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Guyette & Deeter, Inc. North American Decoys At Auction April 26 & 27, 2018


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Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

North American Decoys At Auction Pheasant Run Resort 4051 East Main Street St. Charles, Illinois 630-584-6300 Held in conjunction with the Midwest Decoy Collectors Association Show

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Preview 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Join us for complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres

Thursday, April 26, 2018 Preview 8:00 AM - 10:45 AM Auction 11:00 AM

Friday, April 27, 2018 Preview 8:00 AM - 10:45 AM Auction 11:00 AM

For questions during the auction call 410-745-0485

Catalog $45. Out of Country $54 Absentee, Phone & Online Bidding accepted call 410-745-0485 for arrangements For Free Decoy Appraisal Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416


Important Notices: ■ Unofficial prices realized information will be available five business days after the auction. Official prices realized list will be available online approximately two weeks after the auction. ■ If you would like to consign decoys to our next auction, please contact; Gary Guyette 410-745-0485 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com or Jon Deeter 440-543-1416 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com. Free appraisals are available with no obligation to consign, and all correspondences are strictly confidential. ■ Under no circumstances will we be responsible for damage to frames or glass, or damages caused by them. Under no circumstances will we be responsible for damage to fragile decoratives. These items are marked in the catalog with an *. ■ Auctioneer James D. Julia, Fairfield, Maine. ■ Stands are not included with the decoys or weathervanes unless specified in catalog. Plexiglass cases are not included with shotgun shell boxes. ■ Sales Tax - There is an 8% sales tax on purchases unless you have a Sales and Use Tax License* (from any state) or have your purchases shipped outside of Illinois. If you are exempt, please have a copy of your certificate with you. You will be required to sign an Illinois sales and Use affidavit for us to keep on file. ■ Reserve a room at a discounted rate of $119 by calling the Pheasant Run Resort at 800-474-3272 and mention the Guyette & Deeter room block. ■ All duck calls have condition reports, but are sold “As Is”. ■ Trade Up Program - A limited numer of decoy purchased may be paid

for by consigning decoys to the next Guyette & Deeter. auction. Ask Gary or Jon for Details.

UPCOMING GUYETTE & DEETER, INC. DECOY AUCTIONS July 23 & 24, 2018

Sheraton Harborside Hotel Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Consignments accepted until June 8, or until full 40 Dealer Decoy Show. *NO SALES TAX

November 7 & 8, 2018

Talbot County Community Center Easton, Maryland

In Conjunction with the Easton Waterfowl Festival Featuring the collection of Sam Dyke 50 Dealer buy, Sell, swap. To consign, Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416

We are fortunate to have Robert J. Koenke on staff as our Sporting & Wildlife Art expert. Feel free to contact him for an appraisal or consignment to one of our auctions: 410-758-1644, rjkoenke@verizon.net


Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

Dale & Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 Tel: 410-745-0485 Fax: 410-745-0487 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

Jon & Leigh Ann Deeter 7980 Darbys Run Chagrin Falls, OH 44023 Tel: 440-543-1416 Cell: 440-610-1768 Fax: 440-543-5405 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com

Zac Cote Online Auction Manager Freeport, Maine Tel: 410-253-8616 zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

Mike Stevenson Graphic Designer & Photography St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 michael@guyetteanddeeter.com

Ed Kenney Merchandise Manager & Shipping St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 shipping@guyetteanddeeter.com

Lynda Brooks Office Manager St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 lynda@guyetteanddeeter.com

Denise Jarrell

Bookkeeper St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 billing@guyetteanddeeter.com


©Ducks unlimiteD canaDa

Brown collection to be sold by Guyette & Deeter, Inc. 2018 auctions

Above: Ducks Unlimited Canada’s (DUC) former national planned giving manager Lloyd Derry with Peter Brown (right), who donated a portion of his extensive antique decoy collection to DUC.

The tale of a consummate collector

P

eter Brown will never forget the first time he opened a box of antique Canadian waterfowl decoys. They’d been sent to him by decoy collector Bruce Malcolm, who, along with renowned carver Ron Gruber, thought Brown might be interested in a collection of his own as an investment. That was back in the 1980s. Brown, a Vancouver, B.C., businessman, had already acquired important artwork by Group of Seven and Haida artists. He had other collections, too. But hand carved decoys were different. “I’d never seen a great decoy before, and I thought: these are really something,” says Brown. “There’s no question they were works of art.” Brown was hooked. “As I got more interested, I thought it would be fun to put together the definitive collection of Canadian birds, pursue each of the great carvers and try to get

as many of the species that they made that I could. We ended up with a few thousand birds.” Drawing from sheds, boat houses, duck clubs and collections across Canada, over time, Brown would work with Malcolm and others to amass the remarkable collection of decoys ranging from mint condition to gunning repaints. “Peter liked all decoys, not just the best ones,” says Malcolm. “He had a passion for them. It was not about investment and money. He would interrupt a board meeting or stock trading session to take my call about a possible new acquisition.” “He had a powerful, positive influence on Canadian decoy collecting in the 1980s.”

ZZZ Now, at the age of 75, Brown has taken the unprecedented step of divesting his decades-long pursuit. In May, he donated 1,000 antique duck, geese and


“This is a rare opportunity for DU supporters, waterfowlers, folk art collectors and decoy enthusiasts to acquire a historical, important waterfowl hunting artifact while supporting DUC and its mission.” – bruce malcolm

From Ducks Unlimited Canada’s conservator magazine, fall 2016.

shorebird decoys, appraised at $1.5 million, to Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC). In turn, DUC is offering the majority of the collection to the public through auction by Guyette & Deeter, Inc., the world’s largest decoy auction firm based in Maryland. DUC will be the beneficiary of net proceeds from the sale. The majority of the decoys will be sold beginning April 2017, however, some are now being offered on Guyette & Deeter’s weekly online auctions at decoys forsale.com. Most of the birds are working decoys carved in the late 1800s and early 1900s, including a pair of Fernland pintails appraised at $260,000. “This is a rare opportunity for DU supporters, waterfowlers, folk art collectors and decoy enthusiasts to acquire a historical, important waterfowl hunting artifact while supporting DUC and its mission,” says Malcolm. “There are wonderful core decoys in the Brown/DUC collection: high value, sought-after decoys by all of the important Canadian makers. In addition, there are a large number of lesser known, well-carved decoys that are very collectible and offer great value.” “They’re beautiful things,” says Brown. “I was happy to have them. A collection like that will likely never happen again.”

ZZZ At Brown’s request, a portion of the collection will remain in Canada and displayed periodically at the Oak Hammock Marsh Interpretive Centre in Manitoba, site of DUC’s national office. That display

will be dedicated to Brown’s late long-time friend and best man,William McLallen Jr., who was a “phenomenal duck hunter and outdoorsman,” says Brown. “It took three days for DUC and Guyette & Deeter staff to pack, appraise and photograph the donated decoys at Mr. Brown’s home.” says DUC’s former national manager of planned giving Lloyd Derry, who spent months working on the logistics of acquiring and selling the collection. Derry, who retired in December 2016, adds “It was a nice but challenging way to end my career.”

ZZZ Malcolm, a DUC supporter, avid waterfowl hunter and decoy collector who lives on the north shore of Lake Erie in Norfolk County, Ont., says Brown’s generous gift is a perfect tribute to Canada’s – and DUC’s – waterfowling heritage. “Many extensive DUC projects exist where these decoys were used over the years,” says Malcolm. “Places like Ontario’s Lake St. Clair, Rondeau Bay, Turkey Point and Long Point and Prince Edward County and throughout Quebec, the Maritimes and B.C.’s Fraser Delta.” “I find it ironic that a group of decoys collected from coast to coast arrive in Vancouver, stay for 25-plus years, migrate en masse to Manitoba, ‘stage’ and are now about to redistribute throughout North America to people who will again admire and cherish them. Many will no doubt end up in homes in Canadian waterfowling areas where they were originally created and used, thanks to DUC and Peter Brown.”


Featuring Decoys From The Collections Of: Bokelman Estate Peter Brown Stephan Chodorov Randy George Larry Hughes Anthony Marro

Dixon Merkt Dixon Merkt, a noted authority on Connecticut decoys, was regular at 1970s Bourne auctions including Mackey sales. He became friends with such decoy collecting legends as Bud Ward, Doc Starr, Bobby Richardson, Somers Headly, and Hal Sorenson. He was one of the “experts” on the Shelburne Museum Collection Evaluation Panel in the late 1970s. Dixon was also a major Connecticut collector and author of “Shang.” Since the late 1980s, Dixon has been quiet but still finds time to attend our auction in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Dixon Merkt Roger Meyers Doug & Ellen Miller Robert Personius Doug & Carol Whittington


Robert Personius Bob began collecting decoys in the 1960s in southern Illinois while employed with the US Fish & Wildlife Service at Crab Orchard NWR. A native of North Dakota his first find was a sack of Mason Premier cans in his Dad’s garage in Bismarck. In 1965 he moved his family north to Wisconsin where he became manager of Horicon NWR. He soon crossed paths with Bill Brauer of Fon du Lac and together they founded the first meeting of the Wisconsin Decoy Show in a parking lot on the refuge. In the following years Bill moved the show first to Fon du Lac and then on to Oshkosh at the Pioneer Inn on the shores of Lake Winnebago. One of Bob’s big finds in Wisconsin was an Elliston greenwing teal in original paint in a bag of clunkers in a boathouse on Lake Sinissippi in Hustisford. That bird is featured in this auction. In 1975 he transferred to his last duty station in Fremont, California, where he was responsible for the building and establishment of the San Francisco Bay NWR. In the Bay Area he found fertile ground for decoy collecting with the likes of Dick “Fresh Air” Janson, and others. Roger Barton became a friend and regional advisor. In 1983 he retired from federal services to Anacortes, WA, where he continued his search for decoys in yet another West Coast region. It was there he discovered seven Ward Brothers decoys, mallards, and widgeon, being used as door stops in a hunting clubhouse. What to do? Offer to buy and make a buck, or make a new friend? He befriended the owner and shared his knowledge and offered to broker the birds at auction for the owner. They brought over $70,000 in these pages. He received very little in return. Such is the life of a decoy collector. I’m very proud of my dad. He taught me everything I know about the madness and beauty of this art form. -David Personius, Two Rivers, AK 2018


Artfact is Now Invaluable

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To bid using Invaluable: • Go to the Guyette & Deeter website and click on the Invaluable link below upcoming auctions. • Once on Invaluable’s website, click on the Create Account button on the top right navigation bar. It’s free and only takes a few minutes. • Create your own username and password, along with your email address so Invaluable can send you important information. • Input your information. On the following page, Invaluable will ask you for your interests. • Now that you are a member of Invaluable, not only can you browse and bid on our auctions, but you have access to all of Invaluable’s other auctions.

*Winning bids will be subject to a 5% Invaluable fee

Guyette & Deeter Online Auctions

We e k ly O nline Au c t ions End ing E ve r y T hu r sd ay N ig ht G u a r a nt eed co n d i t i o n re p o r t s , m ul t i p l e p hot os , q u i ck s h i p p i n g , g reat d eal s o n q ual i t y i t e m s

Harry Holloway Sold, $4,054!

Aiden Ripley Sold, $948! Henry Lockard Sold, $1,437!

For questions, contact: 410-253-8616

D.W. Nichol Sold, $1,360!

zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

PO Box 159, Freeport, Maine 04032 www.decoysforsale.com

Recent Sales


Session One

Ontario 1 - 10 11 - 16 Miniatures 17 - 22 Illinois River 23 - 33 Pacific Coast Fish Decoys 34 - 46 51 - 55 Marty Hanson 56 - 60 New England Ben Schmidt 61 - 68 69 - 73 Ken Anger Canada 74 - 83 84 - 91 Jim Schmiedlin 92 - 109 Mason Decoy Factory Sporting Art 110 - 118 Bronze Sculptures 119 - 126 Illinois River 128 - 138 New York State 139 - 152 Advertisements 153 - 160 Shorebirds 161 - 174 Midwest 175 - 186 Toronto Shorebirds 187 - 191 Decoratives 192 - 210B Ontario 211 - 225 Sporting Art 226 - 241 Wisconsin 242 - 250 Duck Calls & Shell Boxes 250A - 250T Fish Decoys 251 - 274 Mason Decoy Factory 275 - 289 Ontario 290 - 301 Contemporary 302 - 316

Session Two

Ontario 317 - 325 Decoratives 326 - 345I Ward Brothers 346 - 353A Louisiana 354 - 373 Mason Decoy Factory 374 - 381 Virginia & North Carolina 382 - 385 Illinois River 386 - 400A Ontario 401 - 416E Shorebirds 417 - 428 Factory Decoys 429 - 444 New England 445 - 452 Decoratives 453 - 468 Michigan 469 - 479 New Jersey & Delaware River 480 - 493 Items of Interest 494 - 507 Maryland 508 - 523 Contemporary 524 - 543 Illinois River 544 - 552

Thursday, April 26, 2018 11:00 AM Lots 1 - 316

Friday, April 27, 2018 11:00 AM Lots 317 - 552

Please read conditions of sale in the back of catalog


SESSION ONE

Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 11:00 am

Ontario 1.

Pair of hollow carved bluebills, Ivar Fernlund, Hamilton, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hen has slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear on hen; minor to moderate wear on drake; small dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 34. (3,500 - 4,500)

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Pair of solid body bluebills, 1st quarter 20th century.  Found in Kingston, Ontario. Similar to work of George Warin. Both have subtle feather paint detail. Both have “Warkworth and Son” stencil on underside.  Original paint with minor wear; both have a few small shot marks; drake has roughness to end of tail.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in collection of Bernie Gates.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 210. (2,500 - 3,500)

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Long body style canvasback drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Rare solid body style. Branded “THOS. CHAMBERS MAKER,” and “JT MCMILLAN” for James T. McMillan 1913 St. Clair Flats Shooting Company Member in the underside.  Original paint with very minor wear; slightly darkened with age; two thin cracks in neck, one is a surface crack; slight cracking at knot in one side; shallow chip missing approximately 1” x 1/4” in one side.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: Peter Brown Collection eBook. (3,500 - 4,500) 4.

Short body style canvasback drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Hollow carved.   Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; thin crack through neck. (2,000 - 3,000)

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Bluebill hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Good feather paint detail on lower sides and comb painting on back.  Original paint with very slight wear; a few tiny dents. (900 - 1,200)

6.

Solid body style bluebill drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Subtle feather paint detail on back. Branded “FTM” for Fred T McMurray, St. Clair Flats Shooting Club Member 1922-1949. And “Bunbury” a St. Clair Flats Shooting Company member 1877-1901.  Original paint with minor wear; thin chip of wood missing from one bottom edge appears to be from when the decoy was made; a few tiny dents; old thin wash of paint added to the underside. (950 - 1,250)

7.

Hollow carved canvasback drake, carved in the St. Clair Flats Club style, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  From the Toronto Big Creek Club.  Original paint with moderate wear; small cracks in tail area; small dents in one lower side; moderately hit by shot. Literature: “Decoying St. Clair to the St. Lawrence,” Barney Crandall, pp. 83-84. (950 - 1,250)

8.

Hollow carved canvasback hen, attributed to Scott Peters, Walpole Island, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Tag on underside reads that Peters was a Potawatomi Indian who lived on Walpole Island reservation. He was a boat builder for Criscraft.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; two small nails has been added to neck base at a later date with tiny cracks there; a few small dents and shot marks. (1,200 - 1,500)

9.

Hollow carved redhead drake, Phineas Reeves, 3rd quarter 19th century.  “HH” painted on underside for Horatio Hathaway, Long Point Club member 18791897.  Old in use repaint with some original showing; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Julia & Guyette, April 1990 Decoy Auction. (1,250 - 1,750)

10.

Bluebill drake, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “G and J Warin makers, Toronto” and “WBW”. Subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; hit by shot; small dents.

Provenance: Crandall.

Formerly in the collection of Barney

Literature: “Decoying St. Clair to the St Lawrence,” Barney Crandall. 129, exact decoy. (1,250 - 1,750) 11


Miniatures

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Wonderfully carved pair of miniature wood ducks, Otto Garren, Canton, Illinois, 1st half 20th century.  Mounted on small shelf. Stylish reared back heads and carved crest on both.  Original paint is crazed slightly on drake’s body; original paint on hen with crack at neck and bill.

Provenance: Consigned by a member of the Garren family. (1,000 - 1,500)

12.

Miniature pair of mallards, Otto Garren, Canton, Illinois, 1st half 20th century.  8” in length. Both with glass eyes. Hen has detailed bill carving. Newspaper residue stuck to top of hen’s head.  Small amount of paint loss on lower breast of drake and two paint drips on top of hen’s head, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Consigned by a member of the Garren family. (400 - 600) 12

13.

Pair of 1/4 size bluewing teal, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1970. Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (500 - 800)

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Very rare standing miniature Canada goose, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey, circa 1930.  Mounted on mahogany base. Fine paint detail and incised wingtip carving. Approximately 7” from tip of tail to tip of bill.  Near mint original paint with good patina; structurally excellent. (1,750 - 2,250)

15.

Three 1/4 size decoys, Joe Wooster, Ashley, Ohio.  A swan, Canada goose, and loon. All are signed and dated 1981 and 1982. All have detailed feather carving.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)


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Exceptional and very early pair of miniature mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Fine original paint by Edna Perdew. Both have thin flat weights on underside stamped, “Chas. Perdew, Henry Illinois.” Both have fine feather paint detail, drake has fine combing. Drake is signed, E.P. ‘36” on underside.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear.

Provenance: From a home in Wisconsin. Literature: “Perdew, an Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacy.

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(5,000 - 7,000)

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Illinois River Robert Elliston 1849 - 1915 Bureau, Illinois “Robert Elliston is certainly regarded as one of the first Illinois River commercial decoy makers and because the quality and quantity of his output is one of the best. He traveled the Midwest until he settled in Lacon, Illinois, where he started a career of full time decoy carving while in this 30s. Later he moved to Bureau where he lived the rest of his life. Elliston’s decoys were made of the finest white pine with the bodies hollowed out of two equal pieces. The heads were well carved with a very detailed bill and had eyes set very high giving a frogeyed look. The painting was superbly done by his wife, Catherine, and set a high standard for other Illinois River carvers that came later. He made mallards in the greatest number, but also made pintails, teal, bluebills, redheads, canvasbacks, ringnecks, coots, and Canada geese. The decoys were weighted by a lead strip on the bottom that was stamped “THE ELLISTON DECOY”. Robert was the first to make turned head sleepers. By all standards, Robert Elliston rates as a classic maker.” “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid

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“FA” as he was known was president of the bank his father founded before him, The First National Bank of Columbus in Columbus, Wisconsin. He was an avid outdoorsman maintaining dual memberships at duck hunting clubs in Wisconsin’s Horicon Marsh area, Ne Pee Nauk club, as well as a private club in Hennepin, Illinois. He shot Parker side by sides when he hunted pheasants and ducks and it is said his club record book entries at the Ne Pee Nauk are full of humor and success stories of his numerous visits. While we do not know for sure, it is likely Chadbourn’s visits to Hennepin, Illinois where he acquired this magnificent sleeping mallard hen from Robert Elliston of Bureau, Illinois. A crispy hot brand was applied to the underside of the decoy sometime after it was acquired by F.A and then it was placed on a shelf for the next one hundred and twenty years. It was not until last year that the family learned of its importance and potential value. This graceful sleeping pose mallard hen by Robert Elliston represents one of Illinois master carvers finest executions in nearly perfect condition. F.A. Chadbourn (1872-1947)

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Extremely rare and important preening mallard hen, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880.  Outstanding paint detail and patina. Branded “Chadbourn”.  Near mint original paint; weight is missing; slight wear under the tail; filler and paint have lifted from three tiny nail holes on one lower side.

Provenance: Consigned by a member of the Chadbourn family. (65,000 - 75,000)

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18. Gadwall drake, Otto Garren, Canton, Illinois, 1st half 20th century.  Signed “O Garren” on underside. Unrigged.  Strong original paint; very good and original. Provenance: Consigned by a member of the Garren family. (2,000 - 2,500)

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Wood duck drake, Otto Garren, Canton, Illinois, 1st half 20th century.  Unrigged. Signed “O Garren” on underside. Long sweeping comb paint on back of head.  Strong original paint; some separation at body half.

Provenance: Consigned by a member of the Garren family. (2,000 - 3,000)

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20. Shoveler drake, Otto Garren, Canton, Illinois.  Signed “O Garren” on the underside.  Unrigged; strong original paint that has remnants of newspaper stuck to some portions on the side and back; structurally sound.

Provenance: Consigned by a member of the Garren family. (1,750 - 2,250)

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21. Pair of mallards, Robert Weeks, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1920s.  “RW” painted on the underside of each.  Repainted by Weeks at a later date; bill crack repair on hen; weights are missing; lightly hit by shot. (2,500 - 3,000)

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22 Detail

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22. Rare greenwing teal drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880s.    Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; worn area on underside; moderate wear on top of head; small dents; thin crack in neck. Provenance: Personius collection. Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(12,000 - 15,000)

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Pacific Coast

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Pintail hen, George Behrman, McMinnville, Oregon, circa late 1930s.    Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Meyer collection. Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson. (650 - 950) 24.

Hollow carved pintail drake, Charles Pice, Astoria, Oregon, circa 1930.    Original paint with moderate wear; crack in breast.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

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Mallard hen, Gordon “Mula” Olsen, Astoria, Oregon, circa 1950.    Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents.

(650 - 950)

Provenance: Meyer collection. Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson. (600 - 900) 26. 20

Hollow carved pintail drake, Percy Bicknell, Richmond, British Columbia.  Good scratch paint feather detail and

raised “V” wingtip carving.  Original paint with minor wear; tiny rough spot at one corner of tail.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 289. (650 - 950) 27.

Pair of greenwing teal, Vern Perret, Delta, British Columbia.  “VP” carved in underside. Also the hen is signed and dated 1986.  Original and good. (300 - 400)

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Pintail drake, George Behrman, McMinville, Oregon, circa 1940.    White on body appears to be second coat the rest is original with minor discoloration and wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

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Pintail drake, Frank Bay, Astoria, Oregon.  Made in 1933. Old tag on decoy reads “Repainted by Bay,” by the carver in 1939.  Working repaint with minor wear; structurally good; slight wear to one edge of bill.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(350 - 450)

(350 - 450)


30.

Pintail drake, Richard Janson, Sonoma Creek, California.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; numerous small dents; slight wear to the wood at the wingtips.

Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Mike Miller and Fred Hanson. (1,600 - 2,000)

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Large pintail drake, Emile Peterson, Astoria, Oregon.    Original paint with minor wear; thin crack partway through neck base.

Provenance: Meyer collection. Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson. (1,600 - 2,000)

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Pintail hen, Richard Janson, Sonoma Creek, California.    Original paint with very minor wear; several short hairline surface cracks in one side; hairline crack in lower breast and partway through neck.

Provenance: Meyer collection. (1,250 - 1,750)

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Oversize hollow carved mallard drake, Harold McGillivray, Sacramento, California. Branded “MCG” and “EAW.” Relief wing carving with good feather detail. Original paint; minor wear; working touchup to the white at the speculums, neck, and edge of tail; slight wear to the wood at tail sprig; shotmark in one side of breast and at one wing.

Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson. (3,500 - 5,500) 21


Fish Oscar Peterson 1887 - 1951 Cadillac, Michigan

Oscar Peterson with two of his trade sign carvings

Born November 14, 1887 in Grayling Michigan, Oscar Peterson soon relocated to Cadillac, Michigan, where he lived his entire life until his death in 1951. It is said that he was a kind, shy person that often gave away his carvings to friends. He prided himself in the fact that he never used special tools, only a drawshave, ordinary chisels, pocketknife, and sand paper. The scope of his carving is amazing. Over the years, Peterson produced items including, fish decoys, trade signs, pincushions, vases, fishing lures, and decorative plaques. Petersons love of nature and, specifically, the bounty found in Northern Michigan is commonly represented in nearly all of his artwork. Without a doubt, today, Oscar Peterson is celebrated as one of America’s greatest folk artists.

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Carved fish plaque of a brook trout in relief, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Trout measures 22” in length. Length of board is 28” x 9.5”. Early thick board with two metal straps on back. Both fish and board have very appealing crazed surface. Glass eye.  Excellent original paint; slight edge wear on board.

Provenance and Literature: Chodorov collection. “Beneath the Ice,” Steve Michaan, p. 99, exact fish plaque. “Oscar W. Peterson,” Wexford County Historical Museum, Cadillac, Michigan, June 12-13, 1981. “Hooked On Carving: Oscar W. Peterson,” Michigan State University Museum East Lansing, Michigan, October 24, 1982 - April 10, 1983. “Fishing for Art,” an Exhibition of the Implements and Art of Angling Organized in conjunction with the American Museum of Fly Fishing, Addison Gallery of American Art Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. March 17 April 15, 1984. (18,000 - 22,000)

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35. Bass fish decoy, Gordon Pecore Fox, Mount Clemens, Michigan.  11 1/2” in length. Carved gills and mouth.  Original paint with one small dent and a rub on opposite side.

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Provenance: Chodorov collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

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7 1/8” long fish decoy, Harry Seymour, last quarter 20th century. Metal fins, curved leather tail, and tack eyes. Also carved fin. Subtle scale paint detail. Jigging stick included. Original paint with good patina and very slight wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Beneath the Ice,” Ben Apfelbaum, Eli Gottlieb, and Steven J. Michaan. (6,000 - 9,000)

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37. Fish decoy, Horace “Bart” Perkins, New Baltimore, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Perch. Measures 7 1/4” in length with tack eyes, well carved mouth and gills.  White paint on underside was strengthened a very long time ago; some paint restoration to areas of tail, along top side of body, and parts of the head. (2,000 - 3,000) 38.

Bass fish decoy, Hans Janner, Mount Clemens, Michigan.  12” in length. Natural finish with white paint on belly and copper fins.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Chodorov collection.

Literature: “The Fish Decoy,” Art, Brad, and Scott Kimball, p. 75, exact decoy. “Beneath the Ice,” Steve Michaan, p. 31, exact decoy. (3,500 - 4,500) 39. Walleye fish decoy, Andy Trombley, circa 1950.  13 1/2” in length. Scaled paint pattern with glass eyes.  Very good and original.

39 24

Provenance: Chodorov collection.

Literature: “The Fish Decoy,” Art, Brad, and Scott Kimball, p. 21, exact fish. “Beneath the Ice,” p. 31, exact fish. Included in exhibition. (2,000 - 3,000)


40

40.

Perch fish decoy, Andy Trombley, (1919-1975), Mount Clemens, Michigan.  8” in length. Glass eyes.  Original and good.

Provenance: Chodorov collection.

Literature: “Arts and Antiques,” Summer 1987, p. 74. “Beneath the Ice,” Steve Michaan, p. 31, exact fish. (2,000 - 3,000) 41. Muskie fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.  5 1/2” in length. Painted eye and gold and black spots painted on side.  Very good and original. Provenance: Chodorov collection.

(2,000 - 2,500)

41 42. Fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.  Walleye. 9” in length. Width 1/2”. Tack eyes.  Original paint protected by a very light coat of varnish, otherwise very good and original. (1,800 - 2,200)

42

43

44

43. Fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.  Sucker. Earlier example, measuring 9” in length and 3/4” wide. Two belly weights. Tack eyes.  Original paint protected by a light coat of varnish; small areas of paint flaking on metal fins; some discoloration and very small chips to body. (1,800 - 2,200) 44.

Perch fish decoy, Abraham DeHate (1890-1968), Mount Clemens, Michigan.  11” in length. Glass eyes. Fins have been bent up against the body. Carved mouth and gill.  Strong original paint.

Provenance: Chodorov collection.

Literature: “Beneath the Ice,” Steve Michaan, p. 31, exact fish. (1,500 - 2,500) 45.

Fish decoy, Larry Joseph Peltier, Mt. Clemens, Michigan, circa 1930.  Glass eyes with carved gill. 6 3/4” long.  Original paint that is worn and flaked on parts of metal fins and small areas of body. (1,500 - 2,000)

46.

Very rare albino trout, Ken Bruning, Tower, Michigan.  7 1/2” in length.  Strong original paint; small areas of flaking on body and fins. (1,200 - 1,500)

45

46 25


Marty Hanson

Hayward, Wisconsin

51.

Full size standing black duck, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin. Signed. On carved wooden base with carved shell. Bird is approximately 21” long, has raised wings, and slightly turned head. Highly detailed scratch feather paint. An exceptional example of Hanson’s work. Excellent and original. (5,000 - 7,000)

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Marty Hanson started filling his first decoy orders at the age of 14 while he was working at the Minneapolis Gun Club, in Prior Lake, Minnesota. Now, almost 40 years later, he has moved his shop to Hayward, Wisconsin from Prior Lake, Minnesota. Hanson continues to make a living producing some of the finest working decoys and decorative carvings. Several items listed in this sale from a private collection represent his finest examples including this running, full bodied black duck. “Inspiration for this piece was the chance to create something that was purely in my mind, that I wanted to make it for myself… no pressure or customer order, just a piece that would appeal to the nonhunter as well as the most seasoned hunter, and also myself. To this day, this is the finest standing piece I have made.” - Marty Hanson

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52. Pair of goldeneye, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Hollow with bottom boards. Both are signed on underside along with carved initials, “MH”. Drake is also signed under tail. These are working decoys with Marty’s highest grade carving style. Highly exaggerated turned heads. Relief carved wingtips and detailed paint feathering.  Excellent and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

52 53.

Rigmate pair of redheads, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Hollow with bottom boards. Both have Hanson’s Prior Lake stamp and are signed on undersides. Both have turned heads and raised carved crossed wingtips.  Excellent and original. (2,750 - 3,250)

53 54.

Oversize eider drakes, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  “MH” carved in underside. Inlet head and detailed bill carving. An open bill with a mussel in it.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

54 55. Wood duck drake, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Signed. Good form with relief wingtip carving and very slightly turned head.  Excellent and original.

Literature: “Decoys: Sixty Living and Outstanding North American Carvers,” Loy Harrell, exact decoy pictured. (950 - 1,250)

55 27


Charles “Shang” Wheeler 1872 - 1949 Stratford, Connecticut

Shang was born in Westport, CT and, unfortunately, lived a far from ideal childhood. Perhaps due to the early death of his mother, he had separated himself from the family by the age of 16. His formal education ended for a time before he had finished high school at a local military academy and he rapidly learned how to take care of himself both physically and financially (he later finished high school when he was 26). It is unclear how he acquired his now famous nickname, but it appears that it may be a combination of the crusty local “Shanghai” oyster and a well-known giant in P.T. Barnum’s side shows named “Chang.” Whatever the source, the label had stuck since his teenage years, and he was known by that name for the rest of his life. Shang seemed to thrive on hard physical work that involved being outdoors and offered some adventure and/or even some potential danger. His early years involved farm work, fishing for cod on the Grand Banks and seining. By the early 1890s, he had found the vocation that would appeal to him for most of his future life – oyster cultivation and harvesting. This proved to be serendipitous as, initially, the business was seasonal and allowed him to spend time working on tugboats, sword fishing, market gunning for ducks, and guiding sportsman on hunting and fishing trips. Around 1907, the oyster business became his full time work, and from 1912 until his mandatory retirement in 1946, he was the general manager of the Connecticut Oyster Farm and Docks in Milford, CT. In his early thirties, the confirmed bachelor began to board with Edward and Fanny Bond in Stratford, and he continued to live most of his life with them. For all of his life, he was most comfortable in the rugged conditions afforded by camps from Maine to Canada and he spent as much of his free time there as possible. His love of nature and the out of doors ultimately led him to political office where he felt he could have a positive impact on legislation to protect the natural resources of the State of Connecticut. He served several terms in the Connecticut House of Representatives and also spent time serving in the State Senate. He spent time in the role of State Game Commissioner and as the State Oyster Inspector in addition to a term as President of the Connecticut Humane Society. For many years he regularly published political cartoons in the Bridgeport Herald. He never sought fame or wealth, as noted in “Shang” by Dixon Merkt, “His companions ranged from presidents to the crewmen on his company’s oyster boats. He never judged a person on the basis of social class or status. What really mattered was that a person knew how to get along in a duck blind or on a remote wilderness stream.”

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56 Detail

56

Wheeler’s decoy production was limited and was never a commercial venture. He carved for his own pleasure and refused to sell his birds, giving most away to friends as gifts. His early birds were strictly for gunning the marshes at the mouth of the Housatonic River but his abundant artistic flair and talent finally led him to competition carving. In 1923, he entered the first Bellport, New York Decoy Show where he won first place in the amateur category. For twelve consecutive years he won first prize in the amateur category of the International Decoy Makers contest held annually at the Sportsman’s Show in New York City. He finally withdrew from competition feeling that “it was time to give somebody else a chance.” He is renowned today as a member of Connecticut’s leading decoy triumvirate consisting of Albert Laing, Ben Holmes, and himself. His carvings certainly represent the Stratford School of carving at its pinnacle of perfection. His keen eye observed all the nuances of each species’s anatomy and feathering and are faithful reproductions of nature and accomplished works of art. Although he carved a wide variety of species for competition, he seems to have lavished most of his love on the black duck. It is said that “imitation is the greatest form of flattery” and Wheeler’s efforts were the inspiration for a host of Connecticut carvers to follow. Men such as Rathmell, Welles, Disbrow, Merwin, Bliss, and Breit, to name a few, followed closely in his footsteps and clearly reflect his influence in their work.

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56 Detail 30


56. Important sleeping black duck, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut.  Extra fine feather paint detail. Exceptional form with resting head curved around with bill buried under feathers.  Excellent and original. Provenance: First place winner 1941 New York City Sportsmen’s Show, ribbon included. Literature: “Shang,” Dixon Merkt, exact decoy pictured. (125,000 - 150,000)

56 Detail 31


57

58

57.

59

Black duck, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut, circa 1930s.  Slightly turned head with glass eyes, fine feather paint detail on head.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents; retains tear drop weight; very slight roughness to end of bill.

58.

Cork body black duck, Lou Rathmell, Stratford, Connecticut.  Slightly turned head.  Appealing old in use repaint. (800 - 1,200)

59.

Very rare possibly one of a kind brant, Gerald Tremblay, Alburg, Vermont.    Separation at neck seam otherwise excellent and original, never used.

Literature: “Decoys of Lake Champlain,” Loy Harrell, exact decoy pictured. (600 - 900)

Provenance: From a hunting rig found in Ohio.

Literature: “Shang,” Dixon Merkt.

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(3,000 - 4,000)


Joseph Lincoln

1859 - 1938 Accord, Massachusetts

60 60.

Rare widgeon hen with well sculpted head and neck, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; moderate wear on underside; small dents; fairly thin age split in underside. Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (7,500 - 9,500)

60 Detail

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Ben Schmidt

1884 - 1968 Detroit, Michigan

61

62

63

64

65

66

61. Mallard hen and drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Drake has raised carved wingtips and fluted tail. Hen has carved wingtips.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,600) 62. Pair of canvasbacks, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Both have slightly turned heads. One is hollowed out from the underside.  Original paint with very minor wear; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Manson Meekins, Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. (1,250 - 1,750)

63.

Pair of widgeon, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, 2nd half 20th century.  This rigmate pair of widgeon is accompanied by a hand written letter from Ben Schmidt dated 1965. In the letter Schmidt details the cost of the

34

decoys at 14 plus 3 for shipping. He also states “These may be the last decoys I will make. My eyes are going bad. Thank you Ben Schmidt”.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 1,800) 64.

Pair of redheads, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,600)

65. Mallard hen and drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Marro collection.

66.

Two redheads, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Drake has slight turned head.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent; drake has several spots of brown paint on one lower side. (800 - 1,200)

(950 - 1,250)


67 Detail

67

68

67.

Rare and desirable Canada goose, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, 1st half 20th century.  Three piece hollow body. From the important Rodgers rig, from Port Austin, Michigan, with that brand carved in the underside. Strong feather stamping with Ben’s early tail carving.  Strong original paint; a few spots of varnish splatter under one side of tail; very tiny puppy chew at tip of bill. (3,000 - 5,000)

68.

Rigmate pair of buffleheads, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Original paint with minor wear; slight separation at body seams and drake’s neck seam.

Literature: “Michigan Decoys,” Forrest Loomis and Clune Walsh. (3,000 - 4,000)

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Ken Anger

1905 - 1961 Dunnville, Ontario 69.

Rare pair of pintails, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, circa 1950.    Very good and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bruce Malcolm. Purchase by Bruce Malcolm with several other Anger decoys, including the Shoveler pair and the Wooduck in this auction, from a family friend of Anger’s who had commissioned them around 1955. (3,500 - 4,500)

69

70.

Rare wood duck drake, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, circa 1950.    Near mint original paint; structurally excellent.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bruce Malcolm. Malcolm purchased with other Anger decoys, including the Shoveler pair and the Pintail pair in this auction, from a family friend of Ken Anger back in the 1980’s.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, editor, p. 28. (2,000 - 3,000)

70

71. Rigmate pair of goldeneye, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.    Very good and original.

71

72. Pair of mallards, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Both are branded “EG” in the undersides for Edward Goss, who hunted on Lake Cayuga in New York State in the 1950s.  Near mint original paint; a few tiny dents. (2,500 - 3,500)

72 36

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Bruce Malcolm. (2,000 - 3,000)


73.

Very rare pair of shovelers, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, circa 1950.    Very good and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown Collection. Formerly in the collection of Bruce Malcolm. Malcolm purchased the Anger Shovelers, Pintails and Wooduck that are in this auction from a family friend of Ken Anger who had commissioned these decoys in the mid 1950’s.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, editor, p. 143. (9,000 - 12,000)

73

73 Detail 37


Canada

74

75

76

77

78

79

74. Classic canvasback drake, Duncan Ducharme, Manitoba, Canada.    Hairline crack partway through neck; otherwise very good and original. (650 - 950) 75. Canvasback drake, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.    Original paint with good patina very slight wear; structurally very good. (800 - 1,200) 76.

Rare preening brant from Malpeque Bay on Prince Edward Island.    Appealing old in use repaint; age split in underside.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

77.

Mallard hen, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.    Original paint with very slight wear; structurally very good. (950 - 1,250)

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(500 - 800)

78.

Root head Canada goose field decoy, George Scarey, lot 16, Prince Edward Island, 2nd quarter 20th century. Old in use repaint on the black area; the rest appears to be original with minor wear; body seam has separated somewhat; cracks in back; slight roughness to tail.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 125. (350 - 550)

79.

Immature eider drake, Bruce Hopkins, Cape Negro, Nova Scotia.  Relief wing carving and detailed bill carving.  Original paint; minor wear; slight separation at neck filler. (350 - 450)


80.

Goldeneye hen, Orel Leboeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec. Bold feather carving. Strong original paint; tight age crack on one side; small knot with flaking on one side; in the making patch in one side of head. (1,800 - 2,200)

80 81.

Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Both have George Thompson collection stamp on underside.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; structurally good. (1,200 - 1,500)

81 82.

Pair of buffleheads, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, 2nd quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; slight separation at hen’s body seam; slight discoloration at lower breast of hen.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 25. (2,000 - 3,000)

82 83.

Bluebill hen, Orel LeBoeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec.  Heavy feather carving detail.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on the top of the head; tiny dents and shot marks. (950 - 1,250)

83 39


Jim Schmiedlin

1945 - 2015 Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania 84. Well carved bluebill drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded and signed 2011.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Schmiedlin collection stamp on underside. Property of ALS, Net proceeds go to ALS society. (3,000 - 5,000)

84

85. Bluewing teal drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded and signed. Dated 2000. Slightly turned head with relief wingtip carving.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

85

86. Pintail drake, Jim Schmied-lin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded and signed. Slightly turned and lifted head. Carved crossed wingtips.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

86

87.

Wide body style canvasback hen, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded “JAS. Slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent. (3,000 - 4,000)

87 40


88. Pair of earlier style oversize bluebills, Jim Schmiedlin Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Signed and dated 1979. Both have raised “V” wingtip carving.  Original paint with very minor wear, mostly on the underside of the hen. (3,500 - 5,500)

88

89.

Preening ruddy duck with slightly lifted wing, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded and signed. Dated 2002.  Original paint with a very small amount of wear, mostly at tail. (3,000 - 4,000)

89

90.

White wing scoter, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded “JAS” in underside. Also signed and dated by Jim, 1984 with inscription “One of my favorite ducks”. Turned head with unusual feather texturing and raised and crossed wingtips. An unusual style that combines his decorative carvings with his gunning style decoys.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

90

91.

Scoter in resting pose, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennslvania.  Signed. Head is turned approximately 45 degrees to one side.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

91 41


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

92.

Exceptional hollow carved mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1905.  Challenge grade with early snakey head style.  Near mint original paint; several tiny dents and shot marks.

Literature: “Mason Factory Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (4,000 - 6,000)

93.

Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade, circa 1905. Oversize solid body Atlantic Coast model with snakey head style.  Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents; slight separation at knot in one side; factory filled crack in one side; short cracks in underside; tail chip restoration. (4,000 - 6,000)

94.

Atlantic brant, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade, circa 1910.  Original paint with minor wear; in factory filled crack in side; slight separation to knot in lower side; crack in underside.

Provenance: Meyer collection. (2,500 - 3,000)

92

93

94 95. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents and shot marks.

95 42

Provenance: Personius collection. (4,000 - 6,000)


96

97

98

99

100

101

96.

Rigmate pair of mergansers, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eyes.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; each has a crack in the underside; paint missing from area of crack on underside of drake; minor roughness on underside where weights were removed; neck filler restoration.

Literature: “Mason Factory Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (2,250 - 2,750)

97.

Rare merganser drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade with early snakey head style. Small “J.J.” stamp in back twice.  Original paint with minor discoloration and minor to moderate wear; several small dents; shallow tail chip that is approximately 1” x 1/2”; filled in factory crack in back has opened slightly; fairly large crack in underside. (2,000 - 3,000)

98. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small chips missing from neck filler; body seam on one

side has opened slightly and filled and touched up at a later date; hairline crack in one lower side. (2,000 - 3,000) 99. Redhead hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early premier grade, circa 1910.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; thin in factory crack in back; lightly hit by shot; shot scar on one side of bill. (1,200 - 1,600) 100. Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with tack eyes.  Original paint that has darkened somewhat with age; minor wear; most of the neck filler is missing; thin surface crack partway down one side; several tiny dents at end of bill. (1,200 - 1,700) 101. Rare scoter, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade glass eye model.  Original paint with minor wear; neck filler is a professional replacement; old touchup on speculums; thin cracks in underside. (1,600 - 2,000) 43


102. Well sculpted pintail drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910.  Premier grade with early snakey head style.  Outstanding original paint with minor wear and good feather detail; some small rubs to the bare wood at the tail; good patina; structurally excellent.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Russ Goldberger.

Literature: “Mason Decoys: A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 34, exact decoy pictured. (20,000 - 24,000)

102

102 Detail

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103. Exceptional pintail hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910.  Stylish with slightly upturned head. Good feather paint detail.  Original paint with very slight wear and good patina; structurally excellent. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of James McCleery. Formerly in the collection of Russ Goldberger. Literature: “Mason Decoys: A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 34, exact decoy pictured. (18,000 - 22,000)

103

103 Detail 45


104. Canvasback hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade, Seneca Lake model circa 1910.  Original paint with minor wear; thin crack through neck; crack in underside; lightly hit by shot. (2,000 - 2,400)

104 105. Rare Back Bay model canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1915.  Premier grade, ca. 1910. Oversize solid body.  Original paint with moderate wear; crack in underside that was filled with glue a long time ago; small dents.

105

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey, Jr., Mackey collection stamp on underside. Formerly in collection of Richard Clayton, collection tag on underside.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 116, exact decoy pictured. (1,600 - 2,000) 106. Rare special order goldeneye hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Modeled from a George Bacon goldeneye.  Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear on breast; crack in underside; some paint flaking near the crack.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (2,500 - 3,500)

106 107. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Near mint original paint; several small spots of discoloration on lower sides; a few tiny dents. (2,500 - 3,500)

107 46


108. Exceptional mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Near mint original paint; thin crack in neck filler.

Provenance: Personius collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

108 108 Detail

109 Detail

109. Pair of redheads, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Good paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; two cracks in underside of drake; filled crack in one side of hen, hairline crack in other side; thin crack in one side of hen’s head. Literature: “Mason Decoys: A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (4,500 - 6,500)

109

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Sporting Art

110

111 110.

Oil on board of dried corn byAlfred Montgomery.  Signed. Image size 19 1/2” x 29 1/2”.  Very good and original.

111.

Oil on board of dried corn, Alfred Montgomery.  Signed. Image size 17” x 22”.  Original and good.

Provenance: Larry Hughes collection

Provenance: Larry Hughes collection

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(2,000 - 2,500)

(1,750 - 2,250)


112

112. Oil on canvas board, William Mckendree Snyder (1849 - 1930), Cincinnati, Ohio and Liberty, Indiana.  Image of setter pointing covey of quail. Signed lower right and dated 1917. Image size 19” x 29 1/2”. Inset in highly decorative period carved oak frame with setter in lower left and covey quail in lower right.  Painting has been professionally cleaned with some restoration to foliage along bottom and head of quail. (8,000 - 12,000)

112 Detail

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113

113.

Mountain goat study, Cont’e crayon on paper, Bob Kuhn.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 8 7/8” x 10 7/8”.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(3,000 - 4,000) 114. Lions study, Cont’e crayon on paper, Bob Kuhn.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 10” x 13 14”.  Very good and original.

114

50

Provenance: Miller collection.

(3,000 - 4,000)


115

115.

“Greenland Fjord King Eiders,” an oil on canvas by Harry Curieux Adamson.  Signed. Image size 24” x 36”.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(6,000 - 9,000)

Adamson is described by internationally famous wildlife artist David Maass as, “unsurpassed when it comes to portrayals of wildfowl on the wing in their natural surroundings.” Wildlife artist Owen Gromme says Adamson is simply, “one of the finest waterfowl artists in the world.” Adamson’s work has frequently been displayed nationally and internationally in the prestigious “Birds in Art” and “Animals in Art” exhibitions, and has been shown at the Smithsonian Art Museum, the British Museum and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, among others. He was named the first California Waterfowl Association Artist of the Year and 1979 Ducks Unlimited Artist of the Year.

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116

116. “Grey Lag Geese,” an oil on canvas by Sir Peter Scott.  Signed. Image size 21 3/8” x 25 3/8”.  Excellent and original.

117

117. “Canada Goose Decoy and Black Necked Stilt,” acrylic on board, Donald Malick.  Signed and dated 1980. Image size 24” x 30”. The decoy in the painting is an early Ward Brothers Canada goose.  Very good and original.

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Provenance: Miller collection. (3,500 - 5,500)

Provenance: Miller collection. (3,000 - 4,000)


118

118 Detail 118. “Open Water,” Oil on canvas, William Zimmerman.  Signed and dated 1979. Subject matter is two bald eagles at pond with buffleheads. Image size 31” x 40”.  Very good and original. Provenance: Miller collection. (4,000 - 6,000)

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Bronze Sculptures

119 Detail

This bronze sculpture was used as the model for the 3,500 lb., 17 foot tall bronze Wapiti made to be placed on Monument Hill, near the now defunct Wildlife World Museum just off interstate 25 near Monument, Colorado. It was cast at Art Castings of Colorado in Loveland. The finished piece was transported by a Chinook helicopter from nearby Fort Carson to the museum. When the museum closed its doors in 1988 the elk Wapiti was moved to its current location in front of the Westminster, Colorado town hall.

119 Detail

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119. “Challenge,” an exceptional award winning monument study limited edition bronze sculpture of a bull elk, Gerald Belciar, 6/9, dated 1980. Mounted on hardwood base. Bronze is 37” long and 33” tall. Excellent and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

Literature: “National Sculpture Society Magazine,” early 1980s. (9,500 - 12,500)

119

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120 120 Detail

120. Limited edition bronze sculpture of a prairie falcon, 11/15, John Scheeler. Sculpture includes cactus, rocks, and a bird. Stands approximately 12� tall. Very good and original.

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Provenance: Miller collection. (5,000 - 8,000)


121

121. Pair of ivory billed woodpeckers on stump, a limited edition bronze sculpture by William Schultz, 4/45. Bronze height 25-1/2�. Excellent and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

57


122. “Old Maude,” a limited edition bronze sculpture of a long horn steer with calf, 31/40, Veryl Goodnight, Mancos, Colorado. Signed and dated 1980. Mounted on hardwood base. Approximately 20” long. Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

Goodnight was inducted into the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame (Fort Worth, Texas) in 2016 and is most well known for her 1 1/2 times life size bronze sculpture of five horses entitled, “The Day The Wall Came Down” made in 1997 to commemorate the fall of the Berlin Wall.

122

123. Limited edition bronze sculpture of a quail, John Scheeler, 5/25. Approximately 11-1/2” tall Very good and original

Provenance: Miller collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

123

124. Limited edition bronze sculpture of a greenwing teal drake, 25/100, William Schultz. Very good and original.

124 58

Provenance: Personius collection. (1,200 - 1,600)


125. Pair of big horn sheep busts on marble and hardwood base, Gerald Belciar. Limited edition 3/20 dated 1982. Approximately 15� tall. Original and good.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(2,500 - 3,500)

125

126. Limited edition Bronze sculpture of a duck standing in the marsh with a decoy head near its feet, William Koelpin, 6/25. Approximately 16-1/2’ tall. Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

126

59


Illinois River Mr. Al Ries (1899 – 1978) began making decoys in the early 1930s from cork, cedar and balsa. He began his commercial production in late 1938, and his work is characterized by the grooves he designed into each piece to separate individual color changes. His decoys were sold through the finest sporting goods shops in the Chicago area such as V.L. & A., Abercrombie and Fitch, and Marshall Fields. His birds were entered in such prestigious shows as the 1948 National Decoy Makers Contest and Exhibition in New York and The Hunters Show in Chicago. This rare and important pair of wood ducks was made in 1941 as part of a special order for Mr. Louis H. Barkhausen (d. 1962) of Chicago for use in a promotional movie being made at his Illinois preserve, “Cuba Island,” for Ducks Unlimited.

128

128. Rare rigmate pair of wood ducks, Al Ries, Chicago, Illinois.  “LBH” is stamped in underside for Lewis Barkhausen, one of the founders of Ducks Unlimited. Relief wingtip and tail carving.  Original paint that has darkened with age; very little wear; a few small dents. Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forest Loomis. (7,500 - 9,500)

128 Detail


129. Exceptional pair of mallards, Hiram Hotze, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.  Paint exhibits the exquisite feather painting Hotze is known for. Hen has never been rigged.  Drake is missing weight; minor amount of shrinkage on the drake’s head and on wings; a few small rubs; both are in excellent original paint. Provenance: Originally found in a home in Iowa. (9,000 - 12,000)

129 Detail

129

Historians agree that Hiram Hotze of Peoria, Illinois, was a talented and meticulous decoy maker. It is said he only used the finest pieces of pine and the highest quality artist oil paints available. His production has been reported as being around 100 canvasback and mallard decoys. A devoted outdoorsman who stamped “H.H.” on most of the weights attached to his decoys, he even went so far as to sign and date the inside of the hollow bodies. More recent information has surfaced proving that Hotze decoys were often sold through the well known Portman’s Sporting Goods Store in Peoria, Illinois. 61


130

130. Bluewing teal hen, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.  Very rare early “round backed” style. Branded Shailer in underside.  Original paint on most of the decoy; minor rougheness to one edge of tail and roughness to edges of bill; old touchup on most of bill; one eye is missing; thin crack through neck. (1,500 - 2,000)

131. Rigmate pair of pintails, Hec Whittington, Oglesby, Illinois, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Drake has slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; very slight roughness to one edge of drake’s tail. (2,000 - 3,000)

131 132. Early three piecedeep “V” style three piece body pintail drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Branded “FJ” in underside.   Original paint with minor to moderate wear; small crack below neck seam on one side; weight is missing; tiny dents. Provenance: Marro collection. (3,000 - 4,000)

132 133. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa late 1930s.    Original paint with minor wear, mostly on one side; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,000)

133 62


134

135

134. Mallard hen and drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  From the Ziegele Rig, branded “JNZ” in undersides. John N. Ziegele an affluent architect from Peoria, Illinois belonged to the Rice Pond Duck Club. He had a large rig of mallards, pintails, and bluebills made by Perdew, most were made in the early 1940s. Hen has slightly turned head.  Original paint with very minor wear; protected by an old coat of varnish; structurally good. (5,000 - 8,000) 135. Rare rigmate pair of ringnecks, Vern Cheeseman, Macomb, Illinois.    Original paint with minor wear on most of the surface; hen has fairly large worn area on underside; perhaps from being stuck in the ice; drake has some wear on underside as well and on the head; structurally good. Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forrest Loomis. (5,000 - 8,000)

134 Detail

63


136

137

136. Rare and stylish bluewing teal drake, Bill Shaw, Pekin, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.  Glass eyes with pencil weight.  Strong original paint has crazed heavily, creating a very desirable surface; a few very small areas of in painting on body and head; several shot marks; hairline crack at bill. (3,500 - 4,500)

64

137. Pintail drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Very slightly turned head. Retains Perdew weight.  Original paint with minor to moderate discoloration and wear; worn to the primer on parts of the back and to bare wood on underside; structurally good. (3,500 - 4,500)


Charles Walker 1876 - 1954 Princeton, Illinois

138 138. Rare mallard drake, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois, circa 1930s.  From the Lawton rig, Princeton Fish and Game Club. Fine comb paint on back and well blended feather painting at wingtips.  Original paint with very slight wear on body; minor wear on head and bill; several tiny dents; retains Walker weight.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (14,000 - 18,000)

138 Detail 65


New York State

Hauled across ice to open water on ice scooter ice boat. The ice scooter and decoys were then put in the water and the hunter shot from the boat. Wilbur Corwin, 1910, probably in Bellport Harbor, sailing ice scooter.

139

139 Detail

139. Merganser hen, George Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Small “scooter” size, total length 13 1/4”, style made for hunting at holes in the ice. “GV” carved in underside.  Original paint with minor wear on head, back, and speculums; old repaint on underside and bill; hit by shot. (5,000 - 8,000)

66


William Bowman

1824 - 1906 Lawrence, Long Island, New York While much about the life of William Bowman remains elusive, some information about him has been generally accepted as fact. He lived his entire life in Maine where he earned a living as a cabinet maker and as a lumberman. He would, however, annually travel to Lawrence on Long Island, New York for the sole purpose of gunning snipe, and he left when the snipe departed. It was on Long Island where he presumably carved his ducks and shorebirds, and he is, thus, best known, and properly referred to, as a Long Island decoy maker. He has been described as somewhat of a hermit, living and working in a tent on the beach or in a nearby fishing shack. His carving output seemed to be in direct proportion to his need for decoys for his own rig or as his supply of available funds dictated. His shorebird carvings characteristically have recessed eye sockets, wings carved in deep natural relief, and possess primaries rising above the tail. As stated in “Gunners Paradise” by Townsend: “The decoys by William Bowman are tours de force of remarkable realism. They combine a craftsman’s absolute control of his medium and a naturalist knowledge of the physical structure and behavior patterns of birds.” While not overly prolific, the quality of his work has unquestionably earned him permanent status as one of the very best of Long Island’s premier carvers. Ref: “The Decoys of Long Island,” Sieger, Timothy, R. 2010. Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Salisbury, MD. Townsend, Jane E. 1979. “Gunners Paradise – Wildfowling and Decoys on Long Island,” Museums at Stony Brook, NY.

140

140. Very rare pintail drake, William Bowman, Lawrence, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with relief wing carving.  Original paint; moderate wear; several very small dents; thin crack through neck; one shot mark in side. Literature: “Decoys of Long Island,” Alan Haid, Timothy Sieger, Geoffrey, Ron McGrath, and Dick Richardson. (5,000 - 8,000)

140 Detail 67


141

142

143

144

145

146

141. Canada goose, Roy Conklin, Clayton, New York.  Balsa body with cedar bottom board, head, and neck.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents. (500 - 800) 142.

Bluebill drake, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  Long tail style with comb paint detail on back. Harris stamp on underside.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; crack in back; slight separation at knot in upper breast. (350 - 550)

143. Black duck by a member of the Verity family, Seaford, Long Island, New York.  Carved eyes.  Mix of old in use repaint and original with moderate wear; crack in back; lightly hit by shot. 68

Provenance: Marro collection.

(400 - 600)

144. Cork body black duck, George Eberhardt, Stoney Brook, New York.  Decoy is in swimming pose.  Original paint on head with minor wear; body appears to be old repaint.

Provenance: Marro collection.

(400 - 600)

145. Cork bodied black duck, George Roberts, Quogue, Long Island, New York.    Appealing old in use repaint; lightly hit by shot; some wear to the cork; crack through neck. (300 - 400) 146. Brant from Long Island, New York, 1st quarter 19th century.  Very slightly turned head.  Working paint; small dents and cracks. (300 - 400)


147

148

149

150

151

152

147.

Bluebill hen from Alexandria Bay, New York.    Original paint with minor wear, mostly on tail. (650 - 950)

148. Pair of mergansers from Long Island, New York, 1st quarter 20th century.  One of several pair found by Jim Andrews in the 1990s. Inlet heads and carved wooden crest.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; a few small cracks. Provenance: Jim Andrews collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

149. Swimming brant, David Cochran, Blue Point, New York.    Original paint with minor wear; thin crack in head secured with a nail a long time ago, appears to be from when the decoy was made.

Provenance: From the Suydam rig, branded “WL Suydam” twice in underside. Formerly in collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey. Hillman collection stamp on underside. (1,600 - 2,000)

150. Bluebill drake, a member of the Verity Family Seaford, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes.  Paint on back and sides is original; the rest has an old second coat; lightly hit by shot. (800 - 1,200) 151. Goldeneye drake, Stevens Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Goiter neck style.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; professional bill repair with touchup in that area; small tail chip missing; hit by shot. (650 - 950) 152. Immature goldeneye drake, Chauncey Patterson, Wellesley Island, New York.  Feather paint detail throughout, including the underside of the decoy.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent. (800 - 1,200)

69


Advertising

153

153. Very rare and desirable DuPont poster, Ballistite, circa 1917.  Dense smokeless shotgun powder. Very desirable image by Charles DeFeo. Retains both top and bottom bands. Measures 30” x 20”. Professionally framed so that bands are exposed. Retains rich color.  Excellent. (7,500 - 9,500)

70


154

154. Rare Peters Cartridge Company calendar, 1908.  Retains calendar page from December. Image of two duck hunters in a sneak boat shooting mallards. Professionally matted and framed to expose both top and bottom bands. Measures 27” x 13 1/2”.  Strong condition with small area of fold marks near bottom right. (6,000 - 8,000)

71


156

155

155. Rare DuPont Company calendar, 1906.  Retains the September page. Measures 30” x 15”. Image of two duck hunters in sneak boat at the end of the day. Professionally matted and framed to show both bands and hang tag.  Very strong original condition.

Provenance: Purchased by the consignor directly from John Delph. (4,500 - 6,500)

156. “Sumpins Gwine to Happen!” an advertisement by Hercules Powder Company, copyright 1925.  Image of black man and son hunting rabbits. Professionally matted and framed.  Tear that has been repaired top right portion of image; a few creases. (800 - 1,000) 157.

72

“Tribute to a Dog,” an advertising poster, Remington firearms.  Artwork by Lynn Bogue Hunt. Measures 23 1/2” x 17”. Professionally matted and framed. Shows both bands and hang tag. Copyright 1929.  Rough area on lower right hand side; small tear approximately 3” on lower right. (800 - 1,000)

157


157A

157A. Winchester Repeating Arms poster entitled, “The Cock of the Woods.” Near mint; retains both metal bands and hanger; two short and barely noticeable folds near the bottom edge.

Provenance: Paul Tudor Jones collection. Formerly in the collection of Dr James McCleery. McCleery stamp on back. Lot 87A in the Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s January 2000 auction. (6,000 - 9,000) 73


158

158

158

159

159

160 158.

Three limited edition prints of waterfowl scenes, Roland Clark.  “Tranquility,” “The Rendezvous,” and “Journey’s End.” All are signed in the margin by the artist.  Fair to good. (950 - 1,250)

159. Two prints illustrated by Richard Bishop.  One is titled “Map of the surface feeding ducks, swans, and geese of North America” and the other is “Map of diving ducks,

74

160 eiders, and merganser of North America.”  Both are professionally framed and in excellent condition. (600 - 900) 160. Two prints, Derrydale Press.  “An Anxious Moment,” Ralph Boyer, signed in the margin, and “Maryland Marsh,” John Frost, limited edition 20/150, signed in the margin.  Good. (800 - 1,200)


Shorebirds

160A

160A. Set of six greater yellowlegs from New Jersey, last quarter 19th century. All are flat sided with iron bills. Mounted on driftwood base. Base is included. Original paint; minor shrinkage and wear; shrinkage is mostly on the tops. (4,500 - 6,500)

160A Detail

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161

162

161. Very rare curlew, Jonas Sprague, Beach Haven, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with good patina and minor wear; bill is an old replacement; a few tiny dents and shot marks. (6,500 - 9,500) 162. Rare ruddy turnstone John Horn, Oceanville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  In spring plumage.  Original paint with good patina and very slight wear; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Formerly owned by John Hillman, two tiny Hillman staples remain right behind the stick hole. Dr. James McCleery collection.

Literature: Dr. James McCleery auction, Guyette & Schmidt Inc./Sotheby’s January 2000, lot 606. Subject of a decoy print published by Brian Hartman, exact decoy showing stand. Stand is included. (6,000 - 9,000)

76


Harry V. Shourds

1861 - 1920 Tuckerton, New Jersey

163

164

163. Small robin snipe in slightly forward pose, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents. (4,500 - 6,500) 164. Exceptional yellowlegs, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Near mint original paint; very minor discoloration on underside; structurally excellent.

Provenance: One of six unused Shourds yellowlegs found in Ocean City, New Jersey. (7,500 - 9,500)

164 Detail

77


165

166

167

165. Rare yellowlegs, Lou Barkalow, Forked River, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  “LB” stamp under the tail.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; moderate wear on the center of one side; a few tiny dents and shot marks. Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., “Shorebirds,” John Levinson and Somers Headly p. 78, exact decoy pictured. (3,500 - 4,500)

78

166. Rare curlew, Taylor Johnson, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; shallow defect in wood in one side; a few small dents. Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (4,000 - 6,000) 167. Ruddy turnstone from New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)


168

169

170

171

172

173

174

168. Curlew, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor wear; protected by an old coat of varnish; hairline cracks and dents; several tiny shot marks. (1,750 - 2,250)

171. Yellowlegs, Ephraim Hildreth, Cape May, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor to moderate discoloration and wear; lightly hit by shot; bill is an old replacement. (1,500 - 2,000)

169. Rare willet, John Horn, Oceanville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; bill is an old replacement; structurally good.

172. Black bellied plover, Rhodes Truex, West Creek, New Jersey, circa 1920.    Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 156. (1,750 - 2,250)

170. Root head plover with removable head, Cape May, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Appealing old in use repaint; most of bill is an old replacement.

173. Yellowlegs from French’s Boatyard, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint; minor flaking and wear; bill is a professional replacement. (400 - 600) 174. “Lumberyard” yellowlegs, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear; bill is an old replacement. (450 - 650)

Literature: “Shorebirds,” John Levinson and Somers Headly, p. 94, exact decoy pictured. (1,200 - 1,500)

79


Midwest John Tax

c.1900 - 1967 Osakis, Minnesota

John Tax - and part of a large catch of “bucket mouths”

John Tax Front yard - field geese and mallards cover the yard

Recognized as one of the Midwest’s greatest waterfowl carvers, John Tax of Osakis, Minnesota, has received much recognition for his full body goose and duck decoys. The life like expressions captured in his hollow carved field decoys has garnered great interest from not only decoy collectors, but also the American Folk Art market. Examples of his decoys can be found in prominent collections across the country. John Tax was a harness maker who inherited his father’s shop in central Minnesota. An avid outdoorsman and talented craftsman, Tax set out to build his own personal hunting rig sometime around 1930. The field decoys consisted of mallards, Canada geese, snow geese, and two speckle bellied geese – in total, about twenty-four.

80


175. Important Canada goose field decoy, John Tax, Osakis, Minnesota. Hollow carved with laminated construction. Slightly turned head with exaggerated bill carving and glass eyes. Thick original paint with very minor wear; minor separation at some of the body seams.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Jim Cook. Formerly in the collection of John Lindgren.

Literature: “Decoys fo the Mississippi Flyway” Alan Haid, p. 66. “Decoys: A North America Survey,” p. 302. “Top of the Line Hunting Collectibles,” Donna Tonelli, acknowledgements page, exact decoy pictured. “last of the prairie carvers,” John Lindgren and Cliff Traff, plate 43. (50,000 - 80,000)

175

81


175 Detail

82


175 Detail

83


176. Rare hollow carved mallard drake from the Kankakee marshes, attributed to Herman Trinosky, last quarter 19th century. Made by the same maker as the well known long neck pintails from Kankakee. The carving was modeled from an early Mason factory premier grade decoy and has a Mason factory weight on the underside. Original paint; minor wear on most of the decoy; moderate wear in a couple of spots on the back; structurally good. Literature: “Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations,� Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 183. (5,000 - 7,000)

176

176 Detail

176 Detail

84


Burlington, Iowa, located on the banks of the Mississippi River, has an important, but not well known, duck hunting history. Iowa was once a paradise for migrating waterfowl. Burlington is located on the “Mighty Mississippi” River, the magnet for the migratory flights of birds in the fall and in the spring. The flights were nothing short of spectacular, and hunters from major cities traveled by train to enjoy the incredible gunning for ducks and geese. About 12 years ago, four of these large oversized mallards in original paint surfaced – the first one showing up on eBay and selling for over $10,000. This particular mallard was part of that original group of four but never made it to eBay. It was traded privately and has been in a midwest collection until this time. We now attribute the maker to be Jacob Scholer of Burlington. While little is known of him, the collecting world quickly elevated his large oversized folk expression mallards to high esteem. Hollowed at the center line, similar to those found in Illinois, and oversized to capture the attention of the migrating flocks of mallards using the Burlington area rivers as their migration route south, there is little doubt that Scholer mallards were the envy of all the local Iowa hunters.

177. Rare oversize mallard drake, Jacob Scholer, Burlington, Iowa, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with good form.  Original paint with fine detail and minor wear; protected by an old coat of varnish; a few tiny dents. (9,000 - 12,000)

177

177 Detail

177 Detail

85


178

179

180

181

182

184

183

178. Bluebill drake, Joseph Wooster.  Signed, “Good hunting Joseph Buckeye Joe Wooster. Broadbill drake made for my own rig of hunting decoys.” Relief wing carving with carved crossed wingtips and fluted tail.  Excellent and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

182. Hollow carved canvasback drake from Michigan.  Branded “F. J. Brogan” in underside “F.J. Brogan” is also stamped in the weight.  Appealing old in use repaint; minor flaking and wear; structurally good. (350 - 450)

179. Rare hollow carved bluebill from Ohio, 3rd quarter 19th century. Gouge feather carving under tail and shoebutton eyes. Original paint with moderate discoloration and minor wear; two short cracks under tail; wear on the top of the head. (1,500 - 2,000)

183.

180. Black duck with relief wingtip carving.  Loop feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good; short crack under tail. (400 - 600) 181. Oversize hollow carved black duck from Michigan.    Appealing old in use repaint; short crack in back. (400 - 600) 86

Hollow carved lowhead style redhead drake, from Lake St. Clair, Michigan.    Paint has been restored; numerous small dents and shot marks. (300 - 500)

184. Hollow carved Canada goose, Butch Schram, Algonac, Michigan.  Tail has been blunted slightly.  Original and good. (300 - 500)


185

186

185. Oversize canvasback drake, Ole Gunderson, Ashby, Minnesota.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear at two spots on the back; several short hairline cracks. (5,000 - 8,000) 186. Very rare immature canvasback drake, Joe Marr, Heron Lake, Minnesota.  Retains original keel. Tack eyes and painted as an early fall or immature canvasback drake. Head swivels over top of body.  Strong original paint; a few small dents scrapes and crazing. (2,500 - 3,500)

185 Detail

87


Toronto Harbor Shorebirds

Southam family member shorebird hunting Toronto Waterfront over the family rig, circa 1900

At least ten different species of Toronto Harbor shorebirds have been identified including yellowlegs, curlews, knots, ruddy turnstones, dunlins, sanderlings, golden plovers, black bellied plovers, blue herons, and gulls. Common characteristics include having two wire legs – many bound with cloth or leather at the transition point from the wooden body to the wire legs, simulating thighs. Bills are both iron and wood, and bodies vary from plump full figures to “flatties.� Eyes vary from glass to tacks to simply paint.

88


187. Rare robin snipe in spring plumage, Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.  On two wire legs with the original wooden block stabilizer located midway down the legs. Extra fine feather paint detail on back and sides.  Original paint with good patina and very slight wear; four tiny shot marks on one side. (9,000 - 12,000)

187 Detail

187

89


188. Rare ruddy turnstone on two wire legs, Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.  Cloth thighs.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on the underside; hit by shot. (6,500 - 9,500)

188

188 Detail

90


189. Rare dunlin with two wire legs from Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.  Original iron bill and shoe button eyes. Cloth wrapped around part of wire legs upper to simulate thighs.  Original paint; with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; wooden base is a replacement.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. (6,000 - 9,000)

189

190. Robin snipe on wire legs from Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; thin chip missing from underside of bill; lightly hit by shot; wooden base is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

190

191. Ruddy turnstone on wire legs, Toronto Harbor, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Tack eyes.  Appealing old in use repaint with minor flaking and wear; one tiny shot mark; base is an old replacement.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. (3,000 - 4,000)

191 91


Decoratives Harold Haertel Dundee, Illinois

193

192

194

195

196

197

192. Two shorebirds, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  A Mongolian plover signed and dated 1987, and a snowy plover. Both have detailed feather carving and raised wingtips.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(1,400 - 1,800)

193. Very rare white wing dove, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  “HH” stamped in underside. In resting pose. Relief wing carving with detailed feather carving at wingtips and at tail.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)

194. Black necked stilt, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  In resting pose with relief wing carving. Detailed feather carving at wingtips.  Excellent and original. (900 - 1,200) 195. Mourning dove with slightly turned head, Harold 92

Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Fine paint detail.  Excellent and original. Provenance: Miller collection.

(650 - 950)

196. Sleeping bluewing teal hen, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Signed and dated 1982. Relief wing carving with slightly raised and crossed wingtips. Bill is buried in feathers.  Paint is original and very good.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(900 - 1,200)

197. Gadwall drake, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Cork body with “TH” carved under the bill. Signed by Harold Haertel in underside. From Tom Haertel’s gunning rig. Head is slightly turned. Well executed paint pattern. Originally purchased at one of the Mackey sales. Lot 196 in the October 1974 Richard Bourne auction.  Strong original paint; small area of paint missing along edge of bill. (1,500 - 1,800)


198

198 Detail

198. Rare pair of harlequin ducks, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Signed and dated 1967. Drake is in content pose. Hen has a slightly turned head. Both have carved wingtips.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection. (3,500 - 4,500)

199

199. Pintail drake, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Signed and dated 1985. Alert head that is slightly turned. Very detailed scratch feather painting on back and side pockets. Well executed feather carving on back and extended and split wingtips.  Excellent and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

200

200. Pintail hen, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Signed and dated 1977. Raised and slightly turned head. Carved wingtips. Fine feather detailing. Accompanied by five baby pintail ducklings, each of which is signed and dated.  Excellent and original. (1,750 - 2,250)

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201

202

203

204

205

206

201. Ring neck drake, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Carved primaries and secondaries. Fluted tail. Signed “For the Oleynick collection. Harold Haertel 1977.”  Slight wear to paint at tip of tail otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Personius collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)

202. Pied billed grebe in summer plumage, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Signed. Relief wing carving, and slightly turned and lifted head.   (650 - 950) 203.

Full size greenwing teal drake, William Schultz.  Signed, “Original for bronze July 1979,” bronze is lot 124 in this auction. Detialed feather carving, slightly turned nestled head.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Personius collection.

94

(1,750 - 2,250)

204. Fulvous tree duck, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Signed and dated by Jim on underside, 1984. Hollow carved with slightly turned head.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 205. Hollow carved redhead hen, Allan Bell.  Signed and dated 1993. Good paint detail. Nestled and slightly turned head.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(800 - 1,200)

206. Hollow carved redhead drake, Allan Bell, Toronto, Ontario.  Signed “Bell 04”. Well sculpted carving with turned and slightly nestled head, as well as carved crossed wingtips.  Excellent and original. (950 - 1,250)


207. Standing black duck, Mark Holland, Florence, Oregon.  Signed and dated 1979. Turned head with open mouth. Raised wings and fanned tail.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

208. Hollow carved redhead drake, Jim Foote.  Signed and dated 1976, with inscription “1st place Canadian Nat 1976”. Fine carving and paint detail. Nestled head.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

207

209. Ring neck drake in content pose, William Schultz.  Signed, “Carved for Doug Miller, William Schultz 5/20/75.”  Very slight discoloration from sap on one upper side, otherwise excellent and original. Provenance: Personius collection. (2,000 - 3,000) 210. Walking lesser yellowlegs, Bob White. Relief wingtip carving and slightly turned head.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(800 - 1,200)

210A. Small standing Canada goose, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey. Approximately 9” tall. Turned head, relief wingtip carving. Signed under the base. Near mint original paint with good patina; structurally very good.

Provenance: Miller collection.

208

(900 - 1,200)

210B. “Thwarted,” a wooden carving of a cow moose protecting a calf from a bear, Alexander Dumas. Signed and dated 1987. Carving stands approximately 12-1/2” tall. Original and good.

Provenance: Miller collection.

210

(400 - 600)

210A

209

210B

95


Ontario George Warin

1830 - 1905 Toronto, Ontario

211

211 Detail

211. Exceptional solid body redhead drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, 3rd quarter 19th century.  “CRH” written on the underside. “NB” is scratched into one of the weights. Decoy is also branded “G and J Warin”. Raised neck seat. Outstanding paint detail.  Original paint with almost no wear, except on the underside; several tiny tacks have been added to underside of bill to prevent cracking. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Laura and Gerry Whitmarsh, who purchased it around 45 years ago in Prince Edward County between Wellington and Bloomfield, from descendants of Nathaniel Branscombe. Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 64. (10,000 - 14,000)

96


212. Rare hollow carved pintail drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Branded “FTM” and “Bunbury”.  Original paint with good detail and minor to moderate wear; lightly hit by shot; professional repair to a shallow chip missing from center of top of the tail. (10,000 - 14,000)

212

212 Detail

97


213. Solid body style pair of mallards, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Fine paint detail.   Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; thin crack partway through hen’s neck. (3,500 - 4,500)

213

214

214. Hollow carved canvasback hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Oak Lake style. Branded “JRW maker” on underside, along with painted brand “G. R. C.”.  Strong original paint; fine feather combing on back; several shot marks in body and head; subtle wing feather painting on brown areas of breast and tail; bill is a professional restoration with an “H” carved on underside probably for TJ Hooker. (3,500 - 4,500) 215. Hollow carved redhead hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.   Numerous small “g’s” are stamped in the underside. Raised neck seat and subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint; very minor wear; lightly hit by shot. (3,500 - 4,500)

215 216. Redhead drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “FTM” for Fred T. McMillan, St. Clair Flats Shooting Club member.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,000)

216 98


217.

Pair of long body style canvasbacks, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Both are hollow and branded “Geo M. Hendrie”. Drake has tight comb painting on back area and sides.  Original paint; paint on breast has crazed slightly; each has several shot marks; a few small dents; hen’s breast is crazed lightly and has a crack in the neck. (8,000 - 12,000)

217

217 Detail

99


Bob Jones

1861 - 1937 Demorestville, Ontario

Bob Jones with four of his grandchildren c. 1925

Until his mid-twenties, Bob Jones made his livelihood by farming with his father. He then worked as a blacksmith in Demorestville from about 1890 to about 1920 when he moved back to a farm near Johnstown. Here, he worked the land, continued to blacksmith, and supplemented his income with trapping. In 1936 during the depression, the family lost the farm and moved to Belleville. Misfortune followed Jones when he was struck and killed while fixing a flat tire near a bridge near Picton. As noted by Jim Stewart: “The decoys made by Robert J. Jones are some of the finest Canadian decoys. Their skillful carving shows the hand of a craftsman, their graceful form the eye of an artist. In the Prince Edward County – Belleville region, no other carver matched the innovative variety of decoy poses created by Jones – and the quality of his carvings was matched by very few.” Jones made decoys as early as the 1880s and continued to carve into his 70s. The splendid tucked head redhead in the McCleery auction (lot 59) was mislabeled as an Ivar Fernlund and represents some of his best work.

218 Detail

100


218. Important hollow carved redhead drake in content pose, Bob Jones, Demorestville, Ontario.  Very wide body. Head is in nestled pose with raised neck.  Near mint original paint with good patina; subtle combing with feather paint at speculums. Provenance: Formerly in collection of Jim McCleery, McCleery collection stamp on underside. Also auction label indicating it was lot 59. Literature: “Call to the Sky,” Robert Shaw, p. 95, exact decoy pictured. “North American Decoys,” Summer 1978, p. 7, Byron Cheever. (35,000 - 45,000)

218

218 Detail

101


219

220

221

222

223

224

219. Solid body redhead hen, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “Thos. Chambers, Maker,” and “JT McMillan.”  Original paint with a few small rubs on the sides; crack in back. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates. (1,750 - 2,250) 220. Canvasback drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Early style branded “Geo. M. Hendrie”.  Paint appears to be a very old second coat that has crazed and worn off in some areas; knot at front of breast. (1,800 - 2,000) 221.

102

Goldeneye drake, Sam Hutchings, Jones Falls, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Detailed feather carving.   Appealing old in use repaint; with moderate wear; fairly large shallow tail chip; minor roughness to other

side of tail.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 147. (1,750 - 2,250) 222. Pair of wood ducks, D.W. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Species, maker, and location painted on underside by Nichol. Both have raised carved wingtips.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(1,600 - 2,000)

223. Rare hollow carved bufflehead drake from Ontario.    Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; several small dents. (1,500 - 2,500) 224. Rare solid body style redhead hen, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, late 3rd quarter 19th century.  Branded “T.H.M.”.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on head and bill; a few tiny dents. (1,500 - 2,500)


Sam Hutchings

1894 - 1995 Jones Falls, Ontario The general consensus among decoy historians is that all of these carvings, with their meticulous cross hatching and finely carved wings, originated from an area surrounding two rural villages, not far from Jones Falls where the Hutchings family farms were located. Sam is the family member often credited with being the architect of these outstanding examples of Canadian folk art. Sam followed his father in the dairy business and worked a 100-acre plot of land with his wife, Jean. Upon the death of his father, he bought a dump truck and backhoe and went into the construction business. In the off season, he trapped and produced maple syrup. It is believed that the decoys credited to him were made between 1908 and 1914 consisting of one or two small rigs of mergansers and several pairs of goldeneyes. What the family didn’t use for their own rig, Hutchings sold for $4 apiece to local hunters. His favorite duck blind was on Crow Lake, and he often would store his decoys nearby in a trapping shack rather than haul them the required three miles back home. Unfortunately, 20 of the decoys were stolen from the shack in 1970. Today, the quality of the decoys produced by this maker firmly places them in the upper tier of designs to emerge from the Rideau Canal Waterway.

225

225. Exceptionally well carved goldeneye drake, Sam Hutchings, Jones Falls, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Fine cross hatch carving detail on body. Relief wing carving with feather detail.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally very good. Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, editor.

(6,000 - 9,000)

225 Detail

103


Sporting Art 226

226. A setter and pointer on point, oil on board, T. Bailey.  Signed lower right “T. Bailey”. Image size 24” x 35”.   Very small amounts of in painting to areas that have flaked. (800 - 1,000)

227. Oil on board of flying geese and decoys, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Image size 21 1/2” x 25”.  One small hole in each upper corner from where painting was screwed to the wall; paint loss in upper left corner; vertical cracks in paint on much of the painting; small paint flakes missing from lower half.

228

Provenance: Whittington collection. (1,500 - 2,000)

227 228. Watercolor of retriever with duck, Nick Klepinger.  Professionally matted and framed. Image size 30” x 25”. Signed.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

104


229

230

231

229.

232

Oil on canvas of flying geese, Walter Hemenway.  Signed. Painting was used for the cover of “Golden Life” magazine. image size 25 1/2” x 19 1/2”.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200)

230. “Brant, Great South Bay, Long Island,” watercolor on paper, David Hagerbaumer.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 7” x 9”.  Very good and original. (400 - 600)

231. Watercolor of flying ducks, Lee Cable.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 9 1/2” x 12” 1/2”.  Very good and original. (500 - 800) 232. Caribou, watercolor on paper, Charles Liedl.  Professionally matted and framed. Image size 11” x 15-1/2”.  Small mark of discoloration in upper righthand corner, otherwise very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

105


233

233. Oil on canvas of fish and teal.  Image size 22” x 32”.  Original and good.

234

235

106

Provenance: Larry Hughes estate. (2,000 - 3,000)

234. Pastel on board of fish and creel.  Unsigned. Image size 17 1/2” x 39”.  Some discoloration and wear. (600 - 900)

235. Canada geese setting wings, a gouache on paper board by Lynn Bogue Hunt.  Signed in the lower left, and the word “Rough” indicating it is a study written below name. On the back it is signed “Edgar Burke, Jersey City, New Jersey,” indicating property of. Framed behind glass.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)


236

237 236

238

236

236

236. Set of four pencil drawings, Lem Ward, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated ‘82. Image sizes 7” x 10”. Frame sizes 12” x 15”.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 237. Oil painting on canvas, Daniel Loge.  Signed in the lower right. 19 1/2” x 25 1/2”. Image of duck hunter in boat with canvasbacks circling.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 238. Oil on canvas, William Eaton.  Hunters in blind talking with land owner. Probably done as an illustration. Image size 23 1/2” x 22”.  Very thick oil palette which has crazed in some areas. (800 - 1,200)

238A

238A. Oil on canvas of an avocet, Lem Ward, Crisfield, Maryland. Signed and dated, 1983. Image size 14” x 18”. Very good and original. (500 - 800)

107


239

239. Virginia partridge, J.J. Audubon, chromolith by J. Bien, New York, 1859.  Plate Number 289, Number 102. Professionally framed and matted. Image shown measures 25-3/8” x 36-1/2”. Retains bold colors.  A few very tiny spots of discoloration. (5,000 - 7,000)

108


240. Canvas backed duck, J.J. Audubon, chromolith by J. Bien, New York, 1860.  “View of Baltimore.” Plate Number 395, Number 15-1. Professionally matted and framed. Image showing measures 25 3/4” x 37 1/2”.  Slight discoloration where matting meets frame on lower edge; otherwise retains strong color; very good condition; frame has some rubs and scratches. (3,000 - 5,000)

240

241

241. “Pin tailed duck,” J.J. Audubon, engraved, printed, and colored by R. Havell, 1834.  Number 46, Plate CCXXVII. Professionally framed and matted. Image showing measures 20 1/2” x 26”.  Several very small spots of dark discoloration. (1,200 - 1,800)

109


Wisconsin Joseph Sieger

1871 - 1959 Tustin, Wisconsin Joseph Sieger was born on the family farm on the northwest shore of Lake Poygan. Of German descent, he and his wife, Addie, had one son named Grant. Joe spent his life as a farmer and must have been fairly prosperous as he is listed in various census records as owning his own farm and having employees. In addition to farming, he also rented his marshland along the Wolf River to hunters. The surrounding waters were so rich in food that they attracted thousands of migrating waterfowl and the area became known as the “Canvasback Capital of the World.” An accomplished woodworker, he made many of his own hunting and fishing accoutrements in addition to some fine violins which he enjoyed playing. He became close friends with fellow decoy legend August Moak, and the two occasionally hunted together. It is reported that his production of his now famous canvasbacks was limited to perhaps two or three dozen, apparently all for his personal use. His decoys rank among the finest of early Wisconsin decoys. Joseph Sieger

Ref.:Spengler, David J. 2000. “Joseph Sieger – A Master Craftsman.” Decoy Magazine, March/April 2000.

242 Detail

110

242 Detail


242. Stately hollow carved canvasback drake, Joseph Sieger, Tustin, Wisconsin.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents.

Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of the Great Lakes,” Donna Tonelli. (15,000 - 20,000)

242

111


243

244

243. Hollow carved canvasback drake, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin.    Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot. (4,000 - 6,000)

112

244. Canvasback drake, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin.  “J. Stransky” is painted on the underside, also “JS”.  Original paint with minor wear and discoloration; thin crack at neck base and partway through bill; working touchup at bottom board seam. (3,000 - 4,000)


245

245.

Oversize canvasback hen and drake,Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin.    Original paint with very minor wear; old overpaint has been taken off the underside of the drake; hen has some overpaint on the underside and a short crack in one side.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (7,500 - 9,500)

245 Detail

113


246. Pair of canvasbacks, Frank Strey, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, 1st half 20th century.  Both have slightly turned heads. Hen has “FE” carved in underside.  Strong original paint protected by an old coat of varnish that has yellowed slightly, mostly on drake. (1,500 - 1,800)

246

247

248

249

250

247. Oversize and hollow carved mallard drake, Joseph Gigl, Princeton, Wisconsin.  Approximately 24” long.  Original paint with minor wear; neck filler repair with touchup in that area; chip missing from one side of tail. (900 - 1,200) 248. Canvasback drake, Sylvester “Swede” Swedesky, Neenah, Wisconsin, circa 1930.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents. (800 - 1,200)

114

249. Canvasback hen, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin.  From the Sorge rig. Branded “MRS”.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear on much of the decoy; touchup on breast and most of the bill; small chip missing from underside of bill; thin crack in tail.

Literature: “Decoys of the Winnebago Lakes,” p. 83. (800 - 1,200)

250. Oversize redhead drake, Frank Strey, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.    Original paint with minor wear; hit by shot; thin crack in underside. (500 - 700)


Calls 250A. Duck call, William Clifford, River Forest, Illinois. Barrel has two metal bands and stopper has one. Very good and original. (3,000 - 5,000)

250A 250B. Rare and important duck call, William Clifford, River Forest, Illinois. Five brick style on barrel with two types of wood. Very good and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

250B

250C. Rare and important duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois. Measures 5�. Three checkered panels on barrel. Protected by a coat of varnish. Appears to have never been used. Excellent and original. (2,000 - 3,000

250C

115


250D

250E

250G

250F

250H

250D. Duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Carved for VL&A Sporting Goods store, Chicago, Illinois. Checkered teardrop design with “V.L.&A.” carved inside. Very good and original.

Provenance: From an estate in Missouri.

(1,750 - 2,250)

250E. Rare and important duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois. Measures 5 3/4”. Three checkered panels on barrel. Protected by a coat of varnish. Appears to have never been used. Excellent and original. (2,000 - 3,000) 250F. Four crow calls, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Smallest measures 3-1/8” long. The three larger size read: “Pat. Nov 2, 1909, Chas. H. Perdew, Henry, Illinois”. All show in use wear. (600 - 800)

250I

250J

250G. Three crow calls. Two cedar calls by Charles Perdew, Henry Illinois. One small and one large. Third call is by an unknown maker, also carved from cedar. All three calls show average wear. (300 - 500) 250H. Two duck calls, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois. One measures 4 1/2”, never been varnished. The other 4”. Longer call is missing wedge block, otherwise excellent. (800 - 1,200) 250I. Duck call, Duncan Taylor. Three panel checkered barrel. 5 1/4” with two lead bands, probably added at a later point around barrel. Small area of damage to one checkered panel; tight crack in barrel; wedge block and reed appear to be replaced. (1,800 - 2,200) 250J. Duck call, Ben Jon, Memphis, Tennessee. Light wood barrel with rosewood stopper. All parts appear original. Light wear; label on barrel is partially worn off; a few small scratches in stopper and wedge block. (800 - 1,000)

116


250K

250L

250N

250K. Hazard Powder Company blue ribbon hanger DuPont shooting medal, Western Party 1899, Grand American handicap. Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 250L. Very rare Chamberlin cartridges 10 gauge shotgun shell box with shells. Original and good. (600 - 900) 250M. Three 100 count shotgun shell boxes. Including Union Metallic Cartridge Company Magic, GL Wood and Sons Universal cartridges, and Winchester repeater. Original and good. (600 - 900)

250M

250O

250N. Seven shotgun shell boxes. Including Winchester NuBlack, smokeless powder pointer, DuPont redhead, and Peters high velocity 36 gauge. Varies from very good to fair. (650 - 950) 250O. Seven shotgun shell boxes. Including Peters League and Leader and High Velocity. Western Field load, CAC Black Smokeless. Fair to good. (600 - 900)

117


250P

250Q

250R

250S

250T

250P. Rare gunpowder tin, Austin Powder Company, Cleveland, Ohio. “Club Sporting.” Small discoloration and rubs on front label, can has numerous scratches and imperfections. (400 - 600) 250Q. 9 various sizes of gunpowder tins. Includes Gray-Dittmar Powder, Dupont, Hercules, American, and Matthews & Sons. Conditions vary from good to average. (800 - 1,000) 250R. Three glass target balls, all from London. Amethyst color is a Greener, the light blue is E. Jones Gunmaker, and the dark blue is a Greener. Very good. (600 - 800) 118

250S. Three glass target balls, one American, two from London. Amber color is Ira Paine, purple has image of shooter and is an English shooter ball, green is also a shooter ball with shooter on each side. Very good. (600 - 800) 250T. 13 various sizes of gunpowder tins. Includes Indian Powder, Lafflin & Rand, Hazard Powder, King Powder, Dupont, and Nobel’s. Conditions vary from good to poor. (800 - 1,000)


Fish 251

251A

252 251. Watercolor of a northern pike, B.K. Hall. Signed. Inscribed on bottom right corner is “Caught by FW Blackmer and RB Dodge, Jr. at Feb 26, 1892 at Tatnuck Mills. Weight 5.5 lbs.” Image of pike near weedy bottom with small bait fish swimming above. Image size 12” x 33 1/2”. Professionally framed. Small stain on left edge near frame, otherwise very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400) 251A. Trade sign carved in the shape of a fish, probably a carp from the Midwest, 1st half 20th century. Fish has stamped carved scales and is painted on both sides. 37” x 14 1/2”. (500 - 800)

253 252. Fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan. 7 1/4” in length. Original surface with varnished wood sections and painted wood sections. Structurally good. Anal fin missing. (950 - 1,250) 253. Pike fish decoy from Minnesota.  Unknown maker. 7 1/2” in length. Stylish fish with open mouth and detailed metal fins.  Original paint appears to have been hit by a spear and had a piece of wood reglued to one side; some fins are bent with minor rust. (700 - 900)

119


254. Fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.  Sucker. 5 1/2” in length. 3/4” wide. Tack eyes.  Strong original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; small amount of paint missing at top fin. (700 - 1,000)

254

255.

Rare cisco fish decoy, Bunn King, Upper Peninsula, Michigan.  11” in length with articulated swivel tail. Textured body and button eyes.  Original paint; mild in use wear. (600 - 900)

255

256

256. Unusually large frog spearing decoy, possibly Minnesota, circa 1940.  10 1/4” in length. Large brass tack eyes with copper line tie, side fins, and feet. Feet have been attached with screws and bolts. Has heavy belly weight on underside.  Strong original paint; that has discolored slightly with age; a few areas of flaking; otherwise very good and original. (600 - 800)

257. Large perch spearing decoy from the Goulette Family, Mount Clemens, Michigan.  12” long. Tack eyes.  Original paint with areas of flaking; tip of rear fin has been broken and reattached; otherwise original and good. (600 - 800)

257

258. Two fish decoys from Michigan.  Perch by Andy Trombley and shiner by Discher. Perch measures 7.5” and is very good and original. Shiner measures 6” and has original paint with crazing.   (700 - 1,000)

258 120


259. Fish decoy, Boelter, Minnesota.  5 1/2” in length.  Original paint; one small gouge on underside otherwise original and good. (300 - 500)

259 260. Fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.  Perch. 6” in length. Tack eyes. 3/4” wide.  Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; colors above eye and fin varies very slightly from traditional Peterson fish. (700 - 1,000)

260 261. Fish decoy, Frank Mizera.  Black with small fish symbols on fish, four on each side and three on top. 9” in length. Typical line striping on both fins and tail.  Strong original paint that has mellowed nicely; very small mark at one side. (800 - 1,000)

261 262. Flower fish, Leroy Howell.  Yellow with white and red dots. 6 1/2” in length.  Slight discoloration on tops of fins, otherwise original and good. (700 - 900)

262 263. Rare fish decoy, William Faue, Minnesota.  Tan and white paint with metal fins. Measures 10 1/2” in length.  Original paint that has worn and crazed; slight roughness at tip of face. (800 - 1,000)

263 264. Two fish decoy, Leroy Howell, Minnesota.  A bass with natural finish and red paint over part of the head, measuring 6.5” long. And an orange and white fish.  Original and good. (500 - 700)

264 121


265. Sturgeon fish decoy, probably from Wisconsin, circa 1930.  18” long with well carved gills and metal fins.  Original paint; tail is a possible working replacement. (800 - 1,200)

265

266. Sturgeon spearing decoy, Wisconsin.  30” in length. Metal fins with inset wooden tail. Tack eyes.  Original paint; a few small gouges from light wear. (500 - 700) 267.

266

Sturgeon spearing decoy, Wisconsin.  22” in length.  Original yellow and red paint with a coat of glitter; tip of tail has been broken off; small area of flaking on metal fin. (300 - 500)

268. Fish decoy, Alex Meldrum, Mount Clemens, Michigan.  11 1/2” long. Curved body with carved gill and mouth.  Old paint that has been strengthened; tail is broken and reattached in two places. (600 - 800) 269. 7 1/2” long fish decoy from Lake Chautauqua, New York, last quarter 19th century. Metal fins. Carved gills. Tack eyes, and curved leather tail. Worn old surface, structurally good. (600 - 900)

267

268

270. Rare fishing plug, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.  Yellow jacket. Measures 2 1/2” in length. Has two treble hooks.  Original paint; natural finish with black, white and red painted features; structurally good. (500 - 700) 271. Reproduction of an Oscar Peterson fish vase, Reggie Birch, Chincoteague, Virginia.   Signed. Approximately. 10 “ tall.  Very good and original.

269

270 122

271

Provenance: Doggart collection. (500 - 800)


272. Ten fish decoys from Minnesota and Wisconsin.  Including a large sucker by Arno Lau of Hilbert Wisconsin. Others by various makers, including a unique red and silver pan fish, a green and gold fish with extremely curved tail and at fins.  All but one in original paint. (600 - 800)

272

273. Eight fish decoys from Michigan.  Five of which are attributed to Marv Mason. Also a sucker by Irvin Steward.  All Mason’s are in original paint and structurally good; one possibly has a replaced tail; sucker is in original paint with some staining on one side. (1,000 - 1,200)

273

274. Brook trout fish decoy, A.J. Downey, Michigan, circa 1970.  14” in length. Well executed original paint. Weight on underside with Downey’s name.  Very good and original; area of tail has been broken and reglued.

Provenance: Chodorov collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)

274 123


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

275

276

277

278

279

280

275. Pintail drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; touchup to small area at tail and neck filler; neck filler is intact; several tiny dents on back.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(1,000 - 1,400)

276. Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; neck filler appears to be professionally replaced; crack in each side.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(950 - 1,250)

277. Pintail drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; worn area on one lower side; professional touchup where neck joins body. 124

Provenance: Personius collection.

(1,000 - 1,400)

278. Canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade, Seneca Lake model.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few very small dents; “in factory” filled crack in back; very small area on one side where factory filler has fallen out of a defect in the wood. (950 - 1,250) 279. Greenwing teal drake, Hayes Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint that has darkened with age and has minor wear; much of the neck filler is missing; fairly wide crack in underside. (950 - 1,250) 280. Mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early premier grade style with snakey head. “RR” carved in underside.  Original paint with moderate wear and discoloration; hit by shot. (900 - 1,200)


281

282

283

284

285

286

287

288

289

281. Pintail hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; professional tail chip repair; a few small dents; touchup on part of the bill.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(800 - 1,200)

282. Bluewing teal hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes. Branded “Walker” in underside.  Original paint with minor wear; slight roughness on one lower side; fairly large knot missing from one side of tail; most of the neck filler is gone; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(800 - 1,200)

283. Pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Rare standard paint eye models.  Original paint with minor wear; hen has a crack in the back; and most of the neck filler missing; drake has a small crack in the neck filler.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(800 - 1,200)

284. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Challenge grade.  Original paint protected by a light coat of varnish; very small chip at end of tail; tight crack running through back; tight crack at neck; structurally good. (800 - 1,000)

285. Canvasback hen and drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; some of the drake’s neck filler is missing; each has a couple of thin cracks in lower half of body; small amount of varnish on flat area of underside of drake; hairline crack on hen’s bill. (650 - 950) 286. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.   Challenge grade.  Repainted as a widgeon; some original showing; thin crack in underside; small defect in wood in lower side; very lightly hit by shot. (600 - 1,000) 287. Merganser drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; neck filler has been replaced; most of bill is a professional replacement; crack in underside; worn area on one lower side. (400 - 600) 288. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with painted eyes.  Original paint with very slight wear; some of the neck filler is missing; a few rough spots on underside where weights were taken off. (300 - 400) 289. Early bluebill hen with turned head, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.   Original paint with moderate wear; a few small dents and shot marks; around half of the neck filler is missing. (350 - 450) 125


Ontario

290

291

292

293

294

295

290. Pair of greenwing teal, D.W. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Drake is identified on the underside by Nichol.  Very good and original. (950 - 1,250) 291. Pair of goldeneye, D.W. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Signed and identified on the underside.  Original and good. (750 - 1,000) 292. Pair of mallards, D.W. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Identified and signed on the underside. Hen has very slightly turned head.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(650 - 950)

293. Pair of hollow carved redheads, Don Reid, Hamilton, Ontario.  Both are branded “DR”.  Old in use repaint; 126

wooden pins through neck, part of one pin has come out. (650 - 950) 294. Hollow carved redhead hen, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Earlier style with reared back head and raised neck seat. Branded “Geo. M. Hendrie”.  Original paint with moderate wear; filler added near original rectangular plug in the back; lightly hit by shot. (650 - 950) 295. Two decoys, D.W. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Bluewing teal and greenwing teal drakes. Both are identified on undersides. Bluewing teal has very slightly turned head.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

(650 - 950)


296

297

298

299

300

301

296. Pair of hooded mergansers, Oliver King, Port Severn, Ontario.  Relief wingtip carving and slightly lifted heads.  Very good and original. (500 - 800) 297. Hollow carved redhead drake, David Ward, Toronto, Ontario, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Branded “WRP”.  Appealing old in use repaint; hit by shot; many shot marks have small wooden plugs in them. Literature: “Decoying St. Clair to St. Lawrence,” Barney Crandall, p. 198, rigmate. (500 - 800) 298. Redhead drake, D.W. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Comb paint detail.  Original paint; minor wear; structurally good. (500 - 700)

299. American merganser hen, Lawrence Davis, Ontario.  Relief wing carving and slightly lifted head.   Original paint with very minor wear; small chip missing from tip of bill. (500 - 700) 300. Redhead drake, D.W. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Good comb paint detail.  Excellent and original. (400 - 600) 301. Large mallard drake, Frances Patterson, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with significant shrinkage on back; minor wear; long thin defect in wood in one side; a few small dents. (350 - 450)

127


Contemporary

303

302

305

304

306

307

302. Two sickle billed curlews, David Personius.  Signed and dated 2017. Both have iron bills. Both are hollow and have relief wing carving.  Very good and original. (600 - 800) 303. Lowhead style black duck, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania.  Bob White weight on underside.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

(650 - 950)

304. Pair of hooded mergansers, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Each is stamped “G Strunk” in the weight and signed. Hen is in content pose, drake has slightly turned head.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

(650 - 950)

305. Pair of bluewing teal, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  “Strunk” is stamped in each weight. Both have carved, crossed wingtips and slightly turned head.  Excellent and original.

(650 - 950)

306. Oversize eider drake, Keith Mueller, Killingworth, Connecticut.  Signed. Good feather carving detail.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; a few tiny dents. (650 - 950) 307. Pair of black ducks, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Each is stamped “G Strunk” in the weight. One is in content pose, the other a slightly turned head.  Very good and original.

128

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

(650 - 950)


308

309

310

311

312

313

314

315

316

308. Pair of pintails, Ben Heinemann.  Signed, also have embossed weights. Both have carved crossed wingtips and slightly turned heads.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

310. Brant in swimming pose, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  “G Strunk” stamped in weight. Head is slightly turned.  Several very small marks on one side, otherwise very good and original. (400 - 600)

311. Oversize black duck carved in the Eastern Shore of Virginia tradition, Ira Skees.  Signed. Inlet head and raised wingtip carving.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good.

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

(500 - 800)

309. Ruddy turnstone, Bob Brown, Barnegat, New Jersey.  Relief wing carving, glass eyes, and turned head. “RJ Brown” stamp in underside.  Very good and original. (400 - 600)

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

Slightly turned head and raised crossed wingtips.  Thin crack in underside, otherwise very good and original.

(400 - 600)

312. Wood duck drake, Len Carnaghi, Romeo, Michigan.  Signed and dated 2003. Also branded “LC”.

Literature: “Decoys: Sixty Living and Outstanding North American Carvers,” Loy Harrell, exact decoy pictured. (350 - 550)

313. Wood duck drake, Woodson Roddy, Clinton, Missouri.  Signed and dated 2005.  Very good and original. Literature: “Decoys: Sixty Living and Outstanding North American Carvers,” Loy Harrell, exact decoy pictured. (350 - 450) 314. Rowley Horner style brant, George Stump.  “G. Stump” carved in underside.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (300 - 400) 315. Stylish wood duck pair, Gene Konopasek, Chicago, Illinois.  Both in preening position.  Both good and original. (300 - 500) 316. Preening black bellied plover, Jerry Siloski.    Original paint that has been aged; two small shot marks.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(250 - 350)

End of Session One 129


Session Two

Friday, April 27, 2018 – 11:00 AM

Ontario John Cooper Reeves was the eldest son of Phineas Reeves (1833-1896) who was the patriarch of three generations of decoy carvers, boat builders, duck guides, and club managers. John Reeves was the first bookkeeper of the Long Point Company, which was established in 1866 as a prestigious hunting club on the North Shore of Lake Erie in Ontario, Canada. Working at Long Point with his father Phineas, the father/son team guided and made decoys for club members. They used the same patterns, and their decoys were very similar. John made teal, black, mallard, pintail and goose decoys. In the late 1880s, John moved to the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company (established as a hunting club in 1874) as the club manager. The club is often referred to as The Canada Club and/or The Toronto Club.

317

317. Important hollow carved Canada goose, attributed to John Reeves, Port Rowan, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Believed to be an earlier “pre Merideth Rig” example of his work. One other goose of this style is currently known to exist. Branded “FH Walker,” “AH Buhl,” and “Mills,” all St. Clair Flats Shooting Company members.  Original paint; good patina; and minor wear; a few tiny dents and shot marks.

Provenance: Formerly in the Barney Crandall collection. Guyette & Deeter, Inc., April 2002 auction, Lot 72.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. “Michigan Decoys,” Forrest Loomis and Clune Walsh. “Decoying St. Clair to the St. Lawrence,” Barney Crandall, p. 47, rigmate. (25,000 - 35,000)

130


317 Detail

317 Detail

131


318. Rare redhead hen, Markham rig, Markham, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Slightly turned head with the high style paint found only on a few of these hens with a well executed bill and jowl carving.  Excellent original paint with the same rubs to bare wood that many from this rig exhibit; structurally excellent.

318

318 Detail

132

Provenance: Exhibited at the Ward Museum, Salisbury Maryland. Retains Ward exhibition sticker. (10,000 - 12,000)


George Warin

1830 - 1905 Toronto, Ontario 319. Hollow carved Canada goose, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario circa 1875.  Fine feather paint detail and raised neck seat.  Original paint with minor wear; some flaking on tail; part of bill is a professional replacement by Russ Allen; several chips missing from one edge of tail; tiny dents on body. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Part of a hunting rig found at Lake Skugog, Ontario owned at one time by the Seagram family of Montreal. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 43. “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 149. (12,000 - 16,000)

319

319 Detail 133


320. Hollow carved bluebill drake, Robert Rennardson, Toronto, Ontario, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Subtle comb paint on back. Raised neck seat.  Original paint with minor wear; minor roughness to end of bill; small rough area under tail where some filler has fallen out; small crack in underside. (2,000 - 2,500)

320 321. Canvasback drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hollow with bottom board. Comb painting to white areas on back.  Original paint; crack at neck and separation between neck and body; paint loss at bill. (2,000 - 2,500)

321 322. Hollow carved redhead hen, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Raised neck seat and slightly lifted head.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 14. (2,000 - 3,000)

322 323. Delicate hollow carved bluewing teal hen, circa 1900.  Slightly turned head. Similar to the work of John Wells. Glass eyes. Branded “Kangas” on underside.  With very thin paint that appears to be a mix of original with some old strengthening; bottom board has separated. (2,000 - 2,500)

323 134


324

325

324. Canada goose, Harry “Spud” Norman, Wolfe Island, Ontario, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Relief wing carving with slightly raised tips and fluted tail.  Near mint original paint with good patina; thin crack in back; professional touchup at seam between head and neck. (2,000 - 3,000)

325. Very rare greenwing teal hen, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  One of five known. In early season plumage with wonderfully blended scratch paint and a form that is reminiscent of Chrysler’s elegant high headed black ducks. Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 104. eBook, exact decoy pictured. (5,000 - 8,000) 135


Decoratives

326

326. Exceptional pair of full size standing pintails on driftwood base, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1973. Both have highly detailed feather carving and fine paint detail. Hen has open and lifted wings and is in calling pose.  Excellent and original. Provenance: Miller collection. Purchased from Lawson at the 1973 Easton Waterfowl Festival. (5,000 - 7,000)

326 Detail

136


327

327. Outstanding full size standing Canada goose, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1973. Slightly turned head. Highly detailed feather carving with carved crossed wingtips, raised secondaries, and fluted tail. Fine paint detail.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Miller collection. Purchased from Lawson at the 1973 Easton Waterfowl Festival. (4,000 - 5,000)

327 Detail

137


329

328

330

331

332

328. Large hollow carved heron, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Signed and dated 1990. Approximately 26” from tip of bill to tip of tail.  Very good and original. (1,750 - 2,250) 329. Pintail drake, Steve Worona.  Signed and dated 2000. Highly detailed and layered feather carving with turned head. Exceptional paint detail.  Excellent and original. Provenance: Miller collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

330. Preening redhead hen, Steve Worona.  Signed and dated 1998. Hollow carved. Relief wingtip carving. Bill is buried in the feathers under one wing.  Excellent and original.

138

Provenance: Miller collection.

(1,250 - 1,750)

331.

Shooting model canvasback hen, William Schultz.  Relief wing carving.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Personius collection.

(1,200 - 1,600)

332. Mallard hen, Mike Frady, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Signed, “Louisiana Wildfowler Carvers and Collectors Guild, 1983”. Relief carved primaries and secondaries. Turned head.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,600)


333. Pair of canvasbacks, Jim Foote.  Signed and dated 1976 with inscription “Best pair of show Canadian Nat 1976” on the underside. Both have slightly turned heads, fine carving detail with carved, crossed wingtips and fluted tail.  Very good and original. (4,500 - 5,500)

333

334.

Hollow carved black duck, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia, circa 1970s.  Branded “Cigar” and signed. Very slightly turned head. Highly detailed carved primaries and secondaries as well as fluted tail. Good paint detail.  Excellent and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

334

333 Detail

334 Detail 139


Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts 335. Rare full size decorative ring necked plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is under carved wooden base that is made to represent a clam shell. Extra fine paint detail. Approximately 5” tall. Very good and original.

335

Literature: Cullity.

335 Detail

336. Full size decorative sandpiper, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Approximately 4 1/2” tall. Carving is on wooden base with Crowell’s rectangular stamp on the underside. Also signed “AE Crowell Cape Cod.” Excellent and original. (5,000 - 7,000)

336 140

“The Songless Aviary,” Brian (8,500 - 9,500)


337. Carved wooden bluejay on wooden carved double maple leaf base, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Signed “AE Crowell Cape Cod” on underside of base. Good feather paint detail. Carving stands 6 1/2” tall. Very good and original. (3,500 - 5,500)

337

337A. Carved wooden black crowned night heron, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. On carved wooden base with identification on underside. Also stamped “JP French”. Approximately 5” tall. Excellent and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

337A 141


338

339

340

341

342

343

338. Shooting model brant, attributed to William Schultz.  Slightly turned head, relief wingtip carving.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Personius collection.

(1,200 - 1,600)

339. Hunting model black duck, William Schultz.  Oversize with relief wingtip carving. Slightly tuned head.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Personius collection.

(800 - 1,200)

340. Black duck with relief wing carving, Ken Scheeler.  Signed with electropen on the underside.  Very good and original.

142

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

(900 - 1,200)

341. Pair of full size flying greenwing teal, Mike Borrett.  Signed and dated 2005. Approximately 16” between wingtips. Feather carving detail.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 342. Ruddy duck hen, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Signed and dated on underside as a gift for Gene Konopasek, 1969. Cork body with wooden head, slightly turned.  Excellent and original. (800 - 1,000) 343. Sleeping mourning dove on wooden base, Joe Wooster, Ashley, Ohio.  Signed and dated 1981.  Very good and original. (600 - 900)


344. 3/4 size flying mallard drake, Delbert Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Wing span is approximately 18”. Detailed scratch feather paint. Label on underside of wing indicates this decoy was lot 577 in a March 1988 Richard Bourne decoy auction. “P” brand in underside for Bill Purnell.   Original paint with minor wear; slight sap bleeding at one side of neck; one wing is loose.

Literature: “Ira Hudson and Family,” Henry Stansbury. (4,500 - 5,500)

344

345. Pair of American coot, William Schultz.  Both have original keels, slightly turned heads, and relief wing carving with extended tips. Both are signed. One was a first place winner for species International Decoy Show August 1970.  Excellent and original. (5,000 - 7,000)

345 143


345A

345A. Full size carving of greenwing teal on wooden base with carved butterflies, William Koelpin. Signed and dated 1976. Both birds have carved, extended wingtips and slightly turned heads. Original and good; small part of one butterfly’s wing is missing. (3,500 - 4,500)

345B

144

345B. Decorative old squaw drake, Pat Godin. Signed with the inscription, “Old squaw drake 1995 an original creation by Pat Godin.” Decoy is in content pose with slightly turned head. Raised and layered wingtip carving and carved secondaries. Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)


345E

345D

345G

345F

345I

345H 345D. Hollow carved Canada goose, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Marty’s old Prior Lake stamp on underside. Decoy is carved in a Virginia style with raised “V” wingtip carving. Branded “JDC” twice in the underside.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (800 - 1,000) 345E. Pair of hollow carved swimming Canada geese, Frank Finney, Cape Charles, Virginia.  Both have his name carved in the underside. Good feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor shrinkage on the back of one; moderate shrinkage on the back of the other. (2,000 - 3,000) 345F. Pair of bluewing teal carved in the style of John Blair, Sr., Bob Seabrook.  “Seabrook” brand in underside of each. Hollow carved.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

345G. Large hollow carved mallard, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. “McNair” carved in underside. Slightly turned head Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (600 - 900) 345H. Pair of widgeon, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Each has “Strunk” stamped in the weight. Both have slightly turned heads.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

(650 - 950)

345I. Pair of oversize canvasbacks, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Stamped “G Strunk” in weight. Hen is in rare sleeping pose. Drake has head turned.  Excellent and original. Provenance: Bokelman estate.

(650 - 950) 145


Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

346

146


Lem and Steve Ward inspecting wood

Lem and Steve Ward skillfully made decoys together for nearly 50 years. Styles of their cedar decoys range widely from the early wide body “fat jaw” to their sleek and stylish 1936 models. It is a window of time in the late 1920s, however, that their working decoys display more animation than any other period. Some of the Bishops Head Club geese, and few black ducks with turned and twisted heads, specifically, lot 8 from the collection of Sam Dyke, are good examples. But, without a doubt, it is a rig of goldeneyes made in this time period that exhibit the most interesting characteristics. “Tilted,” “twisted,” “leaning,” and “cocked” can all be used to described their disposition. This bold drake, with a perfectly executed head with puffed out plumage, nearly comes alive with its leaning and bent head presentation. The Wards must have had a special fascination with the goldeneye, and for that, we are thankful.

147


346 Detail

346. Important hollow carved swimming goldeneye drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa late 1920s.  Slightly turned and cocked head with wide cheeks. Good feather paint detail at wingtips.  Original paint with very slight wear; slight separation at neck seam; several tiny spots of touchup at filled shot holes and spots where filler fell out above recessed nails used to join body halves, all in lower sides; small amount of professional touchup to a paint rub near one speculum; thin crack in underside mostly covered up by the weight.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Peter Pappas. Pappas collection stamp in underside. Until November 2016 this decoy held the world record for most expensive Ward Brothers decoy ever sold at auction.

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath. (75,000 - 95,000)

148


346 Detail

149


347. Redhead drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1932 model. Signed. Tag on underside indicates that the decoy was at one time exhibited by Davison Hawthorne at the Ward Foundation.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear on most of the decoy; old overpaint was taken off of the black area of the tail and breast and the head to traces of original paint; crack in underside.

347

Provenance: Bokelman estate. (2,500 - 3,000)

348. Goldeneye drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1950s.  Slightly turned head.  Two small spots of touchup on one side, otherwise very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

348 349. Black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1948 model with balsa body, inserted cedar tail, and slight turned cedar head.   Original paint with very minor wear; a few small dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

349 350. Pair of shooting stool model bluebills, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both are signed 1 of 50 and dated 1972. Both have a poem on the underside written by Lem Ward. Both have turned heads.  Drake has near mint original paint; hen has significant shrinkage at wingtips and minor shrinkage behind the head and on parts of the breast.

350 150

Provenance: Bokelman estate. (2,000 - 2,500)


351

351. Goldeneye hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930s. Slightly turned and lifted head. Good feather paint detail. Original paint with almost no wear; professional repair to a crack in the neck filler and to a small chip at one edge of tail.

Provenance: From the estate of John Longfellow in the 1930s Longfellow was a purchasing agent for E.S. Atkins in Salisbury Maryland, who supplied wood to the Ward Brothers. (12,500 - 17,500)

351 Detail

151


351A

352

351A. Goldeneye hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; paddle tail is a replacement with touchup in the area that it joins the body. (4,000 - 6,000)

152

352. Pair of shooting stool model redheads, Ward brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Hollow carved with turned heads. Both are signed and dated 1965.  Very slight wear at edges of bills, otherwise very good and original. (3,000 - 5,000)


353. Well carved black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1936. Highly detailed feather paint. Slightly turned and lifted head.  Original paint with a few spots of touchup on the back; flat part of underside was painted black at a later date; several small spots of black paint on one side of head. (20,000 - 24,000)

353

353 Detail

153


The pronounced apron under the squared off tail and the notch behind the head are all identifying characteristics of the special order Canada geese used at the Bishops Head Gun Club. The club, located near Hooper’s Island Straight in Dorchester County, Maryland, placed the order sometime between 1920 and 1930.

353A Detail

353A Detail

154


353A. Classic swimming Bishops Head Club style Canada Goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa early 1930s. Great form with slightly lifted head. Ice dip behind neck. Signed by Lem Ward on the underside. Well executed loop feather paint. Painted crossed wingtips on top of tail. Original paint on most of the decoy with minor wear; working touchup on parts of the black area of the head and neck; hairline crack through bill; slight separation at seam where neck joins body; small cracks at knot at one side of the tail.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of William Purnell, Ocean City, Maryland, “P” branded in underside. From the Bishops Head Gun Club.

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Brian McGrath and Ron Gard. “Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art,” Salisbury University, chapter on Bishops Head Gun Club. (30,000 - 40,000)

353A

155


Louisiana

354

355

356

357

358

359 Pair of teal, Adam Gisclaire, Galliano, Louisiana.  Signed and dated 1970. Good carving detail.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

357. Pair of preening mallards, Arthur Pellegrin, Houma, Louisiana.  Both have Charles Frank’s brass tags on the underside.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

355. Pair of bluewing teal, Alfonse Verdin, Pointe au Chien, Louisiana.  Relief wingtip carving.  Very good and original.

358. Two Hutchinson decoys from Louisiana.  Both are marked “Hut” in the undersides. The pintail has carved, crossed wingtips and fluted tail.  Very good and original. (400 - 600)

354.

Literature: “Louisiana Duck Decoys,” Charles Frank. (900 - 1,200) 356. Pair of mallards, Willie Carmadelle, Bayou Gauche, Louisiana.  Both have Charles Frank’s brass tags on undersides.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

156

359. Greenwing teal hen, Xavier Bourg, Larose, Louisiana.  Relief wing carving.  Original paint; very slight wear; professional neck crack repair with touchup in that area.

Literature: Cheramie.

“Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian (650 - 950)


Adam Ansardi 1885 - 1953 Devant, Louisiana

Adam Ansardi, born 1885, was a landowner in Davant, LA, which is located in Plaquemines Parish. Adam’s home stood on an expansive plantation nestled against the levee of the Mississippi River in the lower delta region. His descendants still reside on the land today. The plantation includes hundreds of acres of wetlands that team with wild game, including waterfowl. Adam provided for his family through farming, hunting, and trapping, which is why he learned how to hand carve wooden duck decoys. Because of the remote location of the planation, Adam did not have access to the woodworking tools of the time, so he hand carved the decoys with his various hunting knives and painted them using feathers he gathered from local waterfowl. Other hunters, noticing the high quality and craftsmanship of Adam’s decoys, starting buying and trading for his decoys. Adam, recognizing a business opportunity, began displaying his finest decoys in his barn and workshop for potential buyers, including the greenwing teal drake decoy. The rest of the decoys were put to work in wetlands. When Adam died in 1953, a selection of the finest decoys he crafted were distributed among his children as mementos. This small greenwing teal drake was displayed in his daughter’s home until she passed in 1990s and then again, following the tradition, in his granddaughter’s home until now. It has been consigned directly by the family for this auction.

366

366 Detail

366 Detail 366. Extremely rare swimming greenwing teal drake, Adam Ansardi, Devant, Louisiana.  Classic Ansardi body shape with raised tail and slightly dipped bill. Carved separation between wing and tail. Detailed scratch painting on back of neck and top of back.  Unused, never rigged; a few small paint flakes under one eye; original paint protected by a coat of varnish.

Provenance: Consigned by a member of the Ansardi Family.

(12,000 - 15,000) 157


367

368

369

370

372

371 367. Widgeon drake, Herman Chauvin, Boutte, Louisiana.  Stamped and signed.  Very good and original. (350 - 450) 368. Swimming mallard hen from Louisiana.  Relief wing carving.   Original paint; minor wear; small dent in one side; crack through bill. (600 - 900) 369.

Pair of mallards, Clovis Vizier, Galliano, Louisiana.  Both have relief wing carving and fanned tails.  Appealing old in use repaint; with little wear on hen; several spots of flaking on drake’s back.

personal use on Lake Charles and its adjoining shallow marshes, and their small design fit the limited space in the pirogues. Each tip up is carved with raised wingtips, feet, and fluted tails. Both are mounted on designer base.  Strong original paint; teal has broken tip of wing; both have rubs and small areas of paint missing Literature: Feeders on cover of Decoy Mag, July – August 2013. (800 - 1,200)

(650 - 950)

371. Rigmate pair of greenwing teal, Don Gearhart, Tulsa, Oklahoma, circa 1940.  Both have slightly turned heads. Wings are carved in relief with highly detailed feather painting.  Good and original. (800 - 1,200)

370. Two well executed tip up decoys, Don Gearhart, Tulsa, Oklahoma, circa 1940.  Don Gearhart oil man with Sinclair Oil spent considerable time in Louisiana in the early 1930s. He created these decoys specifically for his

372. Greenwing teal drake, Don Gerhart, Tulsa, Oklahoma.  Relief wing carving and glass eyes.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; a few small dents. (600 - 900)

158

Provenance: Whittington collection.


Reme Ange Roussel Jr.

373

373. Pair of bluewing teal, Reme Roussel, Raceland, Louisiana.  An excellent example of Roussel’s work. Signed and dated 1970. Good paint detail and raised “V” wingtip carving.  Excellent and original.

Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie. (5,000 - 8,000)

373 Detail

159


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

374 Detail

374

374. Extremely rare ring neck drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit Michigan, circa 1910.  Premier grade. “BARTHALOMEY” brand in underside. Only two examples in original paint are known. Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; a few paint rubs on lower sides.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey, Jr, Mackey collection stamp on underside. Formerly in collection of Dr. James McCleery, McCleery collection stamp on underside. Lot 263 in James McCleery collection auction Guyette & Schmidt, Inc./Sotheby’s January 2000. Formerly in the Goodman collection, collection tag on underside.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 94, exact decoy pictured (full page). (8,500 - 11,000) 160


375 Detail

375

375. Rare matched pair of snakey headed canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1905.  Challenge grade.  Original paint with very minor wear; drake is nearly mint, with an in factory filled crack in one side and a knot in top of tail; each has a crack in underside; hen has wear to primer on parts of the back. (7,500 - 9,500)

161


376. Bluebill hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.   Original paint; minor discoloration and wear; thin crack in one eye; slight wear to wood at edges of bill. (1,200 - 1,600)

376 377. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.   Original paint with minor wear; some of the neck filler has been replaced; crack in back; restoration to tail chip. (2,500 - 3,500)

377 378. Pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade, Seneca Lake models.  Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents; each has a thin crack in the underside extending a short way up the breast and under the tail; slight separation at hen’s neck seam; small dent in one side of hen’s tail. (2,750 - 3,250)

378 379. Rare pair of buffleheads, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  Hen has original paint with touchup on lower breast and a few other spots; drake has original on much of the bird; white areas on breast and underside have old touchup and some of the black does; a few small dents; neck filler restoration on drake. (3,500 - 4,500)

379 162


380. Pair of bluebills, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade with wide bills.  Original paint with very minor wear; lightly hit by shot; two short hairline cracks in drake’s body; both have the undersides repainted a long time ago with initials “BWO” added. (5,000 - 7,000)

380

381. Extremely rare bufflehead hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Original paint; minor discolration and wear; wear to paint at end of bill; small crack in side and in underside; bill has been very slightly blunted; several tiny dents.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 75. (8,000 - 12,000)

381

163


Virginia and North Carolina

382 382.

Canvasback drake, Alvirah Wright, Duck, North Carolina.  Iron keel attached with bent nails. Scooped out tail and stately high head.  Multiple coats of paint; nails have been added to secure neck to body; tight crack in neck; rough area on one side of bill; wood filler has been used in several areas on neck to cover nail holes. (5,000 - 7,000)

382A. Cast iron brant wing duck, North Carolina, circa 1900. Good old paint with some pitting. (500 - 700)

382A

383

383. Merganser drake, Doug Jester, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Longer body style.  Strong original paint; slight separation between neck and body; small rough areas near tail and top of head. (600 - 800)

164

384

384. Merganser drake, Doug Jester, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Unusual high head style. Carved crest.  Strong original paint; light wear at top of head and edge of tail. (400 - 600)


Ned Burgess

1863 - 1956 Churches Island, North Carolina Burgess started carving full time in 1917, and over the next 40 years, he likely produced more decoys than any other carver in his state. He never owned a band saw, so most of his decoys were chopped out of juniper with a hatchet. Most of the breasts and backs of his decoys were left rough from his rasping technique. He believe this helped to keep the paint shine to a minimum. He carved mostly canvasbacks in his younger years then switched to pintails and widgeon because the divers were not frequenting the area due to lack of food in the bay. Mallards are possibly the rarest of the Burgess decoys… this hen is only the second one offered at auction in the last 30 years.

385

385. Extremely rare mallard hen, Ned Burgess, Churchs Island, North Carolina.  Decoy has never been rigged for gunning.  Strong original paint; small areas of crazing and rubs on chine line and top, and areas of head; very slight age crack in one side of head. (12,000 - 15,000)

385 Detail

165


Illinois River Charles Perdew 1874 - 1963 Henry, Illinois

Each state or region in North America where decoys were produced in significant numbers, had its icons that were recognized far and wide as the best at their trade. Illinois was no exception. The Illinois River region produced many carvers who produced extremely well made decoys. Two, however, have come to be recognized as iconic representatives of that region. They are Robert Elliston (1848-1915) and Charles Perdew, (1874-1963). Charles Perdew was born in 1874 in Oxbow Prairie, Putnam County, Illinois just northeast of the town of Henry. Charles was the youngest of 11 children born to Moses and Nancy Perdew. Moses and Nancy, like many early pioneers traveled from the East to settle in Illinois. They settled near Henry purchasing a farm just across the river around 1869. Charlie was born five years later, and spent the first 15 years of his life on the family farm. It was on Saw Mill Lake, lying along the banks of the Illinois River that Charlie made and hunted over what was likely his first rig of decoys. It was in this area that Charlie shot ducks for the market, and shipped them to Chicago. He iced the day’s shoot down and carried it to the depot in Henry, where the Chicago Rock Island and Pacific Railroad transported the birds to Chicago the same day. In 1889 Charlie left the farm and traveled to Chicago. There he was employed in a meat packing plant, and also as a carpenter working on the construction of the Chicago World’s Fair, the Columbia Exposition of 1893-94. At the end of 1895 Charlie left Chicago and returned to his family’s farm along the Illinois River. Charlie was self-employed at several occupations, which included wood worker specializing in furniture repair and upholstery. He ran a bicycle livery and repair shop in Henry, and sometime around 1898, established his decoy and call making business. In 1900, Charlie took a position as advertising agent for the Peters Cartridge Company of Cincinnati. In 1902 Charlie married Edna Haddon, a native of Henry. Edna and Charlie spent the rest of their lives in Henry where the decoy and call business flourished. In the early years, Edna painted the decoys, and it is those decoys painted by her that are most sought after by collectors today. Charlie’s calls and decoys were marketed and sold through numerous stores throughout the Midwest, including Portman’s Sporting Goods in Peoria, and the largest sporting goods in the Midwest, Chicago’s Von Lengerke and Antoine. Perdew An Illinois River Tradition, Lacy, copyright 1993, David A. Galliher publisher .

1

Fish and Fowl of the Great Lakes, Donna Tonelli, copyright 2002 by Donna Tonelli, Schiffer Publishing Ltd.

2

166


386. Outstanding hollow carved mallard hen in sleeping pose, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, early 2nd quarter 20th century.  One of the finest Perdew decoys to ever come to auction. Exhibiting the very best of Edna Perdew’s fine subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; structurally good; weight is missing.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Pete Van Trigt

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey, p. 137, similar decoy shown from the collection of Alan and Elaine Haid. (75,000 - 95,000)

386 Detail

386 Detail

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386 Detail

386

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386 Detail

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387 Detail

387 Detail

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387

387. Rare rigmate pair of mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa late 1920s.    Original paint by Edna Perdew; minor wear; very slight wear to the wood one edge of each bill; retains plain Perdew weights.

Literature: “Charles Perdew,” Ann Tandy Lacy.

(27,500 - 32,500)

171


388

389

390

391

392

393

388. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa late 1930s.    Original paint with minor wear to bare wood in some areas; structurally good.

Provenance: Meyer collection.

389.

Rigmate pair of wood ducks, Charles Schoenheider, Jr., Peoria, Illinois, 2nd half 20th century.  Both are signed on underside.  Strong original paint; knot in back has discolored on hen; slight discoloration on light areas of drake with some spider droppings on back; and very thin split at front of bill. (800 - 1,000)

(1,500 - 2,500)

390. Rare ringbill drake, Perry Wilcoxen, Liverpool, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.  Marked “PWW” which designated it was from Wilcoxen’s personal hunting rig.  Original paint with minor wear; several small dents.

Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forrest Loomis. (1,000 - 1,400) 172

391.

Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Retains Perdew weight.  Original paint, minor discoloration and wear; old touchup on much of the head and parts of the back. (1,000 - 1,500)

392. Mallard drake, Charles Ruggles, Henry, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.    Old in use repaint on much of the decoy; paint on breast and head appears to be original with moderate shrinkage; a few tiny dents. (1,250 - 1,750) 393. Rare bluewing teal drake, Bill Shaw, Pekin, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.  Glass eyes.  Strong original paint that has crazed heavily to create a desirable surface; a few small areas of touchup on head and body; bill has had damage with part missing and has been resecured with two nails. (800 - 1,200)


394 Detail

For many years, decoys by this carver were attributed to Charles Ruggles (1864 – 1920). Research by Donna Tonelli, however, indicates that they were indeed produced even earlier by Charles’ father, Henry. Henry worked as a professional house and sign painter, and he eventually gained quite a local reputation as a portrait and landscape artist. These talents obviously lent themselves to his finishing his decoys in such an accomplished manner. He enjoyed hunting and fishing and had a houseboat on the Illinois river and would often entertain the local children by taking them on rides in his skiff. Charles Perdew, also of Henry, worked with him during the early years of his carving efforts and learned, and eventually improved upon, the style and procedures developed by Ruggles.

394

394. Rare and important mallard drake, Henry Ruggles, Henry, Illinois.  Ruggles best style with tack eyes, sleek body, and snakey style head. Exhibits Ruggles dowel in top of body to remove moisture. Branded “Morris Sellers” and “Denton”.  Thin original paint; darkened on white areas; has worn off at raised grain spots of body; a few other small rubs; small amount of white paint between bill and eye; sliver of wood missing from underside. (25,000 - 30,000)

394 Detail

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Bert Graves

1887 - 1956 Peoria, Illinois Bert Graves of Peoria was actively making decoys in the 1930s and early 1940s. Graves modeled his decoys after the work of Robert Elliston of Bureau, Illinois – the premier early carver of the Illinois River style. He worked with the assistance of his wife, Millie, who was responsible for painting many of the decoys. Graves also sent decoys to Catherine Elliston, wife of Robert Elliston. Eventually, Catherine taught Millie her painting skills, and passed along her husband’s tools and patterns to Bert. Bird Decoys of North America, Nature History, Art, Robert Shaw, copyright 2010 Robert Shaw, Published by Sterling Publishing Co., Toronto, Ontario.

395

395 Detai;

174

395 Detai;

395.

Exceptional “white sided” mallard drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Extremely fine combing and feather paint detail.  Near mint original paint; good patina; structurally excellent; retains Graves weight.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(9,000 - 12,000)


396. Black duck, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  From the Caswell Rig. Branded “CJC” twice in the underside. Subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; small worn spot on one lower side; a few tiny dents; retains graves weight.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(9,000 - 12,000)

396

396 Detail 175


397

398 397. Mallard hen, Charles Walker, Peoria, Illinois.  Round bottom style with wing carving and turned head. Underside is painted #25 for the Zearing rig.  Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; as with most of the decoys from this rig the wing tips have been strengthened; crack in neck has been reglued with a small amount of paint added.(3,000 - 4,000)

398 Detail

398. Pair of widgeon, George Kessler, Pekin, Illinois.  Both are stamped “ECB” in underside. Good feather paint detail.  Both have original paint with very minor wear; drake has a worn area on one lower side and underside; a tiny chip missing from top of tail and slight wear to wood on one side of bill.

176

Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forest Loomis. (6,500 - 7,500)


Decoys traded to Otto Myer. This exact decoy is circled in yellow. For complete article see Decoy Magazine Jan 2013.

399

399. Important black duck, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1950.  One of three made for Otto Myer.   Strong original paint; protected by a light coat of varnish; mild edge wear on bill; very small scratch on body.

399 Detail

Provenance: Formerly in the Dave Galliher collection. Formelry in the Otto Meyer collection. (8,000 - 10,000)

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400

400. Rare rigmate pair of oversize mallards, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Both have fine swirl feather paint by Catherine Elliston. Both are branded “JBC”. Hen has original paint and minor wear,and has been lightly hit by shot; hairline crack in neck and very minor roughness on the tip of the bill; drake has original paint with minor wear and working touchup on the head, neck, and speculums; it is also been lightly hit by shot.

178

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Joe French. Purchased by Joe on April 7,1956 from Arthur Graff. Graff was a superintendent of Grand Island Gun Club south of Bath, Illinois. They were made for John V. Crawford from Chicago who was a member of the club in the early 1900s. The numbers 400 and 401 on the underside were Joe’s inventory numbers. (17,500 - 22,500)


400 Detail

400 Detail 179


Daniel Voorhees

Duck Island Club House, October, 1895

Hunters with their kill, Duck Island c. 1925-30

The Voorhees family, Daniel Sr. and Daniel Jr., were actively affiliated with the Duck Island Club near Peoria, Illinois, and their decoys were almost certainly used there for many years. Daniel Sr. was president of the club as well as president of the Illinois Sportsman’s Association. The Duck Island Hunting and Fishing Club was the oldest organized duck club in Illinois. The club was founded at Banner, Illinois on 3,000 acres in 1880 by businessmen from Peoria and Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1928, it became a nonprofit organization with the mission of “protecting all game for legal acts of recreation.” Membership was small, numbering between eight and twelve men. During the early years of its development, the only access was by boat. Ref: Parmalee, Paul W. and F.D. Loomis. 1969. “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Northern Illinois University Press, DeKalb, IL.

400A Detail 180


400A Detail

400A. Canada goose field decoy, Dan Voorhees, 1st quarter 20th century.  Cast iron head. Branded “DWV.”  Original paint with moderate wear on body; structurally good. (15,000 - 18,000)

400A

181


Ontario John R. Wells

1861 - 1953 Toronto, Ontario

A prominent boat builder and decoy maker from Toronto, Wells was also an avid hunter. He and his good friend, George Warin, made some of the finest decoys ever produced in Ontario. This early style pair of canvasbacks was first owned by Howard C. Meredith (St. Clair Flats Shooting Company member, 1894–1935) and then, Harry N. Torrey (St. Clair Flats Shooting Company member, 19351946).

John R. Wells

401 Detail

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401. Important pair of hollow carved canvasbacks, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “HNT” for Harry N. Torrey (St. Clair Flats Shooting Company member 19351946) and “Meredith” for Howard C. Meredith (St. Clair Flats Shooting Company member 1894-1935).  Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates.

(25,000 - 35,000)

401

401 Detail

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402

403

404

405

406

407

402. Hollow carved bluewing teal, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.    Original paint with minor wear; several filled shot holes. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 49, exact decoy pictured. (2,000 - 3,000) 403. Pair of canvasbacks, Ray Andress, Gananoque Ontario.  Good comb paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear; white areas on lower sides of drake have old in use repaint; lightly hit by shot; hen has a thin chip missing from the neck base.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Carved for Jay Kid, mayor of Trenton, Ontario. Purchased from his son Jack by Bernie Gates.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys’, Bernie Gates, p. 139. (1,500 - 2,000) 404. Pair of redheads, Bob Burke, Wolfe Island, Ontario.  Relief wingtip carving.  Original paint with minor wear; wear to the wood at hen’s tail; small chip missing from drake’s tail; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. 184

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 131. (1,500 - 2,500) 405. Hollow carved black duck, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900.  Raised neck seat.  Original paint with minor wear; several paint scrapes and small dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Jamie Stalker. (1,500 - 2,000)

406. Oversize black duck, Ralph Smithers, Dunnville, Ontario, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Relief wing carving and good scratch paint detail on head.  Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased form Bernie Gates. Literature: “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 45. (1,500 - 2,000) 407. Hollow carved canvasback drake, John Morris, Hamilton, Ontario, circa 1900.  Relief wing carving.  Original paint; minor wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Waterfowl Decoys of Southwest Ontario,” Paul Brisco, p. 117. (1,250 - 1,750)


408. Very rare rigmate pair of hollow carved pintails, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Branded “JRW maker”. Both are from the Oak Lake Club in Winnipeg.  Original paint with minor wear and subtle feather paint detail; small dents and shot marks; slight roughness to tip of hen’s tail. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 46.

408

408 Detail

(12,000 - 15,000)


409

410

411

412

413

409. Rigmate pair of redheads, D.W. Nichols, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Good comb paint detail.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; a few very small dents, otherwise good structurally. (1,200 - 1,500) 410. Hollow carved Canada goose, Phineas Reeves, Port Rowan, Ontario, 3rd quarter 19th century.    Appealing old in use repaint; protected by a coat of varnish; numerous dents; shallow chip missing from top of tail; thin chip missing from neck base. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Notes on underside read found in Easton family cottage in Long Point. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 17. (2,000 - 3,000) 411. Solid body bluebill drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “FH Walker”, “WLM”, and “Mills”. All St. Clair Flats Shooting Club members.  Original paint; with minor to moderate

186

414

wear; small dents; small rough area at one side of lower breast and thin crack through neck.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 43. (1,500 - 2,500) 412. Set of 3 black ducks from the Toronto Harbor area, 1st quarter 20th century.  Subtle scratch feather painting. Two have glass eyes.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; thin crack in two of the tails; one tail has very slight roughness on one edge. (950 - 1,250) 413. Hollow carved blackduck, Fred Croft, Belleville, Ontario. Good scratch feather paint detail. Original paint; very minor wear; several tiny dents. (1,000 - 1,400) 414. Hollow carved blackduck, William Hart, Belleville, Ontario. “W.H.H.” carved in underside. Scratch feather paint detail. Original paint; minor wear; a few tiny dents. (1,750 - 2,250)


415

415 Detail 415. Hollow carved bluebill hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “JFC” and signed “JC Forman, Toronto” on underside. Good comb paint detail.   Original paint with minor wear that has darkened with age; a few tiny dents and shot marks. (6,500 - 9,500)

187


415A

416

415A. Hollow carved bluebill drake, Will Smith, Bloomfield, Ontario, circa 1920s. Scratch paint detail on back. Original paint with very minor wear; very slight roughness to one edge of tail;

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Literature: “American Decoys,” Mackey, p. 108. “Picton Style,” Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming. (2,500 - 3,500

416. Delicate rigmate pair of bluebills, Addie Nichols, Smiths Falls, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Both are hollow with an incredible amount of artistic design carved and stamped into the backs of each decoy. Drake’s wingtips are raised approximately 1/2”. Hen’s are also raised, but only slightly. Drake’s head is slightly turned. Hen’s head is nestled. Both have the letter “C” stamped in the original weights in the undersides.  Drake’s paint is original and worn to expose some primer and bare wood, mostly on head; hen is mostly original paint with some wear at head and small amount of strengthening on wing speculums and white area of lower edge. (6,500 - 9,500)


416A

416B

416C

416D

416E

416A. Solid body blackduck, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario. Subtle feather paint detail. Original paint with very slight wear; a few tiny scratches and dents; small chip missing from top of tail.

Provenance: Second place winner at the Thousand Islands Decoy Collectors Show, ribbon included. (1,750 - 2,250)

416B. Very rare solid body ring neck drake, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario. Original paint with good combing and very minor wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates. (1,200 - 1,400)

416D. Hollow carved black duck from the Toronto Harbor area. Glass eyes. “TC” painted on underside. Original paint with minor wear; several spots of old touchup; tail chip missing; minor roughness on edge of tail. (800 - 1,200) 416E. Bufflehead drake, D.W. Nichols, Smiths Falls, Ontario, circa 1940s. Original paint on black and bill; working repaint on white areas and underside, except for the feathering under the tail; tiny chip missing from one wingtip. (250 - 350)

416C. Solid body goldeneye hen, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario, first quarter 20th century. Original paint; minor wear; filled crack in one side. (1,000 - 1,400) 189


Shorebird Decoys Obediah Verity 1813 - 1901 Seaford, New York

417 Detail

418 Detail

190


417. Exceptional black bellied plover, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Wide beetle head style with one eye a little lower than the other.  Near mint original paint with good patina; fine detail; lightly hit by shot, mostly on one side. Literature: “The Decoys of Long Island,” Geoffrey K. Fleming and Alan Haid (27,500 - 32,500)

417

418. Running sandpiper, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes and relief wing carving. Good feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; worn spot on one wing; wear on the bill; lightly hit by shot. Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” Somers Headly and John Levinson. (35,000 - 40,000)

418 191


419

420

419. Rare black bellied plover, Andrew Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York.  Carved eyes. Relief wing carving and good feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; structurally good. (6,500 - 9,500)

192

420. Running sandpiper Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century. Relief wing carving and large carved eyes. Original paint with fine feather detail and minor wear; one side is noticeably darker than the other probably because it was placed dark side down on a shelf for a very long time. (7,500 - 10,000)


421

423

422

424

425

421. Yellowlegs, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Good scratch feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear on the dark areas; the light areas of the breast and under the tail have a thin wash of old repaint; very slight roughness to edge of tail; most of the bill is a professional repair by Cameron McIntyre.

Provenance: This is the best of group of four that were recently found in a yard sale in Denver, Colorado. (3,000 - 5,000)

422. Black bellied plover from the Delancy Nichol rig.  Wide beetle head style with carved eyes.  Original paint; very minor wear; dent in one side of tail.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Dr. James McCleery. McCleery collection stamp on underside. Decoy was Lot __ in the Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s January 2000 auction. (2,750 - 3,250)

423. Black bellied plover by a member of the Verity Family, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes.  Worn old paint; numerous shot marks; structurally good. (1,400 - 1,800) 424. Verity family black bellied plover, Seaford, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; bill is an old replacement hit by shot. (800 - 1,200) 425. Black bellied plover from Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Two piece body construction with removable hardwood head and neck. Relief wing carving.  Old in use repaint; heavily hit by shot; thin cracks in underside.

Provenance: Mackey collection stamp under the tail. (500 - 700)

193


John Dilley

Quogue, New York

426

426 Detail

426 Detail

426. Black bellied plover, John Dilley, Quogue, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and shoe button eyes.  Original paint with minor discoloration wear; lightly hit by shot; small chip missing from one eye. (12,000 - 14,000)

194


George Boyd

1873 - 1941 Seabrook, New Hampshire

427 Detail

427

428

427. Yellowlegs, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire, 1st quarter 20th century.  Finely detailed feather paint.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (5,000 - 8,000)

428. Black bellied plover, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire, 1st quarter 20th century.  Fine feather paint detail.  Original paint with almost no wear; lightly hit by shot; three smalls shot scars on top of head; small amount of touchup at crack in bill. (3,500 - 4,500)

195


Factory Decoys

429

429 Detail 196

429.

Very rare Canada goose, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Solid body model with tack eyes. Interesting feather paint on tail.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; wear on one lower side; paint missing where there is filler loss where head joins neck; area with no paint at in the making shallow rough spot in center of back approximately 1 1/2” x 2 1/2”.

Literature: “Detroit Decoy Dynasty,” Bill Dodge and Ron Sharp. (6,000 - 9,000)


430. Very rare merganser drake, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1880s.    Original paint with minor to moderate discoloration and wear; approximately 1/2 of bill is a professional replacement; minor roughness to edges of crest; old touchup at white on neck.

Literature: “Detroit Decoy Dynasty,” Bill Dodge and Ron Sharp. (12,000 - 15,000)

430 Detail

430

197


431

432

433

431. Rare dowitcher in fall plumage, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1900.  Glass eye model with sponge painting on back.  Strong original paint; three shot scars; tight crack in breast, which was filled at the factory in making; otherwise original and good. (2,000 - 2,500) 432. Yellowlegs, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1880.  Tack eye model with wooden bill.  Thin original paint with minor discoloration and wear; small amount of overpaint on bill professionally removed and tack eyes accurate replacements by Russ Allen. (2,000 - 3,000)

198

433. Factory made yellowlegs similar to the work of the Dodge Decoy Factory.  Stamped “FF” in underside.  Original paint with minor wear; some filler is missing where the metal bill joins the head. (650 - 950)


435

436

436 Detail

435 Detail

435. Very rare special order robin snipe in spring plumage, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910.  Elaborate paint detail suggests that decoy is a salesman sample. Glass eye model with extra fine feather paint detail and painted wings.  Original paint with minor wear; in factory hairline crack in lower breast. (6,500 - 9,500)

436. Rare dunlin in spring plumage, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; thin crack in one side; hit by shot.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Joe French. Small “JB French” stamp under the tail. (5,000 - 8,000)

199


Impressive the flock would have been – large, elegant decoys; graceful, arched necks; and bold, massive heads of the European mute swan. Rare, unique, and historically important… the Dodge swans of the St. Clair Flats. This swan decoy was purchased by Bruce Malcolm in the 1980s from W.R. Miller of Ottawa and, subsequently, was acquired by Peter Brown. “Bill” was an early decoy collector, waterfowl biologist, and enforcement supervisor with the Canadian Wildlife Service in Ottawa, Ontario. Miller indicated that he acquired the decoy in 1962 from the manager of the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company. The decoy, one of two owned by Miller, was one of several swan decoys used in the Mitchells Bay area of Southwestern Ontario in the late 1880s. Several of the Mitchells Bay swan decoys made their way to the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company.

437

437. Very rare hollow carved swan, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.    Old in use repaint; filled crack in one side; thin crack in the other; neck filler is rough.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Bruce Malcolm.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, editor, p. 19. “Decoys of Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 65. (3,000 - 4,000)

200


439

440

441

442

442A 439.

Black duck, Peterson Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Detailed bill carving.  Original paint with minor wear; small area in center of underside was planed so decoy would sit flat. (1,750 - 2,250)

440. Bluebill hen, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor wear; approximately 1/3 of neck filler is missing; a few tiny dents and wear to the flat part of the underside.

444

443

Provenance: Personius collection.

(1,000 - 1,400)

441. Pair of wood ducks, Wildfowler Decoy Factory, Point Pleasant, New Jersey.  Both have a Point Pleasant stamp in the underside.  Original paint with a few small rubs; minor wear on both bills. (800 - 1,200) 442. Mammoth style canvasback drake, Evans Decoy

Factory, Ladysmith, Wisconsin.  Evans stamp on underside.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Personius collection.

Literature: “Factory Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (650 - 950) 442A. Rare early slope breasted style mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade with very slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; crack in underside. (950 - 1,250) 443. Two special order oversize canvasback drakes, Pratt Decoy Factory, Joliet, Illinois.    Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; small amounts of neck filler missing; each has an age split in the underside. (400 - 600) 444. Bluewing teal drake, Peterson Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1880.    Original paint with minor wear; neck filler is missing. (950 - 1,250) 201


Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts

446

446. Classic Canada goose, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; age split in underside.

202

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph.

(7,500 - 9,500)


447

448

447. Sleeping goldeneye drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside.  Original paint with minor wear; a couple of “in the making” hairline cracks in back; a couple of small dents. (9,000 - 12,000)

448. Hollow carved pre brand goldeneye hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Carved, crossed wingtips and slightly turned head. Applied bottom board. Branded “JWW” for John Ware Willard.  Original paint with very minor wear; a few tiny dents and shot marks. (7,500 - 9,500)

203


449

450 449. Rigmate pair of old squaw, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Carved eyes and relief wing carving. Decoys are made with swivel heads.  Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; one thin crack in body; otherwise structurally good.

Provenance: From a large hunting rig of this style decoys found in the late 1980s on Lake Champlain in Vermont. (2,500 - 3,500)

450. Oversize black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Slightly lifted head.  Original paint with very minor wear, protected by an old clear coat of varnish; several small dents. (2,250 - 2,750)

451

451. Black duck, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 19th century.  Slightly turned head.  Paint was restored a long time ago; structurally good.

204

Provenance: Meyer collection. Formerly in the collection of Robert D. Congdon, Nantucket, Massachusetts, Congdon collection label on underside. There is also a label reading swapped with Ted Harmon, West Barnstable, Mass 10/74. (650 - 950)


Augustus Wilson

1864 - 1950 South Portland, Maine

452

452 Detail

452 Detail

452.

Very rare rocking head blackduck with open mouth, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Moveable rocking head is attached ot the body with a thin hardwood pin. Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Mussel is carved inside of open mouth.  Near mint original paint with feather detail; slight roughness on one edge of tail; long defect in wood is visible on one side just under the carved wing; vertical crack in the bottom part of the front of the neck.

Literature: “The Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, Editor. “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (12,000 - 15,000)

205


Decoratives Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

453

454

455

453. Full size decorative bluewing teal drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1966. Head is turned approximately 45 degrees. Detailed feather carving.  Very slight wear to paint at tip of tail otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Personius collection.

(4,000 - 5,000)

454. Pair of mallard bookends, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both are 1936 model with the “LT Ward and Bro” ink stamp on the underside.  Very good and original. (1,750 - 2,250) 206

455. Large standing quail, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1966. Carving is in preening pose with lifted wings and fanned tail.  Original and good. (1,200 - 1,500)


456

456. Rare decorative snow goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1958. Raised, crossed primaries and carved secondaries. Fluted tail and slight turned head.  Crack in underside extending a short way up the breast and under the tail, otherwise very good and original. (12,500 - 17,500)

456 Detail

456 Detail 207


457

459

461

458

460

462

457. Eider drake, Allan Bell, Toronto, Ontario.  Slightly turned head. “Bell” carved in underside.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

460. Widgeon drake in content pose, Allan Bell, Toronto, Ontario.  Carved crossed wingtips. “Bell” carved in underside.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

458. Bluebill drake with carved wingtips, Allan Bell, Toronto, Ontario.  “Bell” carved in underside. Slightly turned head.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

461. Ringneck drake in alert pose, Allan Bell, Toronto, Ontario.  Wingtip carving. “Bell” carved in underside.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

459. Hooded merganser drake in content pose, Allan Bell, Toronto, Ontario.  Slightly turned head. “Bell” carved in underside.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

462. Bufflehead drake with carved crossed wingtips, Allan Bell, Toronto, Ontario.  Head is turned approximately 90 degrees. “Bell” carved in underside.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

208


464

463

466

465

467

463. Full size saw-whet owl, Gary Eigenberger.  Signed and dated 2009. Carving is 13” tall.   Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 464. Hollow carved ruddy duck drake in content pose, Allan Bell, Toronto, Ontario.  “Bell” carved in underside.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 465. Goldeneye drake, Allan Bell, Toronto, Ontario.  Relief wing carving and slightly turned head. “Bell” Carved in the underside.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

468

467. Wood duck drake, Len Carnaghi.  “LC” branded in underside. Slightly turned head and feather carving detail.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(400 - 600)

468. 2/3 size redhead drake, John Zachman.  Branded “JZ”. Very slightly turned head and detailed wingtip carving.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection stamp on underside. (350 - 450)

466. Canvasback hen and drake hat rack, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1963 on back.  Very good and original. (400 - 600)

209


Michigan Ferdinand Bach 1888 - 1967 Detroit, Michigan

Ferdinand Bach

Born in Switzerland, Bach emigrated to the United States when he was 28 years old. He used his training as an architect and his talent as an artist to find employment in the automobile industry in Detroit. He was initially hired as a draftsman, but his abilities were soon recognized and he, at various times, worked in or served as head designer for the Studebaker, Dodge, Chrysler, and Rickenbacker companies. He was an avid outdoorsman and was particularly interested in the lives of our early Native Americans. Although he lived in a typical rural neighborhood, his home was a log cabin in the midst of a miniature forest which he nurtured and embraced. With open water in his back yard, his surroundings were reminiscent of a hunting lodge nestled in the North Woods. Bach never made decoys to sell or to exhibit. Nearly all were made for his own use with the exception of only a few early blacks which were made for a friend. It was about 1922 that he turned out a personal rig of 75 decoys and an 18’ duck skiff, but a boathouse fire in 1925 destroyed them all. In 1926, he made a similar rig of decoys and another skiff. It is interesting to note that in carving this rig, he utilized 44 different head patterns. He ceased carving decoys after the early 1950s. His decoys possess a sense of calm and were designed and constructed to please himself and his own aesthetic view of what was beautiful in waterfowl. His carvings that survive today are usually in very fine condition – a testimony to his careful cleaning and individually wrapping of each at the end of every season. On August 21, 1967, Ferdinand Bach was found floating in the water not far from his home. A sad but perhaps fitting end for a man who so loved the woods and waters of Michigan.

210


469. Bold classic canvasback drake, Ferdinand Bach, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1930.  Carved and fluted tail. Carved and raised wingtips with ice groove and shapely shoulders. “F. Bach” carved in underside.  Strong original paint with nice patina; a few small dents; otherwise very good and original. (20,000 - 25,000)

469 Detail

469

211


470

472

474

471

473

475

470. Black duck, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Very good and original. (600 - 900)

473. Ferdinand Bach black duck head.    Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (400 - 600)

471. Canvasback drake, Ed “One Arm” Kelly, Monroe, Michigan.  Very slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; several “in the making” filled cracks in back. (600 - 900)

474. Canvasback drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1930.  Hollow, drilled out from underside. With unusual bobtail and tack eyes.  Original paint; a few gouges and roughness at edge of bill. (500 - 700)

472. Widgeon hen and drake, Hank Walters.  Detailed wingtip carving.  Original paint with minor wear; touchup on hen’s bill; drake has several tiny shot marks and also a hairline crack partway through neck base and in one side. (500 - 700)

475. Large black duck, Frank Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (300 - 500)

212


476. Hollow carved Canada goose, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Original paint; minor wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Michigan Decoys,” Lowell Jackson and Clune Walsh. (2,000 - 3,000)

476 477.

Very rare oversize Canada goose, Chris Smith, Algonac, Michigan.  Hollow carved with inserted bill.  Appealing in use repaint; structurally good. (800 - 1,200)

477 478. Hollow carved bluebill drake, George Sibley, Whitehall, Michigan.  Inserted hardwood bill.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; mostly on the lower half; structurally good.

Literature: “Waterfowl Decoys of the Great Lakes,” Donna Tonelli. (2,000 - 3,000)

478 479. Two pinch necked canvasbacks from Point Mouillee, Michigan.    Both have a mix of original and old in use repaint; thin cracks. Provenance: Marro collection. (1,000 - 1,500)

479 213


New Jersey and the Delaware River

480

481 480. Merganser drake, Bill Brown, Manahawkin, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint; minor wear; thin crack through neck; minor damage from dog chews on tip of crest and end of bill. Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (3,500 - 5,500)

481. Merganser hen, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear on most of the decoy; the white paint on the lower half is an old second coat with good patina; professionally repaired crack through neck; small shallow chip missing from one side of underside of bill; a few small dents.

214

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (5,000 - 8,000)


482. Rare mallard drake in eclipse plumage, Dan English, Florence, New Jersey.  Nestled head with raised “V” wingtip carving and fluted tail.  Original paint with average wear and good patina; thin chip missing from one edge of tail and a very small chip missing from top of tail; overall very good structurally.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (3,000 - 4,000)

482 483. Large, full body black duck, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton New Jersey.  Scratch loop feather paint on back and tack eyes.  Original paint with minor wear on the back; most of the paint on the underside is missing; crack through neck; several very small dents. Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (2,750 - 3,250)

483

484. Black duck, Dan English, Bordentown, New Jersey.  In slightly feeding pose.  Near mint original paint on most of the decoy; paint has flaked off of most of the weight; slight separation at neck seam.

Provenance: Bokelman estate. (2,500 - 3,000)

484

485. Rare balsa body canvasback hen, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Nestled cedar head that is slightly turned to one side.  Original paint with minor wear; numerous small dents.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (2,500 - 3,500)

485 215


Ben Hance

1857 - 1928 Point Pleasant, New Jersey Hance was a builder of sailing sneakboxes and decoys. He made brant, black ducks, goldeneye, canvasbacks, bluebills, and at least two swans. It’s the swans that separate Hance from other New Jersey carvers. As strange as it seems this is a species that New Jersey carvers simply did not make. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only early working swan from New Jersey our company has ever offered for auction. Its rigmate is pictured in Jim Doherty’s book, Classic New Jersey Decoys. A true N.J. swan One pictured in Doherty’s book

486.

Rare working swan decoy, Ben Hance, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Several coats of working repaint; cracks in body; some neck filer is missing from base of neck. (6,500 - 9,500)

486

486 Detail

216


John Dawson

1889 - 1959 Trenton, New Jersey

487

487 Detail

487 Detail

487. Rare merganser hen, John Dawson, Trenton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  Heavily carved raised “V” wingtips and slightly lifted head. “JD” is carved in the underside.  Original paint with slight paint loss at filled nail holes, otherwise very good and original.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight.

(16,000 - 20,000)

217


John Blair, Jr.

1881 - 1953 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

488

488 Detail

488. Hollow carved pintail drake, John Blair, Jr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  Retains typical Blair pad weight and has unusual eyes made with an approximately 1/4” diameter hardwood pin through that part of the head. Detailed feather paint on back.   Original paint; minor discoloration and wear; tiny chip missing from one edge of the tip of the tail.

218

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (25,000 - 35,000)


489

490

492 489. Very rare swimming hollow carved bluebill hen, John Blair, Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  Traces of tie strap are attached with square nails.  Original paint; minor wear; moderate wear on underside; very small rough spot on one edge of tail; thin crack under the tail. Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (3,500 - 4,500) 490. Black duck in content pose, Tom Fitzpatrick, Delanco, New Jersey.  Subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint with slight wear; structurally good.

491

493 Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (800 - 1,200) 491. Black duck, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Old in use repaint; paint on sides of head appears to be original; small dents and crac ks. (500 - 700) 492. Brant, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Old in use repaint; very small dents; slight separation at body seam. (500 - 700) 493. Harry V. Shourds style brant, Charles Birdsall, Point Pleasant, New Jersey.  Signed. Stamped “CRB” in underside.  Very good and original. (350 - 450) 219


Items of Interest

494

495

496

497

494. Rare windmill weight from the Elgin Manufacturing Company, Elgin, Illinois.  Form is in the shape of a squirrel. 17” tall x 13” wide.  Structurally good; surface retains old brown paint. (1,500 - 2,000) 495. Desirable windmill weight, known as the rainbow rooster.  14” x 16”.   (1,000 - 1,500) 496. Three canes.  Wooden carved cane with snake and ball. Wooden cane with dog head and sterling silver band, last quarter 19th century. And Wooden carved cane with

220

498

lizard and snake circa 1900 with good paint detail on snake.  Original and good; shows some age. (900 - 1,200) 497. Ten State of Pennsylvania resident hunting license pins.  From 1939 to 1959. In small wooden case.  Original and good. (400 - 600) 498. Copper eagle weathervane.  Stands approximately 20” tall.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200)


499

500

501

499. Rare relief carved plaque of a canvasback hen, J. Coudon, Aiken, Maryland.  Signed “Coudon” in the lower left and also in pencil on back “Done by Joseph Coudon, August 1950”. Measures 11” x 30”.  Strong original paint; edge wear with a few small chips on bottom left and bottom right. (3,500 - 4,500)

501. Hand made wooden canoe with two paddles.  Canoe measures 19”. “Jennie” is painted on each side.  Appealing old surface of original black paint is heavily crazed; paddles have heavily crazed varnish surface. (1,200 - 1,500)

500. Two carvings of people working at cigar making desks.  Both appear to be quite old. Good carving detail. Both are approximately 10 1/2” tall.  Original and good. (1,750 - 2,250) 221


502. Well carved ram’s head with applied wooden horns.  Approximately 25” wide. Highly detailed carving emulating wool. Decorative motif and frame around neck. All in natural wood that has color variation due to oxidation.  (2,000 - 3,000)

502

503. Full size carved rooster with metal feet and bone bill.  Detailed feather carving. Bird stands just under 16” tall.  Original gilding has significant wear; structurally good.

503

222

Provenance: Larry Hughes collection. (2,000 - 3,000)


504

504. Wonderfully carved and painted Northwest Coast dugout canoe, 1st half 20th century.  34” in length and 8” wide. Carved from one piece of wood. In traditional shape of northwest boats. Appealing Indian motifs painted similarly on both sides.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

505

505. Two canoes that appear to be Northwest Coast Indian.  One measures 34” and one measures 25 1/2”. Both carved from one piece of wood. Both show good age. Both have intricate motif carving and paint.  Some small dents and rough areas along edges. (800 - 1,000)

505

507

506

506. Black duck diagram, Long Island Sound, plate #3 by Joel Barber.  Framed and mounted under glass.  Slight discoloration around edge. (500 - 800)

507. “The Quail Hunters,” a print by Ogden Pleissner.  A limited edition of 425 printed by Cross Roads of Sports. Signed in the margin.  Professionally matted and framed. Image size 18” x 27”.

Provenance: Very good and original.

(250 - 350)

223


Maryland Lloyd Tyler

1898 - 1971 Crisfield, Maryland Lloyd Tyler was a man of many means, eventually becoming a decoy dealer and folk artist. However, long before that, he made gunning decoys for local hunters and clubs. The pair of pintails and widgeon in lots 508 and 509 are from this early period. The long sleek bodies with thin necks represent the classic Tyler decoys made around 1940s.

508. Rare rigmate pair of pintails, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Drake’s head is turned slightly.  Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear with very shallow surface on surface burn on one side of hen’s tail; small dents and cracks.

Provenance: Whittington collection.

Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 1819-1936”, C. John Sullivan. “Chesapeake Bay Decoys,” Robert Richardson, color plate, exact decoys. (2,000 - 3,000)

508

509.

Rigmate pair of widgeon, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; small cracks; small shallow chip missing from one side of head on drake; shallow defect on hen’s back.

Provenance: Whittington collection. Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 1819-1936”, C. John Sullivan. (2,000 - 3,000)

509 224


510

511

512

513

514

515

510. Pair of canvasbacks, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1948 models with balsa bodies, slightly turned cedar heads, inserted cedar tails and wooden bottom board.  Old repaint by Severin Hall; slight separation at bottom board seam.

Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 18191936”, C. John Sullivan. (1,000 - 1,400)

511. Canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa body with slightly turned cedar head and inserted cedar tail. Signed and dated 1948.  Original paint with minor wear; numerous dents in balsa; reglued crack in bill. Provenance: Bokelman estate. Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 18191936”, C. John Sullivan. (1,000 - 1,500) 512. Canvasback hen, Will Heverin, Chestertown, Maryland, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with very minor wear; numerous tiny dents. Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 18191936”, C. John Sullivan. (900 - 1,200)

513. Canvasback drake, Taylor Boyd, Perryville, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor wear; protected by a thin coat of varnish; one side of neck seat is lifted slightly; small splashes of dark paint on parts of back.

Provenance: Personius collection.

Literature: Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 1819-1936”, C. John Sullivan. (900 - 1,200) 514.

Pintail hen, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1958. Balsa body.  Original paint; very minor wear, mostly on tail; a few small dents; long thin chip missing from center of underside.

Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 18191936”, C. John Sullivan. (800 - 1,200)

515. Canvasback drake, James T. Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, circa 1900.  Copper tag with the name “John Mckeag Darby Pennsylvania” on underside. Also bears Henry Fleckenstein’s brand, F”.  Strong original paint; a single nail in back to secure an area where wood has split; rough area at one side of face; some edge wear at tail and side of body. Literature: “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 18191936”, C. John Sullivan. (800 - 1,000) 225


516

517

517A

518

519

520

521

522

523

516. Canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Decoy is made with some sort of cast resin.  Original and good. (600 - 800) 517. Redhead drake, Dick Howlett, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.  “RECKLESS” brand in underside.  Old in use repaint, numerous cracks and small rough areas; chip missing from underside of bill. (500 - 800) 517A. Large swan from Maryland. Not very old. Original paint with slight wear; filled crack in back and underside. (350 - 550) 518. Cast iron sink box decoy.    Canvasback drake with old paint. (450 - 650)

226

519. 3/4 size mallard drake, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Approximately 11 1/2” long. Signed and dated 1962. Slightly turned head. Balsa body.  Original paint with slight wear; small dents in one lower side. (500 - 800) 520. Swimming snow goose, Madison Mitchell, Havre de Grace.  Slightly turned head. Signed and dated 1980 with electropen.  Very good and original. (300 - 500) 521. Redhead drake cast iron sinkbox decoy.  Possibly from Long Island, New York.  Retains old paint. (450 - 650) 522. Deep body canvasback wing duck, probably from Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Old repaint; structurally good. (400 - 600) 523.

Black duck, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated “To Mort Kramer, Christmas 1993”. Slightly turned head.  Very good and original. (400 - 600)


Contemporary Carvings

524 524. Pair of pintails, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Well carved with raised carved wingtips and good paint detail. Hen is in preening pose.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

526. Swan, David Ward, Essex, Connecticut.  Hollow carved with “DBW” stamped in underside, 1980. Measures 37” in length. Aged and stressed surface made to look old.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

526

227


527. Pair of canvasbacks, Ken Scheeler.  Signed on the undersides with electro pen. Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Bokelman estate. (1,750 - 2,250)

527

528

529

530

531

528. Running curlew, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Approximately 23” long. Relief wing carving shot marks in each side.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200) 529. Feeding yellowlegs, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  McNair carved in the underside. Carved in the style of Fred Nichols. On original base.  Very good and original.

Provenance: This decoy was a birthday present from Mark McNair to Mort Kramer. (650 - 950)

228

530. Large reaching curlew, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  “MH” carved under tail. An inset pitchfork iron bill. Glass eyes. Shoulder carving and wing tail execution similar to Crowell’s finest examples, with raised and split wingtips. Detailed paint feathering.  Excellent and original. (800 - 1,200) 531. Hollow carved ruddy turnstone, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  McNair carved in the underside. Relief wing carving.  Very good and original. (650 - 950)


532. Classic widgeon drake, Jim Foote, Detroit, Michigan.  Signed by Jim on underside. Hollowed out with bottom board. Tucked head is slightly turned, resting over puffed breast. Wings are raised from tail and slightly crossed. Strong combing on back and side pockets.  Original and good. (1,500 - 1,800)

532

533

534

535

536

533. Pair of oversize mallards, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Both have “G Strunk” stamped in the weight.  Very good and original.

535. Ruddy duck, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed and dated 2000.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good.

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

534.

Running whimbrel, carved in the style of Nathan Cobb, Jr., Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  McNair carved in the underside.  Original paint with slight wear that has been aged; lightly hit by shot. (800 - 1,200)

(900 - 1,200)

(800 - 1,200)

536. Canada goose in alert pose, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania.  Signed and dated 1999. Slightly turned head.   Provenance: Bokelman estate.

(800 - 1,200)

229


537

538

539

540

541

542

543

537. Full size flying goldeneye drake, Mike Borrett, Madison, Wisconsin.  Signed. Detailed feather carving on wings and tail.  Near mint original paint; tiny dark spots on white areas of body where sap has bled through the paint; structurally good. (650 - 950)

540. Black bellied plover, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  McNair carved in the underside. Extended wingtips that have been pinned onto the body.  Original paint with slight wear that has been aged; hairline surface crack at one side of neck. (600 - 900)

538.

Pair of flat bottom style greenwing teal, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  “Strunk” stamp in weight, also signed by the maker. Both have raised, carved, crossed wingtips and slightly turned head.  Excellent and original.

541.

Provenance: Bokelman estate.

(650 - 950)

539. Pair of ruddy ducks, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  “Strunk” stamped in weight. Slightly turned head, and wide, fanned tails.   Provenance: Bokelman estate.

230

(650 - 950)

Dunlin, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  McNair carved in the underside. Relief wing carving with detailed feather carving on wingtips. On original base signed “For my good pal Mort Kramer. Dunlin 2010.”  Very good and original. (650 - 950)

542. Hollow carved willet, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  McNair carved in underside. Relief wing carving.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 543. Running sandpiper carved in the style of Obediah Verity, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  McNair carved in the underside. On original base. Signed, “Made for my friend, Mort Kramer. Mark McNair 2011.”  Very good and original. (500 - 800)


Illinois River

544

545

546

547

548

549

550

551

552

544. Greenwing teal drake, Perry Wilcoxen, Liverpool, Illinois.    Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (650 - 950) 545. Mallard drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Graves weight on underside.  Original paint with moderate discoloration and wear; a few small dents, chip missing from top of tail. (650 - 950) 546. Coot, Hec Whittington, Ogelsby, Illinois.  Stamped and dated January 1977. Signed on underside “To Hal (Sorenson) from Hec April 30/77.”   Provenance: Personius collection.

(500 - 700)

547. Rigmate pair of mallards, Walter “Tube” Dawson, Putnam, Illinois.    Appealing old in use repaint; small dents; crack in underside of hen which had tape added to it when the decoy was repainted, someone has pulled the tape off. (400 - 600) 548. Cork body canvasback drake, Harold Haertel, Dundee Illinois.  Signed and dated 1960.  Original and good. Provenance: Personius collection.

549.

Pintail drake, Parry Wilcoxen, Liverpool, Illinois.  Good scratch paint detail.  Original paint with very slight wear protected by a thin coat of varnish; structurally good. (600 - 900)

550. Flat bottom mallard drake, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois.  From the Jolly rig.  Paint has been restored in the Walker style; minor wear; a fairly large chip missing from underside near one edge. (500 - 800) 551.

Mallard hen, Henry Holmes, Bureau, Illinois.    Original paint that is darkened with age and has minor wear; two small shot scars on bill. (500 - 800)

552. Pintail drake, Henry Holmes, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880s.    Repainted by Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois. Significant wear on underside; crack through neck. (500 - 800)

End of Session Two

(400 - 600)

231


Index of Carvers Andress, Ray.............................................................................403 Adamson, Harry Curieuxx........................................................115 Anger, Ken........................................................ 69-73,75,77,81,82 Ansardi, Adam..........................................................................366 Audubon, J.J..................................................................... 239-241 Austin Powder ...................................................................... 250P Bach, Ferdinand.................................................................469,473 Bailey, T....................................................................................226 Barkelow, Lou...........................................................................165 Bay, Frank...................................................................................29 Behrman, George...................................................................23,28 Belciar, Gerald...................................................................119,125 Bell, Allan............................................. 205,206,457-462,464,465 BenJon .................................................................................. 250J Bicknell, Percy............................................................................26 Birch, Reggie............................................................................271 Birdsall, Charles........................................................................493 Bishop, Richard.........................................................................159 Blair, Jr., John...........................................................................488 Blair,Sr., John............................................................................489 Boelter .....................................................................................259 Borrett, Mike......................................................................341,537 Bourg, Xavier............................................................................359 Bowman, William.....................................................................140 Boyd, George.....................................................................427,428 Boyd, Taylor..............................................................................513 Brown, Bill................................................................................480 Brown, Bob...............................................................................309 Bruning, Ken...............................................................................46 Burgess, Ned.............................................................................385 Burke, Bob................................................................................404 Cable, Lee.................................................................................231 Carmadelle, Willie....................................................................356 Carnaghi, Len.....................................................................312,467 Chamberlain ......................................................................... 250L Chambers, Tom................................3,4,216,217,219,294,321,322 Chauvin, Herman......................................................................367 Cheeseman, Vern.......................................................................135 Chrysler, William.................................................. 325,416B,416C Clark, Roland............................................................................158 Clifford, William.......................................................... 250A,250B Cochran, David.........................................................................149 Conklin, Roy.............................................................................141 Coudon, J..................................................................................499 Croft, Fred.................................................................................413 Crowell, Elmer................................................. 335-337A,446-450 Daisey, Cigar.............................................................................334 Davis, Lawrence.......................................................................299 Dawson, John............................................................................487 Dawson, Walter.........................................................................547 DeHate, Abraham........................................................................44 Derrydale .................................................................................160 Dilley, John...............................................................................426 Dodge Decoy Factory .................................429,430,432,437,440 Downey, A.J..............................................................................274 Ducharme, Duncan.....................................................................74 Dumas, Alexander..................................................................210B DuPont .............................................................................153,155 Eaton, William..........................................................................238

Eberhardt, George.....................................................................144 Eigenberger, Gary.....................................................................463 Elgin Manufacturing Company ...............................................494 Elliston, Robert...............................................................17,22,130 English, Dan.......................................................................482,484 Evans Decoy Factory ..............................................................442 Faue, William............................................................................263 Fernlund, Ivar................................................................................1 Finney, Frank......................................................................... 345E Fitzpatrick, Tom........................................................................490 Foote, Jim....................................................................208,333,532 Fox, Gordon................................................................................35 Frady, Mike...............................................................................332 Garren, Otto................................................................ 11,12,18-20 Gearhart, Don.................................................................... 370-372 Gigl, Joseph..............................................................................247 Gisclaire, Adam.........................................................................354 Godin, Pat..............................................................................345B Goodwright, Jerry.....................................................................122 Goulette Family........................................................................257 Graves, Bert.........................................................395,396,400,545 Gunderson, Ole.........................................................................185 Haertel, Harold.................................................... 192-202,342,548 Hagerbaumer, David.................................................................230 Hall, B.K...................................................................................251 Hance, Ben................................................................................486 Hanson, Marty............................................... 51-55,328,545D,530 Harris, Ken................................................................................142 Hart, William.............................................................................414 Hazard ..................................................................................250K Heinemann, Ben........................................................................308 Hemenway, Walter....................................................................229 Hercules ..................................................................................156 Heverin, Will.............................................................................512 Hildreth, Ephraim.....................................................................171 Holand, Mark............................................................................207 Holly, James..............................................................................515 Holmes, Henry...................................................................551,552 Hopkins, Bruce...........................................................................79 Horn, John..........................................................................162,169 Horner, Rowley...........................................................................14 Hotze, Hiram.............................................................................129 Howell, Leroy....................................................................262,264 Howlett, Dick............................................................................517 Hudson, Delbert........................................................................344 Hudson, Ira................................................................................421 Hunt, Lynn Bouge.....................................................................235 Hutchings, Sam..................................................................221,225 Janner, Hans................................................................................38 Janson, Richard......................................................................30,32 Jester, Doug........................................................................383,384 Johnson, Lloyd..........................................................................210 Johnson, Taylor.........................................................................166 Jones, Bob.................................................................................218 Kelly, Ed...................................................................................471 Kessler, George.........................................................................398 King, Bunn................................................................................255 King, Oliver..............................................................................296 Klepinger, Nick.........................................................................228


Koelpin, William.............................................................126,345A Konopasek, Gene......................................................................315 Kuhn, Bob..........................................................................113,114 Kuhn, Bob.................................................................................114 Lawson, Oliver.........................................13,326,327,514,519,523 Leboeuf, Orel.........................................................................80,83 Liedl, Charles............................................................................232 Lincoln, Joseph....................................................................60,451 Loge, Daniel..............................................................................237 Malick, Donald.........................................................................117 Markham rig ............................................................................318 Marr, Joe...................................................................................186 Mason Decoy Factory ................................................................... 92-109,275-289,374-381,431,435,436,442A,444A McGillivray, Harold....................................................................33 McLoughlin, John...........................................................210A,485 McNair, Mark................ 345G,524,528,529,531,534,535,540-543 Meldrum, Alex..........................................................................268 Mitchell, Madison.....................................................................520 Mizera, Frank............................................................................261 Moak, Augustus......................................................... 243-245,249 Montgomery, A.................................................................. 110,111 Morris, John..............................................................................407 Mueller, Keith...........................................................................306 Nichol, D.W..........................222,290-292,295,298,300,409,416E Nichols, Addie...........................................................................416 Norman, Harry..........................................................................324 Olson, Gordon.............................................................................25 Patterson, Chauncey..................................................................152 Patterson, Frances.....................................................................301 Pellegrin, Arthur........................................................................357 Peltier, Larry...............................................................................45 Perdew, Charles...... 16,132-134,137,250D,250F,386-388,391,399 Perkins, Horace...........................................................................37 Perret, Vern.................................................................................27 Personius, Mark........................................................................302 Peters .......................................................................................154 Peters, Scott...................................................................................8 Peterson Decoy Factory ...................................................439,444 Peterson, Emile...........................................................................31 Peterson, Oscar.................................... 34,41-43,252,254,260,270 Pice, Charles...............................................................................24 Pleissner, Ogden........................................................................507 Pratt Decoy Factory ................................................................443 Rathmell, Lou.............................................................................58 Reeves, John.............................................................................317 Reeves, Phineas......................................................................9,410 Reid, Don..................................................................................293 Remington ...............................................................................157 Rennardson, Robert...................................................................320 Ries, Al......................................................................................128 Roberts, George........................................................................145 Roddy, Woodson.......................................................................313 Roussell, Reme.........................................................................373 Ruggles, Charles................................................................392,394 Rule, Newt..........................................................250C,250E,250H Scarey, George............................................................................78 Scheeler, John....................................................................120,123 Scheeler, Ken.....................................................................340,527 Schmidt, Ben............................................. 61-68,466,470,474,476 Schmidt, Frank..........................................................................475

Schmiedlin, Jim............................................................. 84-91,204 Schoenheider, Jr., Charles.........................................................389 Scholer, Jacob...........................................................................177 Schram, Butch...........................................................................184 Schultz, William.........................121,124,203,209,331,338,339,34 Scott, Sir Peter..........................................................................116 Seabrook, Bob........................................................................ 345F Shaw, Bill...........................................................................136,393 Shourds, Harry V.............................163,164,168,481,483,491,492 Sibley, George...........................................................................478 Sieger, Joseph............................................................................242 Siloski, Jerry.............................................................................316 Skees, Ira...................................................................................311 Smith, Chris..............................................................................477 Smith, Will.............................................................................415A Smithers, Ralph.........................................................................406 Snyder, William Mckendree.....................................................112 Sprague, Jonas...........................................................................161 Stevens Decoy Factory ...........................................................151 Strey, Frank........................................................................246,250 Strunk, George............. 304,305,307,310,345H,345J,533,538,539 Stump, George..........................................................................314 Swedesky, Sylvester..................................................................248 Tax, John...................................................................................175 Taylor, Duncan........................................................................ 250I Tremblay, Gerald........................................................................59 Trombley, Andy.....................................................................39,40 Truex, Rhodes...........................................................................172 Tyler, Lloyd.................................................................227,508,509 Verdin, Alfonse.........................................................................355 Verity Family .....................................................143,150,423,424 Verity, Andrew..........................................................................419 Verity, George...........................................................................139 Verity, Obediah...........................................................417,418,420 Vizier, Clovis............................................................................369 Voorhees, Dan........................................................................400A Walker, Charles...........................................................138,397,550 Walters, Hank............................................................................472 Ward Brothers, ................................. 346-353A,453-456,511,516 Ward, David.......................................................................297,526 Ward, Lem.......................................................................236,238A Warin, George............................................6,211,212,224,319,411 Weeks, Robert.............................................................................21 Wells, John R...........5,7,213-215,220,401,402,405,408,415,416A Wheeler, Shang......................................................................56,57 White, Bob.........................................................................303,536 Whittington, Hec................................................................131,546 Wilcoxen, Perry..........................................................390,544,549 Wildfowler Decoy Factory ......................................................441 Wilson, Gus........................................................................449,452 Winchester ..............................................................................157 Wooster, Joe..................................................................15,178,343 Worona, Steve....................................................................329,330 Wright, Alvirah.........................................................................382 Zachman, John..........................................................................468 Zimmerman, William................................................................118


Collection Planning Program

Enjoy Collecting Now and Plan Ahead With a forty year history, you can rely on the Guyette & Deeter decoy auction house as the most trusted decoy auction firm to handle your estate planning and collection management needs. Whether it’s for tax purposes, estate planning, gifting, charitable giving or insurance purposes, let us manage and periodically update a comprehensive written appraisal of your collection. Gary and Jon are available to work with banks, attorneys, trust and estate officers, probate court, private clients and family members who may be responsible for the dispersal of estates and collections. Let professionals document your collection with accurate values and descriptions. We will work closely with you to ensure that your wishes are established at agreed upon terms and conditions now, to make it easier to administer your estate later.

Please contact Gary or Jon to discuss our Collection Planning Program today.

With several options, we make it easy for you to reach us: Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 • St. Michaels MD 21663 (410) 745-0485 • (410) 745-0487 fax decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com Jon Deeter 7980 Darbys Run • Chagrin Falls OH 44023 (440) 610-1768 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com For more information, visit our website: www.guyetteanddeeter.com


NORTH AMERICAN

Vintage Decoy & Sporting Collectibles Show • The The largest largest decoy decoy aand nd sporting collectibles show sh how Pheasant Run Resort in North America – ST. CHARLES, IL – • Room-to-Room Trading • Guyette & Deeter Auction • MegaCenter Dealer Show • Exhibit of work by Pat Gregory • Stoughton, WI Decoy Display • Chautauqua Fish Display • And much more!

APRIL 24-28, 2018 Sponsored by the Midwest Decoy Collectors ors Assn.

For information on daily events, booking oking rooms, and reserving selling tables go to

midwestdecoy.org

OR CALL

586-530-6586


You’ve built a collection of unique, valuable decoys and historical waterfowling items. Have you considered what will happen when you are no longer adding to the collection? Ducks Unlimited, Inc. has a team of gift planning professionals ready to review estate planning options that may benefit not only your family, but help you leave a legacy of conservation. They offer assistance to avoid capital gains, increase income, reduce potential estate taxes and still leave a legacy of conservation.

For more information contact: Chris Cole Managing Director Gift Planning 901-758-3763 office ccole@ducks.org


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One Bass Pro Drive | Memphis, TN 38105 | 901-291-8257


2018 Clayton Decoy/Wildlife Art & Sporting Collectibles Show July 20th & 21ST (Friday and Saturday) | 9am - 6 pm Friday & 9 am - 4pm Saturday Gordon Cerow Recreation Park | 615 E Line Rd, Clayton, New York TIDCA Display: Decoys of Augustus “Gus” Rogers Goldeneye hens by Gus Rogers, Alexandria Bay, NY

TIDCA Vintage Decoy Contest - Friday July 20th Decoy and Antique Auction - Friday, July 20th: ( www.chappysplace.com or www.auctionzip.com )

Broadbill pre 1960; any maker or style

Canvasback pre 1960; any maker or style

Teal pre 1960; any species of teal, any maker or style

For more information visit www.timuseum.org or call 315-686-5794


EVANS FACTORY DECOYS

A Collectors Comprehensive Pictorial Reference Guide NEW RELEASE Ready at the Midwest Decoy Collectors Assn. show. Save shipping with pick-up at the show! Advance orders will not process until the book is shipped in April. Order Your Copy Today!

TThe first comprehensive pictorial

✠ Over 200 hard-bound pages

reference guide by Evans Society ✠ Over 350 full color photos Members Andy Schoneich and Terry ✠ Factory history Smart detailing the Evans Duck Decoy Factory. Filled with never-before ✠ Grade identification published information, this book is a ✠ Head & speculum identification must for any Evans enthusiast or dealer ✠ Toys, doorstops & paperweights of wildfowl decoys and collectibles. ✠ Miniature replicas & more... Published by L&M Design. A Limited First Edition of 1,000 books $75.00 + $6.00 S&H for first book / $2.00 each add. book (Cont. US)

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Please find the Evans Decoy Book tab. Print and complete the order form and mail or email (depending on method of payment) to: Andy Schoneich, 9345 West 119th Street, Palos Park, IL 60464

If no Internet access to print the order form:

708-448-3061 for help ordering


“Calling The Wild is a

fascinating and well -researched exploration of the history of the duck call in Arkansas and a tribute to the innovation and craftsmanship of the state’s callmakers.”

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- DALE HALL:

Cheif Executive Officer, Ducks Unlimited Memphis | New Orleans


The Legacy of the American Duck Call In this follow up to the 1988 book “Duck Calls – An Enduring American Folk Art” Howard Harlan and James Fleming depict the art of the duck call craft and display the efforts of those masters who set the standards of ingenuity and craftsmanship in luring the wary puddle duck. This 496-page, full color book is the culmination of over 60 years of research conducted by Harlan and Fleming and is the most complete work of its kind. As you turn the pages of this book you will be revisiting the golden age of water fowling.

$89.95 New Book $149.95 Limited Edition Book

Visit www.howardharlan.com to order your copy today. Project2_Layout 1 3/14/16 5:25 PM Page 1

2018 Baton Baton Rouge 2016 Rouge Antique Decoy Antique DecoyShow Show

August August 18, 27, 2018 2016|• 9am 9am to to 4pm Hosted by the Bluebonnet Swamp Swamp Nature Hosted the BREC BREC |• Bluebonnet NatureCenter Center

Mark "McCool" Whipple pintail

Southeast Antique Decoy Collectors Swap Meet Join Us For this Antique Louisiana decoy collectors event. Display, Buy, Sell & Swap. Activities Exhibitor display tables available on a first come first served basis. Request that exhibitors donate door prizes to BREC in lieu of $50 table rental. Premium Southern Antique Decoy Collectors Display Primitive Decoy Carving Demos Antique Pirogue Boat Displays Interactive Activities and Games for Children

Pair of mallards by presentations to honor the Bayou Terrebonne and Special Nicole Vidacovich West Louisiana Decoy Carvers contributions to Louisiana Waterfowl History

Location BREC Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center 10503 N. Oak Hills Parkway Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70810 Directions

For event Information, table reservations and decoy display contact Gary Lipham • garylipham1@gmail.com • (225) 571-2835

Exit I-10 at Bluebonnet BLVD. Travel past the Mall and cross Perkins. Turn toward the Whitney Bank on N. Oak Hills Pkwy into the parking lot.


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CONDITIONS OF SALE ‑- PLEASE READ 1.

GUARANTEE ‑ We have made a consistent effort in correctly cataloging and describing the property to be sold. The decoys and paintings have guaranteed condition reports. Should the need arise, the auctioneer reserves the right to make verbal corrections and provide additional information from the block, at the time of the sale. Absentee bids will not be executed on items that are found to be other than described in the catalog. Since opinions can differ, particularly in the matter of condition, the auctioneer will be sole judge in the matter of refunds. 2. DURATION OF GUARANTEE ‑ Request for refund for items purchased IN PERSON at the auction must be made within 3 days of the sale. If you are an absentee or phone bidder it is your responsibility to examine the lot immediately upon receipt. On items purchased absentee, the guarantee will end 3 days from the date of delivery. Therefore, all guarantees on items purchased will become null and void 7 calendar days from the date of shipment. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT IF YOU PAY LATE, YOU WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE GUARANTEE. Payment must be postmarked no later than 30 days after the auction. 3. PROTESTED BIDS ‑ In the case of a disputed bid, the auctioneer is the sole determinant as to who the successful bidder is, and at his discretion, may reoffer and resell the article in dispute. If a dispute arises after the sale, the auctioneer’s sales records shall be conclusive as to who the purchaser was, and the purchase price. 4. BIDDING - Bidding usually starts below the low estimate and advances in increments of approximately 10% of the opening bid subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right, at his sole discretion, to refuse any bids that he deems unreasonable. The minimum bid increment guideline is as follows: $500 to $1000 - $25 $10,000 to $20,000 - $500 $100,000 and above - $2,000 $1000 to $10,000 - $100 $20,000 to $100,000 - $1,000 5. ABSENTEE BIDS ‑ Phone or mail bids, at the discretion of the Auctioneer, will be accepted with a 20% deposit. In such case, the bookkeeper will execute such bids competitively. Absentee bids are executed by the bookkeeper on behalf of the bidder in accordance with the bid increment policy shown above. Please review the rules governing both absentee and phone bids in the back of the catalog. 6. TERMS ‑ All items are to be paid for in U.S. funds on the day of the auction. No items will be released until they are paid for. Those who have not established an account with us and wish to pay by check, must do so prior to the beginning of the auction, by presenting a current letter of reference from their bank, or by providing references, that are suitable to the Auctioneer. The Auctioneer reserves the right to hold merchandise purchased by personal check, until the check has cleared the bank. Phone and absentee bidders ‑ You will be notified one week after the auction of your bids/results. PAYMENT IS DUE UPON RECEIPT. A late charge will be accessed on all balances not paid, at the rate of 12% A.P.R. commencing 30 days after the auction. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. Guyette & Deeter will not carry insurance on items that are not paid for within 35 days of the auction. Also, the auctioneer may retain and/or recover the deposit specified as liquidated damages. In addition, the property can be resold at public or private sale without further notice. Any deficiency resulting from such resale shall be paid to the auctioneer by the defaulting buyer, together with all charges, fees, and expenses incurred by such resale, or the enforcement of the obligation hereunder. Buyer agrees to pay all charges and expenses incurred by reason of any breach of the Terms and Conditions of Sale, including without limitation, reasonable attorney fees. 7. PAYMENT FOR PURCHASES MAY BE MADE WITH VISA , MASTERCARD, CASH, CHECK, OR WIRE TRANSFER. 8. BUYERS PREMIUM- The buyer’s premium, assessed on each selling lot, is 18% of the hammer price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 10% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. For payments made using Visa or MasterCard, the buyer’s premium is 21% up to and including $1,000,000, plus 13% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. 9. TAX ‑ THERE IS A 8% SALES TAX IN ILLINOIS. Tax is waived if buyer presents a valid resale certificate from any state or has purchases shipped outSIDE of Illinois. 10. ACCEPTANCE OF CONDITIONS ‑ Bidding on any articles in this catalog indicates your acceptance of all the above items. 11. BIDDING AGENT RESPONSIBILITY ‑ If you are registering for someone or if you execute a bid for someone else under your number, you are responsible for the settlement of that account. You are also responsible for examining the decoy(s) for your client regarding the guarantee. 12. WITHDRAWAL ‑ We reserve the right to withdraw any property before the sale and shall have no liability whatsoever for such withdrawal. 13. TITLE ‑ Title passes upon the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer. It will then be the responsibility of the buyer to make full payment prior to removing the goods from the premises. Removal is at both the buyer’s risk and expense, and must be made at the conclusion of the sale, unless other arrangements are made with the Guyette & Deeter staff. Any lots we might make arrangements for moving or storing are solely at the risk of the owner, and any damage or loss occurring after the fall of the hammer becomes that of the buyer. 14. LEGAL DISPUTE ‑ Any legal disputes arising from this auction shall be settled in the court system of the State of Maine. UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE - The Maine Uniform Commercial Code, Title II, Section 2328 applies to this auction. 15. All calls are sold “As Is”. THE OFFICE WILL NOT BE OPEN UNTIL WEDNESDAY AFTER THE AUCTION.


ABSENTEE, PHONE, AND ONLINE BIDS 1. Absentee bids are a service provided to our customers free of charge. Every effort is made to execute all absentee bids, however, in the event of an error or omission, or failure to properly execute absentee bids, the Auctioneer shall not be held liable. 2. All absentee bids must be accompanied by a 20% deposit, which will be refunded immediately after the auction if your bid is unsuccessful. If your bid is successful, the deposit will be applied to the purchase price and the balance due upon presentation of your bill. All absentee bidders are notified by mail, whether successful or unsuccessful. 3. Visa and Mastercard numbers can be given in place of a check deposit, if your bid is submitted by phone. Your card number will not be used to make payments for purchases, it is only used as collateral. Your card number will only be used to make payment for purchases if you default on payment. 4. To execute an absentee bid, fill out the enclosed form listing catalog number, description, and your top bid price (not including the 18% buyer’s premium). Send this together with your deposit as soon as possible. If your bids are sent seven days or less prior to the auction, you should call our office three days prior to the auction, to confirm that we have received your bids. If they have not been received at that point in time, we will take your bid over the phone. We cannot guarantee that bids received after the auction has started will be executed. 5. If two or more bids are received on the same item from different people, the bidding will open at the next logical raise above the second highest bid. If two absentee bids are received with the exact same amount, the first one received will take precedence. 6. All bids must be in even dollar amounts. Bids in fractions of dollars will be considered the next lower even dollar amount. 7. Bid increments: The bid increment policy, which also applies to both absentee and phone bidders, is listed under “CONDITIONS OF SALE” (item #4), in the front of the catalog. 8. Open bids, bids with no set top amount, or orders to just simply buy the lot, cannot be accepted. You must have a definite top limit before we can execute your bid. Alternatives to this are as follows: a. To bid over the telephone. This can be done by simply sending a 20% deposit for what you wish to bid on the object. This will bind whatever bid amount you wish to bid over the telephone. (NOTE: There are only 8 phone lines into the auction room and phone bids will be handled on a first come, first serve basis.) b. Some bidders concerned that a lot might just go for one bid above their top limit, leave a top bid plus one bid. This works as follows: the top bid submitted might be $1,000, but not wishing to lose the lot for simply $25 more, the party might bid $1,000 + 1 bid if they definitely don’t want to go over a certain price, they would indicate $1,000 +1 ($1,025) (NOTE: One possible problem that occasionally arises with absentee bids is when someone in the audience bids exactly the amount, which you specify is your limit. In such a case, we would not go one extra bid unless your bid sheet indicates “plus one” bid.). 9. If you are a successful bidder, a bill will be sent one week after the auction. Purchasers should indicate their desired method of shipment, if such is necessary. There is a charge for shipping, labor, materials, and insurance. Shipping is done on a first come, first serve basis, and can take up to 4 weeks. Please note that a certified check, Visa, Mastercard, or any other form of guaranteed funds will expedite shipping. 10. According to UPS regulations, we must now crate all paintings. In addition, for expensive oil paintings and delicate carvings, we need a written statement from the purchaser, assuming the responsibility of pursuing any claims, in the event of damage incurred during shipping. Valuable lots need to be sent 2 day air UPS due to values. Under no circumstances will we be liable for damage to glass or frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of cause. 11. TERMS — Phone and absentee bidders — You will be notified one week after the auction of your results. Payment is due upon receipt. Interest will be charged on all balances not paid within 30 days after the bill is sent at the rate of 12% APR. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. If an account is 75 days overdue, the items may be returned to the consignor and overdue buyer will pay the buyers premium and commission from the sale, if they wish to participate in future Guyette and Deeter auctions. 12. Bidding on any article(s) indicates your acceptance of these terms above. 13. If you would like any additional information on any of the lots, please contact: Gary Guyette at (410) 745-0485 or Jon Deeter at (440) 610-1768. nd

If you have any questions concerning absentee bids, please call us.


OFFICE: OFFICE:

ABSENTEE AND PHONE BID FORM

1170 PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD MD 21663 410-745-0485 410-745-0485 Fax Fax 410-745-0487 410-745-0487 decoys@guyetteandschmidt.com decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

OFFICE USE ONLY TIME DATE OF BID AUCTION DATE MANAGER ABSENTEE OR PHONE BID

NAME ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

TELEPHONE DEPOSIT $

(Check Amount or Visa or MasterCard # & Exp.)

IIdesire following items in the sale.sale. The The bids bids are toare be to executed by Guyette & Deeter, up to but desiretotobid bidononthe the following items in the executed by Guyette & Schmidt, Inc.,not upexceeding to but notthe amount(s) on the below bids.on Allthe bidsbelow will be executed and will accepted subject to theaccepted Terms ofsubject Sale andtoAbsentee Bids exceedingspecified the amount(s) specified bids. All bids be executed and the Terms of Procedure outlined inBids the catalog. (Please be sure you understand before using thisour Absentee and Phone Sale and Absentee Procedure outlined in that the catalog. (Pleaseour be procedures sure that you understand procedures before Bid Form.) will not open until Wednesday after using this Office Absentee andbe Phone Bid Form.) Office willthe notauction. be open until Wednesday after the auction.

Signature

A PREMIUM OF OF 18% WILL BE APPLIED ITEMSSOLD, SOLD, PAID BY THE BUYER A PREMIUM 15% WILL BE APPLIED TO TO ALL ALL ITEMS TOTO BEBE PAID BY THE BUYER OFFICE USE

IN CATALOG # ORDER

DESCRIPTION

A SECOND PAGE IS PROVIDED ON BACK SHOULD YOU REQUIRE ADDITIONAL SPACE TOTAL BIDS $

x 20%

EQUALS DEPOSIT ENCLOSED $

BID AMOUNT


Page 2

NAME OFFICE USE

PHONE IN CATALOG # ORDER

AUCTION DATE DESCRIPTION

BID AMOUNT


112

242

187

317


G uyet te & De et er, Inc. PO Box 1170, St. M icha els , M D 21663 410-745- 0485 | g u yet t ea nddeet er .com

North American Decoys at Auction April 26 & 27, 2018  
North American Decoys at Auction April 26 & 27, 2018  

Guyette & Deeter, Inc.'s annual spring decoy auction held on April 26 & 27, 2018 in St. Charles, Illinois held in conjunction with the Midwe...