well. Perhaps the most damaging effect of fire is erosion.  Intense fires, especially in small-tree and shrub communities, can burn the vegetation down to the roots.  On hillsides and mountainsides, the vegetation holds excess rainfall runoff.  When a fire destroys the intricate matrix of roots and grasses, devastating landslides can occur. Sediments can cloud streams, which can affect fish. Hu-

mus, the decaying organic material on the ground within the vegetation, can hold five times its weight in water. The increased runoff resulting from erosion can seriously damage the watershed. Water and mud are not the only debris that can slide down a charred mountainside.  Landslides, rock slides, and avalanches are far more devastating and can occur more frequently when heavy rains follow a fiery summer or fall. Soil and water temperatures are also greatly affected by fires. When the overhead canopy is destroyed, sunlight reaches regions that are not used to the added heat. Foliage that normally survived under the previously shady regions cannot survive because of the increase in sun-

See UI FORESTRY p. 26

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

19


Faced with a deadline they cannot meet, railroad carriers all over the nation are depending on an extension from Congress to save them from closing down by the end of the year.

Focus on Agriculture

Impending Deadline Could Stop Rail Shipments in their Tracks By Erin Anthony Spring planting may seem quite far off, but farmers are already looking ahead with a wary eye on something that may derail all their plans—a nationwide railroad shutdown. Unable to comply with the looming Dec. 31 deadline for implementing positive train control, railroads are warning customers that they might stop rolling altogether— and soon, unless Congress gives them more time. 20

Positive train control is a GPS-based train control system designed to prevent collisions and over-speed derailments. Under the Rail Safety Improvement Act of 2008, railroads are required to implement PTC systems by the end of this year on mainline tracks that carry “toxic by inhalation” materials like anhydrous ammonia—a key fertilizer ingredient—as well as passenger traffic. BNSF, Union Pacific and other large rail carriers say they’ve been working on PTC since the mandate was put

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

in place in 2008, but it’s a very large, complex system made up of multiple independent technologies, many of which didn’t exist seven years ago. According to information from the Federal Railroad Administration and the railroads themselves, no Class I freight railroad will be in compliance with PTC requirements by the end of the year. At least one railroad— BNSF—has said if Congress doesn’t extend the deadline, it plans on stopping all traffic on lines that are re-

See FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE p. 33


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Word Search:      Think  About  Safety  in  These  Areas   WORD SEARCH PUZZLE: THINK ABOUT SAFETY IN THESE AREAS      

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Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015


GOATS

Continued from page 7 stock like cattle. “Goats eat a little less, they eat a bigger variety of foods,” said Askew. “The idea that you can stick them on the end of rope in a weed patch, they can thrive on that.” Askew said that, like all other grass-feeders, goats do better with a little alfalfa and grain, but their un-pickiness as far as forage is concerned is a serious plus to producers. Stokes said goats are browsers where cows are grazers. Goats will lead sheep or other animals that they graze with to the best foraging grounds. Goats will also graze foliage shorter than other livestock. When goats share grazing ground with other livestock, they “clean up” after the other animals and use the pasture to its fullest extent. “Their appetite is looking for a lot of different things, and that’s why they work well with cattle, because they don’t really

compete,” said Stokes. “They will if you push them, but they don’t compete for the same food as cattle do. They overlap about 20 or 30 percent on what they like, but they browse while cattle like to graze. A goat is a lot like a deer where it’s browsing across the whole area, they will cover a big area while cattle only graze in a certain area and then move on to another area.” This grazing style is what has made goats so popular with land management groups with noxious weed problems. They have been using goats for years to graze off problem plants like leafy spurge and yellow star thistle. Stokes’ livestock operation includes grassfed beef, pork, laying hens, meat chickens and turkeys. He added goats about ten years ago after using them to solve a grazing problem on his property. He runs over 350 head of Boer goats.

The market and awareness of goats and goat meat in Idaho is bound to keep increasing. The Snake River Meat Goat Association, of which Haun, Askew and Stokes are all members, was founded to help promote the meat goat industry. It is a grassroots organization meant to help and educate its members and the general public. Askew sees a great future for the goat market in Idaho, not only because of the easy upkeep and high productivity of goats, but because of their engaging personalities as well. She thinks the market will continue to grow because of the rising generation of goat producers. “Our future is our kids, and as long as they’re enjoying doing it and getting a little reward out of it, that furthers the industry.”

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UI FORESTRY

Continued from page 19

light and temperature. Stream water temperatures are also affected by the increase in sunlight.  Spring runoffs can lead to floods because snow reserves melt much sooner, especially on steeper, sunlight facing slopes.  Fire erosion affects both the landscape and plant and animal habitat. The effects are often prolonged following a heavy fire because full regrowth can take years to occur. Water quality can be affected by fire. Increased concentrations of dissolved nutrients generally occur in stream water after a fire. These concentrations tend to get diluted as streams become larger. Nutrient concentrations vary with fire intensity, length of time it takes for the watershed to revegetate, and the amount of precipitation the watershed receives in subsequent years. Fires can affect animals in a variety of. Seldom are animals left unscathed after a devastating fire sweeps through their habitat. After a fire has burned an ecosystem, animals with specialized diets seldom survive. Even animals that can feed on a variety of food sources struggle to stay alive. If a fire destroys their habitat, their population can be affected for many years.  After a fire, elk, deer, and other large herbivores thrive on the newly sprouted grasses and shrubs that occupy recently burned forests.  During long periods without fire, trees in dense forests often out compete (shade out) the grasses and shrubs that large animals feed on, result26

ing in a decline in big game. Many birds also thrive after a fire when the seeds of many trees are dispersed. Birds like the woodpecker take advantage of burned out trees to make nests or forage for dead insects. Other birds like the grey owl flourish in old-growth forests and therefore decrease after a fire has destroyed their community.  Insects usually do not survive fires well because their escape range is too small.  This can affect birds if specific insects are their food source.  Trees can benefit from the death of insects that reside in their trunks.  Many insects, like the mountain pine beetle in lodge pole forests, kill the trees which they inhabit.  A lot of these forest pests, like the beetle or the spruce bud worm, are burned out by fires. Fires are natural occurrences, similar to hurricanes, floods, and heavy rains. It has always been a part of our ecosystem and most Idaho plant communities have adapted to it, but its impact on the ecosystem varies dramatically with severity or intensity of the fire. Although they can be devastating, they are also important to the survival of ecosystems. Fire acts as a necessary evil, destroying, cleansing and diversifying wildlife communities. Randy Brooks is an Extension Forestry Specialist and professor in the College of Natural Resources for the University of Idaho.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015


KELLER

Continued from page 2 a leading role in global efforts to alleviate hunger and malnutrition and to enhance world food security through international food aid – primarily through either the donation or sale of concessional terms of U.S. agricultural commodities. Since 2006, U.S. food aid has averaged nearly $2.5 billion per year – accounting for over 6% of total U.S. foreign aid. Countries in Africa and South and Central Asia together total more than 90 percent of the aid provided through U.S. government food aid programs. Current U.S. food aid programs had their origins in 1954 with Public Law 83-480, or “P.L. 480” as it was commonly known. P.L. 480 has been amended multiple times and renamed as the Food for Peace Act (FFPA). One of the original purposes of P.L. 480 in-kind donations was to reduce large government stocks of program crops that had accumulated under USDA commodity price support programs. Since the end of the Cold War, U.S. food assistance goals have shifted more toward emergency response and support of long-term agricultural development. However, the U.S. continues to rely on domestic purchases of U.S. commodities as the basis for its food aid programs. In contrast, most other countries operating international food aid programs have converted primarily to cash-based food assistance. U.S. reliance on in-kind food aid has become controversial due to its identified inefficien-

cies and potential market distortions compared with cashbased assistance. An example of these concerns is the flexibility of the U.S. response to emergency food crisis. U.S. law requires that all agricultural commodities be sourced from the U.S., at least 50 percent of U.S food aid must be shipped on vessels flying the U.S. flag, and at least 50 percent of any bagging must consist of whole-grain commodities bagged in the U.S., plus other idiosyncrasies. The past two U.S. administrations and a growing number of members of Congress have sought greater flexibility in the use of U.S. food aid funding, particularly for cashbased assistance, in order to respond with great expedience, at lower cost, and with more interest in meeting cultural food preferences when responding to international food emergencies.

Cash-based food assistance has its potential perils. Food aid acquisitions occur in a food-deficient region or a region where commercial markets are not well developed; they could induce inflationary pressures and distort trader behavior. In cases of acute food needs, local foods may not have adequate nutritional quality. Farm Bureau knows the discussion of food aid distribution is evolving. The authority for food-aid spending is in Congress’ agricultural committees. The new discussion is to move to House and Senate foreign affairs com-

mittees. Farm Bureau is concerned about the trend taking the U.S. farmer out of the formula for providing food aid. U.S. agriculture has a stake in making sure that U.S. aid is used effectively and that it helps feed the neediest populations around the world. The U.S. wouldn’t be the most generous country in the world if its farmers and ranchers were not both the most productive and the most generous either. International food assistance efforts are an expression of the compassion and good will of the American people and a visible example of Americans’ commitment to helping those in need.

Proponents of cash-based food assistance argue that, because cash transfers can occur electronically, food acquisitions are not delayed by international shipping operations. In addition, they contend that the increased flexibility allows U.S. aid to reach situations that would otherwise be difficult to access with in-kind food aid. It is believed that cash-based food assistance is less disruptive to local agricultural producers and markets, less disruptive to global commercial markets, supports local market channels and food preferences, and allows greater flexibility. Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

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Farm Facts

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Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015


Top Farm Bureau Agents WORD SEARCH ANSWERS from page 24 Word Search  Answers    

Rookie of the Month:

A

Agent of the Month: Agency of the Month: Brad Burbank Biggs Agency

Lynnae Gliege Zemaitis Agency

Biggs Agency

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Tentative Agenda

IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION

“Idaho Farm Bureau – Embracing Idaho’s Future” 76th Annual Meeting Shoshone-Bannock Hotel, Fort Hall, Idaho December 1 - 3, 2015

Tuesday, December 1 ****************************************************************************** 9:00 am REGISTRATION DESK OPENS 11:00 am 1:00 pm

Event Center Lobby

GENERAL SESSION LUNCHEON

New Technology In Ag Panel – Zach Beutler, Dairy Health Bran Mackert, Pioneer Equip.; JJ Stacg, Ag Sense Racehorse A

Innovative Composting – TBA

2:15 p.m.

RISE 'N SHINE BREAKFAST Affiliated Company Reports Insurance, Paul Roberts Marketing, Dennis Brower

8:00 am 12:00 noon 8:00 9:15 am

HOUSE OF DELEGATES SESSIONS BEGINS

Pocatello

REFRESHMENT BREAK Event Center Lobby

ACHIEVER AWARD JUDGES Snagg

FARM BUREAU'S LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE AND WORKSHOPS (continued) Market Outlook - Clark Johnston, J.C. Management

10:00 am

Racehorse A

DISTRICT WOMEN'S CAUCUSES District I Women’s Suite District II Snagg District III Racehorse B District IV Deli District V Tyhee REFRESHMENT BREAK Event Center Lobby

WOMEN'S COMMITTEE BUSINESS MEETING

Pocatello

2:00 pm

HOUSE OF DELEGATES CONTINUES

Arimo

2:00 pm

“Don’t Be A Victim” Workshop - Diane Brush, Pocatello P.D.

Racehorse B/Snagg/Tyhee

3:15 pm

REFRESHMENT BREAK

Snagg

4:30 pm

DISTRICT CAUCUSES District I Pocatello District II Snagg District III Racehorse B District IV Deli District V Tyhee FARM BUREAU'S ANNUAL BANQUET President’s Cup Award Speaker: Ron Nilson

Lessons Learned From EATJ – Jennifer Ellis Arial Monitoring – Tyson Coles, Empire Unmanned 3:00 pm

DISCUSSION MEET PARTICIPANTS AND JUDGES

3:15 pm

DISCUSSION MEET SEMI-FINALS

5:15 pm

Chief Taghee 4

9:30 am 11:30 pm 11:30 pm

Racehorse A

5:00 pm

Event Center Lobby

7:00 am

Chief Taghee 4

FARM BUREAU'S LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE AND WORKSHOPS Legislative Issues - IFBF Governmental Affairs Arimo

2:00 p.m.

Wednesday, December 2 ****************************************************************************** 6:00 am HEALTH WALK

Tyhee

CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE MEETING SCREENING COMMITTEE MEETING Tyhee

YOUNG FARMERS AND RANCHERS CAUCUS Racehorse B

5:30 pm

DISCUSSION MEET JUDGES

6:00 pm

DISCUSSION MEET FINALS

7:00 pm

YF&R AWARDS BANQUET

Arimo

7:00 pm

Racehorse A

YF&R Awards (Live auction will follow)

Chief Taghee 4

Racehorse B

AWARDS LUNCHEON

Gold Star/Women’s Awards Chief Taghee 4 Racehorse A

Racehorse B

Event Center Lobby

Chief Taghee 4

Thursday, December 3 ****************************************************************************** 7:00 am COUNTY PRESIDENTS BREAKFAST (County Presidents/State Board and Spouses Only)

1

30

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

Chief Taghee A

8:20 am

ELECTION of OFFICERS and DIRECTORS Racehorse A2 HOUSE OF DELEGATES CONTINUE

10:15 am

REFRESHMENT BREAK

12:00 noon

ADJOURN HOUSE OF DELEGATES

12:30 pm

STATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS LUNCHEON

12:30 pm

STATE BOARD SPOUSES LUNCHEON

1:30 pm

STATE BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING

8:00 am

Racehorse A

Event Center Lobby

Racehorse A

Chief Taghee A Snagg

Racehorse B


Insurance Matters Mike Myers ­­— Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Co. of Idaho

Why Insure Your Home Beyond its Market Value? cost of replacing your home. It’s the homeowner’s responsibility to make sure the home is insured for full replacement value. Your best protection is to contact your Farm Bureau Insurance agent to make sure you have “Insurance to Value” any time the value of your home changes. The replacement value of your home also includes its furnishings and contents. We recommend completing a thorough inventory of your home’s contents and estimating their value, then comparing this estimate to the home contents limit listed in your policy. Make sure these two values match. The easiest way to complete a home inventory is to use a video camera, recording and describing items as you walk through your house. Store the video off-site so you won’t lose it if your house is damaged.

Your home’s market value is typically less than its replacement value.

Do you have enough insurance to replace your home in the event of a substantial or total loss? Many homeowners may be surprised to find the answer is “no.” They may also be surprised to learn that there are two significantly different ways of valuing their home when insuring it: Market value and replacement value. Market Value is based on factors beyond the material and labor costs of repairs and construction. These factors include the value of the land, proximity to good schools, local crime statistics, and the availability of similar homes. It’s what your real estate agent would probably list your home for if you put it up for sale. Replacement value or “Insurance to Value” is not the same as the market value of your home. It refers specifically

to the cost to completely rebuild your home based on its physical characteristics after a total loss. Replacement costs typically increase with time because the cost of materials and labor increase with time. Besides this inflation, there can be additional costs when a home is repaired or replaced, including clearing debris, upgrading and updating to current building codes, and working around existing landscaping. All of these can add greatly to a home’s repair and replacement costs. In some cases, it’s more expensive to repair or replace an existing home than it is to build a new home. Home improvements like remodeling or adding a garage or addition can also increase a home’s replacement value. If you’re making home improvements, don’t forget to increase your insurance protection to keep up with the increased

Typically, the replacement value of your home is much greater than its market value. This means if your home is destroyed and it was insured for market value, you would either have to make up the difference between its market value and replacement value to replace the house or opt to build a new, less expensive home. Because of this, we recommend that you insure your home for at least 100 percent of its replacement value. For most homeowners, insuring at this amount will have a minimum effect on their insurance premium. Although insuring your home for its replacement value instead of its market value may cost a little more in the shortterm, it can help you avoid being caught short on protection if your home is damaged or destroyed.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

31


MEMBER OWNED Valley Wide Cooperative has been proudly serving Idaho Farmers since 1938 in our Agronomy, Retail, and Energy divisions. We look forward to continually serve you and your needs! CONNECT WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA • 208-324-8000 • www.valleywidecoop.com

Protect your seed investment. NOW is the time to protect young plants and insure a strong start with Bio-Forge® ST seed treatment. Bio-Forge® ST up-regulates key genes associated with stress. At the plant level you will see: • • • •

Thinking about a new bin? Don’t wait any longer. The farmers who get top dollar for their crop are the ones with on-farm storage. Order now and take advantage of winter discounts on the full line of Sukup Grain Drying and Storage Equipment. Adams Grain Bins Jerome & Ririe Idaho 208-932-3232 www.adamsinc.net

• • • • • •

Enhanced germination Stronger seedling vigor Rapid, downward root growth Fibrous root mass for increased nutrient uptake especially nitrogen Slightly shorter stalks and more robust grain heads Higher test weight Reduced lodging Protects young seedlings from stress especially in cool spring soils Increased winter survivability Blends well with other chemical sprays

To find a dealer near you visit

StollerUSA.com

Sagely Sown Mark (208) 495-3178 ™

Two Locations to Serve You sales@trailer-world.com

Hydraulic Doors

801.973.2117

www.powerliftdoors.com

32

No Lost Headroom All Welded Maintenance Free Lifetime Structural Warranty Delivered & Installed

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

Woodburn (503) 981-8777

Best Trailer, Best Service, Best Price www.trailer-world.com

Bend (541) 389-9849


FOCUS ON AGRICULTURE Continued from page 20 quired to have PTC installed, and they won’t wait until the end of the year to do so.

shipments of fertilizer are distributed equally across the year to meet demand.

To ensure there are no TIH shipments on their systems as of Jan. 1, 2016, many railroads plan on issuing TIH notices prior to Thanksgiving. Faced with the likelihood of fewer rail shipments in the last quarter of this year and potentially no shipments in early 2016, fertilizer manufacturers, who work around the clock to ensure an adequate supply for on-time planting, will probably cut way back on production, according to the Fertilizer Institute. And even if—and that’s a very big “if” —fertilizer manufacturers don’t slow down, fewer shipments in late 2015 will be a big problem for spring planting in 2016 because rail

The American Farm Bureau Federation and other organizations, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Retail Federation, highlighted the catastrophic consequences that would follow a shutdown of large segments of the nation’s freight rail network, in a letter to Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. From farm inputs and goods to coal, automobiles, retail consumer goods and chemicals like those used to purify water for drinking, a major service disruption would have cascading impacts on the nation’s food, energy and water supplies, as well as transportation, construction and nearly every sector of the

U.S. economy. As compliance with the PTC mandate is simply not achievable, the groups are urging Congress to act by Oct. 31 to extend the deadline to allow railroads enough time to put the system in place. In its multiyear highway bill, the Senate has given the railroads another three years to meet the PTC deadline, but the House has yet to act on its version of the bill. Unless Congress acts it’s not only rail shipments that will be grinding to a halt; farmers, ranchers and the rural communities and national economy they support will also be well off track. Erin Anthony is editor of the American Farm Bureau Federation’s FBNews enewsletter and website.

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

33


Marketbasket Survey Dairy And Bacon Prices Down, Apples Too WASHINGTON, D.C.,– Lower retail prices for several foods, including whole milk, cheddar cheese, bacon and apples resulted in a slight decrease in the American Farm Bureau Federation’s Fall Harvest Marketbasket Survey. The informal survey shows the total cost of 16 food items that can be used to prepare one or more meals was $54.14, down $.12 or less than 1 percent compared to a survey conducted a year ago. Of the 16 items surveyed, 10 decreased and six increased in average price. Higher milk and pork production this year has contributed to the decrease in prices on some key foods. “Energy prices, which affect everything in the marketbasket, have been quite a bit lower compared to a year ago. Processing, packaging, transportation and retail operations are all fairly energy-intensive,” said John Anderson, AFBF’s deputy chief economist. Lower energy prices account for much of the modest decrease in the marketbasket. “As expected we saw higher egg prices because we lost so much production earlier this year due to the avian influenza situation in Iowa, Minnesota and some other Midwestern states,” Anderson said. Price checks of alternative milk 34

and egg choices not included in the overall marketbasket survey average revealed the following: 1/2 gallon regular milk, $2.21; 1/2 gallon organic milk, $4.79; and one dozen “cagefree” eggs, $4.16. The year-to-year direction of the marketbasket survey tracks closely with the federal government’s Consumer Price Index (http://www.bls.gov/cpi/) report for food at home. As retail grocery prices have increased gradually over time, the share of the average food dollar that America’s farm and ranch families receive has dropped. “Through the mid-1970s, farmers received about one-third of consumer retail food expenditures for food eaten at home and away from home, on average. Since then, that figure has decreased steadily and is now about 16 percent, according to the Agriculture Department’s revised Food Dollar Series,” Anderson said. Using the “food at home and away from home” percentage across-the-board, the farmer’s share of this $54.14 marketbasket would be $8.66. AFBF, the nation’s largest general farm organization, began conducting informal quarterly marketbasket surveys of retail food price trends in 1989. The series includes a Spring Picnic survey, Summer Cookout survey, Fall Harvest survey and

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

Thanksgiving survey. According to USDA, Americans spend just under 10 percent of their disposable annual income on food, the lowest

average of any country in the world. A total of 69 shoppers in 24 states participated in the latest survey, conducted in September.


The following items showed retail price decreases from a year ago: Whole Milk, Down 17 Percent To $3.14 Per Gallon Bacon, Down 11 Percent To $4.55 Per Pound Apples, Down 7 Percent $1.45 Per Pound Shredded Cheddar, Down 5 Percent To $4.56 Per Pound Flour, Down 4 Percent To $2.37 Per Five-Pound Bag Bagged Salad, Down 4 Percent To $2.46 Per Pound Vegetable Oil, Down 3 Percent To $2.61 For A 32-Ounce Bottle Russet Potatoes, Down 3 Percent To $2.64 For A Five-Pound Bag White Bread, Down 1 Percent To $1.69 For A 20-Ounce Loaf Chicken Breast, Down 1 Percent To $3.42 Per Pound

These items showed modest retail price increases compared to a year ago: Eggs, Up 56 Percent To $3.04 Per Dozen Orange Juice, Up 7 Percent To $3.43 Per Half-Gallon Ground Chuck, Up 6 Percent To $4.55 Per Pound Toasted Oat Cereal, Up 3 Percent To $3.09 For A Nine-Ounce Box Sirloin Tip Roast, Up 3 Percent To $5.67 Per Pound Sliced Deli Ham, Up 1 Percent To $5.47 Per Pound

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

35


ONIONS Continued from page 5 mate that over 9.2 million acres of onions are harvested annually around the world. Countries leading in onion production are China, India, the United States, Turkey, and Pakistan. U.S. onion exports amount to 11-14 million 50-pound bags per year. Leading export countries for the U.S. are Canada, Mexico, Japan, and Taiwan. Besides travelling all around the world,

where do these onions go? Every onion does not end up in the produce aisle at the grocery store. Onions are an essential ingredient in processed foods like spaghetti sauce, most canned soups and salsa. They are also valuable in their own right as onion rings, distributed to fast food chains like Arctic Circle or Burger King or sold in the frozen foods section at the local gro-

cery store. Onions are the jack of all trades in the food industry. They can be ground into powder, minced and dried, slivered up and sold by the pound, mixed in with other ingredients in ready-made foods, or sliced and diced and sent to places like Papa Murphy’s and Subway to be served fresh on their products.

Onions are used for many things other than cooking: One active ingredient in the onion is phosphoric acid, the same active ingredient that is in Coca Cola and, coincidentally, in most industrial tarnish and rust removers. The phosphoric acid in onions is also the reason they make you cry. —RedandBlack.com As with Coke, it is possible to use raw onions to remove rust and polish metal. Raw onions can also be used to clean the grill.—WonderHowTo.com Raw sliced onions can be used to remove the new paint smell from a room, drive away an ant infestation, soothe bruises or bee stings, remove splinters and repel insects; though rubbing an onion all over the skin may repel human company as well. – Care2.com Boiling an onion in water to make an “onion tea” can help cure a cold and soothe a sore throat. A few drops in the ear can also help heal an earache.

—WonderHowTo.com

Cutting up an onion and keeping it in your sock with the cut portion touching the soles of your feet is supposed to purify the blood, help the immune system fight bacteria and clear up your liver.—HealthyWildandFree.com Just slicing onions up and leaving them around the house is supposed to purify the air and get rid of bad odors. The onion absorbs any harmful bacteria or viruses that are hanging around waiting for someone to get sick.—HealthyWildandFree.com

36

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015


1. Publication Title

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications)

IDAHO FARM BUAREAU QUARTERLY 4. Issue Frequency

2. Publication Number

0 2 2

_

8 9 9

5. Number of Issues Published Annually

QUARTERLY

4 (four)

7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and ZIP+4 ®)

275 TIERRA VISTA DRIVE POCATELLO, ID 83201-5813

3. Filing Date

NOVEMBER 2015 6. Annual Subscription Price

$4.00 JOHN THOMPSON (208) 239-4292

275 TIERRA VISTA DRIVE, P.O. BOX 4848 POCATELLO, ID 83205-4848 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do not leave blank) Publisher (Name and complete mailing address)

RICK KELLER PO BOX 4848 POCATELLO, ID 83205-4848

NOVEMBER 2015 Average No. Copies No. Copies of Single Each Issue During Issue Published Preceding 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date

a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run)

b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

70335

70820

70199

70688

(1)

Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

(2)

Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

0

0

(3)

Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®

0

0

(4)

Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail®)

JOHN THOMPSON PO BOX 4848 POCATELLO, ID 83205-4848

c. Total Paid Distribution [Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)]

(4)

Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

JOHN THOMPSON PO BOX 4848 POCATELLO, ID 83205-4848

0

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

275 TIERRA VISTA DR, POCATELLO, ID 83201-5813

70694

70204

e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4))

10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Full Name Complete Mailing Address

6

5

d. Free or (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Nominal Rate Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS Outside (3) (e.g., First-Class Mail) the Mail)

Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION

14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below

IDAHO FARM BUREAU QUARTERLY 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation

Contact Person

Telephone (Include area code)

8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer)

13. Publication Title

0

0

0

18

12

12

12

30

24

70234

70718 102

101

g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100)

70335

70820

99.9

99.9

* If you are claiming electronic copies, go to line 16 on page 3. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skip to line 17 on page 3.

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) 16. Electronic Copy Circulation

11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or x None Other Securities. If none, check box Full Name

Complete Mailing Address

Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months

No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date

a. Paid Electronic Copies

0

0

b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a)

0

0

c. Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a)

0

0

d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c  100)

0

0

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 2 of 4) I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership

X If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed NOVEMBER 2015 in the ________________________ issue of this publication. 12. Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes:

XX

18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement)

PS Form 3526, July 2014 [Page 1 of 4 (see instructions page 4)] PSN: 7530-01-000-9931

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

Publication not required.

Date

NOVEMBER 1, 2014 I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

Celebrating 75 Years Conserving the Idaho Way

LOW INTEREST LOANS FOR IDAHO SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION Sprinkler Irrigation, No-Till Drills, Fences Livestock Feeding Operations Solar Stock Water Pump Systems

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

2.5%-3.5% Terms 7-15 Years Up to $200,000 CONSERVATION

LOAN PROGRAM

swc.idaho.gov | 208-332-1790 Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

37


Results of the 2015 Photo Contest Announced “Seasons of Agriculture in Idaho” photo contest is a project of the IFBF Women’s Leadership Committee. Completing its 13th year, winning photos will be used in the 2016 calendar published by the committee. Requirements for the contest are full frame photos with lots of creativity. It is limited to amateur Idaho resident photographers only. Cash prizes are awarded.

Grand Prize: Shera Adair—Franklin County 38

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015


1st Place 21 and Over: Dave Priestly —Franklin County

1st Place 13-20: Ysela Pelayo —Caribou County

See PHOTO CONTEST p.40 Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

39


PHOTO CONTEST

Continued from page 39

1st Place 6-12: McKinna Owens—Onieda County

40

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

3rd Place 13-20: Ysela Pelayo—Caribou County


Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

41


Classifieds Animals

Hay and Feed

Two female black German Shepherd puppies for sale $350, OBO. Pure breed but not registered. Mother (white) AKC registered. Father (black) not registered. email clgb5@ yahoo.com cell 208-540-0706. Soda Springs, Id. Please leave a message I work shift work

Barley Straw small bales for sell. $1.15 per bale. Idaho Falls, Id. Call/text 208-705-4055 or 522-8595.

Farm Equipment 1952 model 60 John Deere. American Falls, Id 208-479-4464. Milk transport tank. 2600 gallon Brenner insulated stainless steel tank. Licensed by ISDA to haul milk or other grade material. 240 volt pump to load or unload tank. For mounting on truck or trailer. $6,000. Rupert, Id. Call 208-436-3496. Roller Mill on trailer. $2,400 obo. Moyie Springs, Id. 208-267-8992. Steigarst 270 Cat engine for sale. Low hours. Malad, Id. 435-230-0317. Massey Ferguson tractor and blade. Also a camp wagon. Hagerman, Id 208-731-5936. John Deere tractor wheel and tire, older but hardly used. BF Goodrich, 6 ply, 1142. $200 or best offer. Paul area. 208-219-9034 or 312-1365. Bale elevator, 20 ft., perfect chain with 1 h.p. electric motor. Malad, ID. 208-766-6157. New Squeeze chute, green, hand pull, $1,300. Midvale, Id 208-355-3780. Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime.

DEADLINE DATES:

ADS MUST BE RECEIVED BY NOVEMBER 20 FOR NEXT ISSUE OF THE PRODUCER 42

Help Wanted Agricultural Appraiser. Our top part-time livestock and Equipment appraisers earn 60,000/year. Agricultural Background Required. Call 800-488-7570 www. amagappraisers.com.

Household Ives-Way can sealer. Model 200. For home canning. Seals no. 1, 1 ½, 2 ½, 3 size cans. American made. Excellent. $100 plus shipping. Miracle wheat grass juicer, also purees fruits and berries. Perfect. $35.00 plus shipping. K. Largent PO Box 364, Grangeville, ID 83530. 208-983-1959. Oak Table, four chairs. Excellent Condition. Twin Falls, Id. 208-735-2470. Carpet - 2 sizes. Blue/Grey. Gently used. $200. Shelley. Call 528-5337. Beautiful black suede dance shoes, size 7-1/2, 3” heel. Cutaway toe design. $25. Nampa, Id (208)466-2242.

Miscellaneous WoodMaster outdoor wood stove for sale. Sits outside and heats home, hot water, shop or barn. Works for small homes or large ones. Can burn either wood or pellets. Safe and efficient way to heat your home. John 208-781-0691. Antique Monarch wood/coal cook stove. Complete and in great shape. $6oo.oo OBO. Pocatello, ID. Email krfarley56@hotmail. com or Ken 208-234-2612. Miller Dialarc welder/ 250 ac/dc $500.00. Twin Falls, ID 208-733-8308.

SEND US YOUR CLASSIFIED ADS!

Idaho Farm Bureau Quarterly / FALL 2015

Real Estate/Acreage

Vehicles

2009 Golden West Manufactured Home, 2 bd rm with 2 full baths plus utility rm. All electric energy star (6 inch walls). Excellent, clean, non-smoking condition. NADA (Kelly Blue Book listing price is $32,700. Asking $30,000. New Plymouth, Id. 208-278-5548.

Tail lights/headlights 1996-97 Honda Civic. Used/great condition. $25. PT Cruiser snow tires, used one season. R205/50R17 $500/ obo. Nampa, Id (208)466-2242.

Lot for Sale - 3/4 Acre Country Lot. City water, Gas, Utilities. $25,000. Lot for Rent - 14’x65’ Mobile Home. $175.00 Mo. + Utilities. Both lots in Shelley. Call 528-5337. Waterfront property - 7 acres with 330ft of level waterfront property on Pend O’reille River (lake) in Priest River, Idaho, Bonner County. Includes older 3 bedroom house with full basement, out buildings and orchard on dead end road. $769,000. phone 208-448-1016. Bouse, AZ - 5 acres with corrals. Furnished 2 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home with awnings and patios. $110.00. Bouse is between Quartsite and Parker. 208-436-1941 or 670-4908.

Vehicles 1992 Dodge Dakota Sport pickup with shell. $2,500. V6, Low miles, Auto, AC, Cruise, Good condition. Boise, Id. 208-344-1898. 1972 GMC ¾ ton 2 wheel drive $1,000. American Falls, Id 208-479-4464. 2010 Dodge Ram Bighorn with 20” wheels. Quad cab 2 wheel drive, fog lights, all the bells and whistles, mp3 with CD, tow package, stabling, heated mirrors, all power windows, $17,995 without extended warranty, $19,995 with extended warranty. Pocatello, Id. 208-317-9443. 1962 Ford F500 with 2 ton, 2 speed rear end, 12’ metal bed, twin cylinder hoist motor weak. $1,500. Kooskia, Id. 208-926-4611.

1966 Dodge D100 truck stilling in shed. Pix to share. $2,000. obo. Ashton, Id 208709-4854.

Wanted Looking for the Applesauce Raisin Cookie recipe by Connie Hanse put out in about 1965-1967 in a light green folder at a lot of the county fairs. Please share - 208670-2893. Want 12 foot Aluminum boat. Bonners Ferry, Id. 701-240-6808. Looking for New Holland - Hayliner 276 baler. Working or parts. Kooskia, Id. 208926-4611. Buying U.S. gold coins, proof and mint sets, silver dollars, rolls and bags. PCGS/ NGC certified coins, estates, accumulations, large collections, investment portfolios, bullion, platinum. Will travel, all transactions confidential. Please call 208-859-7168. Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338. Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258 Paying cash for old cork top bottles and some telephone insulators. Call Randy. Payette, Id. 208-740-0178.

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Non commercial classified ads are free to Idaho Farm Bureau members. Must include membership number for free ad. Forty (40) words maximum. Non-member cost- 50 cents per word. You may advertise your own crops, livestock, used machinery, household items, vehicles, etc. Ads will not be accepted by phone. Ads run one time only and must be re-submitted in each subsequent issue. We reserve the right to refuse to run any ad. Please type or print clearly. Proof-read your ad.

Mail ad copy to: P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848 or email Dixie at DASHTON@IDAHOFB.ORG Name: __________________________________________________________________________ Address: _________________________________________________________________________ City / State / Zip: __________________________________________________________________ Phone: _____________________________________ Membership No. ___________________ Ad Copy: ________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________


Farm Bureau Rebate $500 Idaho Farm Bureau Program With General Motors

Eligible Farm Bureau members in Idaho can receive a $500 rebate on each qualifying 2015, or 2016 model year Chevrolet, GMC, or Buick vehicle they purchase or lease. This Farm Bureau member exclusive is offered for vehicles purchased or leased at participating dealerships through Farm Bureau’s—GM PRIVATE OFFER at a participating GM dealership. Members simply go to www.fbverify.com, enter their Farm Bureau membership number (i.e. 123456-01) and zip code, and print off a certificate to take to the dealership. Discount must be processed at time of purchase. To qualify for the offer, individuals must have been a Farm Bureau member for at least 30 days prior to the date of delivery of the vehicle selected. The Farm Bureau discount is stackable with some incentives and non-stackable with others. See dealership for full details or call Joel at (208) 239-4289.

Chevrolet Chevrolet Avalanche Chevrolet Camaro Chevrolet Colorado Chevrolet Corvette Chevrolet Cruze Chevrolet Equinox Chevrolet Express Chevrolet HHR

Chevrolet Impala Chevrolet Malibu Chevrolet Sierra Chevrolet Silverado Chevrolet Sonic Chevrolet Suburban Chevrolet Tahoe Chevrolet Traverse

Buick Buick Enclave Buick LaCrosse Buick Lucerne Buick Regal Buick Verano

GMC GMC Acadia GMC Canyon GMC Savana GMC Sierra GMC Terrain GMC Yukon GMC Yukon XL

2015


Fall 2015 Volume 15, Issue 4  
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