Page 1

mtmCONSULTING

mtm SCHOOL MATTERS

ISSUE 16

The most intelligent and rigorous advice for independent schools Now in its TENTH year:   The Strategic Insights Conference for Independent Schools  

Also in this   issue: 

Independent educa on.... but  not as we know it  By Melanie Tucker  Principal, mtmconsul ng 

W

hen mtmconsul ng created the very first annual Prac cal Strategies con‐ ference ten years ago, our aim was to provide leaders with up‐to‐date  thinking and prac cal advice to posi on their schools in order to compete effec‐ vely.  These aims remain at the heart of our  Conference. We con nue to invest in  cu ng‐edge research to provide you with  the best informa on about the prospects  for the sector, the changing a tudes of  buyers, the poten al for your school to  recruit, and to inform your investment  decisions. 

The prospects for the economy, and  how this will impact on independent  schools?  

Page 2:   

Loca ng your ‘Super  Streets’  James Legge  introduces the  most radical update of   MANDARIN, our bespoke  market analysis for schools.     

Page 4:   

Probing behind the   obvious ques ons  Chris Rimmer on what  schools need to ask before  they undertake research   

Page 5:   

INSIGHTS: Applying new  research methods to un‐ derpin your   marke ng strategy  

The rate of change in the educa onal  market place in the past ten years has re‐ sulted in a sector that many could hardly  have envisaged, so this year we are focus‐ ing on topics to help you posi on your  school in the dynamic and vola le market  of the next ten years.  This year we are very fortunate to have  secured as our keynote speaker Jus n Ur‐ quhart Stewart (right), Co‐founder of Sev‐ en Investment Management which has  developed one of the most sophis cated  economic research programmes to guide  investment decisions. Familiar from regu‐ lar TV and radio appearances, Jus n will  share his thoughts on:  

MAY 2014

12 June: mtmconsul ng’s  latest in‐depth seminar for  school leaders   

Page 6:   

What price self‐catering?  For details on how to book your place  at the conference, see page 8. Other key  themes of the conference will include:  Why is independent educa on such an  a rac ve proposi on for investors?  Many schools have opened in the past  five years, despite the recession.  Recent‐ ly, this ac vity has increased, so why are  investors rushing to open schools and  establish new groups?   

Gavin Humphries on the im‐ pact of school fees on your  parents’ family   budgets  If you would like to receive a digital  version of School Ma ers please let  us know.    Email:   office@mtmconsul ng.co.uk 

Continued on page 7

mtmconsulting ltd. Portland House, 43 High Street, Southwold, IP18 6AB TEL: 01502 722787 www.mtmconsulting.co.uk

01


mtm SCHOOL MATTERS

Mandarin update: loca ng your  ‘Super Streets’  

A

Our new and  ‘Bubble’ maps (right) showing market  nother newsle er, another Mandarin update, only  size have a more powerful visual impact than previous  this  me  it’s  the  most  important  refinement  of  edi ons, and we can colour the ‘bubbles’ to show, for  this  vital  market  planning  tool  since  mtmconsul ng  example, the share you have of the market within your  introduced  it  to  the  independent  schools  sector  in  catchment. Overlaying the loca ons of compe tors  2003.  allows you to understand where there are significant  We have reviewed all the data available to us, includ‐ opportuni es within the catchment which are currently  ing our unique postcode database gathered over more  under exploited. We will also suggest changes to your  than a decade, to make our unparalleled market intelli‐ coach routes to help you maximise recruitment and  gence product more usable than ever before. We have  expand your catchment.  refined the data outputs, providing heads with firm  Another addi on to the Mandarin is the inclusion of  evidence to support business decisions, marketers with  popula on projec ons by  the key areas within which  the four groups. Using the  James Legge , Research Consultant and  to focus marke ng efforts  four super‐groups at a neigh‐ Project Manager at mtmconsul ng,  and run bus routes, and bur‐ bourhood level (c140 house‐ introduces the most radical update of our  sars with a firm founda on  holds) allows a detailed un‐ from which to plan poten al  bespoke market analysis for schools.  derstanding of exactly where                 incomes streams.  your target market is likely to grow, and be able to  Following detailed reviews with users, we have re‐ quan fy the change.  moved the a la carte 18 lifestyle groups, replacing them  Comple ng the supply and demand research is our  with four bespoke key easy‐to‐target super‐groups of  tried and tested compe tor analysis. We pride our‐ families (right above). We know the percentage of fam‐ selves in knowing the rolls of all schools in the UK since  ilies living in ‘Super Streets’ na onally who send their  2006, by age and gender. Using this data we can tell  children to independent schools, so knowing where  you, using the most accurate source available, where  these families are in your catchment ensures you can  the market is moving, which of your compe tors are  key target your messages and plan your coach routes  struggling and which are expanding. Only mtmcon‐ appropriately. Similarly, a Mandarin analysis will iden ‐ sul ng can provide your school with this superior mar‐ fy the percentage of families on ‘High Roads’ who send  ket intelligence.   their children to independent schools. Only our new    Mandarin report ensures your school can target them  For more informa on, please contact   effec vely.  jlegge @mtmconsul ng.co.uk  

What people say about mtmconsul ng:  The  outcome  of  the  work  that  we  did  with  mtmconsul ng was considerable. As a new head it  was infinitely helpful to me to understand the mar‐ ket very quickly.  Bee Hughes,   Head, The Maynard School Exeter 

We were  very  pleased  with  the  research  and  analysis conducted for us by mtm. This has given  us an invaluable insight into our marketplace and  will be hugely useful in our strategic future plan‐ ning.  Stamford Endowed Schools 

Recent clients include:   ALPHA PLUS GROUP  •  AMPLEFORTH  •  CANARY WHARF GROUP  •  CLAIRES COURT SCH mtmconsulting ltd, Portland House, 43 High Street, Southwold, IP18 6AB TEL: 01502 722787 www.mtmconsulting.co.uk

02


mtm SCHOOL MATTERS

It is extremely important that as businesses we moni‐ tor and react to our sector's performance. Within our  own  schools,  we  iden fy  trends  and  use  our  data  to  prepare for the future. Sector reports, like mtm’s, are  a  really  important  benchmark  against  which  we  can  measure  our  posi ons.  They  also  provide  valuable  informa on  that  can  help  with  strategic  planning,  provide evidence for taking par cular ac on and sup‐ port our work..  Tori Roddy, Stowe School 

ISSUE 16

The research and presenta on have been invaluable and  we  have  found  MTM  highly  professional  and  helpful  at  all  mes.  You took the  me to listen and understand the  school and were able to tailor the research to our needs.  We now have a firm foo ng on which to base our plans  for  the  future.  The  presenta on  added  a  great  deal  of  value  to  the  project  and  overall  exceeded  our  expecta‐ ons. Thank you!     Reigate Grammar School  

HOOLS  •  CLIFTON COLLEGE  •  COBHAM HALL  •  COGNITA  •  DURHAM HIGH SCHOOL  •  HERNE HILL SCHOOL  •  mtmconsulting ltd, Portland House, 43 High Street, Southwold, IP18 6AB TEL: 01502 722787 www.mtmconsulting.co.uk

03


mtm SCHOOL MATTERS

Probing behind  the obvious  ques ons   

by Chris Rimmer   Senior Lead Consultant  Digital technology has made surveying parental opinion  much simpler than it once was. But does an on line sur‐ vey tell you all you need to know? Parental percep ons  are o en too  complex to fit into neat categories. 

I

n commissioning market research, schools need to be  mindful of the appropriateness of the research method  adopted for their research objec ves. Understanding which  research methodology to select, be it quan ta ve or qualita‐ ve, can have a huge impact on the usefulness of the re‐ search findings in terms of ac ons for management and fu‐ ture strategic thinking.  

A typical research objec ve might be for a new head to  understand parental percep ons of a school. Ins nc vely,  many of us are drawn to online surveys with pre‐defined  categories such as the clarity of school communica ons and  the quality of teaching and learning, with each category em‐ ploying a set of pre‐defined ques ons.  While this quan ta ve approach has many benefits (such  as providing a standardised approach that can be ‘measured’  and benchmarked from one year to the next) it is o en not  the most appropriate tool to explore in depth what parents  really think about a school.  In emphasising benchmarking and measurement, quan ta‐ ve research by its nature is limited to the categories which  have been pre‐defined. But many important parental percep‐ ons and a tudes to a school do not neatly slot into the pre‐ defined categories and ques ons? Qualita ve research by its  nature is intended to be exploratory and seeks to understand  and represent the views of people and parents as they are,  and not though the lens of a pre‐defined set of categories.   Qualita ve research draws on comprehensive verba m  comments obtained from interviews, focus groups and well‐

designed telephone surveys. Responses are recorded, tran‐ scribed and analysed and from these responses common  percep ons, concepts and ideas are generated. This is a  highly skilled process of breaking data down (disassembling),  crea ng categories and codes (re‐assembling), interpre ng  findings and then arriving at conclusions.  Elaborate and explore  Clearly, research is driven by a set of objec ves, which in  the case of qualita ve research informs the ques ons posed  in interviews, focus groups and telephone surveys. However,  the skilled prac oner does not approach this ques oning  with a ‘quan ta ve mind‐set’ by seeking yes/no responses  or one line answers, but instead probes and prompts re‐ spondents to elaborate and explore their thoughts and rea‐ sons for their thinking. It is in this way that qualita ve re‐ search really comes into its own by o en revealing unex‐ pected a tudes, perspec ves and nuances of percep on. A  recent large scale qualita ve research project conducted by  mtmconsul ng involving face‐to‐face interviews with feeder  heads revealed the key touch points (all the points at which  customers engage with a brand e.g. a school) shaping paren‐ tal percep ons of a prospec ve school. Although under‐ standing parental percep ons was an ini al research objec‐ ve, it was the qualita ve approach which, through careful  analysis of the data, revealed the no on of touch points,  with different parental percep ons at different points. This  research facilitated a rich understanding of parental a ‐ tudes and, therefore, a more informed, targeted and strate‐ gic basis for managers to act upon. 

Recent clients include:  ABBOT'S HILL •  CLAYESMORE  •  CRANMORE  •  FARLINGTON  •  GREY COAT HOSPITAL •   mtmconsulting ltd, Portland House, 43 High Street, Southwold, IP18 6AB TEL: 01502 722787 www.mtmconsulting.co.uk

04


mtm SCHOOL MATTERS

ISSUE 16

mtmINSIGHTS   mtmconsul ng seminars for school  leaders  Our business is to be at the leading edge of the independent edu‐ ca on sector.     The mtmconsul ng ‘Insights’ events enable delegates to access the  latest research and ideas, and to apply them in their schools.  

"The mtm  insights  series  are  a  fantas c  opportunity  to  understand  exactly what is happening in the Independent schools market and spe‐ cifically, our local area. It is a wonderful opportunity to meet likeminded  individuals. With the guidance and support from mtm we feel we have a  be er  understanding  of  how  to  progress  the  business  and  meet  the  needs of our local market".    Holly Chris e, Park Hill School 

Diagram:   Typical Touch  points in   Parental   Decision‐Making for   Senior Schools 

Thursday 12 June 2104 

Applying new research methods  to underpin your marke ng  strategy     

Of course, it is not a case of one research method being be er  than another; be it qualita ve or quan ta ve. The key is to un‐ derstand the merits and limita ons of each approach and,  where possible, combining the benefits of both.  For example,  once an in‐depth understanding or parental percep ons of a  school has been gained through qualita ve research, this can  then obviously inform the categories and ques ons for a quan ‐ ta ve approach through which a school may then wish to  benchmark itself and evaluate progress. At mtmconsul ng we  can provide research in the form of one‐off projects, or combine  research methods to provide a full market research service to  schools as we have all the skills, researchers and so ware tools  in‐house to conduct research, whether it is qualita ve and  quan ta ve, to the highest standards.    For more informa on contact crimmer@mtmconsul ng.co.uk   

 Chris Rimmer has an MBA from the University of Durham  and an LSE in Human Resources.  He is a former director  of ICT at an HMC boarding school and is a specialist in  strategic marke ng.  As well as being a courserian, blog‐ ger and tweeter on educa onal issues, Chris has substan‐ al exper se in the strategic management of ICT. 

The Rag 36‐39 Pall Mall London SW1Y 5JN  (formerly The Army and Navy Club) 

This is a prac cal session for Heads, Bursars, Marke ng  Managers, SMT members and Governors who want to  develop their marke ng and achieve a strategic ad‐ vantage over compe tors. It will include:   An introduc on to new research methods  How these underpin your strategy  Case studies to show how to apply research  How to segment your market and why it’s important  Tips on marke ng and admissions to increase recruit‐ ment in a dynamic market    Case studies on: using new research methods to be er  target buyers and save money and  me; what research  needs to be carried out when extending your school age  range, establishing satellite feeders, going co‐educa onal  or opening a new school.     Speakers:  Chris Rimmer: marke ng and strategy consultant  James Legge : research consultant  Case study presenters from leading schools    Fee £175 plus vat. These events are limited to 20 delegates and likely  to be over subscribed, so early booking is advised.   To book a place go to our website www.mtmconsul ng.co.uk   

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIP  •  NEWCASTLE SCHOOL FOR BOYS  •  OUNDLE •  SHIPLAKE COLLEGE   •  mtmconsulting ltd, Portland House, 43 High Street, Southwold, IP18 6AB TEL: 01502 722787 www.mtmconsulting.co.uk

05


mtm SCHOOL MATTERS

What price self‐catering?  by Gavin Humphries, Head of Research Publica ons and Reports     

I

t’s the Easter holidays and, as happens every year, the  Chairman of the Governors has kindly wri en to us with  details of September’s fee rise. It’s 5.75% ‐ higher than in the  last few years and definitely part of a trend. As the economy  strengthens, annual fee rises are creeping up again. Most  schools have decided that their markets can bear this – but is  that a fair assump on?  The parents most vulnerable to such infla on‐bus ng rises  are those earning just enough to pay the fees now and with  no recourse to other sources of funding. How many of your  school’s parents come into that category? 

The first ques on to be answered is: What income do you  need to pay school fees? The Joseph Rowntree Founda on  ques ons members of the public about what they think con‐ s tutes a minimum standard of living. The results suggest  that a family of four needs £119 per week for food, £78 for  motoring, £56 for u li es and so on. Add in payments on a  typical mortgage and a single set of day school fees and we  get to a minimum required income of £69,000.  How DO they pay?  The results from mtmconsul ng’s most recent Fees Survey  suggest that 29% of current independent school parents  have a household income of less than £70,000. So how do  they pay for schooling? Our calcula ons reveal that in fact  only about two‐fi hs of their total fee bill is paid for straight  out of income. About 30% comes from savings and invest‐ ments, about 20% comes from non‐repayable sources (such  as the school or from rela ves) and about 10% is borrowed  (such as through a mortgage, via personal loans or again  from a rela ve).  So this group is less vulnerable to fee rises than would first  appear. Only 11% of parents in <£70,000 households are  paying fees en rely out of income. But that does mean a  shade over 3% of all parents meet those two criteria: income  of less than £70,000 and fees paid en rely out of income.  This is the group that probably cannot respond to fee rises  

simply by forgoing a holiday or otherwise  ghtening their  belts.  However, some of them will have access to other sources  of funding that they are not currently using. They may be  able to remortgage, dip into savings, liquidate investments  or get funds from a rela ve. At the moment about a quarter  of <£70,000 households get non‐repayable help from a rela‐ ve; what is not known is whether many grandparents s ll  wait in the wings.  With infla on seemingly under control interest rates look  set to stay lower for longer. This may persuade more people  that their money would be be er spent on their grandchil‐ dren’s con nuing educa on than in earning a low rate of  return. It may well be that the ability to take a pension as a  lump sum (rather than have to invest it in an annuity) will  also free up more cash for independent school fees.  Clearly some (perhaps most) of this 3% will have further  financial op ons. But what if they simply do not want to use  them? The Joseph Rowntree Founda on’s Minimum Income  Standard is just that – a minimum. For example, it includes a  two‐week family holiday but defines it as a self‐catering fort‐ night in the UK.  Is an independent educa on worth that, year in year out?  Certainly for a small number, but for a larger number, proba‐ bly not. When we surveyed parents who could afford an in‐ dependent educa on but chose not to, the biggest differ‐ ence between them and current independent sector parents  was that they placed more value on giving their children  great experiences – including great holidays – than the best  educa on.  When money is  ght, there are an awful lot of great family experi‐ ences you can have and s ll have change from £10,000 a year.  For more informa on on the research reports which underpin  this analysis, go to our website or call us on (01502) 722787. 

Recent clients include:  GRESHAM'S  •   HABERDASHERS' MONMOUTH   •   HORNSBY HOUSE   •   MAGDALEN COLL mtmconsulting ltd, Portland House, 43 High Street, Southwold, IP18 6AB TEL: 01502 722787 www.mtmconsulting.co.uk

06


mtm SCHOOL MATTERS

ISSUE 16

Independent educa on ... but not as we know it  Continued from page 1

done, and how to communicate a vision for the future. 

What is it that children really want from their school, and  what are they likely to want in future? As far as we know  there has never been a pupil survey asking them what they  want from their school. We present new research of almost  5,000 pupils in independent schools. 

How do you create a future‐proof IT strategy?  There are  plenty of examples of big companies and government de‐ partments making the wrong decisions about IT support.  Independent schools have invested a great deal in IT. The  spend is set to increase, so just how do you make the right  decisions to provide the IT to run the school as an effec ve  business? 

Break‐out sessions include:   

Advice for governors and trustees on managing an invest‐ ment por olio. In recent  mes it has been a struggle for  some Trustees to achieve reasonable returns on invest‐ ments, so we include a workshop on the building blocks of  por olio management.  Some schools have been forced to reconfigure in order to  compete effec vely and consolida on con nues apace,  while others have taken the economic downturn as an op‐ portunity to develop market share. We will cover compli‐ ance issues when embarking on major structural change  such as mergers, the establishment of groups of schools, and  overseas franchises.  Are you using your brand name effec vely? The sector has  some very powerful brand names, which in many cases are  much under used. Our speakers will give advice on exploi ng  a school’s name, trade mark protec on, and intellectual  property issues.  How do you reposi on your school in the market to en‐ hance demand? We present a case study to show how it’s 

Jus n Urquhart Stewart  Keynote speaker    us n is one of the most recog‐ nisable and trusted market com‐ mentators on  television, radio, and  in the press.     Originally trained as a lawyer, he  has observed a unique understand‐ ing of the market's roles and bene‐ fits for the private investor. Having  trained as a barrister, Jus n took up  interna onal corporate finance,  working in both Africa and Singa‐ pore then back in the UK. This led  Jus n to help found Broker Services in 1986, which went on to  become Barclays Stockbrokers where he was Corporate Develop‐ ment Director. In early 2001, he co‐founded Seven Investment  Management (7IM).  

J

How do you select the right head to lead your school in  the future? Leading an independent school requires specific  skills and a ributes. The pool of talent is not infinite. Finding  the right head is fundamental to success, so how are leaders  of the future developed and what special talents do they  need? We will consider new research that will be of interest  to heads, depu es and governors.  What are the benefits of using social media in your mar‐ ke ng strategy? Holly Chris e (Park Hill School) and Chris  Rimmer will be deba ng the benefits, risks and opportuni es  of employing social media within a school marke ng strate‐ gy. This will cover prac cal themes such as reputa on man‐ agement, arguments for and against engaging in social me‐ dia, returns on investment and the capabili es needed for  the effec ve  use of social media.   

Book now at www.mtmconsul ng.co.uk     

Jill Berry  Speaker and Conference Chair     ill’s teaching career spanned 30  years, during the course of which  she was a teacher of English, second  in and then Head of Department,  Head of Sixth Form, Deputy Head  and Head.  The six schools in which  she worked included maintained  and independent schools; girls’,   boys’ and co‐educa onal; compre‐ hensive and selec ve schools, and  11‐18, 7‐18 and 4‐18 schools.    Since finishing as a Head, a er 10 years, in 2010, Jill has  worked for the HTI/Na onal College for Teaching and Lead‐ ership and has carried out a range of educa onal consultancy  work, working with governing bodies on headship appoint‐ ments, heads’ and senior leader appraisals/professional re‐ views, heads’ coaching and staff training.   

J

EGE SCHOOL  •   METHODIST INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS TRUST  •   RUGBY SCHOOL  •   ST HELEN'S  NORTHWOOD  •     mtmconsulting ltd, Portland House, 43 High Street, Southwold, IP18 6AB TEL: 01502 722787 www.mtmconsulting.co.uk

07


mtm SCHOOL MATTERS

ISSUE 16

The Autumn School Strategy Conference  Independent Educa on...but not as we know it  A day conference for independent school decision‐makers:   heads, governors, bursars and marketers. 

The Royal Overseas League  Park Place, St James's Street, London SW1A 1LR 

Speakers and sessions will include:  Jus n Urquhart‐Stewart   Head of Corporate Development, 7IM 

The UK and global economies & how they will im‐ pact on independent schools    Richard Palmer & Peter Bodkin   Chairman & Secretary,  The Society of Heads 

What do our pupils want from their  independent  schools?    Mark Mackenzie Crooks  Business Director, St Helen’s Northwood 

Reposi oning a top girls’ school in the market    Charles Robinson  Director, Interna onal Schools Part‐ nership 

Why is the UK independent sector so  a rac ve to  private investors?   

Breakout sessions:        Sam Macdonald & Anthony Misqui a  Mergers, Franchises & Groups  Two separate sessions on:   (a) Branding: exploi ng a school’s name, trade  mark protec on, and intellectual property     is‐ sues , and   (b) Compliance issues for schools when they are  embarking on major structural ini a ves, such as  mergers, overseas franchises or the establishment  of groups of schools.      

Chris Rimmer  Separate sessions on:   What are the benefits of using social media in  your marke ng strategy?    Crea ng a future‐proof IT strategy for your  school. 

Jill Berry  Associate Consultant, mtmconsul ng   

How do you select the right head to lead your  school in the future?  

Early bird booking discount of £185(inc VAT) per delegate ends   31st May 2014.  To secure your place please email your details to cblizard@mtmconsul ng.co.uk,   call +44(0)1502 722787 or visit our website at www.mtmconsul ng.co.uk  mtmconsulting ltd, Portland House, 43 High Street, Southwold, IP18 6AB TEL: 01502 722787 www.mtmconsulting.co.uk

08

mtmconsulting School Matters issue 16  

The leading publication for independent schools senior management teams

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you