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January 2014 • Volume 18, Issue 1

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Cattle Sale Benefits Wildland Fire Effort

5 IFBF

Convention Wrap-up

®

Idaho Farm Bureau

10 Focus on

Agriculture


Farmers Have a Full Plate in 2014 By Bob Stallman AFBF President

The old expression “The more things change, the more they stay the same,” is fitting as we ring in the new year.  As we begin 2014, farmers are facing down many of the same legislative issues we were a year ago: farm bill, immigration, waterways infrastructure, taxes and

BLM Priotities Askew By Frank Priestley President Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

In its selection process of a route for a massive power transmission line across southern Idaho, the Bureau of Land Management listed eight

Celebrating Idaho Farm Bureau’s 75th Anniversary By Rick Keller CEO Idaho Farm Bureau Federation

The 20’s and 30’s were devastating decades for American agriculture. Commodity prices tanked, drought-caused dust storms darkened the skies, and a 2

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

The Ag Agenda the list goes on. But, while on the surface it looks like not a heck of a lot was accomplished in the past year, in spite of what was a contentious political year, solid progress was made on several of Farm Bureau’s priority issues. Moving the Needle As the popular Christmas/New Year song goes:  “What have you done? Another year  over, and criteria used in the decision making process. “Route on public land where practical,” came in 7th. The purpose of the Gateway West Transmission Project, proposed by Rocky Mountain Power and Idaho Power, is to route energy generated in Wyoming to population centers on the West Coast. Any benefits to Idaho residents are negligible. In fact, it’s not even on Idaho Power’s list of needed improvements over

worldwide depression led to the foreclosure of one-third of all U.S. farms. Life on the farm was bleak. The farmers that remained on the farms sought help and assistance from anywhere available and at that time, the United States government was the only entity able to assist. Farmers across the country united, seeking federal assistance. The American Farm Bureau, the Farmers Union, and the National Grange urged the passage of the Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) in 1933.

a new one just begun,” I can’t help but look back at 2013 and think that Farm Bureau definitely moved the needle on our key issues.  A farm bill will likely be completed early in the new year, the Senate and House passed a waterways bill and the labor issue progressed further than it has in its history. I daresay that the issues on our agenda moved as far, See STALLMAN, page 9 the next ten years. However, it will place major constraints on some of the most productive farmland in the state where it crosses Power and Cassia counties. In those two counties, 75 percent of the route will be on private property. On one hand, it’s astonishing that the right to own private property, one of the most basic freedoms outlined by our nation’s forefathers, slips to 7th place on a list like this. On the other hand, when analyzing See PRIESTLEY, page 16 The purpose of the AAA was to raise commodity prices close to parity levels where farm income and farm expenses were equal. This was accomplished through the government paying farmers to reduce their acreage or hog tonnage by 20 percent, creating commodity scarcity which would improve commodity prices. The theory was good, but unintended consequences followed. Farmers did not sign up in adSee KELLER, page 9


Volume 18, Issue 1

IFBF OFFICERS President ................................... Frank Priestley, Franklin Vice President ..................................Mark Trupp, Driggs Executive Vice President .............................. Rick Keller BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bryan Searle ............................................................Shelley Mark Harris ................................................ Soda Springs Chris Dalley ....................................................... Blackfoot Dean Schwendiman ........................................... Newdale Danny Ferguson ........................................................Rigby Scott Steele ..................................................... Idaho Falls Gerald Marchant .................................................. Oakley Rick Pearson ................................................... Hagerman Rick Brune............................................................Hazelton Curt Krantz ............................................................ Parma Cody Chandler....................................................... Weiser Tracy Walton ....................................................... Emmett Marjorie French .............................................. Princeton Alton Howell ................................................ Careywood Tom Daniel ............................................... Bonners Ferry Carol Guthrie ......................................................... Inkom Luke Pearce ............................................. New Plymouth STAFF Dir. of Admin. Services ....................... Nancy Shiozawa Dir. of Organization............................... Dennis Brower Commodities & Marketing Assistant ........... Peg Pratt Member Services Assistant . ................... Peggy Moore Publice Relations Assistant ..................... Dixie Ashton Dist. I Regional Manager .......................... Justin Patten Dist. II Regional Manager ....................... Kendall Keller Dist. III Regional Manager .................. Charles Garner Dist. IV Regional Manager ..........................Brody Miller Dist. V Regional Manager ...................... Bob Smathers Dir. of Governmental Affairs ...............Russ Hendricks Asst. Dir. of Governmental Affairs ... Dennis Tanikuni Energy/Natural Resources . ..................... Bob Geddes Director of Public Relations ............. John Thompson Video Services Manager ............................ Steve Ritter Broadcast Services Manager .................... Jake Putnam Office Manager, Boise ................... Julie Christoffersen Member Services Manager ........................ Joel Benson Printed by: Owyhee Publishing, Homedale, ID

Cattle are sold to the highest bidders at the annual Burgess Ranch Performance Sale in Homedale. Photo by Steve Ritter

Burgess Bull Sale: An Owyhee County Tradition

By Jake Putnam

HOMEDALE – Cattle ranching in desolate, arid conditions like Owyhee County and the surrounding region is tough on cattle. Ranchers in the three-state area say there’s a growing market for bulls that can thrive in harsh conditions.

GEM STATE PRODUCER USPS #015-024, is published monthly except February, May, August and November by the IDAHO FARM BUREAU FEDERATION, 275 Tierra Vista Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201.

Enter the Burgess Bull Sale; where Ranchers from Elko to Jordan Valley show up with an urgency. They want to build tough range cattle with the prized yearling Angus bulls this sale offers.

POSTMASTER send changes of address to: GEM STATE PRODUCER P.O. Box 4848, Pocatello, ID 83205-4848. Periodicals postage paid at Pocatello, Idaho, and additional mailing offices.

The Black Angus bulls are unique because they’re hearty enough to survive Owyhee winters according to rancher Doug Burgess of Homedale. He’s hosted bull sales for the past two decades.

Subscription rate: $6.00 per year included in Farm Bureau dues.

“That’s why we started raising registered bulls,” he said. “We couldn’t buy bulls that would work in this area and so we started the sale and we created demand. The bulls stay within this 150 mile area, most go to neighbors and friends. They keep coming back and it’s helped their cattle.”

MAGAZINE CONTACTS: Idaho Farm Bureau Federation EDITOR (208) 239-4292 • ADS (208) 239-4279 E-MAIL: dashton@idahofb.org www.idahofb.org

Cover: Part of the proceeds from the recent Burgess Angus Ranch Sale will be donated to wildland firefighting efforts in southwest Idaho. Photo by Steve Ritter

At the Burgess Ranch, long rows of trucks start lining up outside the makeshift auction barn the second week of December. It’s a reunion of one of the most exclusive ranch groups in the Western U.S: hearty survivors of the Owyhee.  See BURGESS page 3 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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BURGESS

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Cattle buyers take a look at yearling Black Angus bulls before the sale. Photo by Steve Ritter

Diana Fillmore of Jordan Valley, Oregon says they’re looking for the right bull, specifically a hybrid that can live on sparse range grass and thrive in the high desert.

“It’s about the best lunch you’ll ever have on the range,” said John Richard, Owyhee County Farm Bureau President, “and I wouldn’t miss it.”

“We run out on the desert and there are years when we do not have much feed so we try to buy a moderate growth bull because they tend to breed back better,” said Fillmore.

Beside the food, Richard says he’s there to build up his range cattle.

Fillmore adds that the Owyhees are unique and Burgess bulls are bred to thrive on this land. “We have to buy bulls that are strong, that are easy fleshing and moderate frame size,” said Fillmore, who comes to the sale every December. “We don’t like the big tall bulls because they put too much energy into growing and the heifers just don’t breed back as well.” After stockyard inspections by ranchers it’s time for lunch at the Burgess ranch. On this day it’s barbecued beef and Dutch oven desserts. 4 #

“I prefer to buy my bulls this time of year,” said Richard. “You winter ‘em and grow ‘em into your conditions. You buy the bull now and he’s conditioned by the time you turn him out in March.” Richard says he prefers not to wait until spring to buy bulls because they come out of the feedlot too soft.  “These are commercial bulls but the genetics are the best around,” he said. “These bulls were not pampered in a feedlot; they were raised in the hills and followed their mothers all summer. When they get back on the range they know how to survive.” Burgess sold 60 registered bulls during this year’s sale ranging from $2,200 to $6,000.

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Richard says each bull has far reaching impacts on the buyer’s herd. “One good bull will do more good than anything you could possibly do for your cattle,” said Burgess. “A good bull will impact you for generations; then again so will a bad bull. It’s so important and it’s not about what you paid for them, it’s what you get. We stand behind these bulls 100 percent and we’ve replaced bulls when all we got was an ear tag back from a customer.” Burgess says he’s glad that his operation can play a part in improving cattle of the Owyhee range. The three-state area is one of the most remote areas in the lower 48 states. Burgess says it’s more than sturdy cattle that can withstand the harsh country. “It’s about the people that can withstand it, that’s important. There are good people that are interested in ranching and are going to be in the business for years to come,” he said. “We’re glad to be a part of that.


Bull sale Benefits Wildland Firefighting By Jake Putnam At the annual Burgess Bull sale in Homedale more than 60 bulls were auctioned off, but a prized heifer went on the auction block and sold three times. The heifer was sold to raise money for the Owyhee County Rangeland Fire Protection Association. The Association has been up and running just a year after the Bureau of Land Management signed an agreement with the newly formed organization.

A barbecue beef lunch is part of the tradition at the annual Burgess Ranch Performance Sale. Photo by Steve Ritter

We’ve proven that ranching is sustainable in this part of the world.” Ranchers must also adapt to changing BLM restrictions, range fires and even environmental groups that want to drive them off the range. “There’s a lot good young people involved in ranching. The good ones pay attention to details, that shows when they come here for the sale. You can’t be just a good cowboy, you have to be a good manager, businessman and the whole family has to be onboard or it’s not going to work,” said Burgess. At the Burgess sale kids run and play because it’s a reunion for them too and Diana Fillmore proves that their operation is truly a family affair. “I’m writing the check for my husband Mark,” she said. “This morning I was buying Christmas gifts online, now I’m buying a Black Angus bull. It’s all right, it’ll pay for itself in a few years.” The Burgess Bull sale is part reunion, part barbecue, and an Owyhee County Tradition every December in Homedale.

“It’s a memorandum of understanding so that we can fight fires with the BLM when needed in the heat of summer,” said Doug Rutan, president of the Owyhee County Rangeland Fire Protection Association. The just-formed fire district covers more than a million acres from the Owyhee River to Grandview, south to Nevada and all the way to the Oregon border. “We have to get to these fires quicker and try to hold them with our resources before they burn into hundred-thousand acre fires,” said Rutan. “Fire is so hard on the land and habitat; it’s a tough deal for ranchers to deal with.”

have an edge and it’s tough to just sit and watch land burn. We want to get it out.” Doug Burgess donated a heifer for sale with hopes of raising money for new firefighting equipment. “I think it’s great, we raised $5,000 for them,” Burgess said. “They can buy equipment and radios, water tankers whatever to help defray some of the expenses. Everything takes money and we did it for the Oregon side last year. This year was for the Owyhee County side.” Idaho Cattle Association Executive, VP Wyatt Prescott helped get the association started. “It actually got started during the governor’s Owyhee County trail ride,” Prescott said. “We had some Oregon ranchers along; they started their Association and had success as far as Wildland firefighting associations go. They had a working relationship with the BLM and the state. We took that model and went to work on our state code and enabled it.” The first Wildland Fire Association in Idaho got started in Mountain Home. Owyhee is up and running and a few others are in the works.

Ranchers have always fought fires, but in recent years the BLM forbid ranchers to attack fires because of habitat issues. That’s all changing with the agreement, and now the Association is buying equipment.

“We’re seeing them spring up all over the place. Ranchers are interested because it unties their hands and we’re able to jump on a fire before it becomes a big fire,” said Prescott. “That’s good for everyone.”

“Nothing you do is for free,” said Rutan. “The diesel, the vehicles, the time is donated by ranchers and people that want to help fight fires with the BLM. We know the land, we

Stewardship of the land, says Doug Burgess is not only a good idea but good for public use and good business for ranchers.

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Longtime Farm Bureau volunteers and Cassia County ranchers Gerald and Celia Marchant receive the Farm Bureau President’s Cup Award from Idaho Farm Bureau President Frank Priestley, right. Photo by Steve Ritter

Farm Bureau Delegates Reelect Priestley; Adopt New Wolf Policy

Sun Valley – Delegates to the Idaho Farm Bureau Federation’s 74th Annual Meeting, held in Sun Valley December 2-5, reelected President Frank Priestley and Vice President Mark Trupp.

Idaho Fish and Game Department, Idaho Cattle Association and Idaho Woolgrowers Association have all agreed to support the effort. The state legislature is likely to consider a bill that would also include state

money early next year. It is expected that the funds will be dedicated to wolf management. Farm Bureau’s annual banquet drew over

Elected to the organization’s Board of Directors were Scott Steele of Bonneville County, Mark Harris of Bear Lake County, Rick Brune of Jerome County, Cody Chandler of Washington County, Alton Howell of Bonner County and Luke Pearce of Payette County. Delegates representing 41 of Idaho’s 44 counties set the organization’s course for 2014 debating a wide range of agriculture and natural resources policy matters. The group voted to support an increase in brand registration fees to help fund a federal agency that conducts predator and pest control efforts. Federal government cuts have taken nearly $750,000 from Wildlife Services, a division of USDA, over the past three years. Farm Bureau delegates voted Zak Miller of Jefferson County won the Young Farmer and Rancher discussion meet. He received a to join the ongoing, cooperative effort Polaris ATV and a trip to San Antonio, Texas to compete in the American Farm Bureau discussion to raise funds for Wildlife Services. The meet. Photo by Steve Ritter 6

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014


300 members. The group enjoyed entertainment from the Bar J Wranglers. President Frank Priestley awarded the President’s Cup Award to Gerald and Celia Marchant of Oakley. The Marchant’s are cattle ranchers and long-time members. Gerald has served on the State Board of Directors for several years. Winner of this year’s Young Farmer and Rancher discussion meet was Zak Miller of Jefferson County. Miller is a cattle nutritionist and cattle rancher. He will receive a Polaris Trailblazer ATV and an all-expense paid trip to San Antonio, Texas to compete in the American Farm Bureau Discussion Meet in January. Discussion Meet runner-up was LeNae Nalder of Oneida County. Elizabeth and Steven Kohtz of Twin Falls County received the Young Farmer and Rancher Excellence in Agriculture Award. Dwight and Jamie Little of Madison County received the Young Farmer and Rancher Achiever Award. For the past several years Polaris Motorsports has made a generous donation to the Farm Bureau Achiever Award winner. This year, Jared Burt of Rexburg Motor Sports presented a Polaris Ranger UTV to the Little’s.

Delegates debate the issues during the Idaho Farm Bureau’s 74th Annual Convention in Sun Valley. Photo by Steve Ritter

Recognized as Women of the Year were Marci Bingham of Franklin County, Jalene Shuldberg of Jefferson County, Kerry Thompson of Lincoln County, Shirley Florence of Valley County and Linda Rider of Kootenai County. The Idaho Farm Bureau extends its best wishes to outgoing State Board members Scott Bird of Bannock County, Mike McEvoy of Canyon County, Bob Callihan of Latah County and Mike Garner of Cassia County.

Recognized as Women of the Year were Jalene Shuldberg of Jefferson County, Marci Bingham of Franklin County, Kerry Thompson of Lincoln County, Linda Rider of Kootenai County and Shirley Florence of Valley County. Photo by Steve Ritter Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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Dwight and Jamie Little, seated, of Madison County received the Young Farmer and Rancher Achiever Award. On the left is Jared Burt of Rexburg Motorsports who presented the Polaris UTV to the Littles. On the right is Young Farmer and Rancher Chairman Cody Chandler. Photo by Steve Ritter

The Bar J Wranglers provided the entertainment during this year’s 74th Annual Idaho Farm Bureau banquet. Photo by Steve Ritter

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STALLMAN

Continued from page 2

or farther, than those of any other policy advocacy organization. Further, Farm Bureau had a huge judicial win with the Lois Alt case.  We joined Mrs. Alt in standing up to the Environmental Protection Agency when it threatened her with enormous fines for ordinary storm water runoff.   Unfortunately, agriculture is increasingly going to have to use the judicial branch to stop agencies like EPA from overreaching and trying to make political hay by targeting farmers. And rest assured that Farm Bureau will keep working to protect farmers and ranchers on these important issues. On the Horizon Looking ahead, farmers and ranchers will have a full plate in 2014. In addition to completing the farm bill and implementing a new five-year law, passing waterways and port infrastructure legislation out of Congress and continuing our work on ag labor, a lot more work

remains on other important issues. Tax reform and the federal budget will take center stage as we continue pushing for rational budget reforms and prioritized spending cuts to put America’s fiscal policy back on track.  Instead of continually plunging off of one budget cliff and shooting down the rapids to the next, we must look for fair and balanced solutions.  In doing so, we need to make real progress on individual and business tax reforms that affect farmers’ and ranchers’ profitability. This, too, will help bolster economic recovery. Farmers and ranchers will continue to battle perennial regulatory creep in 2014, particularly as it relates to waters of the U.S.  Current proposed regulations that we know are under review completely ignore repeated U.S. Supreme Court decisions that uphold congressional intent and deny EPA the right to create law on a regulatory whim. If these regulations are adopted and enforced, farmers and

ranchers can expect that nearly everything they do pertaining to water on their farms and ranches will be regulated by EPA. On a separate note, another year has passed and we are still awaiting Food and Drug Administration clarity on how various proposed food safety rules will affect farmers. With the complexity inherent in each of these rules, Farm Bureau is joining the call with other farm groups and state regulatory officials urging FDA to provide an adequate period of time to thoroughly review all of the “final” proposals together in order to avoid unnecessary, and potentially unfair, regulatory requirements that do little to improve food safety. So, while we have a lot on the horizon this coming year, Farm Bureau stands ready to take these challenges and opportunities head on.  It’s time to clean our plate.

keller

Continued from page 2 equate numbers for the program to be viable. Farmers, believing their neighbors would reduce acreage, increased their own production to reap the anticipated reward from reduced production. The result was overproduction and commodity prices declined even more, moving away from the promised parity. The pre-war years began to see non-ag industry prices rise and labor earnings soar while the farm commodity prices were held down by the burden of surpluses. The government enacted laws making mandatory 85 percent-of-parityprice loans on basic farm crops for five years. Farmers turned in their crops for the loan rate. Ag began to benefit from the pricing, and then the consequences of the government setting commodity prices began to emerge.

The on-rushing war abroad and feverish ‘defense’ preparations at home brought new threats and new troubles. Wages and prices of non-agricultural commodities rose, passing against government price control ceilings on commodity prices. Government agencies sold their stored grains at reduced prices – wheat at 61 percent of parity - holding farm prices down. The government, in an effort to reduce its expenses, launched a direct attack on farm prices with no attempt to control union wages. The city press unmercifully berated agriculture and farm organizations for opposing holding farm commodity prices down but not controlling wages on the other end. The government set price controls on commodity prices far below parity. Farmers were restricted on income received through the

federal price controls but their expenses continued to rise because no limits were placed on skyrocketing labor wages. Farmers would suffer from these unintended consequences for years and relief would not come until after World War II and the end of price controls. The past lesson learned is when agriculture sought relief from the government, relief was only temporary and brief, followed by years of control and restrictions. We witnessed this time and time again in the 30’s and 40’s during Farm Bureau’s beginning years. As a result, Farm Bureau has historically been reluctant to seek assistance from the government, fearing the unintended consequences that unfailingly follow.

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The lifeblood of America . They’re the humble heroes who rise before dawn and battle the elements. They put clothes on our backs and food on our tables. Their genuine values and tireless work ethic are an inspiration to us all. We appreciate all that America’s farmers do and invite you to join us in saying thanks at www.fbfs.com/SayThanksToAFarmer.

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Focus on Agriculture

Farmers’ Efforts Provide Strong Start to New Year By Erin Anthony Congress is hardly any more predictable than the weather, but the legislative forecast for early 2014 looks pretty good to farmers and ranchers. Just like a bumper crop though, there’s a lot that’s been done over the past 12 months to get a farm bill and waterways infrastructure legislation well on the way to the president’s desk.  The Senate took the lead with both the Water Resources Development Act and the farm bill, passing those bills in May and June, respectively. The House caught up a few months later, but its late-fall passage of the measures set the conference wheels in motion a little too late to finish work before Congress’ year-end adjournment. Lawmakers working on each of the bills are optimistic their measures will be enacted not too long after we ring in the new year.  Still, that these bills are as close as they are to being ready for the president’s signature is proof of farmers’ and ranchers’ dedication to educating their congressional delegations and being satisfied with nothing less than action. One of the best examples of that in 2013 was Farm Bureau’s Bring the Heat campaign, through which Farm Bureau members made sure Congress was working through the August recess.    As part of this grassroots effort, farmers and ranchers spoke out at town hall meetings, had one-on-one conversations with lawmakers and their staff and made quite a few phone calls to get legislators fired up about finalizing the farm bill and moving waterways transportation legislation. While the weather cooled down in September and October, farmers and ranchers refused to take the pressure off, yielding a House-passed farm bill and a House-passed Water Resources Reform and Development Act, putting both bills on the path to conference with the Senate.  See FOCUS ON AG, page 25 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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Life on the Range

Some sage grouse in the Antelope Springs Allotment decided to establish a lek by a cattle water trough, so Jared Brackett has since discontinued use of the trough during the spring mating season.

Jared Brackett - Ranching in a Fish Bowl By Steve Stuebner Jared Brackett raises Black Angus cattle in a remote area known as the Antelope Springs Allotment, southwest of Twin Falls. He grazes 600 cow-calf pairs on 50,000 acres of federal, state and private land in the allotment. You might say that Brackett ranches in a fish bowl because he manages his cattle alongside premium habitat for sage grouse, a candidate species for listing under Endangered Species Act. The Bureau of Land Management is under court order to manage the area with tight controls to protect sage grouse habitat.

But Brackett, the incoming president of the Idaho Cattle Association, doesn’t worry too much about that because Antelope Springs has plenty of feed and habitat for cattle and wildlife, he says. “This is as good as it gets. We’re quite proud of it. Unless you have something to hide, there’s nothing to be scared of. Because in the end, the resource will show what’s there,” Brackett says. BLM officials say that Brackett takes excellent care of the Antelope Springs Allotment by following tightly controlled management guidelines, which allow for a maximum of 30 percent utilization of native grasslands in the allotment. “On average, his grazing utilization is 20 percent or less,” says Ken Crane, super-

visory range conservationist for the BLM in Twin Falls. “He’s well within what he’s required to meet, so we’re pretty comfortable.” Brian Kelly, Idaho State Supervisor of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, complimented Brackett on his range stewardship. “The sustained efforts of Jared Brackett exemplify the land ethic, leadership and commitments necessary to ensure the long-term health of rangelands in the West,” Kelly said. “His efforts, and efforts by others like Jared, are essential to retaining species management at the local level, and illustrate that good business, good See LIFE ON THE RANGE page 14

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LIFE ON THE RANGE

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Three Creek Rancher Jared Brackett explains one of the wet meadow areas that has been fenced off from cattle use in the Antelope Springs Allotment. This particular meadow has been expanded from one acre to five acres for spring brood rearing habitat for sage grouse.

stewardship, and good conservation are not only compatible, but complementary.”  “Jared is a great example of why the state’s cattle industry has been viable for over 100 years,” adds Wyatt Prescott, executive director of the Idaho Cattle Association. “We are faced with challenges everyday that, frankly, seem unsurpassable, and it’s progressive ranchers like Jared who continue to create new ways to operate in today’s environment.” Over the years, the Forest Service, BLM and Natural Resources Conservation Service have partnered with ranchers to develop about 50 miles of water pipelines in the Antelope Springs Allotment. The pipelines deliver water to many cattle troughs scat14

tered throughout the allotment. “It’s that group effort that makes it work,” Brackett says of the partnerships with the federal agencies. The entire allotment is divided into 13 different pastures for year-round grazing winter, spring, summer and fall. Fencing and agency regulations control where the cattle can graze during each season. The water developments give Brackett and the BLM lots of flexibility. If they don’t want cattle to graze in a particular area, they turn the water source off, and push the livestock to another area with water and salt blocks. In one instance, a group of sage grouse set

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

up a lek at a water trough area in a spring pasture, so Brackett shut off the water and left the sage-grouse alone to mate on the lek. “There’s been a water trough here since the 1970s,” he says. “I have four other water troughs in this field, so it’s not a big deal to turn this trough off during the lekking season. It makes it so the birds can lek without being disturbed.” Crane points out another example of cattle and water management in a different sagegrouse lekking area. “This red triangle here is an occupied lek,” he says, noting the lek on the allotment map. “So what we wanted to do was use water to manage the distribution of livestock. Jared turned the water off up here, and kept these


two water sources on. We wanted to keep the majority of the use down here, away from the sage-grouse lek.” And then the BLM followed up to monitor, map and document how the cattle used the area during sage-grouse mating season. Cattle use was 0-5 percent in the sagegrouse habitat area, shown in beige on the map, Crane said. As Brackett takes us on a tour of the Antelope Springs Allotment, he points out that all of the water developments in the allotment have been fenced off to keep cattle out of riparian or wet meadows, leaving them available for sage-grouse and other wildlife. He and his neighboring ranchers have developed multiple water sources with pipelines to keep cattle on upland areas, where there is plenty of vegetation for feeding. For example, Brackett visits a fenced-off pond at the head of Bear Creek. “This is exclusively for wildlife now,” he says. “It’s on private land, property owned by our neighbor Mike Gary. It’s one of three legs

of the water system, and it’s a vital source. This is new solar technology. It takes less panels to run, the pumps are more efficient, and they’re better pumps.” Brackett has another water source nearby where two types of alternative energy have been used to pump water - an old windmill at one time, and then a solar-powered pump. The solar system has older technology that requires a backup power supply and several large water-storage tanks. He may update to a newer solar system at some point to increase efficiency. The Bear Creek pond “is a nice spot,” he says. “It provides not only clean water for our livestock, but also clean water for wildlife.” Sage grouse have been observed using the pond area in the summer and fall, when the females are raising their brood of young birds. “This would be a major water source for them. You can see the fine grasses around the edge, the bugs, major food source, when it gets drier, you’ll see a lot more birds in here.”

In the top of the Antelope Springs Allotment, in an area known as the “beaver ponds,” Brackett developed a third water source that helps keep his cattle widely distributed in Browns Bench. “This really opened up this top field for water,” he says. “It made a huge difference. It helps keep the cows out of the riparian areas, and the cows are happier, they don’t have to walk in here so far, and the water is cleaner. We’re pretty happy with this system.” The project wasn’t easy to pull off, however, he notes, because of its remote location, and installing pipelines in rough-hewn country. “It took my brother, my sister and me about two weeks to put this system in,” he says. “We put it in in the late 1990s, right after I got back from college. It was a lot of work, and we were a lot skinnier back then, too. We had a D-8 cat, a road grader and a backhoe to get that system put in.” See LIFE ON THE RANGE page 16

BLM range conservationist Ken Crane and Brackett show one of the water developments in the allotment that is fenced off from cattle use, to provide more wildlife habitat. Water is pumped from the area to water troughs scattered in the uplands in the allotment. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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LIFE ON THE RANGE

Continued from page 15

“There’s eight miles of pipeline and five water troughs in this system. It allows us to get the cows well-distributed in the upper fields. It’s probably one of the most important water developments that we’ve done up here.” Brackett, who is a member of the Jarbidge Local Sage Grouse Working Group, helped expand a large wet meadow exclosure to create more brood-reading habitat for sage-grouse. “About 10 years ago, we talked to the local sage grouse working group, and they were looking for more wet meadow areas,” he says. “We thought it’d be a good idea to expand the exclosure. It used to cover an acre of ground. Now it’s close to five acres. We said you guys are welcome to have all of the wet meadow area, we’re not going to miss it. It’s good for the bird; we want you to use that.” The BLM monitors and maps livestock use of the allotment throughout the year, Crane says. All of the pastures in the allotment have specific dates set for turnout, the number of cattle allowed, and how much forage can be consumed. The BLM has numerous monitoring points throughout the allotment where they can evaluate and measure upland plant utilization and sage-grouse habitat, and they have about 20 long-term study sites in the allotment. They check on these sites on a regular basis to make sure Brackett is meeting the specified conditions. The water distribution plan is a big key to keeping the cattle distributed throughout the range, Crane says. “The water developments have really helped in dispersing cattle into the uplands, and you can see how the cows are grazing out here, that’s where we want them,” he says. “And Jared has done a real good job dispersing them into those sites, protecting the spring sources, the ponds, and riparian areas. Many of them are fenced off and are no longer accessible by livestock, so it reserves them for other uses particularly wildlife. “And you’re protecting the water source, so you’re maintaining your water production, and you’re maintaining the quality water for cattle as well as wildlife, so it’s kind of an all-around win.” “When people say we’re not doing anything for sage grouse, we get a little bit offended because we spend a lot of time and effort working with them,” Brackett says. “We’re trying to do what’s right for everything. We’re worried about the antelope, the pygmy rabbits, spotted frogs, everything we have out here, it’s a total picture. “We’ve been protecting and saving it for generations, and we’ll continue to,” he says. “Bottom line, the science isn’t going to lie to us. As long as the data is collected properly, processed properly, we’re in good shape. “ Steve Stuebner is the writer and producer of Life on the Range, an educational project sponsored by the Idaho Rangeland Resource Commission. For more information, see www.lifeontherange.org. 16

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014


Priestley Continued from page 2

in the view of our federal government. There are literally hundreds of quotes made by our forefathers about private property rights and their connection to our basic freedoms. James Madison said “Where an excess of power prevails, property of no sort is duly respected.” President Calvin Coolidge said “Ultimately property rights and personal rights are the same thing.” Northern Nevada rancher, the late Wayne Hage, summed it up as well as anyone when he said “If you don’t have the right to own and control property then you are property.” So without further adieu, here’s what it’s come down to folks. Following are the six criteria established by the BLM as more important than your right to own property: Avoid BLM-identified preliminary priority sagegrouse habitat and Wyoming core habitat areas. Avoid designated areas such as National Monuments, Wilderness Study Areas, National Landscape Conservation System areas and State and local parks. Avoid Visual Resource Management Class II areas. Follow existing corridors or linear structures. Avoid sensitive species habitat, including bald eagle nests and big game winter range. Avoid cultural and natural

resource areas. Sage grouse habitat is more important than private property. We heard a rumor several years ago that by the time all was said and done, sage grouse would make the spotted owl controversy seem small in the realm of economic devastation. This could be a preliminary indication of that prediction coming true. While no one can see into the future, it certainly makes you wonder if the farmers and ranchers who settled southern Idaho by developing the water and hacking a living out of the sage brush would have done so knowing that one day the presence of bird habitat would become more important than farms and ranches. Wilderness Study Areas are more important than private property. This is possibly the biggest kick in the guts on the list. It takes an act of Congress to establish a Wilderness Area and judging by recent memory, we all know Congress doesn’t act on much of anything. In light of that fact, our federal land management agencies have the power to establish a Wilderness Study Area – a de-facto Wilderness Area on their own. We would be surprised if the BLM could find one acre south of the Snake River in Idaho that meets the true definition of a Wilderness Area – “untrammeled by man.” Yet, here we have another instance of federal agencies running our state. Follow existing corridors or

linear structures. Isn’t Interstate 86 an existing corridor for infrastructure? Big game winter range and bald eagle nests are more important than private property. One of the true benefits of living in Idaho is an abundance of wildlife. Many farms and ranches support wildlife during different times of the year and some incur significant damage. But we don’t understand how the presence of wild animals is more important than the presence of Idaho’s hardworking farm and ranch families. In addition, we believe those hardworking families have

established a firm record of living harmoniously with our abundant wildlife. How a federal agency establishes this as criteria to justify the taking of private land is astonishing. Private property is an integral part of the engine that powers Idaho’s economy. Private property helps pay a lot of mortgages in this state – sage grouse don’t. The biggest threat to sage grouse is fire. This tells us that BLM needs to do a better job of managing public land and never be allowed to dictate how and where the rights of private property owners will be violated.

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Android Forestry from extended field use. Most mobile computing devices designed for forestry are “ruggedized”, with heavy plastic shells and other features to protect the electronics. Unfortunately, ruggedized devices are not cheap; prices range from $1000-$4000. Enter Smartphones and Tablets By Chris Schnepf No, this column is not about robots working in the woods (not exactly, not yet). This is about the growing number of forestry-friendly computer applications available on Android, an operating system used on many smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices. Apple’s IOS and Microsoft Windows are also used on mobile devices, but currently Android has lots of applications (“apps”) that are useful in the woods, so that will be the focus here (some of the apps discussed here are also available on iOS and Windows). The Evolution of Mobile Forestry Computing Over the last thirty years, natural resource professionals collecting field data have been shifting from paper plot sheets to field devices that store data electronically. Initially these devices just stored data for later use on another computer. But over time, they gained more power to do calculations in the field, integrated global positioning systems (GPS), and improved screens and computing speed to use aerial photos and geographic information system (GIS) data more effectively. One of peoples’ first concerns about taking electronic devices outdoors is whether they will stand up to water and other abuses likely to befall them 18

The first personal mobile computing devices came into wide use in the 1990s (e.g. the “Palm Pilot”). Gradually these devices merged with cell phones to become the smartphones that are widely used today. Over the last 10 years, these devices have followed the familiar path of adding ever more computing power, better internet access, GPS, and larger, sharper screens. In more recent history, tablet computing has been added to the mix. Compared to ruggedized forestry mobile devices, smartphones and tablets have some features that make them attractive to family forest owners (and not a few foresters). They are relatively inexpensive - anywhere from $100 to $700, depending on your cell service plan. They are light. They have current operating systems. They can be used for tasks in addition to forestry work (e.g. telephone calls with smartphone). These devices are not usually built for field use. But they have become more durable over time, and one can usually purchase cases to protect them. Even if they are damaged in the field, you could burn through two or more of these devices and still pay less than a ruggedized device cost. Their lower price also makes it less painful to upgrade to a newer device for significant improvements.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

Apps Galore The Android operating system is “open source,” meaning the system software is freely available for use and/or modification from its original design. This approach creates a fertile environment for innovation. Currently there are over 800,000 apps for Android. GPS The inclusion of GPS (from satellites, not just cell towers) is what started many thinking of forestry possibilities for android devices. Some of the newer devices can even access GLONASS (Russian GPS satellites), as well as American satellites - more satellites often means more GPS accuracy, especially under forest canopies or in canyons where line-of-sight to satellites can be challenging. At least a dozen apps will bring up screens on an android device similar to what you would find on a GPS receiver (e.g., GPS Essentials, GPS Status, etc.). Google Maps will even give you turn by turn, audible driving directions over your device, just like automotive GPS devices do. Mapping, GIS Some of the best android apps integrate the device’s GPS capabilities with aerial photos, maps or other data loaded to the device from the internet. Such features are increasingly being


described as “augmented reality” a view of the real world augmented or supplemented by computer-generated sensory input such as graphics or GPS data (source: Wikipedia). Mapping and GIS apps typically show your location relative to some type of map. So when you see your live location on the map you may also see nearby roads, forest cover, the soil type you are standing on (an app called SoilWeb), topography, or any other information delineated on the map. Most people are familiar with Google Earth and Google Maps for their home computer. These programs are also available as android apps. There are also several other apps that do some similar things including Oruxmaps, and BackCountry Navigator. Even ESRI, a dominant U.S. GIS software provider, has an android app now (ArcGIS). There is a range of sophistication in these apps; Google Maps is pretty useful to most people immediately, whereas the ArcGIS app may require more familiarity with GIS to use fully. If cellular data isn’t available where you are working, you will not have live access to those maps. However, many of these apps allow saving maps or other georeferenced data (data tied to a location) to the device; you can download that data ahead of time for field use. Field Guide Apps Field guide books can be heavy to lug around. Increasingly there are apps to help you identify trees, understory plants, and weeds. One of the better apps of this kind is 1,100 Weeds of North America, which helps you identify weeds using plain language rather than arcane plant taxonomical terms, and includes access to over 4,000 color photos to help you along the way. There are also a variety of books to identify, plants, trees, mushrooms etc. that can be downloaded to and read on a mobile device with “reader” apps such as Adobe or Kindle apps. Timber Cruising

One of the first electronic device uses in forestry was to collect forest measurement data. Many basic spreadsheet programs can be used for this purpose. You can enter plot data into some cells, then enter formulas into other cells to turn those measurements into usable information, such as trees per acre, tree or stand volume, or other stand characteristics. There is also a timber cruise app that does some of this for you - Plothound stores geo-referenced plot data from a mobile device to a “cloud” (a computer network accessed through the internet), from where you can retrieve it from another computer. Citizen Science More people are being engaged in the effort to collect more data to support better science. For example, the EDMapsS West app allows anyone to contribute geo-referenced data (data that is tied to a location) about observations of exotic invasive species (e.g., noxious weeds) they run across. Phenology is the relationship between a periodic biological phenomenon (flowering, migration, etc.) and climate. An app called Natures Notebook, allows you to enter all kinds of phenological data for a given location for use in the scientific community and for your own interest. If you like checking your rain gauge, the CoCoRaHs app helps you to store your records in a cloud and share them with others (you need to sign up as a CoCoRahs volunteer first – go to www.cocorahs.org). There’s an App for That . . . Many other apps can come in handy for a forest owner. For example Want to know the forecast for burning slash piles tomorrow? Try the Weather Channel, Weatherbug, or other weather forecast apps Want to convert feet to meters or chains? gUnit helps you convert over 30 kinds of measurements. Want information on the current snowpack

near you? Install the SnoTell NRCS & RFC stations app. Want to estimate tree height? Try the Measure Height app (results are in meters). Want to know the slope of a road or hill? Try the Clinometer app. When will the sun be in the best place to take a picture at a given site? Try LiteTrac. Don’t Forget your Device’s Web Browser For example, if you use SoilWeb to determine soil type you could go to the web soil survey to get more details about the capabilities and limitations of that soil type for building roads, tree plantability, etc. There are also many good web sites for tree identification and other resources that aren’t necessarily channeled through a dedicated app (e.g. Oregon State University’s tree identification site (http://oregonstate.edu/trees/) Devices and Data Access Smartphones have the obvious advantage of allowing you to make and receive phone calls in addition to the apps. But for mapping apps, a bigger screen makes viewing larger scale maps easier, making a tablet more attractive. Many people who really get into using apps get both. You may or may not need to have data plans for more than one device. If your smartphone can act as a hotspot, you may be able to use the phone for the data access and get data for the tablet through your phone. Apps are typically either free or relatively inexpensive (usually less than $25). A more difficult issue may be the cost of data plans and where you have data service. Some of these applications require real-time access to data to work correctly (e.g. mapping applications). Since family forests tend to be a little closer to towns and cities, you may have more access to data in the woods than you think. Check to see which cellular service providers have the best data coverage in your area.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014


Even if you have field data access, consider downloading maps or other large data sets via connection to your home wireless network. It may be faster and you won’t generate extra data costs if you have a limited data wireless plan. Accessories There are several accessories to consider when taking mobile devices outdoors. For example, GPS reception can often be improved with an external GPS receiver. Garmin makes a small external GPS receiver that links to a phone or tablet via Bluetooth. Placing the device where the signal is better (e.g., above your head, or away from the base of a tree canopy) should increase accuracy. Consider buying a case that will protect your device if it is dropped or exposed to water. If you plan to be in the woods more than a day, look into additional power options such as extra battery packs or portable chargers. There

are also a growing number of solardevices that can charge phones, tablets and other portable electronic devices. Finally, if you plan to store a lot of maps, photo-filled field guide apps, or other large data sets on your device, consider purchasing an SD flash card for additional data storage. Conclusion A growing number of android apps can be used in forestry. Many of these applications are works in progress. For a given application, you may find bugs that keep you from doing exactly what you would like to – that is one of the simultaneous strengths and weaknesses of open source software. Fortunately, multiple apps are often available to accomplish a given task. If an app isn’t working the way you like, try another similar app. The more successful apps are frequently updated to fix bugs and improve functionality, so a future upgrades may handle what you want bet-

ter. We are offering a couple of classes on February 7th in Coeur d’Alene to give forest owners direct exposure to these applications. If you are interested, go to the “Calendar of Events” on the UI Extension Forestry web site at http:// www.uidaho.edu/extension/forestry, and download the flyers for “Android Forestry” and “Free Computer Mapping Tools for Forest Owners”. Note: Mention or a display of a trademark, proprietary product, or firm in text or figures does not constitute an endorsement by the US Department of Agriculture or University of Idaho Extension, and does not imply approval to the exclusion of other suitable products or firms. Chris Schnepf is an area extension educator – forestry – for the University of Idaho in Bonner, Boundary, Kootenai and Benewah counties. He can be reached at cschnepf@uidaho.edu

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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Farm & Ranch Management School The University of Idaho Extension is offering a Farm and Ranch Management School. This 6-week course will focus on the following topics:     

Financial Management Futures Markets Enterprise Budgets Factors Effecting Profit Machine Costs

    

Financial Analysis Cash Flow Budgets Strategic Goals Mission Statements Employee Compensation

Locations & Times: Rexburg – Madison Senior Center Begins January 21th – for six consecutive Tuesdays. Classes are from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Cost: $100 per operation Please register by January 16th, 2014. Call or email the Teton County Extension Office (208) 354-2961, beborn@uidaho.edu.

For questions or persons with disabilities who require alternative means of program information or reasonable accommodation should contact Ben Eborn by December 10th at the Teton County Extension Office, 235 S. 5th Street E., Driggs, ID 83442 (208) 354-2961. The University of Idaho provides and is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educational organization. We offer our programs to persons regardless of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, sexual orientation or disability.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014


Idaho Falls

Carpet One Floor & Home 405 West 17th Street (800) 227-7381 or 529-1951

Lewiston

Skelton's Carpet One Floor & Home 222 1st Street (208)746-3663

Pocatello

L & K Carpet One Floor & Home 129 North Second Avenue (208) 233-6190

Coeur D’Alene

Carpet

Panhandle Carpet One Floor & Home 739 West Appleway Avenue (866) 497-5088

Twin Falls

Laminate

Pioneer Carpet One Floor & Home 326 2nd Avenue South (866) 497-8176 or 734-6015

McCall

Lake Fork Design Center 13872 Highway 55 (208) 634-4599

Boise

Neef's Carpet One 1507 Main Street (208) 343-4679

Vinyl

Some stores will have designated staff to handle Farm Bureau members so members should identify themselves at the beginning of the process. This will prevent them from having to switch staff in the middle of the selection process. If you have any questions, call 208-239-4289.

Neef's Carpet One

9601 West State Street (208) 947-1800 Ceramic Tile

Area Rugs

Ponderay

Hardwood

Sandpoint Furniture Carpet One Floor & Home 401 Bonner Mall Way (208) 263-5138

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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Grain Marketing with Clark Johnston

Keep An Eye on Futures as Well as Basis The 2013 wheat harvest was good in some areas while others really didn’t have a harvest that one would like to write home about. Shortly after the wheat was in the bin we discussed the possibility of basis strengthening for the hard wheat classes as we moved towards the spring. We felt at the time that there would be a shortage of protein wheat making it necessary for the flour mills to widen the area they purchase from as well as being more aggressive within their normal buying region. We did see this take place as the basis levels that the flour mills and elevators were posting were higher than we had seen in previous years. Even with the higher basis the futures were lower than the year before thus producing lower cash prices. Producers (especially those that had lost track of the market) were experiencing a little sticker shock. It is very easy at times to focus more on just the cash price than looking at the reasons for the prices levels. I know that at the end of the day it is the cash price that pays the bills but let’s not forget to look at the variables that make up the cash price. In earlier articles we have talked about the importance of breaking the cash price down into, futures prices and basis levels. When we analyze the price for our commodities this way it begins to make sense and helps us to make our merchandizing decisions based on the numbers and less on emotion. In December we experienced basis strengthening in the local market. I’m sorry, let me back up just a little. Depending on where you are geographically the basis either strengthened or weakened just before the Christmas holiday. I would say 24

that an average spread between the market in Southeast Idaho and Ogden is 40 to 45 cents per bushel with the Ogden market being the higher bid. Just before Christmas we experienced the spread widening out to as much as 80 cents to a dollar. At one point the bid in Ogden for Red Spring wheat was as high as $1.25 over the Minneapolis March futures while the southern Idaho market was option price. (Option price is the same price as the futures market) Remember, basis is a good indication of the local supply/demand and in the third week in December it was easy to see that the demand for wheat in Ogden was greater than the supply. I know there are times when I say things that maybe don’t make a lot of sense but, in my life time I have learned that, it is important to sell when someone wants to buy. The basis strength in Ogden gave you an opportunity to sell at a level not seen just a few days earlier. The futures have been weak and with the current news there doesn’t appear to be much chance of a large rally. The cash price may not be up to the levels you would like to see but the only way to take advantage of high basis levels is to sell grain into the market. This is when your marketing plan and knowing the level that gives you the opportunity to be profitable really comes into play. You should always be on the lookout for beneficial movements in the markets. Price movements that may be on the surface don’t appear to make much sense but none the less are there. For the most part quick moves in your favor will more times than not correct themselves just as quickly.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

Clark Johnston

Let’s talk for a minute now on input costs. The historical charts show a correlation between fertilizer prices and corn prices. The cheaper corn prices means less acres and less demand for fertilizer. Early estimates are currently showing corn acreage for 2014 at 91.5 million acres. This is about 4 million less than 2013. If you haven’t already bought your diesel fuel for the spring there is still time. Watch the basis closely this year. Last year we did see a short period of time in the spring where the basis was lower than previous years. I recently remembered a story I heard years ago that I feel could be beneficial in marketing your commodities. One day a young man was talking to his grandfather. He asked his grandfather, Grandpa, how did you get so rich? The grandfather answered, by selling too soon. For more information on the marketing tools offered by the Farm Bureau contact Peg Pratt at the Federation office in Pocatello. Clark Johnston is a grain marketing specialist who is on contract with the Idaho Farm Bureau. He is the owner of JC Management Company in Northern Utah. He can be reached at clark@jcmanagement. net


FOCUS ON AG

Continued from page 2

On both the farm bill and the waterways legislation, Democrats and Republicans came together to get the job done. With the farm bill, the bipartisan effort was almost exclusively on the part of farm-state lawmakers, but members of both parties overwhelmingly supported the waterways legislation passed in each chamber. In fact, out of the more than 500 votes related to final passage of the legislation in the House and Senate, only 17 votes were against the bill.  Lawmakers realized farmers and ranchers were on to something: modernized waterways are key to helping buoy the economy. Another big issue for farmers is immigration reform legislation that meets agriculture’s labor needs. 

The Senate in June passed a balanced, Farm Bureau-supported immigration reform bill that includes a fair and workable farm labor provision. The House, on the other hand, stalled after committee approval of a series of immigration reform bills, each tackling a different aspect of reform. 

slim, but that does not minimize farmers’ and ranchers’ success in coming together to work with Senate lawmakers to draft and pass a bill that would meet all of agriculture’s labor needs,” noted Dale Moore, American Farm Bureau Federation executive director of public policy. 

Yet, farmers and ranchers pressed on. Immigration reform was not only a central part of the Bring the Heat campaign, but farmers and ranchers continued to rally around the issue, joining hundreds of business owners, faith leaders, law enforcement officials and conservatives in meeting with members of Congress in October and making a compelling case for action. 

Despite the chilly winter temperatures that will have most of the U.S. shivering in early 2014, farmers and ranchers will be turning up the temperature on Congress, calling for action on immigration reform and many other important issues, such as tax reform, renewable fuels, the Clean Water Act and food safety.

“Considering how charged and complex the issue of immigration reform is, the chances of congressional action during this upcoming midterm election year are

Erin Anthony is the editor of FBNews, the American Farm Bureau Federation’s official e-newsletter.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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Top Farm Bureau Agents

Rookie of the Month:

Bea Guzman Palmer Agency

Agent of the Month:

Jerry Petersen Reilly Agency

Agency of the Month:

Reilly Agency

e e y r F tar o N At all county Farm Bureau offices for Idaho Farm Bureau members. 26

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

Family of Member Services

TM


2014 Idaho Initiative for Secondary Agricultural Education Improvement Advocates of agricultural education across Idaho invite you to support, and encourage your state legislators to support the 2014 Idaho Agricultural Education Initiative. The 2014 Idaho Ag Ed Initiative is important because:  Production agriculture and agribusiness is Idaho’s leading industry and consistently contributes to the state and local economies.  Crisis level shortages of available qualified people to fill agriculture industry exist statewide.  Turnover in agricultural education teaching positions has been 36% in the last two years alone and threatens long term viability and quality of the program.  Agricultural education programs are found in 37 of the states 44 counties and impact almost 12,000 students annually with 90 programs and their integral FFA chapters.  The “Go to College” rate for professional technical education completers in Idaho is over 63% compared to only 47% for state general education completers.  Agricultural education is a proven, effective contributor to leadership development and career readiness skills through project and problem solving based learning opportunities. Components of the 2014 Idaho Ag Ed Initiative include:  Implement Idaho Quality Program Standards Incentive Grants  Adjust and Fund Added Cost Allocations  Offer Agricultural Education Program Start Up Grants  Establish Statewide Professional Development & Mentoring Program  Establish Full Time Idaho FFA Association Executive Director Position

Thank you Idaho Farm Bureau Federation for your support of Agricultural Education and FFA in Idaho! Initiative Facebook Page: Follow the 2014 Idaho Ag Ed Initiative on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/#!/IdahoAgEdInitiative2014 or type in Idaho Ag Ed Initiative 2014 once you are logged in. Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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American farm bureau federation news

Alan Robertson Speaking at AFBF Annual Convention Alan Robertson, the “beardless brother” on A&E’s hit reality TV show “Duck Dynasty,” will be the keynote speaker at a general session at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 2014 Annual Convention, Jan. 12-15, 2014, in San Antonio.

More than 7,000 Farm Bureau members from across the nation are expected to gather in San Antonio for the 95th Annual Convention to hear from distinguished leaders and participate in a grassroots policy-setting process that will guide AFBF through 2014.

Alan is the oldest son of Phil Robertson, founder of the Duck Commander Company, the family’s Louisiana-based duck call business. He grew up hunting and fishing, helping to build the foundation of the company in the 1970s and 1980s.

Robertson will speak at the general session of the convention on Monday morning. Stallman is the keynote speaker at the Sunday opening session; Gen. Stan McChrystal, a retired fourstar general and former commander of U.S. and international forces in Afghanistan, will speak at the closing session on Monday afternoon.

Before rejoining Duck Commander in 2012, Alan was a full-time minister at White’s Ferry Road Church of Christ in Louisiana for more than 25 years. He and his wife, Lisa, enjoy helping carry out the family’s commitment to spreading the gospel of Christ through their love of hunting and the great outdoors.

Farm Bureau members can register for the 95th AFBF Annual Convention through their state Farm Bureau. Learn more about convention events and related activities at http://annualconvention.fb.org/. A mobile app is available here: https://afbf14.quickmobile.mobi. The official hashtag of the meeting is #AFBF14.

Farm Bureau Members Ski For Less This Winter

www.idahofbstore.com

208-239-4289 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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American farm bureau federation news

New National YF&R Committee Members Appointed WASHINGTON, D.C., December 20, 2013 – New members have been appointed to the American Farm Bureau Federation’s national Young Farmers & Ranchers Committee, for the 2014-2016 term beginning in March. The committee is comprised of 16 positions representing all regions of the U.S. An individual or a married couple may hold each committee position. AFBF President Bob Stallman announced the appointment of the following new members to the committee: Miles and Sarah Kuschel, Sebeka, Minn. (beef cattle); Andy and Kasey Clay, Jamestown, Mo. (corn, soybeans and cattle); Aaron and Nicole Banks, Arundel, Maine (quarter horses); Amy and Jon Hegeman, Anniston, Ala. (greenhouses, horse training); Derek Helms, Arkadelphia, Ark. (rice, corn,

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soybeans and wheat); Danielle and Jacob Larson, Okeechobee, Fla. (row crops, beef and dairy cattle); Sara and Zandon Bray, Redvale, Colo. (cow-calf and yearling operation); and Jason Flowers, Midland, Ore. (small grain crops, hay and cattle).

the YF&R Program planning, which includes the operation of YF&R competitive events during AFBF’s Annual Convention, along with planning and implementation of the YF&R Leadership Conference held in February.

“It is important to ensure that the future of agriculture is in good hands and I am confident that these individuals are great leaders as they have already given so much back to their communities,” said American Farm Bureau Federation President Bob Stallman. “I look forward to the work they will do on the YF&R Committee as well as watching them become even stronger and more capable leaders for American agriculture.”

National committee members are nominated by their respective state Farm Bureaus. They study farm and food policy issues, participate in leadership training exercises and hone other appropriate professional skills during their tenure as committee members.

Committee members are responsible for

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

The Young Farmers & Ranchers program includes both men and women between the ages of 18-35. Learn more online at http://www.fb.org/index. php?action=programs.yfr.home.


American farm bureau federation news

Move the RFS Forward, not Backward By Matthew Erickson The renewable fuels standard has been front and center in Washington since the Environmental Protection Agency last month proposed to roll back total 2014 renewable fuel blending requirements to 15.52 billion gallons, a whopping 1 billion gallons less than 2013 totals and 2.63 billion gallons below the mandate set in the Renewable Fuel Standard 2 law. This decision strikes a blow to conventional ethanol production, as well as dampens the prospects for advanced biofuels. Renewable fuels play a significant role in American agriculture, but have certainly not been the only driver of demand for agricultural products. Since the RFS2 was put into place in 2007, agricultural exports have increased 57 percent, total livestock output has increased 31 percent and total crop output has increased 44 percent. However, the effect of the proposed rule will affect corn prices. Since the leak of the proposed rule in October, corn futures have seen a 5-percent reduction. Net farm incomes are expected to hit the highest level in four decades for 2013, driven by a bumper crop of corn and soybeans that followed two years of drought.  Even with corn and soybean prices where they are now, farmers were able to lock in higher prices earlier this year through contracts, a situation that is not likely to repeat in the spring of 2014. Corn prices dropping the way they are now raises the question: Will 2014 be the year when production costs blow past decreasing commodity prices? Further, if finalized, EPA’s proposed rule would essentially shed more than

500 million bushels from corn demand making ethanol exports the key ingredient to make up for lost demand in the domestic ethanol industry. In fact, estimates range farm prices for corn between $3.95 and $4.15/bushel for the 2014/15 crop year, making the likelihood of the price farmers receive for their corn and soybeans lower than their cost of production. In addition, this significant reduction, should EPA go final with its proposed rule, would slow or halt investments in the infrastructure needed to distribute and dispense larger volumes of ethanol. This decision from EPA will stall new investments in cellulosic biofuels and introduce detrimental ambiguity in a market that is still developing. According to EPA, more than $2.4 billion was invested in advanced biofuel companies by venture capitalists alone from 2007 through the second quarter of 2011. This decision from EPA sends a negative signal that threatens to stall investments that foster good-paying jobs in rural America. While the RFS is important to agriculture, it’s just as important to America’s overall economy and energy independence. Since the RFS2 has been in place, the U.S. has seen its crude oil imports decrease from about 60 percent of total oil use to around 40 percent.

1974, global crude oil expenses represented 4.5 percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Since 2011, every time this figure has increased over 4.5 percent, a world recession has occurred. From 1973-74 during the Arab Oil Embargo, annual world oil prices experienced a price shock of 252 percent, 125 percent from the Iran Revolution in 1978-79 and 34 percent from the 2007-2008 recession.

However, the U.S. still has a ways to go from being completely energyindependent even if oil imports are dropping. We are still affected by swings in oil prices, which are set on world markets.

The RFS has been a tremendous success story that has provided growth in the agricultural sector, provided good paying jobs to rural America and has made the U.S. economy less energydependent on foreign sources for crude oil. We are all affected by rising energy costs. Moving the RFS forward and not backward is paramount to enhancing our energy independence. Fortunately, farmers across the country are up to the challenge of growing the food, feed fiber and fuel that is needed to meet these growing demands.

Price spikes in crude oil can lead to large global economic consequences. During the Arab Oil Embargo in 1973-

Matthew Erickson is an economist at the American Farm Bureau Federation.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

31


Farm Succession & Estate Planning Course The University of Idaho Extension is offering a 4-week course for any operation that will undergo a change of leadership from one generation to another within the next few years. Topics in this course will include: Starting the Conversation Succession Planning – Passing the farm to the next generation. Retirement Planning – How can we pay for retirement? Estate Planning Tools – Trusts, Wills, Probate, Estate Taxes, Gifting, Business Structure, and many others.  Guest Speakers: Accountant, Attorney, Financial Planner

   

Location & Time: Bonneville County Extension Office – 2925 Rollandet, Idaho Falls Dates: February 12, 19, 26, March 5, 2014 Time: 10:00 – 3:00 Cost: $100 per operation (includes lunch and class materials) Registration is required by February 7, 2014. Please call the Teton County Extension Office (208) 354-2961 or email beborn@uidaho.edu.

For questions or persons with disabilities who require alternative means of program information or reasonable accommodation should contact Ben Eborn by December 10th at the Teton County Extension Office, 235 S. 5th Street E., Driggs, ID 83442 (208) 354-2961. The University of Idaho provides and is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educational organization. We offer our programs to persons regardless of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, sexual orientation or disability.

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Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014


2013 Hop Production Up 13 percent

Production for Idaho, Oregon, and Washington in 2013 totaled 69.3 million pounds, up thirteen percent from the 2012 crop of 61.2 million pounds, and seven percent above the 2011 production of 64.8 million pounds. Production increased in all three States; 39 percent in Idaho, 13 percent in Washington, and one percent in Oregon. Acreage also increased in all three States; 39 percent in Idaho, 8 percent in Washington, and 7 percent in Oregon. Yields decreased in Idaho and Oregon, but increased in Washington. United States yield at 1,969 pounds per acre, increased 51

pounds from a year ago.

Northwest Dry Bean Production down 17 percent

Washington growers produced 79 percent of the U.S. hop crop for 2013. Zeus, Cascade, Columbus/Tomahawk, and Summit were the leading varieties in Washington, accounting for 51 percent of the State’s hop crop. In Oregon, Nugget and Willamette were the major varieties, accounting for 50 percent of the State’s hop production. In Idaho, Zeus, Cascade, and Apollo were the major varieties, accounting for 52 percent of the State’s hop production.

Idaho dry bean production is forecast at 2.26 million cwt, down 25 percent from last year. Harvested area, at 119,000 acres, is down 25,000 acres from 2012. Yield is expected to be 1,900 pounds per acre, down 200 pounds from 2012. Garbanzo beans are expected to account for 47 percent of production, followed by pinto beans at 25 percent, and small red beans at 9 percent.

The preliminary 2013 value of production of the U.S. hop crop is $249 million, up 28 percent from the revised 2012 value of $195 million.

Oregon dry bean production is forecast at 189,000 cwt, down 27 percent from last year. Harvested area, at 8,200 acres, is down 2,300 acres from 2012.

Yield is expected to be 2,300 pounds per acre, down 160 pounds from 2012. Navy beans are expected to account for 31 percent of production, followed by pinto beans at 20 percent, and garbanzo beans at 9 percent. Washington dry bean production is forecast at 2.11 million cwt, down 5 percent from last year. Harvested area, at 114,000 acres, is down 1,000 acres from 2012. Yield is expected to be 1,850 pounds per acre, down 80 pounds from 2012. Garbanzo beans are expected to account for 70 percent of production, followed by pinto beans at 14 percent, and black beans at 3 percent.

Celebrating 75 Years Conserving the Idaho Way

LOW INTEREST LOANS FOR IDAHO SOIL & WATER CONSERVATION Sprinkler Irrigation, No-Till Drills, Fences Livestock Feeding Operations Solar Stock Water Pump Systems 2.5%-3.5% Terms 7-15 Years Up to $200,000 CONSERVATION

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swc.idaho.gov | 208-332-1790 Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

33


Insurance Deadlines tinue or change 2014 AGR- percent, and small red beans scholarship program is to invest in the future of the For Crops Approach Lite insurance for existing at 9 percent.

     SPOKANE — Those with the U.S. Department of Agriculture are reminding producers that winter and spring sales closing dates for multiple peril crop insurance programs, whole farm insurance programs, the Adjusted Gross Revenue Pilot and Adjusted Gross Revenue-Lite is nearing.

   Current policyholders and uninsured growers must make all of their decisions on crop insurance coverage before the sales closing date. AGR and AGR-Lite cover most farmraised crops, animals, and animal products.  

policy holders.  

   - Feb. 3, 2014 - Last day

to buy or change crop insurance coverage for 2014 spring planted onions in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington and cabbage in Oregon and Washington.

   - March 17, 2014 - Last day to buy or change all other spring seeded multiple peril crop insurance (excluding wheat in counties with fall and spring planted types). Last day to buy 2014 AGRLite insurance for new application   /enrollment policies.

   A list of crop insurance    If there is no coverage in agents is available at all a county for a specific crop under the traditional multiple peril crop insurance program, producers may ask a crop insurance agent whether they would be eligible for coverage under a written agreement.

USDA service centers or at www3.rma.usda. gov/tools/ agents.

   Federal crop insurance

Idaho dry bean production is forecast at 2.26 million cwt, down 25 percent from last year. Harvested area, at 119,000 acres, is down 25,000 acres from 2012. Yield is expected to be 1,900 pounds per acre, down 200 pounds from 2012. Garbanzo beans are expected to account for 47 percent of production, followed by pinto beans at 25

program policies are sold and delivered solely through private crop insurance companies and agents.

   The deadlines are:    - Jan. 31, 2014 - Last day

to buy or change AGR insurance in select counties in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Last day to submit required documents to con34

US Dry Bean Production down 25 percent

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

Oregon dry bean production is forecast at 189,000 cwt, down 27 percent from last year. Harvested area, at 8,200 acres, is down 2,300 acres from 2012. Yield is expected to be 2,300 pounds per acre, down 160 pounds from 2012. Navy beans are expected to account for 31 percent of production, followed by pinto beans at 20 percent, and garbanzo beans at 9 percent. Washington dry bean production is forecast at 2.11 million cwt, down 5 percent from last year. Harvested area, at 114,000 acres, is down 1,000 acres from 2012. Yield is expected to be 1,850 pounds per acre, down 80 pounds from 2012. Garbanzo beans are expected to account for 70 percent of production, followed by pinto beans at 14 percent, and black beans at 3 percent.

Association calls for Scholarship Applicants

Scholarship applications are due Feb. 14, 2014. Madison, Wis.– The Dairy Calf and Heifer Association (DCHA) is now accepting applications for its annual scholarship program. The goal of this long-standing

dairy industry by offering scholastic support to outstanding agriculture-focused students.

“As an organization focused on the future, we feel very strongly about investing in our industry’s youth,” says Jack Banker, calf and heifer raiser and current DCHA president. “Today’s youth are tomorrow’s leaders and we are pleased to offer a $1,000 scholarship opportunity to the DCHA membership this year to help shape our industry’s leaders.” The annual DCHA scholarship is awarded to a student currently enrolled in agriculture-related field at an accredited college or university. Applicants must have completed at least one year of post-high school education. A person may receive the scholarship only once, and must meet the following requirements for consideration. To apply for the scholarship, applicants must:  Be a member of DCHA, or the son, daughter or legal dependent of a DCHA member Have completed at least one year of post-high school education


Be attending an accredited college or university Be enrolled in a field of agriculture (e.g., food science, horticulture, animal/ veterinary science, agricultural technical course, ag communications, etc.) or in a course of study with relevance to agriculture To download a copy of the application, go to: http://bit. ly/DCHAScholarship_2014 Applications must be postmarked by Friday, Feb. 14, 2014 and can be emailed to: info@calfandheifer.org or mailed to: P.O. Box 1752, Madison, WI 53701. For more information or to join DCHA visit: www.calfandheifer.org, phone: (855) 400-3242 or email: info@ calfandheifer.org. 

Net Farm Income Forecast to Increase

Net farm income is forecast to be $131 billion in 2013, up 15.1 percent from 2012’s estimate of $113.8 billion according to the Agriculture Department.  After adjusting for inflation, 2013’s net farm income is expected to be the highest since 1973. Substantial year-end crop inventories are expected as a result of the record corn harvest.  Net cash income— which measures the dif-

ference between cash expenses and the combination of commodities sold during the calendar year plus other sources of farm income— is forecast at $129.7 billion, down just over 3 percent from 2012. Even so, 2013’s forecast would be the fourth time net cash income, after adjusting for inflation, has exceeded $100 billion since 1973. The projected $10.9-billion increase in total expenses in 2013, to $352 billion, continues a string of year-to-year increases (except for 2009) that have taken place since 2002.  In both nominal and inflation-adjusted dollars, 2013 production expenses are expected to be the highest on record. Labor and rent are the expense items expected to increase the most in 2013, while producers are expected to pay less for fuel and fertilizer. Farm sector assets, debt, and equity are all forecast to increase in 2013. As in the last several years, increases in farm asset value are expected to exceed increases in farm debt, with farm real estate the main driving force. Confirming the strength of the farm sector’s solvency, both the debt-to-asset ratio and debt-to-equity ratio are expected to reach historic lows.

could revolutionize farming

Farmers, ranchers by “by boosting crop health, reflect on legislative improving field management practices, reducing successes

With a new Water Resources Development Act and farm bill expected to be enacted in early 2014, farmers and ranchers are checking two big items off their to-do for Congress.  Still, with ag labor reform and a handful of other critical issues left undone, agriculture has no intention of letting lawmakers off the hook next year.  “As the saying goes, ‘timing is everything.’  Had we not driven as hard as we did to get WRDA and the farm bill so close to the goal line this year, we would have been racing against the clock of the mid-term elections next year,” explained Dale Moore, American Farm Bureau Federation executive director of public policy.  Read more on the FBNews website. 

Drones Will Revolutionize Farming

Piggybacking on Amazon’s announcement recently that it will begin using drones to deliver packages, the Associated Press published an article about the more practical uses of the technology in farming.   According to AP, drones

costs and increasing yields.”  Drones with cameras and sensory equipment are already in the works that will apply pesticides and look for disease in crops. “And the possibilities are endless,” said AP. “Flying gizmos could be used to ward off birds from fields, pollinate trees, do snow surveys to forecast water supply, monitor irrigation, or plant and harvest crops.” Drones are already being used for farming in Japan and Brazil.

AFBF will host a special workshop, “Drones: Turning Technological Controversy into Profit,” on January 12 for attendees of its 95th Annual Convention in San Antonio.

USDA Grants $11 Million for School Food Services

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced that USDA will be awarding $11 million in grants to help schools purchase needed equipment to make preparing and serving healthier meals easier and more efficient for school food service professionals.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

35


Farm Bureau Members Pay Less For Choice Hotels!

FARM BUREAU COMMODITY REPORT

GRAIN PRICES

Portland:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Corn

Ogden:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Pocatello:

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

A $40 room will be closer to

Burley:

$32 A $60 room will be closer to

White Wheat 11% Winter 14% Spring Barley

Nampa:

White Wheat (cwt) (Bushel)

Lewiston:

White Wheat Barley

$48 A $90 room will be closer to

1.800.258.2847

Trend

7.11 7.92-7.97 8.40 No Bid

6.86 7.43-7.63 8.12 No Bid

- .25 - .49 to - .34 - .28 N/A

6.57 7.21 7.54 7.30

6.25 7.07 7.50 7.45

- .32 - .14 - .04 + .15

6.25 7.03 7.00 No Bid

5.90 6.13 6.48 No Bid

- .35 - .90 - .52 N/A

6.17 6.51 6.82 7.50

5.95 6.47 6.80 7.50

- .22 - .04 - .02 Steady

10.42 6.25

10.17 6.10

- .25 - .15

6.94 141.50

6.75 141.50

- .19 Steady

LIVESTOCK PRICES Feeder Steers

Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs Over 700 lbs

Farm Bureau Discount Code

Cows

advanced reservations required

Stock Cows

00209550

12/20/2013

Under 500 lbs 500-700 lbs 700-900 lbs Over 900 lbs

$72

11/22/2013

Utility/Commercial Canner & Cutter

Bulls

Slaughter

BEAN PRICES: Pinto Pink Small Red

Trend

11/22/2013

12/20/2013

150-218 143-186 125-165 100-148

157-235 134-187 121-167 129-145

+ 7 to + 17 - 9 to + 1 - 4 to + 2 + 29 to - 3

145-201 130-165 120-146 100-127

155-214 133-173 115-158 122-143

+ 10 to + 13 + 3 to + 8 - 5 to + 12 + 22 to + 16

80-118 75-108

90-123 80-115

+ 10 to + 5 + 5 to + 7

61-80 50-69

60-87 60-78

- 1 to + 7 + 10 to + 9

1100-1675

950-1400

- 150 to - 275

65-90

63-97

- 2 to + 7

38.00-40.00 39.00-40.00 40.00

38.00-40.00 40.00 40.00

Steady + 1.00 to steady Steady

Compiled by the Idaho Farm Bureau Commodity Division 36

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014


Utility

Under 5

Contracted price - Price and conditions of sale agreed upon Seller negotiates a transaction.

IDaho Hay Report IDAHO HAY – 12/20/13 Tons: 7,884 All prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise stated. Quality Tons Price Range Avg. Price

December 20, 2013 Tons: 7884 Last Week: 8260 Last Year: 3075

Alfalfa Large Square

Compared to last week, all grades of Alfalfa steady. Trade moderate with moderate demand for Premium and Supreme. Light demand for Good and Fair Alfalfa. Retail/feed store/horse steady this week. Buyer demand good with light to moderate supplies. All prices are dollars per ton and FOB unless otherwise stated.

Supreme

1,350

180.00-200.00

190.37

Premium

1,300

170.00-190.00

179.23

Premium - Organic

34

300.00

300.00

160.00-170.00

166.67

150.00-160.00

154.86

Good

300

Fair 1,750 Alfalfa Small Square

Premium – Retail/Stable 3,150 230.00-240.00 232.38 http://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/ML_GR312.txt USDA Market News, Moses Lake, WA 509-393-1343 or 707-3150

POTATOES

USDA Market News, Moses Lake, WA 509-393-1343 or 707-3150

UPPER VALLEY, TWIN FALLS-BURLEY DISTRICT, IDAHO---Shipments 474-721-636 (includes export of 2-3-2) ---Movement expected to remain about the same current week (Dec. 15) then decrease the following week (Dec. 22)due to holiday shipping schedules. Trading fairly active. Prices Norkotah slightly higher, Burbank generally unchanged. Russet Burbank U.S. One baled 5 10-pound non size A mostly 6.50, 50-pound cartons 40-100s 9.00. Russet Norkotah U.S. One baled 5 10-pound film bags non size A mostly 6.50, 50-pound cartons 40-100s 8.00-8.50.

5 Year Grain Comparison

Grain Prices................12/23/2009...................12/22/2010...................12/19/2011.................. 12/26/2012..................12/20/2013 Portland: White Wheat..................... 4.85 .............................7.60................................5.86...............................8.27.............................. 6.86 11% Winter.....................No Bid ..................No Bid.........................6.74-6.86..................... 8.94-9.07...................... 7.43-7.63 14% Spring......................No Bid ................No Bid.............................9.62 ..........................9.51...............................8.12 Corn...............................176-180.25........................246.75........................260-261.50...................288-291.25......................No Bid Ogden: White Wheat..................... 4.45 ..............................6.55 ..............................5.85.............................. 8.40............................ 6.25 11% Winter....................... 4.32 .............................7.02 .............................5.73 ........................... 8.21............................. 7.07 14 % Spring...................... 5.47 ..............................8.67 ..............................8.22 ........................... 8.83............................. 7.50 Barley................................. 5.83 .............................8.50 .............................10.70.............................11.20............................. 7.45 Pocatello: White Wheat..................... 4.25 .............................6.20 ..............................5.55...............................7.80.............................. 5.90 11% Winter.......................4.00 .............................6.64 ..............................5.73 ............................7.37...............................6.13 14% Spring........................ 5.31 ..............................8.51 ..............................8.32 ............................8.02.............................. 6.48 Barley................................. 5.73 ............................8.85 ............................9.90 ...........................11.67...........................No Bid

Potatoes for Processing

December 17, 2013 IDAHO---Open-market trading by processors with growers was inactive.

Burley: White Wheat..................... 4.14 ..............................6.24 ..............................5.65...............................7.40...............................5.95 11% Winter....................... 4.03 .............................6.59 ..............................5.46 ............................7.53...............................6.47 14% Spring.........................5.14 ..............................8.43 ..............................8.00 ............................7.95.............................. 6.80 Barley................................. 5.50 .............................8.50 ............................9.50 ...........................12.25..............................7.50 Nampa: White Wheat (cwt).......... 6.67 ............................10.66...............................8.58 ...........................12.65.............................10.17 (bushel)...........4.00 .............................6.40 ..............................5.15...............................7.58...............................6.10 Lewiston: White Wheat..................... 4.70 .............................. 7.15 .............................5.65.............................. 8.19............................. 6.75 Barley................................116.50 ........................ 171.50............................176.50.......................... 224.50......................... 141.50 Bean Prices: Pintos................................32.00........................22.00-24.00........................45.00.......................35.00-36.00.................38.00-40.00 Pinks.................................32.00........................24.00-25.00........................45.00.......................40.00-42.00......................40.00 Small Reds...................30.00-32.00...................26.00-30.00..................45.00-46.00.................40.00-42.00......................40.00 ***

Milk production December 19, 2013

November Milk Production up 0.3 Percent

Milk production in the 23 major States during November totaled 15.0 billion pounds, up 0.3 percent from November 2012. October revised production, at 15.4 billion pounds, was up 1.4 percent from October 2012.The October revision represented an increase of 27 million pounds or 0.2 percent from last month’s preliminary production estimate.

Production per cow in the 23 major States averaged 1,762 pounds for November, 1 pound above November 2012. The number of milk cows on farms in the 23 major States was 8.50 million head, 22,000 head more than November 2012, but 4,000 head less than October 2013.

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

37


5 Year livestock comparison

United States Cattle on Feed Down 5 Percent

.....................................12/21/2009...................12/21/2010...................12/19/2011.................. 12/26/2012..................12/20/2013 Under 500 lbs.................94-131 ........................ 117-153 .....................136-195 ....................126-198........................ 157-235 500-700 lbs..................... 85-111 .........................105-139.........................120-160.........................116-166........................134-187 700-900 lbs......................70-94 ........................85-119 ......................105-139.........................112-150.........................121-167 Over 900 lbs....................70-85 .........................86-113............................98-119 .......................116-135........................ 129-145 Feeder Heifers Under 500 lbs................. 87-126..........................112-148 .....................125-159.........................117-172........................ 155-214 500-700 lbs.....................77-102 .........................97-127 .......................112-149.........................117-148........................ 133-173 700-900 lbs......................70-89 .........................81-108..........................101-128.........................110-135........................ 115-158 Over 900 lbs....................76-79 ...........................N/A .......................110-112.........................119-120........................ 122-143 Holstein Steers Under 700 lbs..................45-64 ..........................63-85 ...........................65-96 ..........................65-101..........................90-123 Over 700 lbs....................43-59 ...........................58-82 ...........................65-99 ..........................75-106.......................... 80-115 Cows Utility/Commercial...........33-55.............................40-66.............................46-72............................55-79............................60-87 Canner & Cutter..............23-44.............................35-58.............................45-62............................50-71............................60-78 Stock Cows......................580-920 .....................690-1200.......................800-1470.....................800-1500......................950-1400

December 20, 2013 Cattle and calves on feed for slaughter market in the United States for feedlots with capacity of 1,000 or more head totaled 10.7 million head on December 1, 2013. The inventory was 5 percent below December 1, 2012. This is the second lowest inventory for December 1 since the series began in 1996. Placements in feedlots during November totaled 1.88 million, 3 percent below 2012. Net placements were 1.81 million head. During November, placements of cattle and calves weighing less than 600 pounds were 585,000, 600-699 pounds were 510,000, 700-799 pounds were 362,000, and 800 pounds and greater were 425,000. Marketings of fed cattle during November totaled 1.68 million, 5 percent below 2012. Other disappearance totaled 73,000 during November, 17 percent below 2012.

Bulls – Slaughter............39-63.............................51-76..............................50-73 .......................... 63-89............................63-97

Cattle Outlook December 20, 2013 The December Cattle on Feed report said the number of cattle in large feedlots was down 5.5% at the start of the month. November placements were down 3.1% and November marketings were down 4.5%, largely due to one fewer slaughter day. The report was slightly bullish. The House-Senate conference committee appears to be making progress on having the new farm bill ready for a vote in early January. Retail beef prices set new record highs in November. The average retail price of a pound of choice beef was $5.409 in November, up 5.4 cents from the old record set the month before. The average price of all fresh beef in grocery stores during November was $5.014 per pound, up 4.3 cents from the record set the month before. In November, the average retail price of a pound of ground beef was $3.477. That was 2.7 cents higher than a pound of boneless chicken breast. The weekly average fed cattle price dropped below $130/cwt for the first time since week ending October 18. Through Thursday, the 5-area average price for slaughter steers sold on a live weight basis was $129.46/cwt, down $1.54 from the week before, but up $3.29 from the same week last year. Steers sold on a dressed basis averaged $206.91/cwt this week, $6.91 higher than a year ago. This morning, the boxed beef cutout value for choice carcasses was $196.06/cwt, down $1.89 from the previous Friday, but up $2.84 from a year ago. The select carcass cutout is $187.17/cwt, up 4 cents for the week and up $9.95 from the same day last year.

38

Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 613,000 head, up 0.8% from last week, but down 3.0% from the corresponding week last year.Through November, steer slaughter was down 1.3%, heifer slaughter down 2.0% and cow slaughter was down 2.4% compared to the first 11 months of 2012. The average steer dressed weight for the week ending on December 7 was 877 pounds, up 2 pounds from the week before but down 1 pound from a year earlier. Oklahoma City feeder cattle auction prices were mixed this week. Prices for medium and large frame #1 steers by weight were: 400-450# $211-$235, 450-500# $198-$219, 500-550# $191-$212, 550-600# $173-$201, 600-650# $155-$189.50, 650-700# $155-$179, 700-750# $157-$167.50, 750-800# $153-$166, 800-900# $146-$162, and 900-950# $146.50-$152.75/cwt. The December live cattle futures contract closed at $132.52/cwt today, up 65 cents from last week’s close. February fed cattle settled at $133.90, up $1.05 for the week. April settled at $134.50/cwt, up 70 cents. The January feeder cattle futures contract ended the week at $166.97/cwt, down 10 cents for the week. March feeders closed at $166.92/cwt, which was 37 cents higher than the previous Friday. Provided by: University of Missouri


DEADLINE DATES: ADS MUST BE RECEIVED BY

Classifieds

FEBRUARY 20 FOR NEXT ISSUE.

Animals

Miscellaneous

Wanted

ASCA registered Australian Shepherd pups. Working line since 1968. Full satisfaction guaranteed. All four colors available. Boise, Id 208-484-9802

Beautiful Old Barn, built in 1920’s needs to come down or be moved. it measures 36’X60’ two story. Wendell, Id Best offer 208-536-6448

30+ mixed stock cows, solid mouthed, most 1 brand. Will start calving March 1 - bred to Beef Master Bull. 1850.00. Wendell, Id. Call 208-308-0240

Restoring antique John Deere tractors and machinery for displaying in museum. Will take other items if they are very rare. Also looking for milestone dammer dyker wheels. Contact me at 208-228-6484

Recreational Equipment

Farm Equipment New, heavy duty 3 point bale unroller. Salmon, Id. 208-756-4414 Two - 20 ft manure beds all hydraulic, silage sides and beet sides, pump, tank. All controls included. Buhl, Id 208-358-3962 Dr Brush/field mower. Asking $1,250 OBO New $2399. Used 40 hrs. Weiser, Id. 208549-2186 John Deere air drill 730 with 1910 grain cart 36ft wide, 7” spacing. NH3 attachments with winch and John Deere 9420T. Tractor 5500 hrs. 36” belts. With or without greenstar. Excellent shape. Always shedded. Soda Springs, Id. 208-547-4553 or 5401053 New, heavy duty 3 point bale unroller. Salmon, Id 208-756-4414 Balewagons: New Holland self-propelled or pull-type models. Also interested in buying balewagons. Will consider any model. Call Jim Wilhite at 208-880-2889 anytime

5th wheel hitch for sale in Weiser. $225.00. Lightly used. Email IdahoIrish@cableone. net for pictures. 307-256-2897

Trailers Circle J White Trailer. Smooth pulling 2 horse straight load dual axle. Easily removable center panel. Fully enclosed, escape doors both sides. Bought new in 1978. One ownermain use on paved roads 2010--four new tires/brakes/lights. $2000.00 OBO Twin Falls, ID 208-420-7069

Vehicles

Paying cash for German & Japanese war relics/souvenirs! Pistols, rifles, swords, daggers, flags, scopes, optical equipment, uniforms, helmets, machine guns (ATF rules apply) medals, flags, etc. 549-3841 (evenings) or 208-405-9338. Old License Plates Wanted: Also key chain license plates, old signs, light fixtures. Will pay cash. Please email, call or write. Gary Peterson, 130 E Pecan, Genesee, Id 83832. gearlep@gmail.com. 208-285-1258 Paying cash for old cork top bottles and some telephone insulators. Call Randy. Payette, Id. 208-740-0178

FREE

CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS send to: dashton@idahofb.org

2003 Toyota Camry LE V6 127,000 miles. Runs great. Asking $5,500. Pocatello, Id. Call Brooke 208.604.3482

Wanted Wanted- a 2 row potato side digger/ crossover -1985 or newer. Older (before 1995) bulk potato self unloading bed for 10 wheeler. 208-317-7858 Used Great Plains grain Drill - 12 or 14 ft. Used 3 pt (Hang on) field sprayer- about 60 to 70 ft wide. 208-317-7858

SEND US YOUR CLASSIFIED AD FREE TO IDAHO FARM BUREAU MEMBERS! send to: dashton@idahofb.org Idaho Farm Bureau producer / JANUARY 2014

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January 2014, Volume 18, Issue 1