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June 2014 • Volume 18, Issue 4

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Idaho Farm Bureau Celebrates 75th Anniversary

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Custer, Blaine Residents Suspicious of Monument Proposal

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Idaho Farm Bureau

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Jerome Farm Hosts Area Students


It’s Time for Some Field Work By Bob Stallman AFBF President

Farmers have thrown open the doors of the machine shed, greased up the gears and cranked up their diesels. It’s farming season! With Congress in session only a few days between now and August, this also is a good time to gear down and throttle up on

Monument Proposal Lacks Details and Local Support By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

The Idaho Farm Bureau opposes the creation of a Boulder-White Cloud National Monument by presidential proclamation.

agriculture’s

policy

priorities.

forward with immigration reform.

Refueling Immigration Reform

Since then, the engine has idled a bit, and we can’t let that happen. It’s time to tell Congress to refuel immigration reform. Without a legal, stable supply of labor, farmers will continue to face labor shortages and lost crops, and the public will face the loss of economic activity from agriculture and the risk that more of See STALLMAN, page 6

In February, thousands participated in the #IFarmImmigration campaign to bring attention to farmers’ and ranchers’ labor challenges. That same month, more than 600 business organizations, including Farm Bureau, signed a letter urging House leaders to move Backed by environmental groups and the Blaine County Commission, the monument would encompass 592,000 acres of federal land in central Idaho, divided roughly equally between an area east of the East Fork of the Salmon River and a region within the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. Advocates are attempting to persuade the Obama Administration that the area needs the protection that a monument designation might provide. However, their claim is

CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

private property owners. When Richard Nixon signed the law in 1973 it didn’t seem like a big deal. Almost everyone agreed it was a noble cause to protect the American bald eagle, grizzly bear, whooping crane, alligator and other prominent species from harm and extinction.

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) was never meant to apply only to the West, although at times it seems like that. Nor was it ever meant to be such a nightmare for

What Congress failed to take into account was that there were millions of species in the world, including thirty million species of insects, a million and a half of

Celebrating Idaho Farm Bureau’s 75th Anniversary “The Endangered Species Act” By Rick Keller

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The Ag Agenda

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JUNE 2014

false and details on land use restrictions that might occur under a monument are not known. Neither area is threatened by environmental degradation, nor is there credible evidence of such threats. The 280,000-acre area west of the East Fork (aka the Boulder-White Clouds) is protected by Public Law 92-400 that created the Sawtooth NRA in 1972. The lure of its streams, lakes, meadows and alpine peaks, along with healthy populaSee PRIESTLEY, page 6 fungi and tens of millions of bacteria. To some environmentalists at least, the underlying goal of the ESA was clearly this: “Save every species, no matter what the cost.” The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is given the authority under the law to protect plant and animal species. Once a species is listed as “endangered” or “threatened” it cannot be hunted or harassed and its critical habitat cannot be modified. One See KELLER, page 7


Volume 18, Issue 4

IFBF OFFICERS President ................................... Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President ...................................Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President ............................... Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................Shelley Mark Harris ................................................. Soda Springs Chris Dalley ....................................................... Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ........................................... Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant .................................................. Oakley Rick Pearson ................................................... Hagerman Rick Brune............................................................Hazelton Curt Krantz ............................................................. Parma Cody Chandler....................................................... Weiser Tracy Walton ........................................................ Emmett Marjorie French ............................................... Princeton Alton Howell ................................................ Careywood Tom Daniel ............................................... Bonners Ferry Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Luke Pearce ............................................. New Plymouth STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ....................... Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Organization............................... Dennis Brower Commodities & Marketing Assistant ........... Peg Pratt Member Services Assistant ..................... Peggy Moore Publice Relations Assistant ...................... Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager ........................... Justin Patten Dist. I1 Regional Manager ..............................Zak Miller Dist. III Regional Manager .................. Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ..........................Brody Miller Dist. V Regional Manager ....................... Bob Smathers Dir. of Governmental Affairs ................Russ Hendricks Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs .... Dennis Tanikuni Energy/Natural Resources ....................... Bob Geddes Director of Public Relations .............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................ Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager ..................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise .................... Julie Christoffersen Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID GEM STATE PRODUCER USPS #015-024, is published monthly except February, May, August and November by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201. POSTMASTER send changes of address to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, Idaho, and additional mailing offices. Subscription rate: $6.00 per year included in Farm Bureau dues.

MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: The Idaho Farm Bureau Federation, with help from the community of Murtaugh, celebrated its 75th Anniversary on May 14. Photo by John Thompson

Murtaugh Elementary students sang “I’m Proud to be an American” by Lee Greenwood during a recent commemoration ceremony to recognize the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation’s 75th Anniversary.

Idaho Farm Bureau Federation Celebrates 75th Anniversary By Jake Putnam

Under clear blues skies, a stone’s throw from a freshly plowed field, more than 150 people attended the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation’s 75th anniversary celebration in Murtaugh on May 14. The Federation got its start in this hamlet more than seven decades ago. Back then farmers from Pocatello, Twin Falls, Lava Hot Springs and Filer met with a representative of the American Farm Bureau to form a farm-based federation that would look after their political interests. “This year, 2014, marks the 75th anniversary of the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation,” said Idaho Farm Bureau President Frank Priestley. “We’re the largest general farm organization in Idaho with active farm bureaus in 37 counties.” During the Great Depression farmers across the nation lacked political clout. Decisions made in Washington D.C. and Boise had negative repercussions on farms. There were thousands of farms in 1939, but at that time only a handful of farmers were organized and lobbying. Despite the fact that the farming contributed significantly to the overall economy at the time, farmers sorely lacked representation. So the founders adopted a model being used by other states to give themselves a voice at both the state and national level. “Not many people know that 75 years ago this was where the state’s largest general farm organization was formed, and we felt we had to come back,” said IFBF’s Chief Executive Officer Rick Keller. When President Frank Priestley took the podium he answered the question thought by many: “Under these blue skies, why wouldn’t they meet here?” he said. “Forming See IFBF ANNIVERSARY page 4 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2014

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IFBF ANNIVERSARY

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Idaho Farm Bureau Federation officials present a check to the Murtaugh School District. The funds will be used to help build a new greenhouse at the school.

the Idaho Farm Bureau was grass root politics in its truest form.” He added that the Farm Bureau is the only major agriculture organization run from the bottom up with members setting the policy. “There were a lot of trials and tribulations back then,” said Priestley. “We were in the thick of the Great Depression and farmers were barely hanging on. They needed a safety net so they formed this federation and later in 1947 they started an insurance company to help protect farms from natural disasters.” From the Farm Bureau archives in Pocatello a priceless piece of paper was reproduced for the occasion. The minutes from that first meeting were handed out to those attending the celebration. The notes from that meeting still serve as the Idaho Farm Bureau’s foundation. “We the farmers and ranch men of Idaho in meeting assembled in Murtaugh, Idaho, this 15th day of September 1939, hereby organize the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation for the purpose of affiliating with the American Farm Bureau; to work for the 4 #

well-being of farm and ranch families, their rights and interests whatever and wherever they may be; to bring about and maintain parity prices for agriculture with Industry and Labor, and secure for agriculture a fair share of national income, to foster, advocate and strive for an equitable, social, educational and economic balance between all groups in the nation…” An audio history of the Farm Bureau was played for the crowd followed by remarks from Murtaugh Mayor Dee Hunsaker who said it’s fitting that the Farm Bureau got its start from a hard working farm community. “Through their dedication and hard work those founding fathers made Murtaugh come alive with the water that is here, turning sagebrush into lush fields, enabling us to grow all the crops we do. We not only feed the community but the state and world with fewer acres and yet we’re able to produce more each year,” said Hunsaker. The Idaho Farm Bureau has more than 70,000 member families, and more than 14,000 of those families earn a majority

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of their living from the land with members representing every county in the state working together to set policy each year, perpetually from that first meeting. “I think one of the reasons Idaho Farm Bureau has done so well is that it’s a grassroots organization,” said Priestley. “The direction of the organization comes from the farm. The Farm Bureau is nothing more than the voice of our farmers and ranchers at the county level and I think our members are proud of that.” Farm Bureau members, staffers and a choir from Murtaugh Elementary added to the special event. Twin Falls County Farm Bureau provided refreshments for the crowd. President Priestley and Mayor Hunsaker unveiled a large stone monument placed at the corner of Murtaugh’s historic City Hall. Local farmer Kent Mason looked on and summed up the ceremony. ”Well, the Farm Bureau was formed by farmers for farmers, that’s why it’s still going and it’s getting bigger every year,” he said.


LEFT: A stone was placed at Murtaugh City Hall to commemorate the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation’s 75th year. BELOW: Over 100 people attended the event held at Murtaugh City Hall.

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STALLMAN

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their food will come from other countries. Clean up the Pile of Expired Tax Provisions Some in Congress are working to renew tax policies that expired last year. Congress has allowed the work of addressing these tax provisions to pile up like a stack of off-season invoices. One of the most important tax provisions for farmers and ranchers is enhanced small business expensing, which helps them upgrade to more efficient and environmentally friendly equipment, purchase livestock and build certain farm structures. Because farmers operate on tight margins, the ability to deduct these expenses immediately can give a farmer a way to smooth out volatile fluctuations in farm income.

Congress also needs to extend tax credits for renewable energy production, donations of conservation easements, food donations to charitable groups and other tax provisions that help farmers and ranchers be productive and profitable while helping to achieve societal goals. Field Scout for Regulatory Threats

fields that are wet only during rainstorms. EPA wants to classify these areas that shed rainfall, and features such as otherwise dry ditches, as “waters of the U.S.” subject to federal regulation. Farm Bureau is asking Congress to weed out that proposal, and we commend the 231 representatives and 46 senators who have signed letters urging EPA to “Ditch the Rule.”

To keep a crop healthy, the farmer must keep an eye out for pests and anything in the field that doesn’t appear to be thriving. The EPA’s “Waters of the U.S.” rule threatens to drain the vigor from routine conservation and farming activities. Landowners would have to secure federal permits to make ordinary changes to their cropland, build fences or other structures, or apply fertilizer or pesticides even in parts of

Congress has a lot of fallow ground left to plant. “Growing conditions” in Congress have been less than optimal. Germination might seem slow, but we must plow ahead with our legislators and get our farm work done in anticipation of the harvest season ahead.

on River is poor. The bottom land is dotted with picturesque ranches that have coexisted with nature and been in the same families for many generations. Private property rights are likely to be compromised if a monument is designated.

monument overlapped the Sawtooth NRA; 5) The proposal lacks local support. Neither the Custer County Commission (85 percent of the land in question is in Custer County), nor a majority of local residents who spoke during a recent public hearing believe it’s prudent to create a monument. In addition, a rift has developed within the environmental community because a monument isn’t likely to provide the same restrictions as a Boulder-White Clouds wilderness area, which they lobbied for in recent years but lost.

PRIESTLEY

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tions of fish and wildlife, draws multitudes in search of world-class recreational opportunities. The region has earned the reputation as a national treasure and an Idaho crown jewel. This wouldn’t be the case if the area were threatened as monument advocates allege. The 312,000-acre area east of the East Fork (aka Jerry Peak Highlands) is different in many ways from its more famous BoulderWhite Clouds neighbor. Owing in part to its remoteness and absence of recreationrelated destinations, the sagebrush and rock- covered landscape receives little use apart from a few cowhands, hunters and ATV users. Its uses are carefully monitored and regulated by the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management. Flowing between the two areas is a river that is prime spawning habitat for anadromous fish. Wild stocks of salmon and steelhead are struggling, but not because water quality in the East Fork of the Salm-

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The President has the legal authority under the Antiquities Act of 1906 to unilaterally declare national monuments. But because he can doesn’t mean that he should. Here are five reasons why the Idaho Farm Bureau believes the Boulder-White Clouds proposal makes no sense: 1) a monument designation is not needed to safeguard the area; 2) the establishment of a monument by the stroke of a pen would deprive those who live, work and recreate in the area the opportunity to fully participate in an important land-use decision; 3) the wellestablished equilibrium that exists among most area users would likely be undermined; 4) consolidating the two distinct areas would surely cause confusion, conflict and possibly litigation, particularly if the

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Custer County is 96 percent federal land. That limited tax base makes it difficult to maintain law enforcement, fire protection and search and rescue. Land management throughout our state needs to move in the other direction, away from strict federal regulations and far-away decision making. In our view, there is no logical reason to invite another level of federal bureaucracy to gain a foothold in central Idaho.


keller

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Idaho, rich in fish, wildlife, and agriculture, had one of the most-publicized battles ever over endangered species, but the creatures caught in the middle of the fight were not any of the majestic ones associated with the West, but tiny little hot springs snails. thing the law accomplished was giving celebrity status to little known species of plants and animals. In 1978, the Farm Bureau policy stated that “the law shall not encroach upon economic agricultural or silvicultural practices.” Under the law, however, economic factors were not considered when it came to saving a plant or animal. Idaho, rich in fish, wildlife, and agriculture, had one of the most-publicized battles ever over endangered species, but the creatures caught in the middle of the fight were not any of the majestic ones associated with the West, but tiny little hot springs snails. “You could easily mistake them for pieces of grit, gravel or even grains of sand. It’s hard to believe something so small could create such big problems. But some tiny snails are posing a potentially gigantic problem for agriculture in Idaho,” wrote Julie Brown for Farm Bureau News in early 1993. USFWS planned to cut off water rights to more than 50 farms and ranches in southwest Idaho, half of the economic activity in the area, to avoid lowering the level of the

hot springs where the snails were found. Farmers argued that the springs already were being replenished after a drought. The Wall Street Journal said, “It sure would be great if our laws against say, murder and assault, were enforced with the same zeal as the ESA.” Even long-time supporters of the Act in Congress found its enforcement absurd.

the snail from the very beginning. One of the problems with the ESA is the lack of minimum scientific criteria in decision-making. Species are listed on the basis of little or no scientific evidence. Government studies are usually done by those interested in listing a species, and Farm Bureau believes the results are slanted. Idaho Farm Bureau employee Rayola Jacobsen led a tremendous effort in this cause. Working as a member of the Bruneau Snail Committee,

she led the Farm Bureau involvement which included the Great Bruneau Snail Race and other fund raising activities. Ultimately, the drought ended and the controversy waned but only after more than $200,000 expense to individuals, the Bruneau Boosters, the Cattle Association and the Farm Bureau and years of unnecessary worry and litigation. The battle between ESA and private property rights continues to this day with no end in sight.

The Bruneau Hot Springs snail became such a cause celebré that even Richard Nixon mentioned it in a book he wrote shortly before his death in 1994. The former president who had signed the landmark endangered species law in 1973 recognized that “measures designed to protect endangered species such as bears, wolves, and bald eagles are now being used to force Idaho farmers off their land for the sake of a thumbnail-size Bruneau hot springs snail.” Farm Bureau and other litigants scored a first-of-itskind victory in 1994 when a federal judge overturned the listing of the Bruneau snail. Judge Harold Ryan criticized the USFWS for withholding scientific data and having its mind made up about listing Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2014

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Blaine and Custer county commissioners met in early May to discuss a proposal that would utilize the Antiquities Act to create a national monument.

Blaine, Custer Officials Discuss Monument Proposal By John Thompson Unresolved questions about future land management has created apprehension about a proposal to designate a national monument that would overlap parts of both Blaine and Custer counties in central Idaho. Custer and Blaine county commissioners met recently to discuss a proposal brought forward by the Idaho Conservation League and the Wilderness Society. Custer County passed a resolution opposing a Boulder White Clouds National Monument, while Blaine County supports the concept. 8

Advocates are calling on President Barack Obama to use the Antiquities Act to create the new monument. Residents from both counties, and elsewhere, were given the opportunity to comment during a public hearing held May 7th in Ketchum. Those who spoke were overwhelmingly opposed. Some said not enough details have been released about what land management changes might come from creation of a monument. Many fear that motorized recreation would be lost, as well as grazing and other uses. A vocal group of conservation-

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ists, still lobbying for creation of a wilderness area in the Boulder White Clouds, are also opposed because the designation of a monument is not restrictive enough. Advocates presented a map at the beginning of the meeting. Initially the proposal encompassed 570,000 acres but was recently increased to about 592,000 acres. A sensitive area called Malm Gulch that contains prehistoric sequoia trees was added. The proposed monument is divided roughly equally between an area east of the East Fork of the Salmon River and a


region within the Sawtooth National “States and counties frequently have viewed restrictions Recreation Area. Gary O’Malley, executive director of the Sawtooth Society told commissioners his organization is concerned about involvement from various federal agencies and overlapping management. “The action of overlaying a monument over the SNRA should only be taken if there is a clear and compelling case that the monument will provide additional protection not currently afforded to the SNRA,” he said. “In spite of working closely with the advocates, we believe no such case has been made. The SNRA is wellmanaged now.” The Sawtooth Society, formed in 1997, is a non-profit organization working to serve as an advocate, preserve open space, and enhance recreation opportunities in the SNRA. A representative from the Idaho Conservation League, introduced only as “Rob,” said some small adjustments were made to boundaries to exclude some private land along the Salmon River. He said any private land located inside the monument would be considered an “inholding” and would not be subject to federal management. He added that ICL and the Wilderness Society have made agreements to accommodate the use of mountain bikes in the proposed monument. ICL’s website states that negotiations with stakeholders are ongoing. One point that was raised repeatedly throughout the meeting is that land use regulations are typically negotiated after designation of a monument. A document compiled by the Congressional Research Service evaluated how presidents have used the Antiquities Act to create monuments http:// www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R41330. pdf. Researchers found that in general, existing uses of the land that are not precluded by proclamations and do not conflict with the purposes of the monument, may continue.

on federal lands in their jurisdictions as threats to economic development. They maintain that local communities are hurt by the loss of jobs and tax revenues that result from prohibiting/restricting future mineral exploration, timber development or other activities.” However, most proclamations made since 1996 have barred new mineral leases, mining claims, prospecting and exploration for oil, gas and geothermal energy. Restrictions on timber harvesting, use of motorized and mechanized off-road vehicles, hunting, fishing and grazing are common. Typically, these land use issues are addressed when drafting the management plan for each monument. “States and counties frequently have viewed restrictions on federal lands in their jurisdictions as threats to economic development. They maintain that local communities are hurt by the loss of jobs and tax revenues that result from prohibiting/restricting future mineral exploration, timber development or other activities,” the report states. Blaine County Commissioner Larry Schoen said one of their main ideas was to focus on economic outcomes that might be associated with the creation of a national monument. He invited Harry Griffith of Sun Valley Economic Development to evaluate the economic impacts of the proposed monument. Griffith said Blaine County businesses generate about $1 billion per year in sales, while Custer County businesses generate about $53 million in sales. “The relative impact for Custer County will be more significant,” Griffith said. “For us another 100 or 1,000 visitors per year adds a little but for you (meaning Custer County) it adds a lot.” Griffith added that economic impact on Custer County is likely to be in the

range of $200,000 to $1 million per year increase with the creation of a new monument. He said creation of a visitor center, or even two visitor centers would bring in several jobs. Headwaters Economics, a non-profit research group in Bozeman, Montana, studied 17 Western communities with national monuments nearby and found “consistent increases in population, employment and personal and per-capita income in communities surrounding some of the largest national monuments in nine Western states.” “The data do not prove a cause-andeffect relationship between the monuments and growth, said Ben Alexander, the firm’s associate director in an article posted on the group’s website. “But they do show that monuments and economic growth are “highly correlated.” “In no case did we find that the creation of a national monument led to an economic downturn,” he said. All three Custer County commissioners could be counted as skeptical with regard to the economic research presented. Commissioner Doyle Lamb said Arco hasn’t prospered with the creation of the Craters of the Moon National Monument. “Arco is right next to a national monument and that town’s been dying for years,” Lamb said. “I’m not sure I see the economic value of another monument.” Commissioner Lin Hintze said when he went to high school in Mackay See MONUMENT PROPOSAL page 10

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MONUMENT PROPOSAL

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“What’s wrong with what’s being done now and how will a national monument designation change it? Nobody in Idaho really has a say anyway. It’s all controlled by federal agencies.” over 50 years ago there were 100 students in the school. Today there are fewer than 60. The number of cattle on the range in Custer County has also dropped by half in his lifetime, he said. “Being next to the largest wilderness area in the lower 48 states has not helped us,” Hintze said. About 85 percent of the proposed monument is in Custer County. Robert Boring, who lives near Stanley, said he is not opposed to protecting public land but there are too many unanswered questions surrounding this proposal. “What’s wrong with what’s being done now and how will a national monument designation change it,” he asked. “Nobody in Idaho really has a say anyway. It’s all controlled by federal agencies.”

Forest and the Sawtooth National Forest are doing a “beautiful job” of managing the land at the present time and although he is not opposed to additional protection of the resource, he cannot support a “vague map without a plan.”

Mazzotta added that she has 3,300 signatures from Idaho residents on a petition in support of the monument that she will send to President Obama. That petition can be found on Facebook under Boulder-White Clouds National Monument.

Stanley resident Charlie Thompson said the process will cost millions of dollars and could take up to eight years. In addition, it could cause conflicts between the various federal agencies that are likely to be involved. “We could end up with multiple use management from two agencies, wilderness study area management from two different agencies – I don’t see any light at the end of the tunnel and what value does it bring? Is this about politics or policy?”

Opponents of the monument also have an active petition. It can be found at www.yourboulderwhiteclouds.org. A public hearing to discuss the monument proposal will be held at 6 p.m. on May 29th at the Challis Event Center.

Custer County resident Campbell Gardett said claims about the Boulder White Clouds region being “unprotected” are disingenuous and using the Antiquities Act is a mistake with unforeseen ramifications. “From Custer County’s standpoint, it will wipe out a slower way of life than you have here in Blaine County,” he said. “There is no eminent threat to this land so what is the rationale for using the Antiquities Act? If we encourage the President to sign this thing, the consequences will be out of the control of anyone here.”

David Sundholm from Hailey, said economic development studies don’t typically include the value of lost recreation. He said if a monument is created he won’t be recreating in the area because his preferences are either snowmobiles or motorcycles. To Sundholm, the proposal is a land grab. “I’m tired of being lied to by public officials,” he said. “In my experience anytime a large parcel of public land goes through a change like this motorized access is lost. There is no evidence that tourism dollars will come with this monument. If you want to market this area, market it, but this is the wrong thing to do.”

Ketchum resident Bruce Smith said he is also against using the Antiquities Act to create a monument here. He said the SNRA, the Challis National

Dani Mazzotta an Idaho Conservation League (ICL) employee from Ketchum said it’s important for people who live on the East Coast to know

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that large “in-tact” landscapes exist in Idaho and other Western states. “Public lands are important to all Americans,” she said. “A national monument would protect this landscape for all generations.”

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Idaho has two current existing national monuments. Craters of the Moon National Monument was created in 1924 by President Calvin Coolidge. In 1925 visitation reached 4,600 people. In 1956 visitation topped 100,000. The size of the Monument increased to 5,360 acres in 1962. In 1995 visitation reached 237,000 people and in 2000 the Monument was expanded to include all of the Great Rift Zone, an area encompassing about 538,000 acres. Hagerman Fossil Beds was established in 1988. It is 4,400 acres. About 3.5 million years ago it was a wet, mostly forested flood plain, according to the National Park Service. It’s an important site for paleontological research and scientists are still working there to uncover fossils. The Monument contains one of the world’s richest known deposits of horse fossils.


Here’s to bringing up the sun. Here’s to muddy boots and grease-stained hands. Here’s to caring for this great land.

Here’s to protecting what you live for. We’re proud of our agricultural roots, and proud to be the insurance company so many families rely on to protect them from the unexpected. Here’s to protecting you, your family and your future.

www.fbfs.com FB10 (4-14)

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Focus on Agriculture

Farmers’ Markets Grow, Adapt to Changing Consumer Needs By Robert Giblin Growth in the number of farmers’ markets continued last year, and the markets are adapting to new locations and innovative formats to meet consumer needs. According to the Agriculture Department, there were 8,144 farmers’ markets in 2013, an increase of 3.6 percent from 2012. The rapid growth can be attributed to several factors, including consumer perceptions about superior freshness and qual12

ity; the ability to learn about farming practices; and a desire to support local businesses and farmers. An analysis released in 2013 by A.T. Kearney, Buying Into the Local Food Movement, showed that consumers trusted farmers’ markets more than any other types of grocery venues to deliver local food. Growth in the number of farmers’ markets is slowing, compared with the explosive increases of 10 percent in 2011 and 17 percent in 2012.  In some areas, the number of farmers’

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JUNE 2014

markets has reached a saturation point. In others, there were too few vendors to sustain the market.  Yet, an increasing array of farmers’ market concepts are bringing farmers and consumers together in new ways. Popular in many countries with hot climates, night-time farmers’ markets are gaining a foothold in many large urban areas.  In 2012, a “PopSee FOCUS ON AG, page 22


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Lola Fitzgerald, foreground, recently received a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to help teach children about where their food comes from and the challenges faced by farmers and ranchers.

‘Our Food Link’ Grant Awarded to Jerome Farm By Jake Putnam Washington—The American Farm Bureau Women’s Leadership Committee recently awarded four $700 grants to state Farm Bureau members from across the country. Idaho’s Lola Fitzgerald of Jerome County was one of the recipients. The ‘Our Food Link’ program was established in January by the American Farm Bureau and is designed to teach people about the sources of their food. Fitzgerald has a farm near Eden 14

and each spring opens her gates to Jerome County schools with the goal of teaching a generation of Idaho school kids where their food comes from. “Our food link in Idaho is that our food is grown on farms like this,” said Fitzgerald. “I have most of the producers in this county represented and there’s a lot of them. The food links I’m highlighting are chicken, beef, dairy, fish and row crops.” Idaho ranks first in the nation in trout farming. According to USDA in 2011, Idaho recorded

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over $38 million in sales, accounting for 50 percent of the U.S. total. On Fitzgerald’s farm there’s a thoughtfully constructed trout stream using seasonal irrigation water and pumps that keeps fresh running water throughout the summer. Idaho’s dairy industry is also represented on Fitzgerald farm and each child gets a yogurt treat during the open-air classroom part of the tour. Fitzgerald answered questions about food throughout the day. Teacher Carolyn Lee praised

Fitzgerald Farm and her contribution to agriculture education. “Lola set this up, she invited our elementary school, she teaches a grade at a time and its organized because she has all kinds of activities tailored to each grade. The kids are involved in fishing, planting and feeding the animals and they’re learning where food comes from,” said Lee. Fitzgerald farm is the culmination of a lifelong dream for Lola. She loves farming and loves to teach.


“The kids need to know that if we don’t have these farms to produce the things we have, we don’t have food. It is as simple as that and I love what I’m doing,” added Fitzgerald. “It’s a great honor that Lola’s Farm was singled out for this project,” said Idaho Farm Bureau President Frank Priestley. “She has something special going at that farm and I can’t think of a better winner, it is well deserved.” The AFBF Grant-winning programs like Fitzgerald Farm demonstrate a strong connection between the food system and agriculture that creatively engages food buyers while teaching everything about food and agricultural products.

During the spring and fall months of school, Fitzgerald’s farm fills a void for educators. Field trip budgets in some districts are tight and teachers want to get good educational bang for their buck according to Carolyn Lee. “This a rural county but most of these kids are already removed from the farm,” said Fitzgerald. “When they think food, it’s fast food and the farm is lost in the shuffle. It feels great to show them the ag-link and how food familiar to them comes from farms like this.” “Year-round outreach through ‘Our Food Link’ is more important than ever because the average American is now at least three generations removed

from the farm,” explained Terry Gilbert, a Kentucky farmer and chair of the AFBWLC. Farm and ranch families make up less than 2 percent of the U.S. population today. Throughout the year, Farm Bureau members like Lola Fitzgerald help people of all ages and backgrounds connect with their sources of clothing, food, shelter and energy in their communities. Fitzgerald serves on the Jerome County Farm Bureau Women’s Leadership Committee. They do things like set up booths at farmers› markets, talk to lawmakers and even volunteer for interactive booths at county fairs. ‘Our Food Link’ activities also

include food collection and cash donations for the Ronald McDonald House. Each student that visited Fitzgerald’s farm brought a can of food and by the end of the day they had a sizable donation. The launch of the program was spearheaded in January by the AFB Women›s Leadership Committee, although Gilbert noted, “All Farm Bureau members are invited and encouraged to consider participating in ‘Our Food Link’ activities. The flexibility of the program makes it a great fit for anyone looking for creative ways to reach the non-farming public with information about today’s agriculture,” she said.

Workshops, train rides and fishing were all part of the program for Jerome County students. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2014

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Wildfire and Wildlife: Living in Fire-Based Ecosystems returned within hours or days.

Article and photos by Yvonne C. Barkley Many people believe that all wildlife flee before the flames of a wildfire like the animated characters in the movie Bambi. Contrary to this belief, during the 1988 burns in and around Yellowstone Park, animal behavioral scientists didn’t observe large animals fleeing the flames; instead, most seemed completely indifferent even to crowning fires. Bison, elk, and other ungulates grazed and rested within sight of flames, often 100 yards or less from burning trees. Smaller mammals and most birds that left their habitat while it was burning

An animal’s ability to survive a wildfire depends on their mobility and on the fire’s uniformity, severity, size, and duration. Large animals die most often in very large, active fires with wide flaming fronts, crown fires, and thick ground smoke. For example, most of the large animals killed in the Yellowstone fires of 1988 died of smoke inhalation. Animals with limited mobility living above ground are most vulnerable to fire caused injury and mortality. Animals that live in moist habitats, such as amphibians, are the least likely to be affected. Season is also important, with burning during the nesting season being the most damaging. Wildfire most commonly affects wildlife by modifying the proportions and arrangements of habitats across a landscape. Wildlife habitats are not static, but evolve in response to fires and the subsequent changes in vegetation and structure that follow. Immediately after a fire, food and shelter are temporarily lost. Hidden runways and

Yellowstone Park after the 1988 wildfires. 18

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JUNE 2014

burrow openings become exposed and predation increases. Particular successional stages or structures are important to many wildlife species when looking for a place to hide, escape to, or reproduce in. Species will immigrate to new areas when the food and cover they require are not available after a burn. The time it takes for a particular species to return to an area will depend on how much fire altered habitat structures and food supplies. Unburned areas adjacent to burned areas create a mosaic, increasing wildlife choices from a range of habitat structures and conditions. Wildlife populations can shift from species that require cool, moist conditions, such as warblers and wood mice, to species that require warm, dry conditions, such as ground squirrels and quail. Herbivores, and species that prefer herbaceous vegetation for cover, prefer early successional, grass/forb habitats or broadleafed seedlings that establish after a burn. Depending on the vegetation type, burning often increases or improves wildlife forage from a few years to as long as 100 years.


dwelling and aquatic invertebrates generally suffer little immediate damage, though indirect and long-term effects are less understood or unknown. Earthworms generally live four to eight inches under the soil surface where they are protected from the direct effects of heating. Amphibians and reptiles avoid the direct effects of wildfire by either moving away from it or burrowing into the soil.

Unburned areas adjacent to burned areas create a mosaic of conditions, allowing wildlife a choice from a range of habitats.

Sometimes, the nutritional content and digestibility of plants increases for a few years. Dead wildlife becomes food for scavengers, including grizzly and black bears, wolves, coyotes, bald and golden eagles, crows, and ravens, and fire-killed trees provide food for millions of insect larvae (and the animals that feed on them) and provide perches for raptors. As succession continues, conifers succeed broad-leafed trees, which become snags and add to dead wood accumulating on the ground. Snags and downed logs provide important habitat for cavity nesters, small mammals, and even large mammals like bears. Shrubs and saplings invade openings created by downed and dead trees. When interspersed with dense patches of shrubs and trees in long-unburned areas, open-

ings provide excellent food and cover for deer and elk. By suppressing wildfire, this mosaic of disturbance-born habitats succeed to forests, and wildlife species dependent on early and mid-successional stages move away. Invertebrate populations tend to decrease after a wildfire because eggs, food supplies, and/ or shelter are destroyed. Flying insects are especially vulnerable because they are attracted to fire by heat or smoke and are incinerated in great numbers. Surface insect populations, such as grasshoppers, also tend to decrease. Other insect populations, especially bark beetles and woodborers, increase after a fire, as damaged or killed trees provide large amounts of suitable habitat. Ants also tend to increase after fires and can eat large amounts of seed. Soil

Wetlands are less likely to burn, and when they do, they burn less severely than upland sites. Wetlands provide a refuge from wildfires for many wildlife species and activities such as breeding by aquatic species may be carried out with little interruption. Although fire in wetland areas usually increases open water and stimulates vegetation favored by many aquatic and semiaquatic species, removing adjacent riparian habitat can cause problems.

Riparian vegetation shades wetland habitats and vegetative root systems hold the soil and prevent or decrease deposition of sediment into the water. When riparian vegetation is removed, water temperatures may increase and dissolved oxygen content decreases, which can increase fish diseases and reduce spawning efficiency. Fine sediment can also clog fish gills, suffocate eggs and aquatic larvae on the bottom of the stream, and fill in the spaces between bottom cobbles where fish lay eggs. From the elk browsing in the meadows to the trout swimming in the streams, western wildlife has evolved and adapted to living with fire. Yvonne Barkley is an associate extension forester for the University of Idaho. She can be reached at yvonnec@uidaho. edu

Western wildlife has evolved and is adapted to living with the aftermath of wildfires.

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A group of Australian ranchers were given a tour of Bannock and Power counties and introduced to the owner of Lakeview Ag Russ Fehringer in early May. Fehringer, discussed beef production in Idaho and showed the group some of his Red Angus cattle.

Australian Ranchers Visit East Idaho By John Thompson About 30 cattle producers from the state of Queensland Australia visited eastern Idaho in early May. Coming from a sub-tropical climate, many in the group did not expect temperatures in the low to mid 40’s. The cattle they raise are mainly Brahma cross with Simmental and Charolais but they were interested in learning more about the Angus and Hereford breeds. A visit to Lakeview Ag near American 20

Falls was arranged for the group through the Idaho Farm Bureau. Lakeview Ag owner Russ Fehringer discussed trends in the cattle business and the ins and outs of showing cattle at large livestock shows with the group. Fehringer has won awards at several national shows including the Denver Livestock Show and the Fort Worth Stock Show. They discussed prices and auction trends, converting weights from metric to standard, and concluded that in general Australian cattle fetch lower prices in the auction ring but cost of production is probably lower there also.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JUNE 2014

Queensland is located in the northeast corner of Australia. It is home to about four million people. Farmers there produce bananas, pineapples, peanuts, cereal grains, wine grapes, cattle, cotton, sugar cane and wool. It is also a mining region producing bauxite, coal, silver, lead, zinc, gold and copper. Following their visits in northern Utah and eastern Idaho, the group stayed in Jackson Hole, Wyoming and toured a cow/calf operation near there.


American farm bureau federation news

Retail Meat Prices: Up, Up and Away Summer grilling season will cost meat lovers a few more dollars this year, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation. Wholesale meat prices climbed higher during the first quarter of the year and retail meat prices quickly followed suit. “Retail prices for beef and pork cuts have steadily pushed into new record territory,” said John Anderson, AFBF’s deputy chief economist. “For pork, the average retail price per pound in March – $3.83 – was higher than the prior four months and eclipsed the record level set last fall,” Anderson said. “For beef, the price move in March was more dramatic. Consumers saw the sixth straight month of new record retail prices for fresh beef products, at $5.40 per pound, which is a 23-percent increase compared to

the 2010-2012 average,” he explained.

Agriculture Department.

The sharp increase in retail beef prices has not occurred in a vacuum, Anderson noted. Retail pork prices are currently 18 percent higher than in 2010-2012 while chicken is up 9 percent.

Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus or PEDv, a serious hog disease that poses no risk to humans or food safety, is expected to result in a 2 percent decline in 2014 production according to USDA, further influencing retail prices for bacon, ham, pork chops and other products.

“Farmers and ranchers are raising smaller numbers of hogs and cattle. This is the key factor contributing to higher retail meat prices, a trend that is likely to continue through the summer and, at least for beef, into next year,” Anderson said. The long-term effects of searing back-toback droughts in 2011 and 2012 resulted in less feed available for cattle, and ultimately forced a substantial decline in cattle numbers that is now resulting in lower beef production. Year-to-date beef production is down by close to 5 percent according to the

The good news for consumers is that although they will pay a bit more for meats this summer, there will be plenty of everyone’s favorites to go around. “Meat supplies will continue to be plentiful,” said Anderson. “From burgers to brats, steaks to chops and everything in between, consumers will have no problem finding their favorite meats for summer barbeques and cook-outs,” he said.

Lower Old-Crop Soybean and Corn Numbers Forecast A new report from the Agriculture Department provides the first projections for the 2014-15 crop marketing year. But the more compelling story in the World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate is in the old-crop soybean and corn stock numbers, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation. Ending stocks for old-crop soybeans were reduced by 5 million bushels to a projected 130 million bushels. This is a projected stocks-use ratio of 3.8 percent or about a 14-day supply of soybeans available at the end of the 2013-14 marketing year. “If the projections are realized, we’re looking at a record-tight level of soybean ending stocks, which is cause for some concern,”

said Todd Davis, a crops economist with AFBF. USDA’s ending stock projection for soybeans is slightly lower than anticipated by industry analysts. Tempering the likelihood of tight ending soybean stocks is the fact that a record crop is projected to go into the ground – 81.5 million acres – based on USDA’s prospective plantings survey. A record production for the nation’s soybean crop, 3.635 billion bushels, is forecast, based on record yield of 45.2 bushels per acre. The April report lowered 2013-14 corn ending stocks to 1.146 billion bushels because of strong demand in the export and ethanol markets. The 2014 corn crop is expected to come in at a record 13.935 bil-

lion bushels, slightly higher than the prior year. Strong demand from foreign markets coupled with continued steady use for feed and ethanol production is expected to consume about 13.39 billion bushels by the end of the 2014-15 marketing year. Despite the abundant crop projections which illustrate great production capacity, Davis sounded a note of caution regarding Mother Nature. “Farmers are still out there facing the reality of unpredictable weather as they work to get their crops in the ground, favorable weather during the growing season and then cooperative weather again at harvest time,” he said. “There’s still a long way to go before the crops are in the bin.”

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focus on ag

Continued from page 12

Up Greenmarket” in an empty lot in Harlem became the first night-time farmers’ market in New York City. In other cities, night-time farmers’ markets allow consumers to buy farm-fresh products after a busy day at work. They have become popular gathering places for food, socializing, entertainment and even romance. “States and counties frequently have viewed restrictions on federal lands in their jurisdictions as threats to economic development. They maintain that local communities are hurt by the loss of jobs and tax revenues that result from prohibiting/ restricting future mineral exploration, timber development or other activities,” Farmers’ markets are also serving both corporate and factory workers. Smallerscale, roving markets are set up for short periods of time in office building lobbies and factory parking lots, so busy, time-stressed workers can take shop during breaks, lunch periods and work hours. Farmers’ markets are now being featured, rated and evaluated as tourist destinations, with “top 10” lists and travel recommendations in numerous national magazines, newspapers and travel sites. In 1994, USDA began publishing the National Directory of Farmers’ Markets, with upto-date information about locations, dates and hours 22

of operation, websites and methods of payment accepted. Farmers’ markets are now also reaching some of the nation’s most distressed consumers. Once criticized for catering largely to more lucrative consumers, farmers’ markets are now being established in “food deserts”—areas where affordable, nutritious food is difficult to obtain.  And thousands of markets accept Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits, formerly known as food stamps. By providing the point-of-sale equipment needed to process payments from the Electronic Benefits Transfer Cards used by SNAP recipients and beneficiaries of other programs—like the Women, Infants and Children program—USDA is fostering access to fresher foods. Early studies indicate that the ability to use EBT cards and other incentives are starting to improve healthy eating habits of SNAP recipients. Adapting to meet diverse consumer needs and to serve those who previously lacked access to farmers’ markets is starting to pay off, and not just for farmers.  USDA estimated that farmers’ market sales exceeded $1 billion in 2005, and some industry experts believe sales approached $7 billion last year.  In a report

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issued in 2012, The Economic Impact of Farmers Markets: A Study of 9 Markets in 3 Major U.S. Cities, Market Umbrella—a nonprofit organization devoted to cultivating public markets, showed that famers’ markets generate significant economic benefits for vendors, host neighborhoods and surrounding communities. In the studied cities, impact on vendors ranged from $52,000 to $40.5 million per market; impact on nearby businesses was $19,900 to $15.7 million; and on communities, $72,000 to $56.3 million.

Along with the economic impact, farmers’ markets offer a rare opportunity for agriculture and consumers to connect in-person. It’s a chance to entice and educate consumers about where their food comes from and how it is raised or grown. Almost no other shopping experience brings consumers and agriculture together to build trust by meeting face to face. Robert Giblin consults, writes and speaks about agriculture and food industry issues and trends.

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Grain Marketing with Clark Johnston

Consider Historical, Seasonal Market Trends Clark Johnston

By Clark Johnston I still run into people who talk about the days when the market wouldn’t move more than 5 to 10 cents in either direction during the entire year. Now if the wheat and corn markets don’t move at least a nickel during the day we feel that there really isn’t anything going on. A few years ago I heard an elderly gentleman say that when he was a young man many people learned by trial and error. He then went on to say that we can’t afford to do that today. It is important that we learn from those that came before us as well as history itself. Even though the markets have changed over the years with more players (speculators) we still see the historical trends coming into play year after year. When we look at the fundamental numbers, the weather as well as the technical indicators they tell us sometimes more than we really want to know or need to know. I’m not discounting the importance of knowing the fundamental numbers as well as knowing how to read some of the technical indicators but, let’s remem24

ber to look at the historical seasonal trends as part of our marketing plan. This year the Chicago July wheat futures began a rally towards the middle of April and the market moved 64 cents higher by the first week in May. The futures then moved 64 cents lower by the third week of May. Futures moved right back to where we were the middle of April. During this time frame we had news of just how bad the Hard Red Winter wheat crop was going to be. There were less than favorable weather conditions with cold temperatures as well as a lack of moisture in some areas. The news moved the market higher and the news moved the market lower. It is safe to say that this was a volatile time in the market. Having said this, what would you say if I told you we have seen this same pattern over the past 15 years? It would also be safe to say that we have experienced this type of market during this time frame over the past 30 years. The dates aren’t exact but, if we give or take just a few days we can see this seasonal trend.

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If you are beating yourself up for missing the higher bids just a few months ago my advice is “don’t.” Prices for your wheat may not move back up to where we were but, there is a good chance that we will move higher as we move into the end of July and into the fall. The corn market has recently experienced this same movement. Back in the first part of February the futures were showing a carry in the market. The market has since moved to a flat and even a small inverse at times. From the first week in February through the first week in April the December futures moved 55 cents per bushel higher. From April into the third week in May December futures moved 40 cents lower. On the 20th of May corn futures were only 15 cents higher than the first of February. As with the wheat market we also see a correction in the futures from the first part of May through the end of June. Historically the corn market has a good chance of finding strength from July into the end of September before once again moving lower into the first of October.

As with any fundamental news or trading platform the seasonal charts aren’t an exact science but, we shouldn’t discount them thinking that things are completely different now than they were 5, 10 or even 20 years ago. History does have a way of repeating itself and the seasonal trends in the commodities markets are a very good example of that. It would be good to use this data along with the fundamental numbers and the technical charts when planning your marketing strategy for the months ahead. Over the years our equipment has become bigger and better, giving us the capability to do a better job in producing our crops. We should also remember the additional tools that are now available for us to be able to merchandise our crops at a profit. Clark Johnston is a grain marketing specialist who is on contract with the Idaho Farm Bureau. He is the owner of JC Management Company in Northern Utah. He can be reached at clark@jcmanagement.net


County Happenings

Bonner County Farm Bureau sponsored a candidate forum on May 7 featuring local and state candidates for office. The event took place at the Catholic Church in Sandpoint with about 125 people attending. The questions asked ranged from federal lands to other natural resource issues to term limits and common core. Photo by Bob Smathers

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Top Farm Bureau Agents

Rookie of the Month:

Garren Taylor Palmer Agency

Agent of the Month:

Jonathan Jensen Schmitt Agency

Agency of the Month:

Gliege Agency

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Rodents Cause Liability Risk for Landowners By Matt Brechwald

Could gophers, ground squirrels, voles or rock chucks on your land be a liability risk to you? The short answer is “yes.”  Below is a list of cases and laws to demonstrate this.  The main take away from this is that if you have these pests and you have neighbors you have an obligation under law.  Most of the cases cited below involve canal companies and agricultural land.  However, they all demonstrate that the person or entity with the gopher problem can be held financially responsible for their failure or negligence when it comes to controlling gophers or other burrowing rodents. Every state will have laws that relate to this.  Let’s look at Idaho Laws to get an idea of what they look like: Idaho State Code 25-2601 (translation - Title 25, Chapter 26, Section 01) This state code is what establishes the

duty of the landowner. Basically, it states that a landowner has a duty to control gophers and ground squirrels.  As a “catch all” it also includes the term “burrowing rodents.”  This will include voles and rock chucks.

So, if your question is to whether or not you have any obligation to take action as a landowner in Idaho when these pests are present - the answer is “yes.” Idaho State Code 25-2606 (translation - Title 25, Chapter 26, Section 06) This state code gives the county you live in legal authority to enter your land to control these pests if you have been given notice and have refused to do anything. Before you say “great, let them take care of my gophers”, realize that the county or state is likely to bill you for this since they can only enter your land after a process of trying to get you to clean up the gopher or other pest problem yourself.

Look Up. Look Around.

Be Safe.

Always keep equipment at least 10 feet away from overhead power lines. Your safety depends on it.

idahopower.com/safety 28

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What about civil liability? Let me start by saying that the author is not an attorney.  However, I took the liberty of looking up some Idaho cases that involve gophers to give you an example.  Here are some very brief explanations of these cases: Bedke vs. Pickett Ranch & Sheep Company In this particular lawsuit part of the cause of the agricultural damage and one of the reasons cited in the lawsuit was a lack of control of gophers.  In this case gophers had chewed though a buried “poly-pipe” that was approximately three feet deep.  This caused the need for repeated repairs over the years, ultimately to a dispute between neighbors, cropland damage and a lawsuit. Nampa & Meridian Irrigation District v. Mussell This particular situation was caused by See RODENTS, page 31


Farm Bureau Rebate $500

New Idaho Farm Bureau Program With General Motors

Eligible Farm Bureau members in Idaho can receive a $500 rebate on each qualifying 2013, 2014, or 2015 model year Chevrolet, GMC or Buick vehicle they purchase or lease. This Farm Bureau member exclusive is offered for vehicles purchased or leased at participating dealerships through Farm Bureau’s—GM PRIVATE OFFER at a participating GM dealership. Members simply go to www.fbverify.com, enter their Farm Bureau membership number (i.e. 123456-01) and zip code, and print off a certificate to take to the dealership. Discount must be processed at time of purchase. To qualify for the offer, individuals must have been a Farm Bureau member for at least 60 days prior to the date of delivery of the vehicle selected. The Farm Bureau discount is stackable with some incentives and non-stackable with others. See dealership for full details or call Joel at (208) 239-4289.

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Offer available through 4/1/17. Available on all 2014 and 2015 Chevrolet, Buick and GMC vehicles. This offer available with all other offers, excluding discounted pricing (employee, dealership employee and supplier pricing). Only customers who have been active members of an eligible Farm Bureau for a minimum of 30 days will be eligible to receive a certificate. Customers can obtain certificates at www.fbverify.com/gm. Farm Bureau and the FB logo are registered service marks of the American Farm Bureau Federation and are used herein under license by General Motors.

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2014 Idaho Farm Bureau Scholarship Winners

The following are the recipients of the 2014 Idaho Farm Bureau Scholarships. The scholarships are provided by the IFBF Scholarship Fund, Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company, State Women’s Committee and Young Farmers and Ranchers Committee. Each will receive a $750 scholarship.

Abby Shupe

Dillon Blair

West Jefferson High School

Kendrick Jr./Sr. High School

Brian Bagley

Zachary Thibault

Teton High School

Jerome High School

Kate Wood

Justin Nesbitt

Bonners Ferry High School

Meridian High School

Maria Delos Angels Venegas

Bethany Jensen

Kimberly High School

Preston High School

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RODENTS

Continued from page 28

uncontrolled gophers repeatedly tunneling through a canal bank, leading to seepage. What I found interesting about this case is that the landowner grew frustrated with seepage from the canal onto his land due to tunneling gophers.  So, he dug away the canal bank, which the canal company had an easement on and responsibility for. The landowner intended to repair the bank and stop the seepage but he did not get it done in time for irrigation season.  So, the canal company came in and fixed the canal - leaving him with a bill of over $100,000. What is so interesting is that nobody controlled the gophers.  Why not?  If that had been done in the first place by the canal company or the landowner then this whole issue could have been avoided at minimal expense. Brizendine v. Nampa Meridian Irrigation District This is another break in a canal bank.  In this case residential property was flooded inside the City of Boise.  In the lawsuit three experts were brought in to assess the cause of the break in the canal bank.  Each of them cited gophers as either the main

reason or a contributing cause. Johnson v. Burley Irrigation District This appears to be very important case regarding gophers in Idaho. It was appealed to the Idaho Supreme Court, which means the ruling applies everywhere in the state.

portant is the ruling which states that the landowners were not just entitled to compensation for the damage to their crops. They were also entitled to compensation for the damage to the land.

In this particular case from 1963 they cited a loss in value of their land of $100/acre (in After gophers weakened a ditch bank it addition to crop loss) based on compaction broke open and flooded out 10 acres of poand loss of fertility to the soil. According tatoes, ruining the crop.  The defendant in to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Inflation the case cited an Idaho law stating that he Calculator that would be well over $700/ could not be held liable for “acts of God.”  acre in today’s dollars. The Supreme Court ruled that the damage caused by gophers or other burrowing ro- Gophers are a constant issue for farmers in dents were not considered an “act of God” Idaho.  Where will you put controlling gobecause the land owner had the ability to phers on your priority list with the knowlintervene and control the problem. edge that you could be civilly liable for the damage they cause on your own land? This means that a land owner cannot just throw their hands up and Matt Brechwald is a small acreage farmer say “it wasn’t my responsibility.” and the owner of Idaho Gopher Control in Kuna, Idaho.  He speaks about gopher Casey v. Nampa & Me- control and educates farmers and the pubridian Irrigation District lic as often as possible. You can contact This case has significance for reasons oth- Matt through his website  www.idahogoer than whether or not someone could be phercontrol.com, through email  matt@ held liable for damage caused by gophers.  idahogophercontrol.com  or on the teleIn this case cropland was flooded for a dif- phone:(208) 573-0978 ferent reason than gophers.  What is imIdaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2014

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County Happenings Kootenai-Shoshone Farm Bureau President Joe Dobson presents an Idaho Farm Bureau Friend of Agriculture Award to State Senator Steve Vick in Coeur d’Alene. Photo

by Bob Smathers

The Idaho Farm Bureau Collegiate Young Farmer and Rancher Committee recently toured Hilco Technology in Nezperce. Hilco specializes in customizing combines for use on steep terrain. Pictured from left to right are Jeff Kaufman, Sam Emmert, Shane Stubbers, Tara Stubbers, Diana Keller, and Gus Kreder. Photo by Bob Smathers 32

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JUNE 2014


American farm bureau federation news

The Farm Bill: How it Works The American Farm Bureau Federation has produced a new series of videos and launched a website (http://goo. gl/ujjnny) to help farmers, landowners and other stakeholders better understand the provisions of the 2014 farm bill. Featured content includes videos on key commodity program and crop insurance provisions of the farm bill. “We have distilled down a massive and complex piece of legislation – the 2014 farm bill – into several ‘bite-size’ pieces, with the goal of helping farmers and managers understand how it will affect their farms,” said John An-

derson, deputy chief economist with AFBF. “Now that safety net and risk management tools important in crop planning are in place, along with the new program for dairies, the next step is for farmers to be able to move forward with confidence in determining the best options for their individual farms,” Anderson said. “We created the farm bill video series with that goal in mind.” The videos include a farm bill overview describing the basic provisions of the commodity title, including a

description of the decisions related to program participation that will need to be made by farmers and landowners. Four other videos go in-depth on the Price Loss Coverage and Supplemental Coverage Option, the Agricultural Risk Coverage Program, the Stacked Income Protection Program for Cotton and the Dairy Margin Protection Program. Links to useful farm bill information from USDA, land-grant universities, and other organizations also is available on the website at http://goo.gl/ujjnny.

4 Reasons Ditch the Rule is Cool WASHINGTON, D.C., May 1, 2014 – Static, cluttered websites dedicated to public policy issues litter the Internet. But a handful of policy websites rise above the ho-hum. Below are five reasons Farm Bureau’s new Ditch the Rule website (ditchtherule.fb.org) is cool: 1. “Why” is front and center. Why the Ditch the Rule campaign was launched is front and center on the website. You’re not left guessing about why the campaign exists or trying to find an explanation that’s buried deep in the bowels of a clunky site that’s a nightmare to navigate. 2. A picture really is worth 1,000 words.

3. Candid, powerful insights. Bob Stallman, president of American Farm Bureau, pulls no punches when it comes to explaining why all Americans should be concerned about the proposed rule. “The rule is an end run around congressional intent and rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court,” Stallman points out. In addition, “Congress makes the laws of the land, not EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers.” 4. Interactivity, baby. Reach members of Congress with your views, tweet to your followers and send comments to federal agencies with a few mouse clicks.

Color photos of dry ditches and seasonal streams that the Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers intend to regulate under its proposed “waters of the U.S.” rule vividly tell the story.

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Changes Announced to Fruit and Vegetable Planting Rules

USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) has announced fruit, vegetable and wild rice provisions that affect producers who intend to participate in certain programs authorized by the Agricultural Act of 2014. “Similar to previous programs that we’ve administered, planting fruits, vegetables or wild rice on base acres on a farm can result in a payment reduction for program participants,” said Aaron Johnson, Acting State Executive Director for the Idaho FSA.  “I would also encourage beginning farmers, who are unfamiliar with how ‘base’ acres or ‘payment’ acres are determined, to contact one of our 29 offices statewide or stop by and speak with an FSA representative.” Producers who intend to participate in the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) or Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs are subject to an acre-for-acre payment reduction when fruits and nuts, vegetables or wild rice are planted on the payment acres of a farm.  Payment reductions do not apply to mung beans, dry peas, lentils or chickpeas.  Planting fruits, vegetables or wild rice on acres that are not considered payment acres will not result in a payment reduction.  Farms that are eligible to participate in ARC/PLC but are not enrolled for a particular year may plant unlimited fruits, vegetables and wild rice 34

for that year but will not receive ARC/PLC payments for that year. Eligibility for succeeding years is not affected. Planting and harvesting fruits, vegetables and wild rice on ARC/PLC acreage is subject to the acre-for-acre payment reduction when those crops are planted on either more than 15 percent of the base acres of a farm enrolled in ARC using the county coverage or PLC, or more than 35 percent of the base acres of a farm enrolled in ARC using the individual coverage. Fruits, vegetables and wild rice that are planted in a double-cropping practice will not cause a payment reduction if the farm is in a double-cropping region as designated by the USDA’s Commodity Credit Corporation.

WSU announces the name for its stellar new apple

The newest Washington State University apple, designated WA 38, is one step closer to hitting supermarkets with announcement of its brand name, Cosmic Crisp. The name was chosen after an extensive process led by Carolyn Ross, associate professor in the WSU School of Food Science. “It was quite a process,” she said. “I think people didn’t realize how much names can influence their purchasing be-

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havior until they started talking about them.” Ross hosted several focus groups in Washington locations including Pullman, Yakima and Seattle. Participants were presented with a list of potential names to discuss. During the process a theme emerged due to the pattern on the rosy cheeks of the apple. “One of the striking things about the apple is that it’s got lenticels, little spots that look like starbursts,” said Ross, “so people were interested in pursuing names related to outer space and the cosmos.” One of the outstanding attributes of this apple is its crisp texture. “Crisp” also links the WSU apple to its parent, Honeycrisp. Cosmic Crisp apples will not be widely available to consumers until 2019. WSU is working with a number of Northwest Nursery Improvement Institute-affiliated nurseries and other producers to increase WA 38 planting stock. Cosmic Crisp was developed by crossing Enterprise and Honeycrisp in 1997. The tree is upright and spreading with moderately low vigor, so it won’t grow rampantly or oversized. It is precocious, meaning it will start producing fruit at a younger age, with spur development beginning on 2-year-old wood.

House Approves WRRDA Conference Report

The U.S. House of Representatives recently approved the conference report on H.R. 3080, the Water Resources Reform and Development Act, on a 412 to 4 vote. H.R. 3080 passed the House by a vote of 417 to 3 last October and the Senate’s version of WRDA, S. 601, was approved 83 to 14 last May. House and Senate conferees reached agreement on a final measure last week, and now both chambers of Congress must approve the conference report in order to send it to the president to be signed into law. The final conference report contains the majority of Farm Bureau’s priorities, including improvements to the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund and the Inland Waterways Trust Fund. AFBF on Tuesday urged Congress to pass the Water Resources Reform and Development Act. “Passage of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act is a priority issue for the American Farm Bureau Federation and our 6 million members who depend on an efficient and reliable inland waterway system linked to competitive ports,” noted AFBF President Bob Stallman in a news release.


Number of PEDv Cases Continues to Climb

Committee Completes Markup of Appropriation Bill

The Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture passed its fiscal year 2015 agriculture appropriations bill on Tuesday. The bill contains $20.575 billion in discretionary spending, which is $90 million below the level enacted in fiscal 2014. No amendments were offered but Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) stated her intention to offer an amendment regarding the inclusion of white potatoes as eligible for purchase through the Women, Infants, and Children program. Unlike the House bill the Senate bill does not include the white potato in the WIC program.

HSUS Pays $15.75 Million Settlement

The Humane Society of the United States, along with codefendants, have paid Feld Entertainment, Inc., the parent company of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, $15.75 million to settle cases stemming from a lawsuit brought against Ringling Bros. over the care of its Asian elephants. This historic settlement payment to Feld Entertainment ends nearly 14 years of litigation between the parties. “We hope this settlement payment, and the various court decisions that found against these animal rights activists and their attorneys, will deter individuals and organizations from bringing frivolous litigation like this in the future,” said

Kenneth Feld, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Feld Entertainment. “This settlement is a significant milestone for our family-owned business and all the dedicated men and women who care for the Ringling Bros. herd of 42 Asian elephants. We look forward to continuing to set the standard for providing world-class care for all our animals and producing high quality, family entertainment.”

State-mandated GMO Labels Will Drive up Food Prices A recent study showing how mandatory labels for foods made with genetically modified ingredients would cost families in one state hundreds of additional dollars each year at the grocery store is yet another reason why Congress shouldn’t delay in passing the bipartisan Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act, according to farmers and ranchers.

In making it clear that the Food and Drug Administration is the nation’s foremost authority on the use and labeling of foods containing GM ingredients, the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act will provide a federal solution to protect consumers from a confusing patchwork of 50-state GMO labeling policies, and the misinformation and high food costs that would come with them, explained Andrew Walmsley, American Farm Bureau Federation biotech specialist.

The number of cases of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea virus in the U.S. continues to climb, according to the latest data from the American Association of Swine Veterinarians. The number of current confirmed “case submissions” (one or more samples from one or more farms from a single or multiple days of testing) is at 6,421 since the disease was first discovered in the in the U.S. a year ago. Paragon Economics president Steve Meyer, president of Paragon Economics, has estimated that up to 7 million pigs have died from PEDv in North America.

Proposed EPA Rule Could Hurt Arizona’s Water Supply

An editorial in Sunday’s Arizona Republic titled “Proposed EPA rule could hurt Arizona’s water supply,” noted: “Alarm bells are being sounded by Sens. Jeff Flake and John McCain, the Arizona Farm Bureau, water lawyers, ranchers and the head of Central Arizona Project.” Further, “Environmental-law attorney Michelle De Blasi said if the EPA is not expanding jurisdiction, it needs to specifically state that in the final rule. The proposed rule is open to interpretation and court challenges.” The editorial also refers to a recent op-ed by rancher and Arizona Farm Bureau First Vice President Stefanie Smallhouse, who wrote that “every dry wash in Arizona would now be considered ‘connected’ to a navigable waterway and

subject to a permit” if the proposed rule goes into effect. AFBF believes EPA’s proposed rule is an end run around Congress and the Supreme Court. For more information about AFBF’s Ditch The Rule campaign, visit ditchtherule.fb.org.

House GOP Releases Ag Budget

House Republicans proposed a $20.9 billion budget for agriculture and food safety programs recently, an 82-page bill that challenges the White House on nutrition rules and denies major new funding sought by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to better regulate the rich derivatives market. The CFTC fares better than in the past in that the GOP allows for a modest $3 million increase for information technology investments. But the $218 million budget is still $62 million less than President Barack Obama’s request and continues a pattern that has frustrated the administration’s ability to implement Wall Street reforms called for under the DoddFrank law enacted in July 2010. In the case of nutrition programs, the House bill seeks to open the door for white potatoes to be added to the list of qualified vegetables under the WIC supplemental feeding program for pregnant women and their young children. USDA would also be required to establish a waiver process for local school districts which have found it too costly to comply with tougher nutrition standards for school lunch and breakfast programs.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2014

35


FARM BUREAU COMMODITY REPORT GRAIN PRICES

Portland:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Oats

Ogden:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Pocatello:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Burley:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Nampa:

White Wheat (cwt) (Bushel)

04/25/2014

05/23/2014

Trend

7.84 8.75-8.86 8.87 275.00

7.29 8.11-8.21 8.57 280.00

- .55 - .64 to - .65 - .30 + 5.00

New Crop 6.45 7.11 7.21 9.10

6.15 6.52 6.72 9.15

- .30 - .59 - .49 + .05

New Crop 6.50 6.70 6.93 No Bid

6.50 6.99 6.76 No Bid

Steady + .29 - .17 N/A

6.20 7.00 7.00 7.50

5.81 6.45 6.60 6.50

-

11.08 6.65

10.50 6.30

- .58 - .35

Lewiston:

White Wheat 7.50 7.05 H. Red Winter 8.64 8.19 Dark N. Spring 8.59 8.51 Barley 156.50 186.50

.39 .55 .40 1.00

- .45 - .45 + .08 + 30.00

5 Year Grain Comparison Grain Prices.................5/24/2010.....................5/24/2011.....................5/29/2012.....................5/21/2013....................5/23/2014 Portland: White Wheat..................... 4.70 ..............................8.05 ............................6.90 .............................7.65 ...........................7.29 11% Winter...................4.98-5.06.......................9.07-9.17 ......................7.28-7.43......................8.68-8.69..................... 8.11-8.21 14% Spring........................ 6.40..............................12.42 .............................9.10 ...........................9.33.............................. 8.57 Corn...............................169.75-170.................... 303-303.75....................256-257.25.......................285.00..........................No Bid Ogden: White Wheat..................... 4.07 .............................8.00 ..............................6.10.............................. 7.80............................. 6.15 11% Winter....................... 3.89 .............................7.90 ..............................6.03 ............................ 7.22............................ 6.52 14 % Spring.......................5.14 .............................10.97...............................7.52 ............................ 7.85............................ 6.72 Barley................................. 6.14 .............................12.00..............................10.00.............................11.70............................. 9.15 Pocatello: White Wheat..................... 3.85 .............................7.90 ..............................6.00.............................. 7.48............................. 6.50 11% Winter....................... 3.69 .............................. 7.69 ..............................5.84 ............................ 7.55............................. 6.99 14% Spring........................ 5.25 ............................ 11.51...............................7.49 ............................ 7.48..............................6.76 Barley................................. 6.35 ........................... 11.56 ............................10.42............................ 11.35..........................No Bid Burley: White Wheat..................... 3.94 ..............................7.55 ..............................6.05.............................. 7.50..............................5.81 11% Winter....................... 3.72 .............................. 7.75 ..............................6.11 ............................ 7.04..............................6.45 14% Spring........................ 5.01 .............................10.70...............................7.49 ............................ 7.73............................. 6.60 Barley................................. 5.25 ............................ 11.50 ............................10.00............................ 11.25............................ 6.50 Nampa: White Wheat (cwt).......... 6.33 ............................ 11.61...............................9.75 .......................... 11.83.......................... 10.50 (bushel)........... 3.80 .............................6.97 ..............................5.85............................. 7.10........................... 6.30 Lewiston: White Wheat..................... 4.50 ............................. 7.75 ..............................6.50............................. 7.45.............................7.05 Barley................................111.50 ........................ 211.50............................204.50......................... 221.50........................ 186.50 Bean Prices: Pintos................................30.00.............................30.00.............................50.00.......................33.00-34.00.................34.00-35.00 Pinks.................................30.00........................30.00-32.00..................45.00-48.00.................38.00-40.00.................39.00-40.00 Small Reds........................30.00...............................N/A.................................N/A........................38.00-40.00.................39.00-40.00 ***

LIVESTOCK PRICES Feeder Steers

Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs Over 700 lbs

Cows

Utility/Commercial Canner & Cutter

Stock Cows Bulls

Slaughter

BEAN PRICES: Pinto Pink Small Red

04/25/2014

05/20/2014

Trend

200-256 178-236 142-194 102-160

170-258 174-241 145-191 106-171

- 30 to + 2 - 4 to + 5 + 3 to - 3 + 4 to + 11

181-248 164-231 127-176 105-139

189-245 169-221 135-174 114-153

+ + + +

110-150 110-138

115-158 100-145

+ 5 to + 8 - 10 to + 7

82-114 70-95

75-113 74-112

- 7 to - 1 + 4 to + 17

1085-2325

1200-1900

+ 115 to - 425

89-129

91-139

+ 2 to + 10

34.00-35.00 39.00-40.00 40.00

34.00-35.00 39.00-40.00 39.00-40.00

Steady Steady - 1 to Steady

May 19, 2014

Compiled by the Idaho Farm Bureau Commodity Division 36

Milk production

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JUNE 2014

8 to - 3 5 to - 10 12 to - 2 9 to + 14

April Milk Production up 1.2 Percent Milk production in the 23 major States during April totaled 16.3 billion pounds, up 1.2 percent from April 2013. March revised production, at 16.7 billion pounds, was up 1.1 percent from March 2013. The March revision represented an increase of 6 million pounds or less than 0.1 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate. Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,911 pounds for April. This is the highest production per cow for the month of April since the 23 State series began in 2003. The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.53 million head, 10,000 head more than March 2014.


IDaho Hay Report

May 16, 2014 Tons: 14,302 Last Week: 6000 Last Year: 5475 Compared to last week, new crop Alfalfa contracts 10.00-15.00 higher. New crop contract hay is selling straight thru rain or shine with no test required. Trade active this week with very good demand. Retail/feed store/horse not tested this week. Buyer demand good with light to moderate supplies. All prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise stated. Tons Price Wtd Avg Comments Alfalfa Large Square Premium/Supreme 4334 210.00-210.00 210.00 New Crop Good/Premium 4334 210.00-210.00 210.00 New Crop Good 200 165.00-165.00 165.00 Rain Damage Fair/Good 4334 210.00-210.00 210.00 New Crop Utility 800 165.00-165.00 165.00 Del

POTATOES UPPER VALLEY, TWIN FALLS-BURLEY DISTRICT, IDAHO---Shipments 670-668-608--- (includes export of 13-2-4) ---Movement expected to remain about the same. Trading cartons 40-80s very active, others moderate. Prices baled generally unchanged, cartons higher. Russet Burbank U.S. One baled 5 10-pound non size A 4.00-5.00, 50-pound cartons 40s mostly 12.0013.00, 50s 12.00-14.50, 60-80s mostly 14.00-14.50, 90s mostly 11.00-11.50,

Forage Mix-Three Way Large Square Good/Premium

300

135.00-135.00

135.00

Grass Hay guidelines Quality Crude Protein Percent Premium Over 13 Good 9-13 Fair 5-9 Utility Under 5 Contracted price - Price and conditions of sale agreed upon when buyer and Seller negotiates a transaction. USDA Market News, Moses Lake, WA 509-393-1343 or 707-3150

100s mostly 10.50-11.50. The shipment by variety breakdown for weekending May 10, 2014 was generally Russets with 90 percent Burbanks and 3 percent Norkotahs..

Potatoes for Processing

May 20, 2014 IDAHO---Open-market trading by processors with growers was inactive.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2014

37


5 Year livestock comparison

United States Cattle on Feed Down 1 Percent

......................................5/24/2010.....................5/23/2011.....................5/22/2012....................5/21/2013....................5/20/2014

May 16, 2014

Under 500 lbs................ 115-141..........................125-176 ......................140-197 .....................122-158........................170-258 500-700 lbs..................... 97-139 ........................ 114-151..........................130-177.........................119-151........................ 174-241 700-900 lbs.....................90-114 .........................93-139 .......................120-157.........................105-135........................ 145-191 Over 900 lbs...................85-101...........................90-110...........................95-132 .........................89-115......................... 106-171

Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 10.6 million head on May 1, 2014. The inventory was 1 percent below May 1, 2013.

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs.................95-133.......................... 112-156 ......................131-182.........................118-143........................ 189-245 500-700 lbs..................... 87-124 .........................97-149 .......................121-169.........................109-135........................ 169-221 700-900 lbs.....................75-106...........................88-122..........................108-141..........................90-124......................... 135-174 Over 900 lbs....................80-93 ........................98-105...........................90-127 ........................ 80-108......................... 114-153 Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs.................74-101...........................70-116............................75-135...........................73-106......................... 115-158 Over 700 lbs....................64-87 ...........................65-97 ..........................75-106............................76-95..........................100-145 Cows Utility/Commercial........... 41-75.............................52-83.............................64-86........................... 60-85........................... 75-113 Canner & Cutter..............35-64.............................46-76.............................55-78.............................55-74........................... 74-112 Stock Cows......................650-975 ......................850-1500.......................950-1300.....................800-1200.....................1200-1900 Bulls – Slaughter............53-88............................60-100...........................75-102...........................68-110.......................... 91-139

Placements in feedlots during April totaled 1.64 million, 5 percent below 2013. Net placements were 1.55 million head. During April, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 385,000, 600-699 pounds were 255,000, 700-799 pounds were 396,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 600,000. Marketings of fed cattle during April totaled 1.78 million, 2 percent below 2013. Marketings for April are the lowest for the month since the series began in 1996. Other disappearance totaled 83,000 during April, 20 percent above 2013.

Cattle Outlook May 16, 2014

The April Cattle on Feed report said the number of cattle on feed in large feedlots at the start of the month was down 1.0% compared to last year. This was the 21st consecutive month that the on-feed number has been below the year earlier level. USDA said April placements of cattle into feedlots were down 4.9%. April marketings by feedlots were down 2.0%. The average of pre-release predictions was for April placements to be down 3.2%, April marketing down 2.1% and the May 1 on feed number to be down 0.8%. The lower placements makes the report slightly bullish. Retail beef prices were record high in April for the third consecutive month. The average price of choice beef in grocery stores was $5.871 per pound. That was 15.1 cents higher than the month before and 64.7 cents higher than a year ago. The average retail price for all fresh beef was $5.496/lb, also record high for the third month in a row. The 5 market average fed cattle price during April, $147.20/cwt., were down $2.60 from the record set the month before, but up $19.70 compared to April 2013. USDA said that 23% of U.S. pastures were in poor or very poor condition on May 11, up 1 point from the previous week, but down from 33% poor or very poor a year ago. Fed cattle sales volume was good this week. Through Thursday, the 5-area average price for slaughter steers sold on a live weight basis was $146.95/cwt, down $3.07 from last week’s average, but up $22.16 from a year ago. The 5 area average dressed price for steers was $234.06/cwt, down $1.99 for the week, but up $34.30 from the same week last year.

38

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JUNE 2014

Beef prices were higher this week. This morning the boxed beef cutout value for choice carcasses was $226.72/cwt, up $2.83 from the previous Friday and up $17.76 from a year ago. The select carcass cutout is $217.00/cwt, up $3.83 from last week. This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 591,000 head, down 1.5% from the previous week and down 9.6% from the corresponding week last year. Cattle slaughter is on a pace to be the lowest for any May in over 25 years. The average dressed weight for steers slaughtered the week ending on May 3 was 840 pounds, down 1 pound from the week before, but up 1 pound compared to the same week last year. Feeder cattle prices at this week’s Oklahoma City auction were mostly $2 to $4 higher. This week’s prices for medium and large frame #1 steers by weight were: 400-450# $228.50-$257, 450-500# $220-$243.50, 500-550# $222-$234, 550-600# $205-$223, 600-650# $194-$218, 650-700# $186.50-$202, 700-750# $184-$197.50, 750-800# $181-$193.50, 800-900# $172-$186.35, and 900-1000# $162-$173.50/cwt. The June live cattle futures contract closed at $137.90/cwt today, down 15 cents from last week’s close. August fed cattle settled at $138.37, up 17 cents for the week. The May feeder cattle contract ended the week at $187.30/cwt, up $2.73 for the week. August feeders closed at $193.32/cwt. Provided by: University of Missouri


Classifieds

Animals

Wanted

Real Estate/Acreage

Real Estate/Acreage

ASCA registered Australian Shepherd pups. Working line since 1968. Full satisfaction guaranteed. All four colors available. Boise, Id 208-484-9802

Collector of baseball, basketball and football cards. Also baseballs. Idaho Falls, Id. 208881-2213

Himalayan Yaks for Sale - Yearlings, 2 year olds and Breeding Age Cows. $800.00$1500.00. Call or e-mail for more about these amazing animals. McCall, ID. (208) 890-6399 or yakranch@frontier.com

Miscellaneous

Cabin style, 6 bed, 2 bath, huge porch, woodstove, appliances on 4.5 acres. Garage, Quonset, machine shop, 8 stall horse barn, tack, hay, Hotwalker tractor w/attach. 100x300 outdoor riding arena. Located in N. Rupert. Asking $235,000. 208-532-0165

5 acre cabin site, 35 K, owner carry, road in, hydro potential; For rent 1 acre fenced RV site, $150/mo, private garden, electric; Wool, meat sheep, prime breeding pairs, $200. St. Maries, Id. 208-245-1563

1974 Skylark 12x60 $6,000; 1974 Academy 14x60 $6,500. Good Condition. Sold “AS IS” condition. Natural Gas. Must be moved. Shelley area. For more information, call 5285337. Please leave message.

Salmon, Idaho~5.5 acres Tower Creek frontage, water rights, well, mobile home. Grand fathered next to creek, springs. Orchard, apple, plumcot, cherry, apricot. Salmon River near, fishing, wildlife, shed pasture, crossed fenced, trees, gravity irrigation. $169,000. (435) 229-3473 or (208) 403-7685

Bueno Bar Fritz. AQHA Registered stallion, Grullo, Foundation bred. $350 breeding fee + mare care. For more info call (208) 965-7907.

Farm Equipment Challenger MT 755, 2209 hrs, annual service by Western States, 1000 hrs on 25” tracks, Trimble A/S and sprayer control, (reduced) $147,500.00. Two, 500hp US Motors, 480 volt, 3 phase, Inverter duty, hollowshaft irrigation motors, $25,000 each. Call 208220-5588 or e-mail: deegt@aol.com. New squeeze-chute, hand pull, green. $1,200. Midvale, Id 208-355-3780 Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models/parts/tires. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime

Wanted Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338. Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258 Paying cash for old cork top bottles and some telephone insulators. Call Randy. Payette, Id. 208-740-0178

5” Aluminum Main Line (380 ft) with valves and couplers. $600.00; Gas/Propane Hot Water Heater-Make: G.E.-Capacity - 40 Gal. (Tall). Only used 3 years. Great Condition. Paid $550 - Asking $300 Shelley, ID. Call 528-5337. Please leave message. Need a replacement pump? Cleaning out the shop. Gently used submersible pumps from ½ hp to 20 hp. Major brands: Jacuzzi, Berkeley, Gould, Grunfos and Red Jacket. Boise, Id. Call for details 208 863-2887 or 208 385-0151. 1980 Honda CB650 Motorcycle, 1981 Yamaha XT250 Motorcycle, Trailer hitch for 1997 Olds Cutless, 20” Craftsman 6.0 mulching lawn mower, New 4X8 Utility Trailer, 4x10 Heavy utility trailer, Bronze color pickup shell – fits long bed Ford new condition, 5th wheel hitch. American Falls, Id. 208-226-3105

Clean, well maintained 2,500+ square foot home on 1 acre. 5 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, 2 car garage, maintenance free siding, trex deck, private well, sprinkler system, irrigation rights, etc. Westside Idaho Falls off Shelley New Sweden Highway. Call 208-339-8748 10 acres ready for your animals. 3 bedroom 2/12 bath home built in 2001. Property is perimeter fenced with cyclone fencing and cross fenced with 2x4 nonclimb fencing. 40x84 foot shop/barn,20x30 pole building, and some other shelters. $350,000. Athol, Id 208-623-6222

160 Acre Mountain Ranch, Wayan, Id. NFS on 3 sides. Sawmill creek runs entire length of ranch. $224,000. Call Steve Shelton 208557-9005 Silvercreek Realty Group

Trailers Homemade heavy duty 8x12 ‘Dual’ axel trailer with electric brakes. $800 obo. Blackfoot, Id. 208-782-1995

Deerflat Stainless Steel Shovels, personalized. Automatic Chain Oilers for all equipment. 4 wheeler trailer to move wheel lines fast. Weiser, Id. Call John at 208-549-1232 or 550-4619. Antiques: Round oak table w/6 matching chairs, wash stand, hall tree, 4 drawer file cabinet, treadle sewing machine, dresser w/ mirror, Hyboy w/mirror, ice box, buffet, all oak furniture. Burley, Id. 208-678-2036 or 431-2036. Coleman Ram-x17 Canoe $300 obo. MTD rear tine tiller. $450. Bliss, Id 83314. 208490-1300 Antique Blacksmith’s Anvil. Has heavy duty metal stand. $175. Call 208-234-2612

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / June 2014

39


Farm Bureau Members Pay Less www.idahofbstore.com 208-239-4289

General Admission Regular - $51.07

Meal Combo Regular - Over $59

Farm Bureau Price

Farm Bureau Price

$38.50

$44.50

*Lagoon prices include sales tax. Purchase at Farm Bureau offices.

Regular Adult $31.79

Farm Bureau Price

$25.50

*Roaring Springs prices include sales tax. Purchase at select Farm Bureau offices or online.

Regular Adult $29.99

Farm Bureau Online Discount Price

$23.99

Child/ (Under 58�) $22.99

Farm Bureau Online Discount Price

$18.49

Roaring Springs/Wahooz Combo available for $35.99

Regular Adult $45.99

Farm Bureau Online Discount Price

$38.99

Child/Senior $22.99

Farm Bureau Online Discount Price

$17.99

June 2014, Volume 18, Issue 4