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Guyette & Deeter, Inc. North American Decoys At Auction November 9, 2017


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Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

North American Decoys At Auction Talbot County Community Center 10028 Ocean Gateway Easton, Maryland 21601 50 Table Indoor Buy, Sell, Swap November 7 - 9, 2017 In conjunction with the Easton Waterfowl Festival

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Preview 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM Complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Thursday, November 9, 2017 Preview 8:00 AM - 9:45 AM Auction 10:00 AM

For questions during the auction, call 410-745-0485.

Catalog $45. Out of Country $54 Absentee, Phone & Online Bidding accepted call 410-745-0485 for arrangements For Free Decoy Appraisal Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416


Important Notices: ■ Unofficial prices realized information will be available five business days after the auction. Official prices realized list will be available online approximately two weeks after the auction. ■ If you would like to consign decoys to our next auction, please contact; Gary Guyette 410-745-0485 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com or Jon Deeter 440-543-1416 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com. Free appraisals are available with no obligation to consign and all correspondences are strictly confidential. ■ For delicate carvings, a written statement from the purchaser assuming responsibility for pursuing any claims in the event of any damage incurred during shipping is required, these items are marked *. Under no circumstances will we be responsible for damage to glass, frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of the cause. ■ Auctioneer James D. Julia, Fairfield, Maine. ■ Stands are not included with the decoys or weathervanes unless specified in catalog. Plexiglass cases are not included with shotgun shell boxes. ■ All duck calls have condition reports, but are sold “As Is”. ■ Trade Up Program - A limited numer of decoy purchases may be paid

for by consigning decoys to the next Guyette & Deeter. auction. Ask Gary or Jon for Details.

We are fortunate to have Robert J. Koenke on staff as our Sporting & Wildlife Art expert. Feel free to contact him for an appraisal or consignment to one of our auctions: 410-758-1644, rjkoenke@verizon.net

UPCOMING GUYETTE & DEETER, INC. DECOY AUCTIONS February 17, 2018

Marriott Hotel Charleston, South Carolina

In Conjunction with the Southeastern Wildlife Expo

April 2018

Pheasant Run Resort St. Charles, Illinois In Conjunction with Midwest Decoy Collectors’ Show To consign, Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-610-1768


Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

Dale & Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 Tel: 410-745-0485 Fax: 410-745-0487 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

Jon & Leigh Ann Deeter 7980 Darbys Run Chagrin Falls, OH 44023 Tel: 440-610-1768 Fax: 440-543-5405 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com

Zac Cote Online auction manager & Photography Freeport, Maine Tel: 410-253-8616 zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

Mike Stevenson Graphic Designer & Website Developer St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 michael@guyetteanddeeter.com

Bill Lapointe 344 Dillon Lane Swansea, Massachusetts 774-644-9426 tolle@aol.com We are pleased to announce Bill Lapointe as the newest member of the Guyette & Deeter organization. Bill will be focusing his efforts in the New York and New England area. He will also represent our company at decoy shows and our four live auctions each year. Bill has shown tremendous responsibility over the last 12 years working closely with Ted and Judy Harmon at Decoys Unlimited. He is a longtime decoy collector whose specialty is New England decoys with a focus on the Massachusetts South Coast. Bill will immediately be available to discuss consignments for future live auctions or our online sales, as well as appraisals.

Ed Kenney Merchandise Manager & Shipping St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 shipping@guyetteanddeeter.com

Lynda Brooks Office Manager St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 lynda@guyetteanddeeter.com

Denise Jarrell

Bookkeeper St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 billing@guyetteanddeeter.com


Featuring Decoys From The Following Collections: Donald and Betty Denny Bill and Barbara Doggart Otis Dozier Larry Hughes Elizabeth Kfoury Keith Lawton

Harry Lee Anthony Marro Dr. Charles McIntosh Tom Randon The Lloyd Tyler family Betty Williford

Private New England Conservation Organization

Bill and Barbara Doggart Bill Doggart, a long time New Jersey collector, dealer, and the serving president of the New Jersey Decoy Collectors Association passed away on February 10, 2016 while at his winter retreat in Florida. He was 69 years old. An avid duck hunter and fisherman, Bill’s interest in buying and selling decoys started at an early age, purchasing a rig of six Cigar Daisey brant when he was 16 years old for $5.00 each then selling them for $50 apiece. He eventually began attending the local decoy shows, becoming an active participant. But Bill was more than a participant, as he didn’t just join clubs but actively helped run them. Early on he served seven years as the president of the New Jersey Decoy Collectors Association and was very involved in organizing its first show in 1992. He recently began a second term as the group’s president. Over 30 years ago Bill convinced a co-worker, Clarence Fennimore, to try his hand at decoy carving, and for years this pair hunted, carved, and sold decoys together at various East Coast events. He became a familiar face on the show circuit whose contagious enthusiasm and cheerful demeanor was welcomed by all. In recent years, despite a need to use an oxygen tank, Bill continued to be a regular presence on the show circuit, last attending the November 2015 Waterfowl Festival in Easton, Maryland. “If sheer determination has prevailed,” said his friend Clarence Fennimore, “Bill would have lived forever. He kept doing and going when most of us would have pulled back. As they say in poker, Bill was always all in.”


Dorset House Grand Reopening Shelburne Museum’s renowned water fowl decoy collection— featuring works by Elmer Crowell, Shang Wheeler, Albert Laing, and more—comes to roost in the meticulously restored 185-yearold Greek Revival, and is presented in a state-of-the-art display. Dorset House is open May 1–December 30.

Birds of a Feather: Wildfowl Decoys at Shelburne Museum Now available This handsome book, featuring new photography of 250 of Shelburne Museum’s most important and artistically carved decoys, is the first examination of this historic and unparalleled decoy collection. To purchase, visit shelburnemuseum.org/shop. 5555 Shelburne Road Shelburne, VT 05482 802.985.3346

shelburnemuseum.org


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*Winning bids will be subject to a 5% Invaluable fee

Guyette & Deeter Online Auctions

We e k ly O nline Au c t ions End ing E ve r y T hu r sd ay N ig ht G u a r a nt eed co n d i t i o n re p o r t s , m ul t i p l e p hot os , q u i ck s h i p p i n g , g reat d eal s o n q ual i t y i te m s Sold! $1,753

Sold! $1,357

Sold! $3,507

Sold! $1,552

For questions, contact: 410-253-8616

zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

PO Box 159, Freeport, Maine 04032 www.decoysforsale.com

Recent Sales


Auction

Thursday, November 9, 2017 10:00 AM Lots 1 - 414

1-6 Delbert “Cigar” Daisey 7 - 17 Decoratives 18 - 30 New Jersey 31 - 42 Elmer Crowell Miniatures 43 - 50 Maryland 51 - 69 Louisiana 70 - 81 Elmer Crowell Decoratives 82 - 98 Mason Decoy Factory 99 - 103 Midwest Miscellaneous Decoys 104 - 111 Lloyd Tyler Decoratives 112 - 119 Sporting art 120 - 132 Shorebirds 133 - 142 Maryland 143 - 155 Fish 156 - 169 Related Items 170 - 182 Canada 183 - 187 Decoratives 188 - 206 Shorebirds 207 - 222 Mason Decoy Factory 223 - 224A Contemporary 225 - 248 Miniatures 249 - 261 Ward Brothers 262 - 267 Maryland 268 - 273 Jim Schmiedlin 274 - 281 Miniatures 282 - 289 Ward Brothers 290 - 294A 294B - 300 Maryland Virginia 301 - 317 Decoratives 318 - 336 New England 337 - 347 Delaware River 348 - 359 Hurley Conklin 361 - 372 372A - 372F Related Items Sporting Art 373 - 390 Delbert “Cigar” Daisey 391 - 401 Wing Ducks 402 - 405 Maryland 406 - 414

Please read conditions of sale in the back of catalog

Lot 50


Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 10:00 am

Delbert “Cigar” Daisey 1928 - 2017 Chincoteague, Virginia

Remembering “Cigar” Daisey

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Large sickle billed curlew, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  20” long. Branded, signed, and dated 1978.  Near mint original paint; small spot of sap on one side of the breast; structurally very good. (900 - 1,200)

2.

Whimbrel with slightly turned head, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed. Approximately 17” long.  Tiny dent on one side; very small amount of paint shrinkage at knot on other side, otherwise very good and original. (650 - 950)

3.

Swimming brant, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Slightly turned head, feather carving at wingtips. Branded and signed.  Near mint original paint; short crack in underside. (900 - 1,200)

4. Breast preening yellowlegs, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed.  Very good and original. (750 - 950) 5.

Rare pair of hooded mergansers, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded, signed, and dated 1995 on undersides. Carved crests as well as carved primaries and secondaries. Both have very slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

6.

Rigmate pair of goldeneye, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.   Signed “Delbert Cigar Daisey,” and dated 11/71. Both branded “Cigar”.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

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Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

Elizabeth Kfoury’s father was good friends with Lem and Steve Ward for many years, so she was familiar with what their decoys looked like, and always wanted to own one. In 1985 she and her husband went to a house in Wicomico County, Maryland where he was going to purchase a shotgun. This pintail was on the mantle in the living room. She recognized it as a Ward Brothers carving, and her husband wound up buying it and giving it to her as a gift.

The pintail pair made in the 30’s illustrates the same paint pattern as this hen being sold below. It is also the only known full body pintail from this period with peach crate insert wing tips. Plate 53: 1930 pintail pair. “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath

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7. Extremely rare standing pintail hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930.  Signed. Slightly turned head that is cocked to one side. Raised, crossed primaries and raised secondaries made from applied peach basket staves. Incredible abstract paint pattern.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Kfoury collection.

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Brian McGrath and Ron Gard. (17,500 - 22,500)

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8 Detail

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Pair of full body standing greenwing teal, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa bodies. Mounted on base. Each is signed Lem Ward and each dated 1948 under tail. Both have inset peach crate or oak wingtips, and hardwood tails. Both have slightly turned heads. Strong detail painting.  Near mint original paint; some areas of drake have been protected by a very light coat of varnish.

Literature: “Ward Brother Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath. (22,500 - 27,500)

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8 Detail

Lem Ward painting a similar decoy in 1949, as pictured in the November 13, 1949 Philadelphia Inquirer.

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Tan Brunet

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Pair of black ducks, Tan Brunet, Galliano, Louisiana.  Signed, “Collection of Wayne and Faye Watson, Tan Brunet 10/20 1994.” Both have carved, crossed wingtips and slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (4,000 - 5,000)

10. Pair of bluebills, Jett Brunet, Galliano, Louisiana.  Signed and dated 1997. Carved, crossed wingtips and slightly turned heads. Fine feather paint detail.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

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11. Pair of mallards, Tan Brunet, Galliano, Louisiana.  Signed, “Made especially for Faye and Wayne Watson 10/20 1995”. Carved, crossed wingtips and slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (4,000 - 5,000) 12.

Pair of black ducks, Pat Godin, Ontario, Canada.  Slightly turned heads and carved, crossed wingtips. Signed, “For the collection of Faye and Wayne Watson. 1995”.  Very good and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

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Canvasback drake, Mike Bonner, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Signed and dated 1992. Highly detailed feather execution on body and head, with wavy side pocket treatment. Raised and crossed wingtips with turned head.  Excellent and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

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Competition grade black duck with slightly turned head and raised wingtips, Jude Brunet, Galliano, Louisiana.  Signed on the underside “My first black duck hen, July 1990. Made especially for collection of Don and Betty.”  Excellent and original. (1,800 - 2,200)

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Spectacled eider, Jimmie Vizier, Galliano, Louisiana.  Signed and dated 1990. Slightly turned head with detailed feather cuts and tail carving.  Excellent and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

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15 16. Swimming merganser drake, Jimmie Vizier, Galliano, Louisiana.  Signed and dated 2006. Detailed feather carving.  Very good and original. (1,400 - 1,800)

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Rare and possibly unique swan, Jimmie Vizier, Galliano, Louisiana.  Signed and dated 1993. Inscribed on the underside is, “Carved special for Betty and Donald Denny.” Hollow with exaggerated sweeping neck position that rests over mid back.  Three small dents on one side of back otherwise very good and original. (4,000 - 5,000)

Jimmie Vizier

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New Jersey Rowley Horner

1881 - 1943 West Creek, New Jersey 18.

Classic Canada goose, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century. Good form with head in content pose and ice dip behind neck. Original paint very slight wear; thin crack through neck.

Provenance: Formerly in the Bill Staplin collection. Formerly in the Jack Conover collection.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 117, exact decoy. (16,000 - 20,000)

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Early photo of Nathan Rowley Horner of West Creek, New Jersey. Rowley is on the left and next to him is his son, Watson Horner (Photograph collection of Dr. Jack Conover. “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr.)

A Horner goose of the same style is pictured in the permanent collection of the Shelburne Museum. “Birds of a Feather: Wildfowl Decoys at Shelburne Museum,” page 148.

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Nathan Rowley Horner is considered a successor to the father of New Jersey decoy making, Harry V. Shourds. While he did adapt the “Tuckerton” school of decoy that Shourds had developed, it is his subtle refinements that make his decoys so elegant. This goose, probably made in the 1930s, is Horner’s later style which is also his most refined. Similar to the highly sought after mallards and widgeon, this goose displays the iconic ice dip at the shoulders, serpentine neck, and delicate extended tail. An exact rigmate to this goose is in the permanent collection of the Shelburne Museum and is pictured on page 148 of “Birds of a Feather,” Wildfowl Decoys at Shelburne Museum.

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Harry V. Shourds

1861 - 1920 Tuckerton, New Jersey

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18A. Canada goose, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; approximately 1 1/4” piece put in center of neck; head and neck have been repainted.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Dohery, Jr. (7,500 - 9,500)

18A Detail

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19. Black duck, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey.  His early “Shourds” style.   Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; eyes may be an old replacement. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey. Mackey collection stamp on underside. (1,500 - 2,000)

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Black duck, Harry M. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  Subtle loop scratch feather paint.  Original paint with minor wear; some paint loss on small cracks at body seam, mostly on one side; small chip missing from top of tail.

Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (1,500 - 2,000)

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21. Bluebill drake, Harry M. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; thin crack through neck; slight separation at body seam.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (1,500 - 2,000)

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Rare black duck, Jess Birdsall, Barnegat, New Jersey.  High neck seat and tack eyes. Body halves are joined by two small dowels. Small “B” stamped in weight.   Original paint with minor to moderate wear; tiny dents.

Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (1,500 - 2,000)

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Black duck, John Updike, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa 1930.    Original paint, minor wear; thin piece of bark was left on underside when decoy was made and has since fallen off, leaving an area of approximately 1/2” x 4” with no paint and a very slight depression. (1,250 - 1,750)

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Merganser hen, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Appealing old in use repaint; a few tiny dents. (950 - 1,250)

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Two decoys, William Cranmer, Beach Haven, New Jersey.  Bluebill signed and dated 1976, and a black duck branded “WH Cranmer.” Bluebill was part of a rig carved for New Jersey Decoys Unlimited as presentation pieces for the Sandy Island Gunning Club with a commemorative plate. Black duck has subtle feather paint over flocking and was from Cranmer’s personal hunting rig and carved around 1954.  Original and good. (650 - 950)

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Rigmate pair of greenwing teal, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey.  Both are signed on the weight by McLoughlin. Both have raised and split wingtips, carved tails, and side pockets. Drake has fine combing on back and sides. Both have mellowed nicely with age.  Very good and original. (950 - 1,250)

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Four decoys, William Cranmer, Beach Haven, New Jersey.  Canada goose, pair of mallards, and a black duck. Mallards and black duck are signed and dated 1985 and 1988, respectively, and have slightly turned heads.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200)

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Two decoys, Gene Hendrickson.  An old squaw drake and goldeneye drake. Old squaw branded “GEH”.   Original and good. (350 - 450)


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Black duck, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.  Finely detailed scratch paint feather. Made with glass eyes.  Original paint with very minor wear on most of the decoy; glass eyes appear to be replacements; worn area on underside, two cracks in underside; short crack in breast; small chip in each side of the tip of the bill with touchup in each of them.

29 Detail

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Russell Holst. Formerly in the collection of Larry Pollin

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (6,500 - 9,500) 30. Rare hollow carved Canada goose, John Loveland, Lovelandtown, New Jersey.   Branded “JEL.”   Original paint; minor wear; minor wear to wood on the tail; thin crack through neck; short hairline crack in tail. Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. p. 140, exact decoy. (4,500 - 6,500) 23


Miniatures by Elmer Crowell 1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts

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Large miniature chickadee on wooden base, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Decoy is dated 1934. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is under the base. Bird is approximately 4 1/2” long.  Tiny amount of paint missing by one foot. (1,250 - 1,750)

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Miniature blue jay, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s circular ink stamp is on the underside. Larger than typical, approximately 4 1/8” long.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

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Miniature sandpiper on driftwood base, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside.  Original and good. (1,250 - 1,750)

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36. Miniature robin, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. It is also marked male robin on the underside. Carving is a little larger and wider than typical. Approximately 3 1/2” long.  Excellent and original. (1,250 - 1,750) 37.

Pair of miniature redheads, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s ink stamp is on the underside of each base.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

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Miniature Canada goose, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside of the chip carved base. Carving stands just under 5” tall.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)


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Miniature bluewing teal drake and greenwing teal drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Greenwing teal has Crowell’s rectangular stamp in underside of base. Very good and original. (1,600 - 2,400)

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Very large miniature male ring neck pheasant, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. Carving is over 7” long.  Very good and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

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Miniature running yellowlegs, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Signed under the base.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

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Miniature running ruddy turnstone, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Signed under the base.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

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Maryland

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Redhead drake, Will Heverin, Chestertown, Maryland, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; decoy was never rigged.

Literature: “Decoys of Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (1,200 - 1,500)

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Canvasback drake, Bob McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland.    Old in use repaint worn to the original in some places; retains dog bone weight. (1,500 - 2,000)

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Pintail drake, James Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Old in use repaint; structurally good. (1,500 - 1,800)

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Pair of canvasbacks by William (“Will”) Heverin of Charlestown, Maryland. Both branded with a “K” on the breast. Reportedly made for David Kay, a lumber salesman from Westchester, Pa. who delivered the wood and

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“K” brand to Heverin who then made him eighteen pairs of canvasbacks and two pairs of redheads. Original paint with overall light wear; drip of a clear substance on bottom of hen. (1,500 - 2,000) 47. Pintail drake, Captain John Glenn, Rock Hall, Maryland. Original paint with minor wear; few hairline cracks in body and slight roughage to edge of bill. (1,200 - 1,600) 48.

Early high head canvasback drake, Thomas Barnard, Havre de Grace, Maryland Extremely dry gunning paint with moderate wear with heavier wear and weathering to head and neck. Minor roughage to right edge of bill. Crack in neck with a few small partial checks.

Provenance: Formerly in the Fleckenstein collection who acquired it from the Titter family in Chesapeake City. (400 - 600)


48A

49 48A. Pair of canvasbacks, Sam Barnes, Havre de Grace, Maryland. Both have the “F” brand of Henry Fleckenstein who bought them from a Barnes granddaughter sometime around 1976 and kept them in his own collection for a long time. Paint appears to be all original with overall light wear. Some small rubs to wood along both chines. Hen has tight crack in neck. Both have a few shot marks.

Provenance: Formerly in the Fleckenstein collection. (1,750 - 2,250)

49. Pair of high head canvasbacks, Charles Nelson Barnard, Havre de Grace, Maryland. Both have the “J. Pusey” brand for the famous wing shot Joel Pusey. Reportedly there were fewer than a dozen of the high head Barnard’s in existence and most of these were made for U.S. Senator Millard Tydings. The Pusey property was located right next to the Tydings property on Swan Creek which may explain how the Barnard birds ended up with the Pusey brand. . Early gunning paint with overall light wear on drake and heavier wear on hen. Hen has much original paint visible. Both have a few minor shot scars. Crack in neck of hen.

Provenance: Acquired by the consignor from John Sullivan. (2,000 - 3,000) 27


Lloyd Sterling

Crisfield, Maryland

Lloyd Sterling in his workshop

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Important pair of bluewing teal, Lloyd Sterling, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both have fine scratch paint detail. Drake has slightly turned head.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Decoys were a gift from the Ward Brothers to their friend and neighbor, Jim McLane, in the 1940s. Both decoys have been consigned by the McClane family. (30,000 - 40,000)

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Louisiana Below you will find the purchase records and miscellaneous notes from Mr. Otis Dozier from the 1950s and 1960s. Dozier was an artist living in Louisiana and Texas who was intrigued with decoys and their makers. Fortunately for all of us he recorded these historic notes after his visits.

Lot 51 info

Lot 56 info

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Lot 52 and 54 info

Lot 56 info

Lot 53 info

Lot 57 info


Adam Ansardi (left) standing with Judge Cocke and his son, Heard Ansardi. Courtesy “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie.

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Very rare swimming greenwing teal hen, Adam Ansardi, Davant, Louisiana, circa 1950.  Relief wing carving.  Original paint with slight wear; structurally very good.

Provenance: Dozier estate.

Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie.

(3,000 - 4,000)

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1/3 size mallard hen, Mitchell LaFrance, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Signed and dated 1940. Approximately 8.5” long.   Several tiny paint flakes missing, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Dozier estate.

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1/3 size pintail drake, Charles Jeafrau, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Signed. Approximately 8.5” long.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Dozier estate.

(800 - 1,200)

(800 - 1,200)

54. Mallard hen, Mitchell LaFrance, New Orleans, Louisiana.    Good LaFrance paint, but appears to be a second coat; neck crack repair and bill repair.

Provenance: Dozier estate.

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(800 - 1,200)

55. Ringneck Reme Roussel, Jr., Raceland, Louisiana.  Signed and dated 1951.  Very good and original, never rigged.

Provenance: Dozier estate.

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Coot, Xavier Bourg, Larose, Louisiana.    Very good and original.

Provenance: Dozier estate.

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Bluewing teal hen, Ebdon Glasclair, Golden Meadow, Louisiana.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint with almost no wear; tiny tail chip missing; roughness on underside where weight was removed.

Provenance: Dozier estate.

(650 - 950)

(400 - 600)

(400 - 600)


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58. Canvasback drake, Mark Whipple, Bourg Louisiana.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; mostly on top edges of head.

58 Detail

Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie. “Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor, p. 188. (5,000 - 7,000)

59. Ringneck drake, Mark Whipple, Bourg, Louisiana.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; reglued crack in neck; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: From the collection of Sheriff Harry Lee.

Literature: “Louisiana: Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie. (2,500 - 3,500) 33


60. Pintail hen, Xavier Bourg, Larose, Louisiana.  Relief wing carving.   Original paint with very little wear on most of the decoy; minor flaking and wear on lower sides; structurally good. (1,200 - 1,500)

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61.

Rare coot, Dr. Cassius Peacock (1887-1958), New Orleans, Louisiana.  Perky high head with stretched neck.  Original paint with small areas of flaking on bill, neck, and head; a few shot scars.

Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie. (1,200 - 1,500)

62. Mallard drake W.S. Bushnell, Lake Charles, Louisiana.  Signed on underside. Relief wing carving. Finely detailed feather paint.  Excellent and original. (900 - 1,200)

62

63

34

63. Rare coot, Dr. Cassius Peacock, 1887-1958, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Balsa body. Glass eyes and slightly turned head. “TL” on underside created with furniture tacks. Measures 8” long. Peacock was a member of Simoneaux Hunting Club where a pond was named for him.  Head, neck, and part of breast have been repainted; the rest has original paint; ; rough area at end of tail; numerous rubs on body; small dents. (800 - 1,200)


63A. Very rare greenwing teal hen, Nicole Vidacovich, Sunrise Louisiana. Unusual pose with head turned 90 degrees to one side. Relief wing carving. Head is attached with four squared off wooden dowels. Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; professional repair to the forward part of the top of the tail; rough areas to the wood under the tail; surface dry rot on one side of bottom edge; two dents in back. Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie.

(4,000 - 5,000)

63A

63B. Rare pintail drake, Gaston Isadore, Phoenix, Louisiana. Relief wing carving. Original paint with minor wear that has darkened with age; small dents; two thin cracks through neck; most of the bill is a professional replacement. Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie. (2,500 - 3,500)

63B

63A Detail

63B Detail

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63C. Rigmate pair of mallards, Reme Roussell, Raceland, Louisiana. Relief wing tip carving. Near mint original paint; several small dents. Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie. (2,000 - 3,000)

63C

63D. Mallard hen with slightly lifted head, Xavier Bourg, Larose, Louisiana. Relief wing carving. Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear on center area of back; area approximately 1” x 1/2” on one side where there is wear to the wood; a few small dents; a small amount of some putty like substance is visible on top of the paint under the tail. (600 - 900)

63D

63E. Ring neck drake, Mitchell LaFrance, New Orleans, Louisiana. Relief wing carving. Original paint with minor wear; mostly on one side; a few small dents. Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie. (600 - 900)

63E 36


64

65

66

67

68

69

64.

Two bluewing teal, Harry Solet, Golden Meadow, Louisiana.  Both have relief wing carving.  One has original paint with minor wear and a tail chip; the other has been repainted and about 1/3 of paint has flaked off showing original; rough area at lower breast where tie straps were attached. (600 - 900)

65.

Swimming mallard hen from Louisiana.  Cyprus root construction.  Original paint with moderate wear; heavily hit by shot, mostly on underside. (650 - 950)

66. Mallard hen, Clovis Vizier, Bayou Lefourche, Louisiana.  Slightly turned head with strong feather stamping. Raised and split wingtips. Tail carving. Feather stamping extends to underside of body. Glass eyes were probably added at a later date.  Original paint; rough area at end of bill and one side of tail; areas of paint loss; mostly on body; structurally good; rough area at end of bill. (800 - 1,200)

67.

Pintail drake, Adam Pape and an oversize late mallard drake, Jules Frederick, New Orleans, Louisiana.   Pintail drake branded “AJ” in underside. And a oversize late mallard drake, Jules Frederick, New Orleans, Louisiana.   Pintail has old in use repaint; hairline crack through neck; crack in back and tiny chip at tip of tail. Mallard is original and good. (700 - 900)

68.

Greenwing teal hen and drake, Skip Couvillion, Shreveport, Louisiana. Both are signed and have Louisiana duck stamps on the undersides. Also are ID’ed and have the inscription “Hunted over by Phil R. 2014-15 duck season.” Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (400 - 600)

69.

Dove, Skip Couvillion, Shreveport, Louisiana.  Signed and dated 2017.  Very good and original. (250 - 350)

37


Decoratives by Elmer Crowell 1862 - 1952 East, harwich, massachusetts

70

Revisiting the Cunningham Collection In the summer of 1986, Jackson Parker reported on a monumental private acquisition of early carvings by Elmer Crowell. The sale occurred between a Cape Cod collector/dealer and an early Massachusetts family. Today, the Cunningham collection of decoys ranks amongst the three most significant collections of Crowell’s work. The other two are John C. Phillips and Harry V. Long. All three were close friends of Crowell, and all had a major impact on Crowell’s success as a decoy and fine arts craftsman. According to Parker, “News has leaked about a private sale of such magnitude that it cannot be ignored but must be checked out and reported. Earlier this year, a collection of decoys, decoratives, and miniatures by the master carver and painter, A. Elmer Crowell of East Harwich, Massachusetts, that had been in one family for around 80 years, was sold to a dealer and then resold by him in 36 hours. It consisted of about 20 wildfowl decoys and decoratives, a duck weathervane, and around 50 miniatures – all made by Crowell around 19051910. And either oval stamped or signed by him. “The collection was some of Crowell’s earliest and best painted birds — a Massachusetts collection that was first reported by Adele Earnest in her most important book, ‘The Art of the Decoy.’ All the ducks had carved wingtips and tails (Crowell’s best grade) with Crowell’s distinct oval brand.” “Although others – including a major auction house – had been after this collection, it was a Massachusetts collector/dealer, financed by a Maryland collector, who pulled it off. A major Midwest buyer who thought the birds were overpriced made a lower offer that was refused.” “The majority of the ducks sold went to one buyer listed in descending order of value, Green-Winged teal (swimming with mouth open), pintail, widgeon, bufflehead, mallard, bluebill.” Nearly all of the Cunningham collection decoys can be identified by the three small drill holes forming a triangle on the underside of the decoys and stands.

38


70.

Exceedingly rare and important calling greenwing teal drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, first quarter 20th century. Fine paint detail. Carved crossed wingtips with feather carving detail and fluted tail. Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Decoy is also identified on the underside. Small professional repair to the front part of the lower bill.

Provenance: From the Cunningham collection. Cunningham collection mark on underside. Literature: “Songless Aviary,” Brian Cullity. “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (125,000 - 175,000)

70 Detail 70 Detail

70 Detail

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Crowell worked as a cranberry farmer, market gunner, and sportsman’s guide. The latter two of these occupations lent themselves to his producing duck, goose, and shorebird decoys. The success of these creations in attracting birds in the field was equaled, and finally surpassed, by their allure to humankind. As waterfowl regulations increased and demand for his working decoys decreased, Elmer found a flourishing market for the more detailed, ornamental creations which he termed his “mantel” carvings. Although some were carved as early as 1901, it is generally conceded that he began this transition in earnest about 1912, and his style reached its pinnacle in the 1930s. Affluent sportsmen who he had met or worked for earlier in his career became his initial patrons as did the members of the increasing tourist trade on Cape Cod. Notable among these were the Hardy, Phillips, and Cunningham families to name a few. He was not only prolific but also very diversified, producing life-size, half-size, and miniature carvings as well as plaques and additional forms. Crowell knew his subjects well. The vast majority of his “mantel” birds are noted for their life-like realism and extremely animated poses. Although he was basically self-taught, having only rudimentary art lessons in his youth, his extraordinary ability in the painting of his subjects is legendary. As noted in a recent article in “Cape Cod Life” magazine: “Without Crowell – others might have carved birds in decorative ways, but the art form would have taken much longer to develop. There was really no one in the world doing what he was doing. He was decades ahead of everyone else.” Few would argue that Anthony Elmer Crowell is not worthy of being a front runner for the title of “Father of American Decorative Bird Carving.” “Masters of Decorative Bird Carving”. Anne Small. Winchester Press 1981. “A Simple Man, An Extraordinary Talent” Chris White. Cape Cod Life Magazine. April 2016.

71

40


71. Full size feeding greater yellowlegs, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Bears Crowell’s rectangular stamp in the underside and is signed “AE Crowell Cape Cod”. Carving is approximately 14” long. Fine paint detail and patina.   Near mint original paint; structurally excellent; small spot of inpainting where bill meets face. (20,000 - 30,000)

71 Detail

71 Detail

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72. Full size standing killdeer plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is on the underside, and the decoy is identified by Crowell on the underside of the base. Unusual pose with slightly turned head. Well blended paint detail with good patina.  Structurally excellent; very small area of inpainting on one side of tail. (15,000 - 20,000)

72 42

72 Detail


73.

Full size ring neck plover on wooden base carved to simulate clam shell, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Signed, “Elmer Crowell Cape Cod”. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside of base. Good paint detail.  Tiny chip missing in gesso at one knee, otherwise excellent and original. (10,000 - 14,000)

73 Detail

73

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74. Least tern, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Approximately 6 1/2” long. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside.   Professional repair to 1/3 of bill, with touch up on whole bill, otherwise excellent and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

74

75. Mallard drake head, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Mounted on approximately 17” long oval plaque with Crowell’s oval brand on the back.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200)

75

76.

76 44

Miniature bluewing teal drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. Carving is fairly large. Approximately 4-1/2” long. Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

77. Miniature gadwall hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.    Thin crack in base; otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

77


78.

Full size kingfisher, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  On wooden base carved to simulate a rock. Bird stands 8” tall. Detailed crest and tail feather carving. Finely detailed paint.  Original paint with almost no wear and good patina; small professional tail chip repair; one gesso toe is missing. (9,000 - 12,000)

78 Detail

78

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79.

Full size carved robin, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Dropped wingtips and fluted tail. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside of the base.   Near mint original paint on the bird; touch up on part of the bill; small flakes missing from jesso feet; half of one jesso toe is missing. (5,000 - 8,000)

79

80 Detail

80.

80 46

Full size decorative hairy woodpecker, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Mounted on carved piece of bark. Fine feather paint detail.  Chip missing from bottom of bark; otherwise very good and original. (5,000 - 8,000)


81.

Rare full size standing quail, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Approximately 8” tall. On wooden base, carved to simulate a rock. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in underside of base, also written is “Mary McAuraraney August 1932”. Exceptional dry on dry feather paint.  Near mint and original. (20,000 - 30,000)

81 Detail

81

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Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

82.

82

Rare snakey head style mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade, circa 1910. Inscribed on underside is, “To a long lasting friendship, “Super Swede”” and signed “John Lingren 3/6/72.”   Near mint original paint; a few rubs on the head; structurally good; slightly darkened with age. (3,000 - 4,000)

83. Bluewing teal hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Branded “DB Day” on underside. Member of Toussaint Gun Club, Port Clinton, Ohio.  Original paint; a few shot scars; dent and small areas of flaking on one side protected by an old coat of varnish. (2,500 - 3,500)

83

84. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Branded “DB Day” on underside a member of the Toussaint Gun Club, Port Clinton, Ohio. Slightly turned head.  Original paint; several shot scars; small chips in tail; worn areas at sides and top of head; separation and small chip missing from neck seam. (2,500 - 3,500)

84

85.

48

Rigmate pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.   Early slope breasted premier grade with slightly turned heads. Both have horseshoe weights, similar to those used at White Mallard Gun Club. Drake is branded “WJ LEMP”.  Original paint with minor wear; old touchup to speculums; each appear to have a tail chip repair with touchup in that area; a few small dents and shot marks. (2,000 - 3,000)

85


86

87

86.

Rigmate pair of snakey head style bluebills, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1905.  Premier grade. Both have “JJ” carved in the undersides.  Original paint with very slight wear that has darkened with age; structurally very good. (5,000 - 7,000)

87.

Challenge grade brant, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.   “Barron” rig brand on the back and one side.  Original paint with very slight wear that has darkened with age; a few tiny dents. (3,500 - 4,500)

86 Detail 49


88

89

90

91

92

88.

89.

93

Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. “Double blue” pattern.   Original paint with minor to moderate wear; bill chip repair; lightly hit by shot; crack in underside. (1,200 - 1,500) Pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade, Seneca Lake models.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; each has several cracks; small dents and shot marks; small chip missing from top of hen’s bill. (1,250 - 1,750)

90. Goldeneye hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Repainted by Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.   Repaint has minor wear; thin crack in underside. (1,000 - 1,400) 91.

50

Rare bluebill hen, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Very wide bill.  Original paint with minor

94

discoloration and wear; original neck filler is intact.

Literature: “Detroit Decoy Dynasty,” Bill Dodge and Ron Sharp. (650 - 950)

92. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early premier grade.  Original paint with moderate wear; tail chip repair; lightly hit by shot; touchup on worn area on center of back. (500 - 800) 93. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  Original paint with minor wear; appears to have some old touchup on the underside. (500 - 800) 94. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.   Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; tail has been trimmed and repainted; head and part of the breast has been repainted. (500 - 800)


95. Canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Chesapeake Bay model.   Original paint; minor wear; several small cracks; three of the small cracks are in the back and have minor paint loss there; bill piece from another Mason canvasback has been spliced into the underside of the bill. (1,250 - 1,750)

95 96.

Very early blue wing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Standard grade.  Original paint with good patina, and very minor wear; much of the neck filler is missing; slight separation at a knot in one side. (1,500 - 2,000)

96 97.

Early style Mason mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Branded “GP Schafer” on underside. Found at the Toussaint Gun Club in Port Clinton, Ohio.  Original paint with even flaking and wear on most of decoy; several tight age cracks. (1,500 - 2,000)

97

98. Canvasback hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade, Chesapeake Bay model.   Original paint with minor wear; much of the neck filler is missing; thin cracks in underside; lightly hit by shot; dents in edges of tail. (1,500 - 2,000)

98 51


Midwest 99. Canvasback hen, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Retains Graves weight.   Original paint with minor wear; structurally good; two small shot marks on one side. (2,500 - 3,500)

99 100. Canvasback drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Retains Graves weight. From the Peacock rig. Peacock brand on the underside. Also “Hamilton” is painted on the underside.   Original paint with very minor wear; several small dents; several hairline surface cracks in one side of neck. (1,400 - 1,800)

100 101. Canvasback drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Relief wing carving.  Near mint original paint; structurally good; weight has been removed; hairline crack partway through bill. (4,500 - 6,500)

101 102.

102 52

Mallard hen, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Charlie’s paint. Very slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; weight is missing. (2,250 - 2,750)


Robert Elliston 1849 - 1915 Bureau, Illinois

103

103 Detail

103 Detail

103. Rare bluewing teal hen, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1900.  Sticker on underside states “Collection of Clarine and Bud Menzel”. Decoy is branded “W.H.W.” in underside. Weight has been removed.  Strong original paint by Catherine Elliston; a few small rubs on the back; including a shot scar; paint has crazed moderately near wing patches; very tight hairline crack at neck base; rough edges at end of bill. (15,000 - 18,000)

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Miscellaneous Decoys

104

104. Very rare cinnamon teal, Amiel Garibaldi, Sacramento, California.  An unusual species for Garibaldi. Slightly turned head, detailed bill carving, and glass eyes. Raised wingtips. A weight or keel has been removed from underside.  Very small area of paint loss at tip of bill; otherwise original and good. (3,000 - 4,000)

105

54

105. White heron confidence decoy, 1st quarter 20th century.  Body is approximately 38” long. Relief wing carving. Balsa body and head. Cedar neck.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; small chip at one side at end of bill; bill may have a second coat of paint; legs are not original; small dents in balsa body; chip in filler where head and neck join. (3,000 - 4,000)


106. Pair of mergansers from Eastern Long Island, New York.  Inlet and slightly lifted heads and deeply cut relief wing carving.  Original paint; minor wear; each has a crack in the underside and in the back; hen has a crack in one side.

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection. (1,500 - 2,000)

106 107. Pigeon, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Wire legs mounted on wooden base. Slightly turned head and glass eyes. Approximately 5 of these pigeons exist. Made for Otto Meyer, in trade for an installation of a furnace in Perdew’s home. Raised wingtips and split carved tail.  Strong original paint protected by a light coat of varnish. (1,800 - 2,200)

107

108. Exceptional blackduck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade with challenge stamp on underside. Old loop feather paint. Slight discoloration on one side of the bill; small bill chip and tail chip repair; near mint original paint. (2,500 - 3,500)

108

109 109. Two portfolios by Milton Weiler.  “Classic Decoys” and “Classic Shorebird Decoys”. Both are from the collection of Russ Aiken. Classic Decoy series is signed by Weiler and numbered 65. Classic Shorebird Decoys is numbered 321 and is signed by Weiler and Bill Mackey. It also has a dedication reading, “For Russ Aiken, Good hunting, W. Mackey,” and “For a grand sportsman with very special regards, ____Egan” Very good and original.

110

Provenance: Purchased by the consignor at Christie’s in 2003, at one of their sales of Aiken’s Antiques. (800 - 1,200)

110. Limited edition copy of “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid.  In slip case. Signed by the authors and numbered 58 of 200. Also included is a reproduction “Mason Duck Decoys Factory” pamphlet.   Very good and original. (150 - 200) 55


110A 110A. Blackduck, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1920. “D.B. Haffner” is written on the underside. Original paint; minor wear; a few tiny dents and shot marks.

Literature: “Chance,” Harold Reiser, pp. 132-134.

111 Detail 56

(2,500 - 3,500)


A group of three of these outstanding mergansers appeared at an auction in Huntington, New York in the early 1990s. All three were purchased by Bob Gerard. Since then, no information has been gathered that can shed any light on the shadowy “Samuel Squires.” It is not even known if he was the carver of the birds or simply the owner of the rig. One or two other decoys of another species have been discovered, so the rig apparently contained more than just mergansers. The auctioneer indicated that the birds were “discovered out east” (on Long Island). There is an area of Flanders, New York which is located near Southampton that is known as “Squiretown.” Located here were a few sporting clubs and, perhaps, this may be the general area in which these birds were carved. While nothing can be said for certain, preliminary research of the census records indicate that there is one individual with the name of Samuel Squires that lived in the correct area, at the right time, and was the correct age. No one else by that name appears anywhere else on eastern Long Island at that time. A Samuel W. (also known as Samuel A.), appears in the federal census records between 1900 and 1940. He was born circa 1868 and lived in Southampton on “Head of Pond Road.” He must have been somewhat affluent as he is listed as owning his own farm and having employees.

111

111 Detail

111. Well sculpted merganser drake from the Samuel Squires Rig.  High neck seat and carved wooden crest.  Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear; slight rough spot on one edge of tail. (12,500 - 17,500)

57


Lloyd Tyler Decoratives 1898 - 1971 Crisfield, Maryland

Lloyd Tyler

Henry Stansbury, in his book “Lloyd J. Tyler: Folk Artist and Decoy Maker,” had this to say about Tyler: “Lloyd Tyler called himself the ‘Coy Duck King’ because he could make a decoy in a matter of minutes. He was possibly the fastest decoy maker in America and he made thousands of them for many hunting clubs including the Pocomoke Gunning Club, Cedar Island and Watts Island Clubs, and hundreds of other collectors all over america. Many dealers and collectors recognized Lloyd as a source for quality old decoys and they readily purchased them from him as early as the Depression through the 1960s. He never saw himself as the great folk artist he has become.” Life in Crisfield was hard and competition for selling decoys was steep. Inevitably there was some tension between the Ward Brothers and Lloyd Tyler. Lots 112, 113, and 115 illustrate the best of the relationship between the Ward and Tyler family. While likely started by the Wards, they were eventually finished by and painted by Tyler.

58


112. Important hollow carved Canada goose, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Probably an unfinished Ward Brothers carving finished and painted by Tyler. Signed. In preening pose with lifted wings. Detailed feather carving on wingtips. Detailed feather paint on body and wings.  Original paint; very minor wear; mostly on the underside; three small holes in underside from defects in the wood; slight roughness to one wingtip. Provenance: Tyler Family.

(6,500 - 9,500)

112

112 Detail

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113

113 Detail 113. Exceptional black duck with lifted wings and turned head, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1945.  Singed and dated 1969.  Body seam at lower sides has separated slightly; thin crack in underside otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Tyler Family.

Literature: “Lloyd Tyler: Folk Artist,” Henry Stansbury, p. 64, exact decoy pictured. (4,000 - 6,000) 114.

114

60

Full size bittern, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa construction. On metal base. Carving is approximately 24” long.  Original paint; very minor wear, mostly on edges of tail; a few small scrapes in one side; small area of discoloration on one side. (2,000 - 3,000)


115. Full size decorative greenwing teal drake, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1945.  Raised relief wing carving with raised wingtips. Feather carving detail.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Tyler Family.

Literature: “Lloyd Tyler: Folk Artist,” Henry Stansbury, p. 64, exact decoy pictured. (2,500 - 3,500)

115 116.

1/2 size peregrine falcon, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Wingspan is approximately 23”. Detailed feather carving.   Near mint original paint; one wingtip has been broken off and glued back on; small amount of gesso missing from one talon; crack in another talon. (2,500 - 3,500)

116 117. Calling mallard with lifted wings, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1969.   Original paint; slight wear; crack in underside; chip missing from one wingtip.

Provenance: Tyler family.

Literature: “Lloyd Tyler: Folk Artist,” Henry Stansbury, p. 55, exact decoy pictured. (2,500 - 3,500) 118. Full size carved willet, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Standing on simulated rock base made from epoxy. Raised carved wingtips.  Very minor damage to feet, otherwise original and good.

117

Provenance: Tyler Family. (950 - 1,250)

119. Full size curlew on wooden base, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Relief wing carving and slightly turned head.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Tyler Family. (950 - 1,250)

118

119 61


Sporting Art

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Bob Kuhn

1920 - 2007 Buffalo, New York 120

120. “Lions on Kill,” an acrylic on board by Bob Kuhn.  Signed. Image size approximately 21” x 44”.  Very good and original. Provenance: From a New England conservation organization. (50,000 - 80,000) Bob Kuhn is a name synonymous with wildlife art and excellence for over 50 years. He was born in Buffalo, New York and educated at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, where he studied design, anatomy, and lifedrawing. For the next 30 years, he was one of the most popular wildlife illustrators in America before turning to easel painting full time in 1970. Kuhn traveled around the world to obtain inspiration, with many of his wildlife expeditions lasting eight weeks. He made countless trips to Africa, six trips to Alaska, numerous journeys into Canada East and West and numerous trips to the American West. Kuhn’s first love was perhaps African wildlife art, but in later years he concentrated on North American wildlife. Kuhn often painted simple backgrounds with horizontal bands of color and light. He worked primarily in acrylic and was well known for his ability to paint the particular movements and personalities of wild animals. Stuart Johnson, owner of Settler’s West Gallery in Tucson, suggests that Rungius represents one end of the wildlife spectrum and Kuhn the other. “Rungius was interested in the classic pose, the regal Kodacolor moment,” he explains. “Kuhn would take animals and put them into situations no one would ever think of and that’s what made him a visionary.” Sculptor Ken Bunn remembers trips to the African bush he took with Kuhn, when they would be in the middle of nowhere and a pride of lions would emerge and roar and prowl closer to investigate. “In 15 minutes or less, he would have this elaborate sketch of the encounter and it was magical,” Bunn says. “The kind of originality that he possessed does not come from having a limited perspective. It comes from having your eyes and mind open to everything that is going on around you. You try to make your work state something that you believe in.” 63


121

121. Watercolor of hunter setting out decoys, Milt Weiler.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 17 1/2” x 26”.  Very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

122

64

122. Oil on canvas of ducks landing in marsh, Lem Ward.  Signed and dated 1973. Image size approximately 18” x 24”.  Very good and original.

Provenance: From the estate of James and Ellen McLane. (3,000 - 5,000)


122A

122A. “Samburu Evening,” An oil on board by Lindsay B. Scott. Signed and dated 1991. Image size approximately 16” x 37”. Excellent and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

122B

Born and raised in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, a haven for exotic birds and wildlife, Lindsay Scott is an accomplished painter of African wildlife in their natural settings. She spent her childhood observing wild animals, and nature became her passion. She worked as a botanical researcher at the University of Cape Town and as a Curator of Paleobotany and Ornithology at the South African Museum, and both jobs gave her knowledge of plant and animal structures. She got a fine arts degree from the University of Minnesota, and from then has earned much recognition as a wildlife artist including that of first woman to be a featured artist at the 1996 Southeastern Wildlife Exposition. In the early 1980s, she did detailed animal drawings in pencil, but in the 1990s switched to oil painting.

122B. “The Watering Hole,” an oil on canvas by Lindsay B. Scott. Signed by the artist. Image size approximately 21” x 10”. Excellent and original. (3,000 - 4,000) 65


122C

122C. “Teepee Village,” an acrylic on board by Heinie Hartwig. Signed by the artist. Professionally framed. Image size approximately 24” x 37. Very good and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

122D

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122D. “The Scout,” an oil on canvas of Plains Indians by R. Grinnell. Image size approximately 16” x 31”. Professionally framed. Excellent and original. (3,000 - 5,000)


Born in Louisiana in 1859, Rousseau led a full and varied life. After his parents were killed during the Civil War, he and his sister were rescued by a slave and raised by a family friend who introduced him to outdoor sports. He worked at various times as a cowboy along the Chisholm trail, as a lumberman, and, eventually, engaging in the import business. This latter venture proved successful enough that he could retire at the age of 35 and pursue his love of art at the Academie Julian in Paris. Although occasionally returning to the United States to exhibit and paint, he remained in Paris until 1915 when World War I caused him to return permanently to the States where he settled in Old Lyme, Connecticut. He had a number of wealthy patrons and would often shoot and paint at their estates. Notable among these was Percy Rockefeller and his 20,000 acre country club, “Overhills” in North Carolina. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the Lotos Club in New York, and the Lyme Art Association. Rousseau died in 1937.

123

123. Oil on canvas of dogs on point near marsh, Percival Rosseau.  Signed and dated 1908. Image size 13” x 16”.  Very good and original. (15,000 - 20,000)

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124 124. “Startled Pintails,” an oil on board, by Frank Vining Smith.  Signed. Image size 18” x 24”.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

125. Watercolor of brook trout caught on a fly, William Schaldach.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 12 1/2” x 17”.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

126

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125

126. “Northern Encounter,” an oil on canvas of bald eagles by Jorge Mayol.  Image size 11” x 19”. Signed.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)


127

127.

“Morning Glory” an oil on canvas of a bald eagle, John Seerey-Lester.  Image size 24” x 36”  Very good and original. (6,000 - 9,000)

Wildlife artist John Seerey-Lester travels the world extensively to study wildlife in its natural habitat so that he may paint those subjects which he has seen firsthand. A resident of Florida’s West Coast, Seerey-Lester was born in Manchester, England, and studied art at Salford Technical College in Lancashire, England. He worked in the fields of advertising and publishing before becoming a professional artist. And in 1980, after his first trip to East Africa, Seerey-Lester found his passion for wildlife. It was then that he decided to paint images of the natural world, and two years later, he moved to the United States.

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128. “When the Salmon Come Home”, an oil on canvas of a salmon fisherman fishing in the White River in Vermont, Ray “Paco” Young. Signed and dated 1991. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 18” x 36”. Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

128

129. “Autumn,” a watercolor of a fly fisherman, Arthur Shilstone.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 9” x 8.5”.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

129

130

130. Oil on canvas of hanging mallards, J.M. Kavanagh.  Signed. Image size approximately 23 1/2” x 19 3/4”.  Original and good. (1,000 - 1,500)

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131

132

131.

“Winter Flight,” a watercolor by Mort Solberg.  Signed. Image size approximately 18” x 30”.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 5,500)

132. “Hounds with Rucksack,” acrylic on board by Carl Reichart.  Image size 10 1/2” x 14”. Signed and dated ‘08.  Very good and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

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Shorebird Decoys 133. Very rare black bellied plover Lloyd Parker, Parkertown, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.   Original paint with minor wear; small amount of touchup on the white areas on each side of the breast; structurally good. 

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (4,000 - 5,000)

133

134. Rare yellowlegs, Lloyd Parker, Parkertown, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor flaking and wear, mostly on one side; structurally very good.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (2,500 - 3,000)

134

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135

135. Extremely rare long billed dowitcher, Taylor Johnson, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor wear; very thin coat of shellac was applied a long time ago. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Gary Giberson. Small “GNG” is near the stick hole. Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (7,000 - 9,000)

135 Detail

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Daniel Lake Leeds

1852 - 1922 Pleasantville and Somers Point, New Jersey

Somers Point Public Dock, Harbor Lane (From 1914 Souvenir booklet)

1910 postcard from Somers Point

Daniel Lake Leeds was a gunner and bayman from Somers Point, New Jersey. Located on the southern Jersey shore, the area was first settled in 1693 and adopted the name Somers Point in 1750. It was a seafaring town and ships, schooners, and barges were built in the many shipyards located along the shore. Shipbuilding and life along the shore, including market and sport gunning, was a very important part of life in early Somers Point. Compared to others sections of the coast, the area was slow to develop. The first trolley line was completed in 1906 connecting the Town to Atlantic City a short distance to the north, and by 1910, it was possible to make connections from there to Philadelphia. A 1914 souvenir booklet produced by the City Council touts the rural advantages of what they proudly term the “Paradise of South Jersey:” “True, Somers Point does not possess the huge palaces of mirth and amusement typical of the larger and more widely known resorts, but it far outshines the majority of (them) in the possession of a combination of beauty, woodland, lined with picturesque farms and abounding with game, and a seashore that cannot be excelled for its beauty – and fishing parties.” The area must have seen a busy waterfront and bay that would have certainly provided a living for market hunters and baymen such as Daniel Leeds. It would also have been an attractive destination for visting hunters and fishermen from cities such as Philadelphia and beyond. By 1914, there was a formal “Anglers Club” established on Shore Road.

Angler’s Club, Shore Road

136 Detail

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It was in this environment that Daniel Lake Leeds spent his life. It was here that he produced some of the finest and stylistically significant shorebirds produced anywhere along the Jersey shore.

137 Detail


136. Classic black bellied plover, Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving. In spring breeding plumage.  Strong original paint; several small worn areas on underside; bill may be a later replacement.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Peter Bartlett. Formerly in collection of Dr. James McCleery, McCleery collection stamp is under the tail. Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s auction, January 2000, lot 249 exact decoy.

137. Rare sandpiper, Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Fine feather paint detail.  Near mint original paint; structurally good. Provenance: Formerly in collection of Peter Bartlett. Formerly in collection of Gary Giberson. (10,000 - 14,000)

Literature: “Call to the Sky,” Robert Shaw, p. 55, exact decoy. “Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor, p. 120. (13,000 - 16,000)

136

137

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138. Yellowlegs, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; two filled defects in the wood when the decoy was made and filler has come out of portions of these; paint has come off; lightly hit by shot; small crack in breast.

Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (3,000 - 4,000)

138

139. Black bellied plover, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  Original paint with minor to moderate discoloration and wear; hairline surface crack in one side and part of breast; small dents.   Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (3,000 - 5,000)

139

140. Black bellied plover in transitional plumage, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear; touchup to black area at bill and part of face; very lightly hit by shot. Provenance: Doggart.

Collection of Bill and Barbara

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (3,000 - 5,000)

140 76

140 Detail


141. “Brigantine Bullhead” plover.    Original paint with minor wear; knot in back; small chip missing from edge of tail.

Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (3,500 - 4,500)

141

142. Black bellied plover, Harry Boice, New Jersey.  Unusual form for Boice with split tail carving.  Original paint with good patina; and very slight wear; structurally very good.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Gary Giberson. “GNG” written on underside. (3,000 - 4,000)

142

77


Maryland Ben Dye

1821 - 1896 Perryville, Maryland

One of the earliest documented carvers of the Chesapeake Bay, Captain Ben Dye, was born in Monmouth, New Jersey in 1821. He relocated to Stumps Point in Cecil County, Maryland in 1847 and earned a living as a commercial guide, fisherman, and hunter. Dye sold decoys to local gun clubs as well as other hunters. His decoys exhibit typical Cecil County qualities – a slightly raised neck shelf and paddle tail. Known species carved by him include canvasbacks, redheads, bluebills, black ducks, and a few ruddy ducks. This is possibly the only green wing teal that is known to have been made by him.

143 Detail

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143

143 Detail

143. Exceedingly rare greenwing teal drake, Captain Ben Dye, Perryville, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century. Original paint with moderate wear; professional neck crack repair with touchup to that area; small dents and shot marks; minor roughness to edge of tail.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,� Henry Fleckenstein Jr. (9,000 - 12,000)

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144. Small Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Slightly turned head. Repainted; two cracks in neck; filled cracks in body. Literature: “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. p. 186, exact decoy. (1,400 - 1,800)

144 145. Two goldeneyes from the Eastern Shore of Maryland.  Both are branded “JEB” twice in undersides.  A few small dents; original paint with minor wear and good patina. (1,750 - 2,250)

145

146

146. Three working duck decoys, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  A black duck, widgeon, and a bluebill.  Black duck has original paint with minor wear; small cracks; the initials “R.A.T.” are scratched into underside. Widgeon has worn original paint, numerous cracks and filled area of dry rot in underside. Bluebill has bill chip; good gunning paint; small cracks.

Provenance: Tyler Family. (1,750 - 2,250)

147. Pair of hunting model pintails, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. Both have slightly turned heads and original keels.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

147 80


Leonard Pryor

1876 - 1967 Chesapeake City, Maryland

148 Detail

This pintail represents Pryor’s sleek and smooth style, more similar to the Delaware River decoys. A from believed to have been adopted by him after he relocated to Chesapeake City, Maryland.

148. Pintail drake, Leonard Pryor, Chesapeake City, Maryland.  Identified on underside.  Original paint with good detail and almost no wear; numerous spots of what appear to be stain on one side and back. (6,000 - 8,000)

148

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149

150

151

152

153

149. Canada goose, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.    Original paint with slight wear; small cracks in tail. (1,200 - 1,500) 150. Rigmate pair of widgeon, Charlie Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland.    Excellent and original. (800 - 1,000) 151.

Black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1932 model. Repainted by Lem in 1969. Signed by Lem and Steve Ward on underside.  Crack in back was also fixed at time of repair. (800 - 1,000)

152. Black duck, Paul Gibson, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  His earlier style with good scratch paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear; crack in underside; piece added in lower side to fill area with defect in wood when the decoy was made; hairline surface crack at top of head. (650 - 950) 82

154

153.

Balsa body greenwing teal drake, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Relief wing tip carving. Signed and dated 1945.   Original paint with minor wear; small cracks in head and neck.

Provenance: Tyler Family.

(600 - 900)

154. Pair of canvasbacks, Jess Urie.    Paint loss on drake’s breast; otherwise both are original paint with minor wear; a few small dents.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (600 - 900)


Next to the Ward Brothers, Lloyd Sterling made the most collectible decoys in Crisfield. Collectors have long considered his pintails, widgeon, and teal the most desirable. This redhead was once in the collection of David Hawthorne, an early dealer from the Eastern Shore of Maryland. It is quite possibly the only redhead known by Sterling. Any early redhead from Crisfield even by the Ward Brothers is considered extremely rare.

155

155 Detail

155. Rare, important, and possibly unique redhead drake, Lloyd Sterling, Crisfield, Maryland, 1st quarter 20th century.  Classic Sterling head carving. Turned head and rounded underside. Elaborate paint pattern exhibiting almost a modern art feel for wing and back area.  Strong original paint; small neck chip repair to one side; area of varnish protecting underside of decoy; light crazing; two small rubs. (7,500 - 10,000) 83


Fish Decoys Ed Irwin

156

It is said that Ed Irwin caught more musky on Lake Chautauqua than any other man, past or present. Born and raised on what is now known as the Chautauqua Institute property, Irwin loved to hunt and fish. Around 1860, he left the area to attend Bryant & Stratton Business College in Buffalo, New York. Upon his return to the Chautauqua area, he accepted a job in Mayville as a bookkeeper for a local mill. The call of the wild was too much for Irwin to manage. He eventually gave up his job at the mill to become a full time hunter and fisherman. In the fall, Irwin would travel to the Kankakee Marsh in Indiana to hunt ducks for the Chicago market. He would then return to his home on the north end of Chautauqua Lake to ice fish throughout the winter, then fish and guide for musky in the spring and summer months. Irwin began to gain a local reputation for his spearing decoys, casting spoons, and double-ended rowboats.

Ed Irwin in one of his Chautauqua double ended boats.

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156. Lake Chautauqua fish decoy, sucker, Ed Irwin, circa 1900.  Rare and possibly unique for this maker. Featuring classic leather tail, tack eyes and carved sucker mouth on underside. Body is variations of shaded green with red and yellow dot application similar to that of Harry Seymour. Carved gill with red accent paint. Measures 7.5” long.  Strong original paint; rub near the back; two fins are slightly bent otherwise very good and original. (12,000 - 15,000)

157. Lake Chautauqua fish decoy, trout, Ed Irwin, circa 1900.  Classic leather tail and tack eyes. Measures 7” in length.  Light wear around tail, otherwise very good and original. (3,000 - 5,000)

156 Detail

157

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158

160

159

160

161

158. Fish decoy, Leroy Howell, Minnesota.  7.5” long. Flower fish.   Original paint; with discoloration on fins; shows very light wear. (1,000 - 1,200) 159. Two fish decoys, Chet Sawyer.  6” and 4 1/2” long.  Original and good. (500 - 700) 160. Three fish decoys, Lake Chautauqua New York, circa 1900.  Perch that measures 7” with tack eyes, carved mouth and gills. Six metal fins and leather tail. Thick old paint appears to be original and is protected by a coat of varnish; most of paint is missing from belly weight, wear at tip of tail. Trout with tack eyes, metal fins and classic leather tail. Jig stick still attached. 6.5” long. Second fish measures 5 3/4”. Sides of body are cross hatched. Four metal fins with leather tail.  Paint appears to be original. Trout has original yellowish brown paint with black and red dots running from front fin to tail. (1,600 - 2,000)

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162

161. Two fish with metal fins, Pete Peterson, Cape Charles, Virginia.  Signed. One is signed and dated 1987. Lengths are 29” and 22”.  Smaller fish has a couple of cracks near dorsal fin, otherwise original and good. (500 - 700) 162.

Nicely carved and painted wood creel, Emile Robichaud, Medway, Maine. Slat sided with a sloped top fitted with fish formed leather hinges. Two relief carved and painted brook trout. Faint stamp on underside reads ‘Property of J.J De Santo”. Measures 15” by 8”. Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)


163

163 Detail

163. Carved wooden plaque of rainbow trout. Approximately 11” x 30”. Inscribed “#7 lb. 4 ozs. Caught by E.H.T.H. Blagdon Lake, 28th August 1924.” Original and good. (4,000 - 6,000)

163 Detail 87


164 164

164 Detail

164A

164A

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Full round lake trout fish plaque, Reg Edwards, Mechanic Falls, Maine. Fish measures approximately 28-1/2” long, back board measures 46-1/2” x 16”. Detailed gill and mouth carving with inserted metal sawblades for teeth. Birdseye veneer and nicely crazed two-tone backboard. Small area of mouse chews on one pelvic fin; otherwise excellent and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

164A. Two watercolors on board of fish, one is inscribed “R. Frome, 25-6-32,” the other is marked Weight 8-1/2 lbs caught by C. A. A. H., River Exe, bickleigh. One is inscribed “R. Frome, 25-6-32,” the other is marked “Weight 8-1/2 lbs. Caught by C.A.A.H., River Exe, Bickleigh.” Remarked with a lure and a gaff and initialed T.M.H. The larger painting is approximately 12-1/2” x 36-1/2”. Bottom third of smaller fish is faded a little bit; very minor discoloration and paint specks. (650 - 950)


165. Wooden fish carving of a pickerel, Lawrence Irvin, Winthrop, Maine.  Signed on the back. Fish is on 33” wide oval plaque painted to simulate birch bark.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

165

166. Wooden carved lake trout on wooden plaque, Lawrence Irvin, Winthrop, Maine.  Plaque is approximately 24” long.  Original and good. (1,250 - 1,750)

166

167. Large mouth bass on wooden plaque, Lawrence Irvin, Winthrop, Maine.  Plaque is approximately 29” long.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

167

168. Wooden carved small mouth bass, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Signed and dated 2015. Mounted on wooden plaque, approximately 26” long. Good detail.  Very good and original. (700 - 900)

168

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169. Two fish carvings on plaques, Lawrence Irvine, Winthrop, Maine.  A carved wooden rainbow trout on plaque. Plaque is 20” long and is painted to simulate birch bark. And a carved wooden lake trout plaque. Written on back is “Carved and painted by Lawrence C Irvine Winthrop Maine”. Plaque is 24 1/2” long and painted to simulate birch bark.  Rainbow trout has near mint paint on most of carving; small area where paint is worn to wood on the plaque underneath the tail. Other is very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

169

170. Muzzle loading percussion market gun, mid 19th century.  Approximately 66 1/2” long. Good. (800 - 1,200)

169

170

171

171. Glass target ball thrower, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Stands approximately 27” tall.  Good. (950 - 1,250)

90

171A

171A. Iron duck andirons, Wildfowler decoy Factory, Point Pleasant, New Jersey. A lot of rust with some pitting; back leg is missing on each. (350 - 450)


Related Items

172

172. Percussion muzzle loading market gun, Richard Constable, 1817-1851, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Marked “Constable” on lock plate. Constable was known for making fine dueling pistols. Also marked “Philadelphia” on top of barrel. Barrel is 50” long and 1 1/16” in diameter at muzzle. Lock plate, hammer, trigger guard, and back end of barrel are engraved. Stock is cross hatched. Total length approximately 67”.  Very small chip missing from end of forstock; otherwise good. (4,500 - 6,500)

172 Detail

172 Detail

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173 175

174 175

173. Period Sheraton “cookie corner” four drawer chest from New Jersey, circa 1820s.  Four inlaid upland game hunting scenes 3 3/4” x 7 1/4”. Scenes are a progression of a hunter flushing a bird until he shoots it. Case is 38 1/4” wide. Mahogany with American pine secondary wood. Drawers are dovetailed and chamfered.   Hardware appears to be period; chest is original and good. (2,250 - 2,750)

175

174. Wooden barrel for testing motors, Johnson Outboard Motor Company.  One of 15 made and given to Johnson’s 15 top sales locations. Approximately 23” x 33”.  Original and good. Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (1,400 - 1,800) 175. Four outboard motors, circa 1960s.  Three by Johnson, one by Evinrude.  Good.

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175

Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (1,000 - 1,400)


176. Rare complete set of South Carolina hunting license pins.  18, including very hard to find first and second pins.  Very good; 1930 and 1933 are good. (5,000 - 8,000)

177. Duck call, Bill Clifford, River Forest, Illinois.  Five brick style. Laminate construction. All parts appear to be original.   Very good. (5,000 - 7,000)

178. Rare duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois.  Call measures approximately 5” in length.    All parts are original; appears to be unused. (1,000 - 1,200)

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179

179

180

179

179. Several outboard motor related items.  A Johnson outdoor motor wall clock, approximately 14” in diameter, an old Evinrude catalog, Johnson Outboard postcards, Evinrude Motor Company large pins and vintage Evinrude tin small tray. Also included are two outboard motor books and gas can.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (450 - 650)

180. Wooden carved whale, Tom Ahrens.  Approximately 35” long.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (700 - 900)

181

181. Large wooden hand carved turtle scooter/pull toy, 1st half 20th century.  Approximately 30” long.  Original and good; steering post is missing. (650 - 950) 182 Two sided bait shop advertising sign, circa 1940s. Both sides are the same. Signed “Burrell”. Measures 25” x 49-1/2”. With attached iron brackets. Minor paint flaking and wear otherwise very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

182

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Canada

183

184

185 183. Pintail drake, Frank Reeves, Long Point, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow construction with bottom board. Branded “OHP” for O.H. Payne, an early member at the Long Point Shooting Company.  Strong original paint; protected by an old coat of varnish that has darkened; hairline crack running partway through lower body on one side; several dents and shot scars. (2,000 - 3,000) 184. Very rare bluebill drake, Peter Pringle, Dunnville, Ontario, 1st half 20th century.  Highly detailed texturing on both head and body. Performed with a chisel, which is consistent with Pringle’s early decoys.  Several shot scars; original paint; area the size of a quarter on one side of the

186 head has a clear lacquer or varnish applied; otherwise original and good. (3,000 - 4,000) 185. Black duck, David Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Desirable foot painting on side of body. Retains original rigging.  Original paint; small area of crazing on top of bill, otherwise very good and original. (600 - 800) 186. Old squaw hen from Nova Scotia, 1st quarter 20th century.    Appealing old in use repaint; fairly large chips missing from tail.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale & Gary Guyette. (700 - 900) 95


Phineas Reeves

1833 - 1896 Long Point, Ontario This provenance was provided by the owner of lots 183 & 187 in this auction. In 1944, Hanson Ferris, Manager and Head Keeper of the Long Point Company, was given a portion of land on Long Point for his use and development. My father, Norman L. Bosworth, was a friend and avid bird hunter. In about 1947, my father and the Cronk family took a 99 year lease on some of the land to build our summer homes. We summered there ‘til the land was expropriated in 1960 by the government to form the new Long Point Provincial Park. When Hanson Ferris died, his son, Norman Ferris, took over as keeper. I spent many a day at the Long Point Company cottages playing with his daughter. I can vividly remember playing in the decoy shed and seeing each member’s decoys that were kept for their exclusive use. Hanson gave Dad the duck and goose before he died. I don’t know exactly when that was but would think early 50s. It seems I have been looking at them my whole life. Phineas Reeves - First punter of the Long Point Company beginning in 1866. He was patriarch of 3 generations of Reeves men who built their lives around the enterprise. Credit. Article “The Reeves of Longpoint,” Bernard Crandell, North American Decoys, Summer 1976.

Dad hunted every fall as a guest at the Long Point Company. As the President and CEO of Canada Dry, Ltd., he accompanied many dignitaries who were also guests of the company. Governor General Rolland Mitchner and even Bing Crosby. He was one of the founding members of the Griffith Island Club. My brother still hunts in those marshes every year. I was fortunate last year to have a tour of the Long Point Club and see all the renovations that have been done. My brother’s nephew by marriage is now the Manager and Keeper. So, our connection to the Club still continues… Margaret-Ann

187 Detail 96


187. Rare Canada goose, Phineas Reeves, Long Point, Ontario.  Hollow with bottom board. Branded “GBH” twice, once under tail and once on side, for George B. Harris, club member 1872-1892.  Original paint that is dirty with grunge and has oxidized to create a very dry looking surface; a crack in body, running almost the length of the back; shows old filler as well as several other areas of imperfections with filler probably applied when decoy was made; worn areas exposing bare wood at top of head and small spots on back; slight staining to small areas to white area under tail; one eye is partially missing. (12,500 - 17,500)

187 Detail

187

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Decoratives

188. Full size standing curlew on base with drift wood and simulated grass, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. Slightly turned head, detailed feather carving with carved crossed wingtips and fluted tail.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

188

189.

Full size dove with lifted wings, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1966. Finely detailed feather carving and slightly turned head.  Thin reglued crack in bill and very slight separation at one side of neck seam, otherwise very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

189 98


190

191

192

193

194

195

190. * Full size carving of a male cardinal, Al Glassford.  Signed and dated 1991. Mounted on wooden base, on bush made from iron. Good feather carving detail. Approximately 15” long.   Very good and original. (1,750 - 2,250) 191. * Full size carving of two bluebirds, Al Glassford.  Signed and dated 1990. Remarqued with a painting of a nest with eggs in it. Birds are mounted on a piece of wood with moss. Approximately 10” tall.  Very good and original. (1,750 - 2,250) 192. * Full size carving of a chickadee, Al Glassford.  Signed and dated 1979 under the base. Also remarqued with painting of chickadees. Approximately 7” tall.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

193. * Full size carving of a hummingbird at a flowering bush, Al Glassford.  Signed. Approximately 6 1/4” tall. Good feather carving detail on bird. Bush is made from metal.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 194. * Full size carving of a goldfinch, Al Glassford.  Signed on base. Highly detailed feather carving. Carving stands 5 1/2” tall.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 195. Full size sandpiper, Jimmie Vizier, Galliano, Louisiana.  Mounted on wooden base. Highly detailed feather carving raised and carved wingtips. Carved in a feeding position.  Excellent original paint; tip of wingtip has been broken and reattached; glue line is visible. (1,200 - 1,600)

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195A Large gull, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine. Inlet head, carved eyes, and relief wing carving. Worn old paint; crack in one side; age split in the other; thin crack through neck; shallow chip missing form one wingtip.

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection. (2,500 - 3,500)

195A

195B. * Full size standing greenwing teal drake with two chicks, Larry Tawes. Mounted on elaborate wood base. Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

195B

195C. * Full size standing wood duck drake on elaborate base, Larry Tawes. Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

195C

100


196. Pair of full size flying canvasbacks, Ward Brothers Crisfield, Maryland.  Made to hang on wall. Hen has open bill. Both have good carving and paint detail.  Unpainted areas under the wings and tails were painted at a later date, otherwise very good and original. (10,000 - 14,000)

196

196 Detail

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197. Exceptional pair of old squaw, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1964. Hen has lifted head. Drake has carved primaries and secondaries, hen has carved primaries and tail carving.  Very good and original. (14,000 - 18,000)

197 Detail

197

The Ward Brother’s early work was intended to supply the needs of the hunting clubs and individual sportsmen. By the 1950s, however, the demand for this type of product was diminishing and Lem turned more and more to ornamental work. In 1948, Lem had won the grand prize for a gunning decoys in the 11th Decoy Show held in New York, and this may have been his inspiration for the change in the direction of his art. By 1959, the brothers had halted their production of gunning decoys and turned, almost exclusively, to making ornamentals and miniatures. They carved a wide variety of species but certain ones were particularly attractive to them. As Lem once mentioned: “There is one thing I’ll never get out of my memory. It was in Philadelphia in a museum. There was an Old Squaw hen – a mount. I’ll never get over that. I can see her now – head turned toward the back with a feather in her bill. That would make some carving.” Their admiration for this species is apparent in this exquisite pair of carvings. 102


197 Detail

197 Detail

103


198

198. Decorative mallard drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Detailed feather carving and slightly turned head. Signed and dated 1968.   Original paint that has darkened a little with age; structurally good. Provenance: Purchased from the Ward Brothers by Mort Hanson and given to his in-laws as a gift in 1968. (4,000 - 6,000)

199

199. 1/3 size swan, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Approximately 14” long. Signed and dated 1951. Relief wing carving. Very slightly turned head with long graceful neck.  Original paint with good patina and virtually no wear; minor discoloration at two knots in cedar tail. (3,500 - 4,500)

200. Pair of 1936 model mallard bookends, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both have slightly turned heads.  Some roughness to end of hen’s bill and crack in hen’s back, otherwise very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

200 104


201. Pair of ruddy ducks, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed “1 of 12 1969”. Both have slightly turned heads, concave undersides, and detailed wing carving.  Each has a pin feather broken off at the tail. Provenance: Purchased by the consignor’s father in 1969 from the Ward Brothers, when he accompanied John Hillman on a trip to visit them. (9,000 - 12,000)

201

201 Detail 105


202

202. Pair of pintails, Dennis Schroeder.  Signed and dated 1998. Both have slightly turned heads and carved crossed wingtips. Fine paint detail.  Reglued crack in base of drake’s tail. (4,000 - 6,000)

203

203. Full size mute swan, Eddie Wozny, Cambridge, Maryland.  “W” carved in the underside. Also signed and dated 1995. Well sculpted neck. Raised wings with feather carving detail.  Near mint original paint that has been aged; a few small dents. (2,000 - 2,500)

204. Pair of 1/2 size mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Flat bottoms and raised wingtips. Slightly turned head.  Excellent and original. (2,750 - 3,250)

204 106


204A

204A. One of a kind pair of Canada goose bookends, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut. Full size hollow carved decoys with slightly turned heads. On hardwood bases. Approximately 12” tall and 10” wide. Original paint with very minor wear; a few specks of off white paint splattered on the bodies.

Literature: ”Shang,” Dixon Merkt. (9,000 - 12,000)

204A Detail

107


204B

204B. Pair of 1/2 size flying mallards, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia. Wingspans are approximately 14�. Notched tails and gracefully curved necks. Original paint protected by an original coat of varnish; very slight wear; tiny chip missing from one wingtip of each. (5,000 - 7,000)

204C 108

204C. Pair of miniature Canada geese, Ron Rue, Cambridge, Maryland. Taller one is approximately 8� tall. Signed. Included is a small piece of carved corn. Very good and original. (500 - 800) 204D. Dove in resting pose, Ron Rue, Cambridge, Maryland. Branded and signed. Very good and original. (400 - 600)

204D


205

205 Detail

205 Detail

205. Full size carved wooden pheasant flying over cornstalks, a highly decorative carving by Jim Robison.  31” x 32 1/2”. 25” tall. Highly detailed layered feather carving and good paint detail.  Original and good. (10,000 - 15,000)

109


Charles “Shang” Wheeler 1872 - 1949 Stratford, Connecticut

Wheeler achieved national recognition for his carvings starting as early as 1923 when he entered and won the “Grand Prize” at the first American decoy show held in Bellport, Long Island. Among his many exhibitions was a significant display at the National Sportsman’s Show in New York City in the early 1940s. This exact herring gull was included in that early display. Since it was given as a wedding gift to Merwin in 1930, Wheeler must have borrowed it for the display.

Shang Wheeler with fishing guide, thought to be at Upper Dam, near Rangeley, Maine

110


206 Detail

206 Detail

206.

Rare and important standing herring gull, Charles “Shang” Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut.  Very large and full body, approximately 24” in length. Slightly turned head and raised, extended wingtips.  Original paint with good patina that has mellowed nicely; a few very small rubs and areas of discoloration; otherwise very good and original; slight separation where one leg attaches to board that has been reglued.

Provenance: Consigned originally from the estate of Horace B. Merwin, who was a hunting partner to Shang Wheeler. This gift was made by Wheeler and given to Merwin at his wedding in 1930.

Literature: “Shang,” Dixon Merk, p. 20, exact decoy. “Connecticut Decoys,” Henry Chitwood, p. 71, exact decoy. (35,000 - 45,000)

206

111


Shorebirds

207

208

210

209

211

207. Yellowlegs, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; bill is a professional replacement; hit by shot. (2,500 - 3,500) 208. Curlew from the Eastern Shore of Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes. Used at the Accomack Gun Club. Serifed “GA” carved in underside.   Original paint with minor wear; small shot mark in one side of the head; two short hairline surface cracks in head and neck; bill is a professional replacement by Cameron McIntyre. (2,500 - 3,500) 209. Rare black bellied plover, Mark Kears, Northfield, New Jersey.  Original paint with minor discoloration and only slight wear; shot scar on lower breast; five shot marks on neck; a little shiny.

112

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Gary Giberson, Small “GNG” is written behind the stick hole. (2,000 - 3,000)

210. Large so called “shoe horn” curlew, Cape May, New Jersey, last quarter, 19th century.  Approximately 16 1/4” long with iron bill.  Original paint; minor wear; old overpaint has been taken off the underside and breast of the decoy; small defect in wood in one side from a knot; lightly hit by shot; small chip has been filled where the bill joins the head. (1,250 - 1,750) 211.

Golden plover of the type attributed to Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Laminated three piece body construction and tack eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Joseph Lincoln,” Cap Vinal.

(1,500 - 2,000)


212

213

212. Hollow carved golden plover in very rare transitional plumage, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.    Original paint with good patina and minor wear; a couple of tiny dents.

Literature: “Joseph Lincoln,” Cap Vinal (6,000 - 9,000)

213. Rare curlew, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint that has darkened with age; minor wear; bill is a professional replacement; thin crack through neck; one shot mark.

Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (4,000 - 6,000)

212 Detail

113


214

215

216

217

219

218

214. Yellowlegs, Rhodes Truex, Absecon, New Jersey.  Shoe button eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; bill is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (600 - 900)

215. Yellowlegs, Rhodes Truex, Absecon, New Jersey.    Original paint with slight wear protected by an old coat of varnish; very lightly hit by shot; tail has been slightly blunted.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Gary Giberson. “GNG” is written in ink behind the stick hole. (700 - 900)

216. Black bellied plover, Rhodes Truex, Absecon, New Jersey.    Original paint with slight wear; structurally good.

114

Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” Somers G. Headly and John Levinson, p. 95, exact decoy pictured. (700 - 900)

217. Three black bellied plover from Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Decoys are carved in various poses and are slightly flat sided.  Original paint with moderate wear; two have been hit by shot; two have some hairline cracks in the body; one has a defect in the wood in one side; shot scar in one bill. (800 - 1,200) 218. Large yellowlegs, John Horn, New Gretna, New Jersey.    Original paint; good patina and minor wear; bill is a replacement; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Somers Headly. Stamped “SGH” in underside.

Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” Somers G. Headly and John Levinson, p. 86, exact decoy pictured. (1,200 - 1,500)

219. Curlew with wire legs, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.    Second coat of paint appears to be by Tyler; tip of bill is missing; crack in lower side.

Provenance: Tyler Family.

(650 - 950)


220

221

220. Set of 12 folding tin plover, Strater & Sohier, Boston, Massachusetts. Patent dated 1874. In original wooden box marked, “ONE DOZ. GOLDEN PLOVER.” Also included are the 12 sticks. Excellent and original; box has damage at one hinge. (3,500 - 4,500)

222

221. Golden plover, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with some flaking and wear; bill is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. Formerly in the collection of Joe French. Tiny “JF” near stick hole. (1,200 - 1,500)

222. Lincoln type golden plover, 1st quarter 20th century.  Tack eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; filler has fallen out of the plug above the dowel in the head. (1,000 - 1,400)

115


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

223

224

223. Rare long billed dowitcher, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model, circa 1905.  Near mint original paint; in factory filled crack in one side. (4,000 - 6,000) 224. Yellowlegs, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Tack eye model.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: O’Connor collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

223 Detail

116


224A Detail

224A. Large curlew, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Slightly turned head. Rounded tail model.  Strong original paint with good detail; filled crack in underside that has been professionally touched up; small area of touchup at one side of the neck base.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (12,500 - 17,500)

224A

117


Contemporary

225

226

227

228

229

230

225. Lesser yellowlegs in content post, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Carved in style of William Bowman. Signed. Relief wing carving with extended tips and tack eyes.  Very good and original. (600 - 900) 226. Pair of feeding robin snipes, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Both are signed. One is numbered “1” the other “2”. Both are carved in the style of Obediah Verity.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 227. Greater yellowlegs, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200)

118

228. Golden plover in spring breeding plumage, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Circa 1990. Signed. Relief wing carving with pinned extended wingtips. Original paint that has been slightly aged; structurally good. (1,200 - 1,500) 229. Nantucket style golden plover, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  On original base. Both decoy and stand are signed.  Very good and original. (950 - 1,250) 230. Hollow carved golden plover on two wire legs, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)


231

232

234 231. Pair of pintails, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  Signed. Both are carved in the style of early Mason slope breasted premier grade decoys, slightly larger though.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500) 232. Large loon, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.   Signed. Relief wing carving.  Original paint that has been aged; several hairline cracks in body. (1,500 - 2,500) 233. Pair of merganser, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Both are signed. Both have inlet heads and relief wing carving.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,500)

233

235 234. Hollow carved mallard drake, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  Signed. Well sculpted carving with graceful head and “V” wingtip carving. Fine but subtle paint detail.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (2,000 - 2,500) 235. Widgeon drake, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.    “CTM” is carved in the underside. Hollow carved and in content pose.  Very good and original. Provenance: Collection of Bill and Barbara Doggart. (1,500 - 2,000)

119


236

237

238

239

240

241

236. Brant, Marty Hanson, Haywood, Wisconsin.  Signed. Bill is mortise and tenon into the head.  Original paint that bas been aged; structurally good. (900 - 1,200)

239. Hollow carved yellowlegs, Marty Hanson, Haywood, Wisconsin.  Raised carved wingtips.  Original paint that bas been aged; structurally good. (500 - 700)

237. Breast preening merganser drake, Keith Mueller, Killingworth, Connecticut.  Branded and signed. Relief wing carving and inlet head.  Original paint with minor wear; crack in underside. (800 - 1,200)

240. Large sleeping Florida mallard hen, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  The only Florida mallard that Strunk ever made. Signed and dated 2015. Stamped in weight. Carved, crossed wingtips and fluted tail.  Excellent and original. (500 - 800)

238. Hollow carved running curlew, Marty Hanson, Haywood, Wisconsin.  Signed.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (750 - 1,000)

120

241. Pair of flat bottom style greenwing teal, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.   Both have “Strunk” stamped in the weight. Both have carved crossed wingtips. Hen is in swimming pose, drake is preening.  Very good and original. (650 - 950)


242

243

244

245

246

247

242. Hollow carved gull, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed and dated 1988. Relief wing carving with extended wingtips.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (950 - 1,250) 243. Hollow carved preening merganser drake, Keith Mueller, Killingworth, Connecticut.  Signed. Relief wing carving with slightly raised wingtips. Bill is buried under one wing.  Excellent and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 244. Black bellied plover with turned head and original base, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Both are signed.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

248

246. Large curlew, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania.  Signed and dated 1982 under the tail. Approximately 18” long with iron bill and tack eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; numerous tiny dents and shot marks. (500 - 800) 247. Pair of greenwing teal, Pete Peterson, Cape Charles, Virginia.  Branded, signed, and dated 2004.  Very good and original. (500 - 700) 248.

Two decoys, Pete Peterson, Cape Charles, Virginia.  A coot and black duck. Both are branded.  Original and good. (400 - 600)

245. Lesser yellowlegs with turned head, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Signed. Carved in the Massachusetts style with split tail and feather carving and wingtips. Excellent and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

121


Miniatures Ira Hudson was born June 19, 1873 in a small town between Maryland and Delaware, soon after his family moved to Chincoteague, Virginia. Hudson married around 1900. He and his wife, Eva, had 12 children. By 1916, Hudson was well known for his talents at making gunning decoys boats. According to an interview with Dan Trimper, whose family owned a boat yard in Ocean City, Maryland, Hudson left Chincoteague and moved to Ocean City in late 1936 and 1937, to assist his son, Norman, who had been making boats there for several years. Trimper remembered Ira as a model employee, talented craftsman, and a fine fellow who worked from sun up to sun down at the boat yard. Rather than taking a break for lunch, Ira would carve miniature ducks from the scrap lumber in the yard using a pocket knife that he kept on a him at all times. Hudson moved back to Virginia in late 1937 or 1938. Resource: Ira D. Hudson and Family, by Henry H. Stansbury Ira and Eva Hudson. Photo credit: “Ira D. Hudson and Family,” Henry Stansbury

The Ira Hudson miniatures in this auction were owned by Dr. Francis Townsend. Townsend moved from Chincoteague to Ocean City, Maryland in 1906, and practiced there until his death in 1945. Townsend regularly went back to Chincoteague in the Fall and Winter to hunt on the Riddle property on Assateague Island. His home in Ocean City was a block and a half from Norman Hudson’s home and boat yard. His estate included numerous Ira Hudson hunting decoys and miniatures.

Dr. Francis J. Townsend (1875 - 1945)

122


249. Pair of 1/4 size black ducks, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia. Approximately 6 1/2” long. Detailed scratch loop feather paint. Original paint with slight wear; varnsihed a long time ago.

Provenance: Townsend Family collection. (5,000 - 7,000)

249

250. Miniature Canada goose, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia. Approximately 5.5” long. Original paint with good scratch feather paint detail; minor wear, mostly on edges of tail; hairline surface crack in one side of neck.

Provenance: Townsend Family collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

250

251. Miniature pair of redheads, Ira Hudson Chincoteague, Virginia. Approximately 5” long. Scratch feather paint detail. Original paint with almost no wear; decoy was varnished a long time ago.

Provenance: Townsend Family collection. (4,000 - 6,000)

251

252. Miniature black duck, Ira Hudson Chincoteague, Virginia. Approximately 5.5” long. Scratch feather paint detail. Original paint with slight wear; carving was varnished a long time ago.

Provenance: Townsend Family collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

252 123


254

255

256

257

254. Pair of 1/4 size pintail, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both are signed and dated 1951. Both have turned heads.  Very good and original. (500 - 700) 255. 1/2 size pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Slightly turned head.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

124

256. Pair of 1/3 size Canada geese, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both have slightly turned heads. One is in hissing pose. Balsa bodies.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 257. Three 1/4 size decoys, Oliver Lawson Crisfield, Maryland.  Pair of canvasbacks signed and dated 1979, and Canada goose signed “Special edition 25th year at Waterfowl Festival 11/25, 1995.”  A few light rubs on hen’s breast, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)


259. Pair of Emperor penguins, Charles Hart, Gloucester, Massachusetts, circa 1930s. Both are 5-3/8” tall. Hart’s name and address is written in pencil on the underside of one. One has a professional repair to a crack in the beak; otherwise excellent and original. (3,000 - 5,000)

259

260

261

260. Pair of miniature geese and 1/2 size bluewing teal hen, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Pair of geese are signed and dated 1968. Approximately 8 1/2” long. Both have slightly turned heads and good paint detail. Bluewing teal is signed and dated 1967. Approximately 8” long with slightly turned head and good paint detail.  One goose has a separation at the neck seam. (1,200 - 1,600)

261. Two pairs of miniature decoys, Bob McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Pair of canvasbacks and pair of redheads.  Redheads have slight paint loss on one side of drake’s neck and cheek, otherwise very good and original; varnish shrinkage on bases. Canvasbacks are very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

125


Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

Bishops Head Gun Club Style In 1933, the Ward Brothers received a decoy order from the Bishops Head Gun Club in Dorchester County, Maryland. This was not an unusual occurrence for them, but for some reason, whether at the request of the club’s owner, or perhaps creative inspiration, they decided to make several of the species in this order distinctive from others carved in the period. The pronounced apron under the tail, the notch behind the head, and the squared off tail are all identifying characteristics that separate this club’s special order from other Ward decoys made in the 1920s and 1930s.

262 Detail

126


262

262. Exceptional swimming Bishop’s head style Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Fine feather paint detail on the body, including the breast. Well sculpted, slightly turned and lifted head.  Original paint with minor wear; filler added to separation at neck seam; decoy was never rigged; short crack in underside; slight separation at a knot in the center of the back. Provenance: From the estate of Kenned Jard, Virginia Beach, Virginia. Consigned by a member of the Jard family. (30,000 - 40,000)

127


264. Pair of canvasbacks, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1932.    Original paint with good patina and minor wear; working touchup to black on drake’s head; end of hen’s bill has been reshaped slightly and touched up. (9,000 - 12,000)

264

264 Detail

128


265. Mallard drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 model with slightly turned head.   Original paint; minor wear; small dents; slight roughness to one edge of tail; crack in underside.

Provenance: From the White Mallard Hunting Club, near Calusa, California. (10,000 - 14,000)

265

265 Detail

129


265A. Exceedingly rare working wood duck drake decoy, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, early 1930s. Raised primaries and secondaries are made from peach basket staves. Flowing carved wooden crest. Original paint with minor wear; touchup to feathering on one side, parts of the black areas on the back, as well a few spots on black area on head; lightly hit by shot; small crack in one stave; slight separation to filler at neck seat. Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,� Ron Gard and Brian McGrath.

265A

130

(12,000 - 15,000)


265A Detail

265A Detail

131


266. Balsa body widgeon hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1956. Slightly turned head.   Original paint with very slight wear and good patina; structurally excellent. (3,500 - 4,500)

266

267. Pintail hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Slightly earlier than the 1936 model.  Original paint with areas worn to bare wood around tail, bill, and top of head; professional restoration at small area of neck by Cameron McIntyre, as well as minor strengthening at back by McIntyre. (4,000 - 6,000)

267

267 Detail


268

269

270

271

272

273

268. Rigmate pair of bluebills, carved by Norris E. Pratt in 1969, painted by Charlie Joiner.  Drake’s head is in preening pose.  (800 1,000) 269. Pair of sleeping mallards, Charlie Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland.  Signed and dated 2004.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 270. Pair of sleeping canvasbacks, Charlie Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland.  Signed and dated 2004.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

271. Pair of flat bottom style pintails, Charlie Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland.  Signed and dated 2001.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 272. Pair of bluebills, Charlie Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1998.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 273. Brant, Charlie Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland.  Signed and dated 2003.  Very good and original. (500 - 800)

133


Jim Schmiedlin

1945 - 2015 Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania 274. Ruddy duck drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Dated 10/93. Branded “JAS” on underside. Includes “Return for reward”. Head is positioned over back wing that is slightly lifted. Fine feather and tail carving. Writing on underside that decoy was used on Lake Erie in 1993.  A few small rubs otherwise very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

274 275. Redhead drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Dated 1991 with “JAS” brand and beige “Return for reward” on underside. Head is slightly lifted. Wingtip and tail carving.  A few small rubs on head, otherwise very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

275 276. Red breasted merganser drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.   Branded “JAS” on underside. With gray “Return for reward” paint. An earlier carving probably from the 1980s. With well defined crest and slightly turned head.  Original paint; a rub on one side of head where paint is missing; a few small dents; edge wear at tail and bill. (2,000 - 3,000)

276

277. Bluewing teal hen, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Dated 10/88. Note on underside indicated from Jim’s personal rig on Lake Erie. Branded “JAS” on underside, with beige “Return for reward”. Head is turned. Wingtips are crossed. Tail is carved.  Original paint with very light gunning wear. (2,500 - 3,500)

277 134


278. Gadwall drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded “JAS” on underside. Dated 1983. Turned head with raised wingtips and primaries. Tail feathers are carved.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

278

279. Decorative mallard drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Signed and dated 1981. Detailed feather carving.  Near mint original paint; tiny chip missing from one feather tip at tail; small crack in underside. (1,500 - 2,000)

279

280. Scoter, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded and signed with an inscription on underside. Dated 1986. Slightly turned head.   Original paint with very slight wear. (3,000 - 4,000)

280

281.

Large white wing scoter, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded and signed with an inscription, slightly turned and lifted head.   Original paint with minor wear mostly on lower sides; two small shot marks. (3,000 - 4,000)

281 135


Miniatures

282. Very rare miniature wood duck drake, John Blair, Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  Tack eyes and carved wooden crest. Approximately 5” long.  Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; tip of bill has been blunted slightly. Provenance: Purchased around 30 years ago at an estate sale near Worcester, Massachusetts. (3,000 - 4,000)

282

283. Very rare miniature mallard drake, John Blair, Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  Approximately 5 1/2” long. Tack eyes.  Original paint with good detail and patina; very slight wear to the wood at tail and one edge of bill. Provenance: Purchased around 30 years ago at an estate sale near Worcester, Massachusetts. (3,000 - 4,000)

283

284. Miniature cormorant on wooden base, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  Relief wing carving and turned head. Carving is approximately 6” long.  Wire legs have been replaced, otherwise very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

284 136


284A

284B

285

286

287

288

284A. Miniature ringneck plover, A.J. Dettman. Signed. Bill has been repainted, otherwise very good and original. (500 - 800) 284B. Pair of miniature flying plover, A.J. Dando.  Made to hang on wall. Good paint detail.  Thin crack in one wing, otherwise good and original. (600 - 900) 285. Pair of 1/4 size brant, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.   Both are carved in the Delaware River tradition and are stamped “G Strunk” in the weight. One is in a swimming pose with slightly turned head. The other is preening.  Very good and original. (500 - 700) 286. Pair of old squaw, George Strunk, Glendora New Jersey.   Both are carved in the Delaware River tradition and have slightly turned heads. Both are signed and have “G Strunk” stamped in the weights.  Very good and original. (500 - 700)

289

287. Two carvings, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Both are signed. Seal is also stamped and dated 2001. Goose is 1/4 size with carved crossed wingtips and fluted tail. Seal is approximately 9” long.  Very good and original. (500 - 800) 288. Pair of 1/4 size standing cormorants, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.   Both have “Strunk” stamped in the undersides. And have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (500 - 700) 289. Pair of 1/4 size scoter, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  “Strunk” stamp in weight. Both have slightly turned heads and are carved in the Delaware River tradition.  Very good and original. (400 - 600)

137


Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

290 Detail

290 Detail

138


290

290. Rigmate pair of mallards, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 model. Gunning decoys that have never been used. Hen has a turned and slightly lifted head with a nostril hole that is carved all the way through. Drake’s head is slightly alert and turned.  Both are in strong original paint; drake has a knot in one side of breast where pitch has slightly bled through; also very tight separation at wood filler at neck; a few very small areas of flaking at head; hen has crack in underside that has in the making wood filler applied underneath original paint; crack extends approximately 1” at lower breast.

Literature: Guyette & Schmidt, Inc. auction catalog, November 1999, front cover, exact decoys. (25,000 - 35,000)

139


291

292

291. Very well sculpted Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa early 1930s.    Worn old paint, some of which appears to be original; numerous cracks; small chip missing from underside of bill. (3,000 - 5,000)

140

292. Pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1948 model with balsa body, inserted cedar tail, and slightly turned cedar head.  Original paint with minor wear; small chip missing from one edge of tail; some touchup and repair to missing filler at neck seam; thin crack through bill. (2,500 - 3,500)


293. Exceptional pintial drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.   1936 model with slightly turned head. “LT Ward and Bro” ink stamp on underside.  Near mint original paint; crack in underside; approximately 2/3 of the bill has been professinoally replaced by Russ Allen.

Provenance: Formerly in the estate of Sportsman Grooming Essentials CEO, John Hudson Moore. (12,000 - 15,000)

293

293 Detail

293 Detail

141


294

294. Mallard drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 model with slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; small dark scuff on one side; structurally very good.

Provenance: From a sporting goods store in Shreveport, Louisiana. (12,000 - 15,000)

294 Detail

142


294A

294A. Classic 1936 model black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Slightly turned head. Signed. Good feather paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; thin crack in underside; slight separation at neck seam; bill crack has been professionally repaired by Russ Allen. (6,000 - 9,000)

294A Detail

143


294B

John Vickers in his shop on Glasgow Street in Cambridge. “Chesapeake Bay Decoys,” Richardson

294B. Unusual and stylish swan, John Vickers, Cambridge, Maryland, 2nd half 20th century. A unique reaching head position. Quite possibly the exact swan pictured with Vickers in photograph on this page. Structurally good; old paint some os which appears to be original. (3,000 - 4,000) 294C. Very rare canvasback hen and drake, Ed Parsons, Oxford, Maryland. Part of the group of decoys that Ed Parsons kept in his Oxford, Maryland shop. That group of around 100 decoys and miniatures was removed from the shop by Spry Newman during the time he was renting it in the late 1920s. After Spry died his wife, Elizabeth, sold the decoys to Alvin Sanger in 1970. Sanger sold these two to Chuck McIntosh around 2006. Original paint with minor wear; small areas of scrapes on hen’s back where the primer is showing; two cracks in underside of drake; both have small dents. Provenance: Dr. Charles McIntosh collection. Formerly in the collection of Alvin Sanger. Literature: “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (5,000 - 8,000)

294C 144


295

296

297

298

299

300

295. Canvasback drake by the Ward brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.    Head turned to the left with the tail carved in a similar fashion. Mostly dry original paint with light to moderate wear and some paint shrinkage along grain lines. Small area of touch up to a small chip or flake on lower left side. Small chip in underside of tail with some strengthening to the paint in that area. Some filler loss on top of head and some flaking at right neck seat. Provenance: Formerly in the collection Dick McIntyre with his stamp. Exact decoy pictured in color in “Collecting Antique Bird Decoys,” Luckey (1,800 - 2,200) 296. Canvasback drake, Bob McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Part of a rig made in 1941 for R, Lee Mitchell of Havre de Grace who then put the whole rig in his barn and never used it. The weight and line are from McGaw and intended for the rig.   In about mint condition with a small knot visible on the lower right side. Provenance: Acquired from John Sullivan.(1,250 - 1,750) 297. Pair of bluebills, Willim Heverin, Charlestown, Maryland.  Both Have a carved “LP” under the tail for Lewis Pennock, a Cecil County hunter.  Paint appears to be a second coat by Heverin. Surface on both shows overall light gunning wear. Drake has old chip at base of neck and has a few small shot scars. (1,000 - 1,400)

298. High head canvasback drake, Taylor Boyd, Perryville, Maryland.  Conceivably one of the highest head canvasbacks ever carved on the Susquehanna flats.  Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; few minor flakes at a small knot on right rear side.

Provenance: Formerly in the Fleckenstein collection. (650 - 950)

299. Canvasback drake, John (“Daddy”) Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Retains iron keel. Branded “Carroll’s Island”.   Old gunning paint with average overall wear. May be a marriage of a Holly head on a Holly body.

Literature: In “Waterfowling on the Chesapeake 1819 – 1936”, author John Sullivan states that this brand belonged to “one of the most famous gun clubs on the Gunpowder River in Baltimore County” and that “the Carroll’s Island Club held the pedigree for Chesapeake Bay retrievers for over 100 years”. (400 - 600)

300.

Pair of mergansers, Alvin (“gunner”) Meekins, Hoopers Island, Maryland.  Typical narrow bodies with thinly carved bills, extended crest and tack eyes.  Some crazed original paint with some strengthening to some areas of the white. Crack in neck of hen and drake hit by shot. Both retain original chain weights. (600 - 900) 145


Virginia 301. Canvasback drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Round body style with fluted tail and slightly turned head.  Original paint with good detail and minor to moderate wear. (3,000 - 4,000)

301

302.

Bluebill hen with slightly turned head, attributed to Delbert Hudson.    Near mint original paint with scratch loop feather painting at wingtip area; structurally very good. (1,500 - 2,000)

302

303. Pintail drake with banjo tail, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Original paint with moderate wear; crack in underside; worn area to wood on one side; neck filler is missing. (1,500 - 2,500)

303

304. Hollow carved Canada goose, Charles Birch, Willis Wharf, Virginia.    Appealing old in use repaint; lightly hit by shot. (1,250 - 1,750)

304 146


305. Hollow carved teal from Cobb Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Made with typical Cobb low head pose with bulbous neck.  Worn old paint; thin crack partway through bill and partway through top of head. (3,500 - 4,500)

305

306. Hollow carved bluebill hen, Nathan Cobb, Jr., Cobb Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.   Inlet head and carved eyes. Raised “V” wingtip carving.  Old repaint with some original showing.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry, Fleckenstein, Jr.

(3,000 - 5,000)

306

147


307. Early brant, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague Virginia, circa 1920.  High neck seat with small head style and tack eyes. Feather paint detail on sides.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; three hairline cracks in body; hairline crack partway through one side of neck.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (4,500 - 6,500)

307

308. Brant, Dave Watson, Chincoteague, Virginia, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear on most of the body; paint loss on breast, parts of head, and neck; white area under the tail is working repaint.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (5,000 - 7,000)

308

308 Detail

307 Detail 148


308A. Hollow carved black duck, Nathan Cobb, Jr., Cobb Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Inlet head and raised “V” wingtip carving. Large serifed “N” is carved in the underside.  Paint has been restored on part of the body, the rest is old gunning paint; several small cracks in body. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of William Butler, Jr. Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., plates 407 and 408, exact decoy pictured. (16,000 - 20,000)

308A

308A Detail

308A Detail

149


309

310

311

312

313

314

315

316

309. Swimming cork body brant, from Virginia.  Raised “V” wingtip carving. Applied wooden bill.  Head is a little loose; some separation at seams in cork. (900 - 1,200)

313. Hollow carved brant, Charles Birch, Willis Wharf, Virginia.    Old in use repaint; crack through neck; small crack in underside. (500 - 800)

310. Merganser hen, Charles Birch, Willis Wharf, Virginia, 1st quarter 19th century.   Branded “JAH”.   Old in use repaint; hit by shot; small cracks; bill is an old replacement.

314. Coot, J.L. Rowe, Norfolk, Virginia.  Cast aluminum head.  Original paint with minor wear on head. (600 - 900)

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

311.

Two decoys, Doug Jester, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Black duck and a pintail hen.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

(900 - 1,200)

312. Goldeneye drake, Miles Hancock, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Original paint with minor wear; touchup to a thin chip at top of the tail; minor roughness to underside where a weight was removed. (400 - 600)

150

315. Black duck, early Miles Hancock, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Working repaint by Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland; moderate wear on underside and lower sides; age split in back. Provenance: Tyler Family.

(500 - 800)

316. Redhead drake, Theodore Williams, Back Bay, Virginia.  From the North Bay Gunning Club.  Old overpaint has been mostly taken off; small cracks and dents. (550 - 850)


317

317. Exceptionally rare Canada goose, Eli Doughty, Hog Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Classic Virginia tail carving, with canted neck shelf and inserted hardwood bill that has been splined to the back of the head. Underside “W.U.W.” is carved for Walter Wilkins, an oyster inspector from Capeville, Virginia.  Numerous coats of old paint on body and head; flaking reveals several different layers; wood separations at lower edge has been resecured with large square nail; several tight cracks run length of body; small area of wood filler missing at neck seam; otherwise structurally good. Provenance: This goose was recently found in the Western Basin of Lake Lake Erie, near Port Clinton. It likely traveled there a very long time ago with a hunter visiting the duck clubs in Ohio. (7,500 - 10,000)

317 Detail

151


Decoratives

318

319

320

321

322

318. * Full size standing Mandarin duck on elaborate base, Larry Tawes.  Included is a print of a mandarin duck by Larry Tawes.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400) 319. * Full size preening bufflehead drake, Larry Tawes.  Mounted on elaborate base.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400) 320. Two yellowlegs on carved wooden bases, William Gibian, Onancock, Virginia.  Signed. Fine feather carving detail.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 321. Pair of greenwing teal, Josh Brewer.  Signed and dated 2006. Both have carved, crossed wingtips and fluted tails. Both have slightly turned and cocked heads.  Excellent and original. (950 - 1,250)

152

323

322. Rare preening canvasback hen, Corbin Reed, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed and stamped “JC Reed, 1973”. Relief wing carving and carved feet.  Excellent and original. (1,500 - 2,500) 323. Flying dove mounted on tiger maple backboard, Josh Brewer.  Signed and dated 2006. Fine feather carving and paint detail.   (1,200 - 1,500)


324. Rare canvasback drake, John Scheeler, Mays Landing, New Jersey.  Inscription on underside “Made by John S. Scheeler. Winner of 1972 World Champion decoy contest held at Salisbury MD.” And signed by Scheeler 10/21/72. Head is in resting, tucked, and slightly turned position. Fine wingtip and tail carving.  Very good and original. (1,800 - 2,200)

324 325. Flying goldeneye drake, Sam Denny, Clayton, New York.  Fairly large, approximately 21 1/2” long. Signed, “Sam Denny Clayton New York”.   Original paint with significant shrinkage on the white areas; small chips missing from filler where wing joins body. (2,000 - 3,000)

325 326. Pair of mallards, Dennis Schroeder.  Signed and dated 1999. Both have slightly turned heads and carved crossed wingtips.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

326 327. Pair of canvasbacks, Dennis Schroeder.  Signed and dated 1992. Both have carved, crossed wingtips and slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

327 153


328 328. Exceptional carving of full size standing pintails on driftwood, Larry Tawes.  Approximately 24” tall. Highly detailed feather carving with crossed wingtips and fluted tails.  Original and good. (2,000 - 3,000)

329 329. Exceptional carving of full size fulvous tree ducks, Larry Tawes.  Approximately 26 1/2” tall. On driftwood base. Fine feather carving detail.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

330. Wooden carved Chesapeake bay retriever and pup. Adult dog on stand is 39” high and is holding a shot duck. Original and good. (1,500 - 2,000

154


331

332

333

334

335

336

331. Pair of widgeon, Ron Justice, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed. Drake is in preening pose with lifted wing, lifted wingtip on other side, and carved foot. Hen is in content pose with relief wingtip carving.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200) 332. Sleepy eyed canvasback drake, Corbin Reed, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed. Relief wing carving and carved feet.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 333. Large standing woodcock, Lloyd Johnson, Bayhead, New Jersey.    Original paint with shrinkage small amount of gesso is missing from legs. (600 - 900)

335. Pair of canvasbacks, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1987. Both have relief wing carving and slightly turned heads. Both are just under 15” long.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 336. * Wooden carved sleepy eyed greenwing teal hen on habitat base, Richard LeMaster, Chillicothe, Illinois.  Carving exhibits tucked head, carved and crossed primaries, and carved secondaries. Fluted tail. Signed “LeMaster, ‘83.”  Excellent and original.

Literature: Small.

“Masters of Decorative Bird Carving,” Anne (500 - 800)

334. Two full size carved shorebirds on wooden bases, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  A golden plover and ruddy turnstone. Turnstone is stamped “Strunk” under the base.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

155


New England Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1952 East harwich, Massachusetts Some decoys must be considered iconic and Crowell’s swimming mergansers are prime examples. Crowell was constantly striving to produce the best decoys he could. When demand was small, he could lavish more time on each piece. His early decoys, such as those with crossed wingtips or those with carved feather detail like his raised and dropped wing shorebirds, required more time and effort. As orders continued to pour in, he needed to find ways to produce quality, life-like, decoys in as efficient a manner as possible. One way for him to accomplish this was to reduce the amount of carving that went into each piece. Crowell, like a number of carvers, tried to vary the look of a rig by simply turning their basic head pattern to the right or left. Crowell’s innovation, however, was brilliant. By simply making small changes to his head pattern, he could create the impression of a bird actually swimming through the water. The head would be thrust forward, and the rasping to the rear of the head could be slightly modified. The illusion was made complete by the addition of a few additional brush strokes running down the rear of the crest to give the impression of feathers being laid back on the head. These simple changes took very little, if any, additional time but allowed him to produce a completely new and realistic design that appealed to the birds overhead and to the collector today.

337 Detail

156


337

337. Immaculate, swimming red breasted merganser drake, by Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Head is forward with detailed bill carving and rasping on the back. Fluted tail. Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Inset circular lead weight, typical of decoys Crowell made for hunting clubs on Martha’s Vineyard.  Outstanding dry original paint; very slight separation at front of neck seam, otherwise mint; decoy was never rigged. (22,000 - 25,000)

337 Detail

157


Gus Wilson

1864 - 1950 South Portland, Maine

Gus Wilson has long been considered the premier carver from the state of Maine. His output likely far exceeded that of any of the other top Maine makers. However, Wilson’s status as the top Maine maker is based primarily in his creativity and the tremendous variety of carvings that he produced. This rocking head merganser exhibits the creativity and artistic level that Wilson was able to achieve through his skilled craftsmanship.

Gus Wilson

338. Rocking head red breasted merganser drake, Augustus Aaron Wilson, Portland, Maine, circa 1910-20.  Original hardwood pegs through body. Carved eyes, wings, nostrils, and mouth. Stamped on bottom M3.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; long thin original bill remains unbroken; crack through neck.

338

158

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, 1983, p. 97 and p. 207, exact decoy. (10,000 - 14,000)


338 Detail

339

339.

Eider hen, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Slightly turned inlet head with carved eyes and relief wing carving.   (1,500 - 2,000)

340

340. Eider drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Branded “J.C. Pike”. Stamped “J.C. Pike Rig”. Turned inletted head. Relief wing carving.  Strong original paint; wood imperfection on underside; small areas of flaking. (2,000 - 3,000)

159


341

342

343

344

345

341. Black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint; minor wear; a few small dents. (2,250 - 2,750) 342. Black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Slightly turned and lifted head. Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; moderate wear on lower sides; small dents and shot scars. (1,500 - 2,000) 343. Solid body style black duck, Charles Hart, Gloucester, Massachusetts.  Detailed feather carving.  Excellent and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

160

344. Stylish old squaw drake with lifted head, upper Maine coast, 1st quarter 20th century.  Head is inlet into the body. Inlet piece is almost 6” long.  Original paint; minor wear; age split in underside; hairline surface crack in one side. (1,000 - 1,400) 345.

Merganser hen from Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.  Ice dip behind neck.  Original paint with minor wear; crack at neck base.

Provenance: Found in Chilmark, on Martha’s Vineyard. (800 - 1,200)


346

346. Rare hollow carved long body style Canada goose, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.    Original paint; minor to moderate wear on head neck and back; discoloration and wear on breast and lower sides; filled crack in tail from when the decoy was made; slight separation in seams; cracks in breast. (5,000 - 7,000) 347.

Rare middle period merganser drake, Keyes Chadwick, Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts.  Slightly turned head. Branded “CSM” twice in the underside.   Original paint with significant wear on back and top of head; wear to wood on one side; two cracks in body.

Provenance: Recently found in a home in Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts.

346 Detail

Literature: “Martha’s Vineyard Decoys,” Stanley Murphy. (2,500 - 3,500)

347 161


Delaware River 348. Black duck, John English, Florence, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  “JB Perkins” brand in underside twice.  Appealing old in use repaint; tiny dents. Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (1,500 - 2,000)

348 349. Pintail drake, Jess Heisler, Bordentown, New Jersey.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; professional neck crack repair; thin cracks in breast and under tail. (1,500 - 2,500)

349

350. Canada goose, Mel Grauch, Pitman, New Jersey.    Original paint with moderate shrinkage and wear; thin crack through neck.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr., p. 159, exact decoy pictured. (1,750 - 2,250)

351.

Bluebill drake, Jack English, Florence, New Jersey.    Original paint with very slight wear; protected by an old coat of varnish; bill has been broken off and reattached with touchup in that area; small crack in tail. (2,000 - 3,000)

350

351 162


352

353 352 Detail

352. Excellent black duck, William Quinn, Yardley, Pennsylvania.   High neck model with raised “V” wing carving and fluted tail. “W. Quinn Yardley, PA.” is painted on the underside.  Very good and original. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey. Branded “JAH”, also Hillman collection stamp is on the underside. (4,500 - 6,500)

353 Detail

353. Two greenwing teal, John Blair, Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Both are hollow carved with body halves joined by dowels.  Appealing old in use repaint; one has a thin crack partway through bill. Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (6,000 - 9,000)

163


354

355

356

357

358

354. Pintail hen, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, Pennsylvania.  Signed. Crossed wingtips that are made from tin.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Somers G. Headly, “SGH” stamp in underside. (800 - 1,200)

355. Bluebill drake, Clark Madera, Pitman, New Jersey.    Original paint with almost now wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr., p. 163 exact decoy pictured. (650 - 950)

359

356. Mallard drake, Clark Madera, Pitman, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr., p. 162, exact decoy pictured. (600 - 900)

357. Black duck, Clark Madera, Pitman, New Jersey.    Original paint; minor wear; a few tiny dents. (650 - 950) 358. Oversize black duck, Clark Madera, Pitman, New Jersey.    Original flock painting; reglued crack in neck. (500 - 800) 359. Pair of pintails, John Baker, Bristol, Pennsylvania.  His name is on the weight. Relief wing carving.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; structurally very good. (500 - 800)

164


Hurley Conklin

Manahawkin, New Jersy

361

362

363

364

365

366

361. Rare early style pintail drake, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Signed. Unusual two piece head construction.  Near mint original paint; seams have separated slightly in some places. (650 - 950) 362. Large pair of early style canvasbacks, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Both have turned heads. Each has “VN” carved under the bill.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Jack Conover. Conover collection stamp on the underside. Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 152, exact decoys. (1,200 - 1,600) 363. Very rare full bodied stick up gull, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Branded “H Conklin”. Raised

“V” wingtip carving. On original base.  Near mint original paint; structurally very good. (750 - 1,000) 364. Very rare stick up Canada goose, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  On original base. Branded “H Conklin.” Raised carved wingtips and ice groove behind neck.  Very good and original. (750 - 1,000) 365. Stick up Brant, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Branded “H Conklin”. Relief carved wingtips. On original base.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 366. Unusual pair of mergansers, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Both have slightly turned heads in feeding pose with atypical crests and ice dips behind the neck. Branded “H Conklin.”   Original paint with very minor wear and a few tiny scuffs. (650 - 950) 165


367

368

369

370

371

372

367. Two decoys, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  An early style merganser hen and a swimming brant.  Very good and original. (700 - 900) 368. Sleeping black duck, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Branded “H Conklin.” Relief wingtip carving.  Very good and original. (400 - 500) 369. Early style brant, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Signed. Also written on the underside is “From the collection of Russel Holst, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey 1966.”   Thin crack through neck; original paint with very minor wear. (500 - 700)

166

370. Pair of hooded mergansers, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Made with split crest and branded “H Conklin.”  Small dent in back of hen otherwise excellent and original. (500 - 700) 371. Pair of Barrow’s goldeneye, Claude Trader, Florence, New Jersey, circa 1950s.  Both are in content pose.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750) 372. Sleeping mallard drake, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey.  Signed. Carved, crossed wingtips, fluted tail, and carved primaries.  Excellent and original. (1,250 - 1,750)


Clark Voorhees

1911 - 1980 Old Lyme, Connecticut

372A. Extremely rare blue whale plaque, Clark Voorhees, Old Lyme, Connecticut.  Voorhees’ stamp and carved initials in back. 18-1/2” long. Carved fins, tail and baleen with carved and painted eyes. Deeply cut pleats extend from the bottom of the mouth to approximately one third of the distance to the tail past the pectoral fin.  Excellent and original.

372A

Provenance: Recently found in a Westport, Massachusetts home where it has remained with the initial owner who purchased the carving from the Whaling Museum in New Bedford, Massachusetts around 1960. Carving retains the original Whaling Museum label on the back with the address as being “New Bedford, Mass.” Perhaps a special order for this famous Museum’s gift shop (3,000 - 4,000)

372B. Right whale plaque, Clark Voorhees, Old Lyme, Connecticut.  Voorhees’ stamped and carved initials in back. Approximately 18” long with carved fins, tail and baleen, and carved and painted eye.  Very small paint rub at tip of tail; otherwise excellent and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

372B

372C

Clark Voorhees was born in Lenox, Massachusetts and grew up in Old Lyme, Connecticut. His father was an American expressionist painter and a member of the Old Lyme School of Artists. Clark Jr. briefly studied law at Tulane University then attended the Hartford Art School where he studied under German born artist Henry Kreis (1899 – 1963). While in Old Lyme he opened a studio and taught part time at the Lyman Allyn Art Museum and at Connecticut College. He worked at Mystic Seaport during the restoration of the Joseph Conrad and the whaling ship Charles W Morgan. He is best known among today’s collectors for his outstanding whale carvings, both plaques and full bodied, which reflect Voorhees’ love of the sea. These whales were always in demand and were sold through a number of sources such as Abercrombie and Fitch in New York, The Four Winds Craft Guild on Nantucket and, as we now know, the gift shop of the Whaling Museum in New Bedford, MA. (see the blue whale in this auction).

372C. Finback whale plaque, Clark Voorhees, Old Lyme, Connecticut.  Approximately 18-3/4” long. “C. Voorhees” is stamped on the back, also his carved initials. Whale has carved fins, tail and baleen as well as a carved and painted eye, and incised pleats.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

Reference: “Clark Voorhees’ Carved Whales” Kevin Tulimieri, The Magazine Antiques, Jan./Feb. 2011.

Clark Voorhees, a well known wood carver made this house from a barn. (Note what appear to be shorebirds in windows) Reprinted with permission from “Vermont Life” magazine (Autumn, 1968)

167


Bronze Sculptures

372D

372E 372D. “Buffalo,” limited edition bronze sculpture #16/20, Dan Ostermiller.  Signed and dated ‘86. apprixmiately 14” high.  Very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000) 372E. “Going to Post,” bronze sculpture of a horse and jockey, Marilyn Newmark.  11-1/2” high.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500) 372F. “The Sentinel,” limited edition 28/50 bronze sculpture of Indian with shield, John Coleman.  Signed and dated 2005. Approximately 20” tall.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 168

372F


373

Sporting Art

373. “Borderline Point,” a southern scene of a pointer, Chris Chantland.  Professionally matted and framed. Image size 21” x 9”. Painting was used for the front cover of “Pointing Dog Journal” March/April 2005 issue.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

374

375

374. Watercolor study of hunters with decoys in marsh, A. Lassell Ripley.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 5” x 7 1/2”.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

375. “A Five,” a pen and ink drawing of five black ducks rising from marsh, “Shang” Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut.  Remarqued on matting. Image size 17” x 9 3/4”.  Painting and matting have darkened somewhat with age. (900 - 1,200)

169


376

378

377

379

376. Two pencil sketches in wooden frames, Lem Ward, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1983. Images size approximately 6.5” x 8.5”. Subject matter are a Barrow’s goldeneye and a wood duck.  Very good and original. (650 - 950)

378. Oil on canvas of a swimming mallard, Lem Ward.  Signed and dated 1983. Image size approximately 13 1/2” x 17 1/2”.  Small impression in mallard’s feathers; in painting; very thin paint shrinkage on mallard’s head and breast. (600 - 900)

377. Watercolor of numerous game birds, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.   Signed “Tyler”. Image size approximately 10” x 16”.  Minor discoloration, mostly on one edge. (650 - 950)

379.

170

Oil on canvas of two pointers, Eugene Kingman.  Signed. Image size 20” x 24”.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)


380

380

380. “Good Luck” and “Bad Luck,” prints from A.B. Frost paintings.  Of duck hunters returning from hunt. Professionally matted and framed. Image sizes approximately 15 3/4” x 10.5”  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

381

381. “The Brook Hill Dog,” large tin advertising poster made from a painting by Alexander Pope.  Image size approximately 39” x 28 1/2”.  Several small spots of discoloration near top right edge; approximately 1” long scratch center right. (1,750 - 2,250)

171


382

383

384

384

385

386

382. Dry point of a man fishing from canoe with two guides, Ogden Pleissner.  Image size approximately 8 1/2” x 12”. Signed. A letter on the back dated November 1946 to Dr. Lewis indicates that it’s a gift from Pleissner to him and the scene is at Jimmie’s Hole on the Restigouche River, New Brunswick.   Very slight yellowing from age, otherwise excellent and original. (900 - 1,200) 383. Etching of duck hunters in blind, Ogden Pleissner.   Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Approximately 8 3/4” x 12 1/4”.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 384. Etching of flying mergansers, Frank Benson and Etching of flying canvasbacks, 38/50, J.A. Knap.  Benson is signed. Image size approximately 7 1/2” x 11”. Professionally matted and framed. Knap is signed in the margin by the artist. Professionally matted and framed. 172

Image size approximately 9 1/2” x 12 1/2”.  Benson has approximately 1” long thin scrape in the center of the etching; at one end there is a small hole, otherwise original and good. Knap is very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 385. Federal duck stamp original etching, Richard Bishop, 1937.  Signed artist proof. Signed federal duck stamp design. Richard Bishop in margin. Professionally matted and framed.  Slightly yellowed with age, otherwise very good and original. (500 - 700) 386. Mallards, Federal duck stamp design, 1934, original etching by J.N. Darling.  Signed artist proof edition. Professionally matted and framed with duck stamp. In margin, etching is signed, “Designed for first federal duck stamp, 1934, J. Darling.”  Very slightly yellowed with age, otherwise good. (900 - 1,200)


387

387

387. Two lithographs.  “The Shamrock,” a lithograph of hunting dogs and hunter, of a painting by Thomas Blinks, Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 20” x 30”. And “There’s Many a Slip,” a large lithograph of a fox and mallards, printed by Noble. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 18” x 32 1/2”.  Blinks has small discolored area near hunter; small watermark in sky. Noble is good. (800 - 1,200)

388

388. Limited edition, 16/150, print entitled “Maryland Marsh,” John Frost.  Signed in the margin. Published by Derrydale press. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 15” x 20 1/2”.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200)

389

389

389. Plates from portfolio of Ward Brothers decoys, paintings by Jack Schroder.  Plate 1, bluebill and pintails. Plate 5, goldeneye hen and drake. Professionally matted and framed.  Very good and original. (300 - 500) 390. Limited edition duck stamp print, 507/700 of Ross Geese, Edward J. Bierly.  Signed. Included is the 1970 duck stamp. That is also signed by Bierly.  Very good and original. (350 - 450)

390 173


Delbert “Cigar” Daisey 1928 - 2017 Chincoteague, Virginia

391

392

393

394

395

396

391. Two working redheads, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Both are branded “Cigar” and have slightly turned heads. Carved in the style of Ira Hudson.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; structurally good. (1,200 - 1,600) 392. Pair of buffleheads, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Slight feather carving at drake’s wingtips, a little more carving on the hen. Hen’s head is also slightly turned. Original and good.  (1,000 - 1,400) 393. Pair of cork body black ducks, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded in keels.  Near mint original paint; three small scuffs on one’s back. (900 - 1,200)

174

394. Rigmate pair of buffleheads, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed and branded “Cigar” on underside with the words “hunting decoys”.  Both excellent and original. (800 - 1,200) 395. Rigmate pair of buffleheads, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.   Signed “Delbert Cigar Daisey hunting decoys 1969”. Both branded “Cigar”. Both have turned heads.  Small rub on back of drake; otherwise both very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 396. Rigmate pair of widgeon, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed and dated 1974. “My first pair cork baldpates”. Both are branded “Cigar”. Hen has slightly turned head.  Both are unused. (800 - 1,200)


397

398

399

400

401

397. Two decoys, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  A bluebill drake, branded. Carved in the style of Ira Hudson. And a working merganser hen, branded “Cigar”.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot. (1,000 - 1,600) 398. Bufflehead hen, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded. Signed “To Vera and Charlie, 1979, Cigar & Lucille Daisey.” Tucked head, carved primaries and secondaries. Fluted tail.  Very good and original. (500 - 800)

400. Cork bodied brant, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed. Slightly turned head.  Original and good. (650 - 950) 401. Two decoys, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  A Swimming merganser hen, branded and signed. And a Hooded merganser drake carved in style of Doug Jester, branded “Cigar”.  Doug Jester merganser has Original paint that has been aged; a few small dents and worn areas, otherwise very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

399. Two shorebirds, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  A yellowlegs, branded and signed. And a black bellied plover, signed and dated 1969. Slightly turned head.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,800) 175


402

403

404

405

406

407

402. Cast iron wing duck modeled from a Will Heverin decoy, 1st quarter 20th century.    Some pitting and rust, much of the paint remains. (350 - 450)

405. Large cast iron wing duck, last quarter 19th century.    Surface is pitted; slight roughness to tip of bill. (350 - 450)

403. Cast iron wing duck, modeled from a John Graham decoy, 1st quarter 20th century.    Some pitting and rust is showing; most of the paint remains; structurally good. (350 - 450)

406. Canada goose, Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.    Appealing old paint; numerous cracks in body.

404.

176

Cast iron wing duck, last quarter 19th century.    Heavily pitted. (350 - 450)

Provenance: Tyler Family.

(900 - 1,200)

407. Canvasback drake, John Vickers, Cambridge, Maryland.    Near mint original paint; short hairline crack in lower breast. (650 - 950)


Maryland

408

409

410

411

412

413

408. Canvasback drake by Sam Barnes.  Branded “J.D.Poplar”.  Old gunning paint with overall light wear. Few flakes along chine. Few tiny chips on top of head. Literature: From the rig of Jesse Poplar who is pictured (presumably with birds from this rig) on page 113 of “The Outlaw Gunner” by Walsh. (400 - 600) 409. Canvasback hen, John “Daddy” Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Twice branded “H.E. & S.”  Lightly to moderately worn old paint, some of which may be original. Crack in neck and two thin tight checks on back. Hit by shot, mostly on head and breast. (600 - 900) 410. Canvasback drake by John “Daddy” Holly.  Retains iron keel and the brand “Widgeon”. The gunning scow Widgeon was based in Havre de Grace and owned numerous decoys by the Hollys.  Worn gunning paint with some rubs and flakes to wood; few tight cracks in neck. (400 - 600) 411. Redhead hen, John “Daddy” Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Branded “North Carolina”. From the rig of sinkbox decoys used by that scow of that name on the Susquehanna Flats circa 1890.  Very worn gunning paint with traces of original visible. Small area of roughness to

414 top of head and hit by shot – mostly on head and breast.

Literature: This exact decoy is pictured on page 113 of “Decoys of the Mid-Atlantic Region” by Fleckenstein. (400 - 600)

412. Canvasbak drake by John “Daddy” Holly of Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Branded “Reckless” and what appears to be some illegible initials or rig mark. The Reckless was built in Havre de Grace in 1880 and registered as yacht license number 8. She was owned by Henry D. Polhemus and captained by Billy Moore.  Old gunning paint with some areas worn to age darkened wood. Thin, tight crack in neck and minor roughage to edge of bill. Lightly hit by shot. (400 - 600) 413. Wildfowler blanks, painted by Lloyd Tyler, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. One is dated 1964.  Original paint; minor shrinkage on bluebill hen’s breast.

Provenance: Tyler Family.

(350 - 450)

414. Redhead drake, Robert McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  From the “Glenn L Martin” rig, “GLM” brand in underside.  Old in use repaint; crack in neck. (400 - 600)

End of Auction 177


Index of Carvers Ahrens, Tom.................................................................... 180 Ansardi, Adam.................................................................. 51 Baker, John...................................................................... 359 Barnard, Charles Nelson................................................... 49 Barnard, Thomas............................................................... 48 Barnes, Sam........................................................... 48A, 408 Bierly, Edward J.............................................................. 390 Birch, Charles................................................. 304, 310, 313 Birdsall, Jess..................................................................... 22 Bishop, Richard............................................................... 385 Blair, Sr., John................................................. 282, 283, 353 Boice, Harry.................................................................... 142 Bonner, Mike.................................................................... 13 Bourg, Xavier.............................................................. 56, 60 Boyd, George.......................................................... 284, 346 Boyd, Taylor.................................................................... 298 Brewer, Josh............................................................ 321, 323 Brunet, Tan.................................................................... 9, 11 Brunet, Jett........................................................................ 10 Brunet, Jude...................................................................... 14 Bushnell, W.S.................................................................... 62 Chadwick, Keyes............................................................ 347 Chantland, Chris............................................................. 373 Clifford, Bill.................................................................... 177 Cobb, Jr., Nathan.................................................. 306, 308A Coleman, John...............................................................372F Conklin, Hurley........................................................361-370 Constable, Richard.......................................................... 172 Couvillion, Skip.......................................................... 68, 69 Cranmer, William........................................................ 25, 27 Crowell, Elmer.............. 31-33, 36-42, 70-81, 337, 341, 342 Daisey, Cigar.................................................... 1-6, 391-401 Dando, A.J.................................................................... 284B Darling, J.N..................................................................... 386 Denny, Sam..................................................................... 325 Dettman, A.J................................................................. 284A Dodge Decoy Factory ...................................................... 91 Doughty, Eli.................................................................... 317 Dye, Captain Ben............................................................ 143 Edwards, Reg.................................................................. 164 Elliston, Robert............................................................... 103

English, John................................................................... 348 English, Jack................................................................... 351 Frost, John....................................................................... 388 Garibaldi, Amiel.............................................................. 104 Gibian, William............................................................... 320 Gibson, Paul.................................................................... 152 Glasclair, Ebdon................................................................ 57 Glassford, Al............................................................190-194 Glenn, Captain John.......................................................... 47 Godin, Pat......................................................................... 12 Grauch, Mel.................................................................... 350 Graves, Bert.............................................................. 99, 100 Grinnell, R.................................................................... 122D Hancock, Miles....................................................... 312, 315 Hanson, Marty................................................. 236, 238, 239 Hart, Charles........................................................... 259, 343 Hartwig, Heinie............................................................ 122C Heisler, Jess..................................................................... 349 Hendrickson, Gene............................................................ 28 Heverin, Will....................................................... 43, 46, 297 Holly, James...................................................................... 45 Holly, John “Daddy..........................................299, 409-412 Horn, John....................................................................... 218 Horner, Rowley........................................................... 18, 19 Howell, Leroy................................................................. 158 Hudson, Delbert.............................................................. 302 Hudson, Ira............................ 204B, 249-252, 301, 303, 307 Irvin, Lawrence................................................165-167, 169 Irwin, Ed................................................................. 156, 157 Jeafrau, Charles................................................................. 53 Jester, Doug..................................................................... 311 Johnson, Taylor............................................................... 135 Johnson, Lloyd................................................................ 333 Johnson Outboard Motor Company ............................... 174 Joiner, Charlie..................................................150, 269-273 Justice, Ron..................................................................... 331 Kavanagh, J.M................................................................ 130 Kears, Mark..................................................................... 209 Kingman, Eugene............................................................ 379 Kuhn, Bob....................................................................... 120 LaFrance, Mitchell...................................................... 52, 54


Lawson, Oliver................ 147, 188, 189, 256, 257, 260, 335 Leeds, Daniel Lake................................................. 136, 137 LeMaster, Richard........................................................... 336 Lincoln, Joseph............................................................... 212 Loveland, John.................................................................. 30 Madera, Clark..........................................................355-358 Mason Decoy Factory ...82-90, 92-98, 108, 223, 224, 224A Mayol, Jorge................................................................... 126 McGaw, Bob............................................. 44, 261, 296, 414 McIntyre, Cameron......................................... 231, 234, 235 McLoughlin, John............................................. 26, 354, 372 McNair, Mark...................225-230, 232, 233, 242, 244, 245 Meekins, Alvin................................................................ 300 Mueller, Keith......................................................... 237, 243 Newmark, Marilyn........................................................372E Nichol, David.................................................................. 185 Ostermiller, Dan........................................................... 372D Parker, Lloyd........................................................... 133, 134 Parsons, Ed................................................................... 294C Peacock, Dr. Cassius................................................... 61, 63 Perdew, Charles....................................... 101, 102, 107, 204 Peterson, Pete.................................................. 161, 247, 248 Pleissner, Ogden...................................................... 382, 383 Pratt, Norris E................................................................. 268 Pringle, Peter................................................................... 184 Pryor, Leonard................................................................ 148 Quinn, William................................................................ 352 Reed, Corbin........................................................... 322, 332 Reeves, Frank.................................................................. 183 Reeves, Phineas............................................................... 187 Reichart, Carl.................................................................. 132 Ripley, A. Lassell............................................................ 374 Robison, Jim................................................................... 205 Rosseau, Percival............................................................ 123 Roussel, Jr., Reme............................................................. 55 Rowe, J.L........................................................................ 314 Rue, Ron............................................................204C, 204D Rule, Newt...................................................................... 178 Sawyer, Chet................................................................... 159 Schaldach, William......................................................... 125 Schmiedlin, Jim.......................................................274-281

Schroder, Jack................................................................. 389 Schroeder, Dennis........................................... 202, 326, 327 Scott, Lindsay B.................................................122A, 122B Seerey-Lester, John......................................................... 127 Shceeler, John................................................................. 324 Shilstone, Arthur............................................................. 129 Shourds, Harry M........................................................ 20, 21 Shourds, Harry V.................18A, 24, 29, 138-140, 213, 221 Smith, Frank Vining........................................................ 124 Solberg, Mort.................................................................. 131 Solet, Harry....................................................................... 64 Sterling, Lloyd.................................................. 50, 112, 155 Strater & Sohier ............................................................. 220 Strunk, George.........................168, 240, 241, 285-289, 334 Tawes, Larry......................195B, 195C, 318, 319, 328, 329 Trader, Claude................................................................. 371 Truex, Rhodes..........................................................214-216 Tyler, Lloyd...... 113-119, 146, 149, 153, 219, 377, 406, 413 Updike, John..................................................................... 23 Urie, Jess......................................................................... 154 Verity, Obediah............................................................... 207 Vickers, John........................................................ 294B, 407 Vizier, Clovis.................................................................... 66 Vizier, Jimmie......................................................15-17, 195 Voorhees,Clark................................................... 372A-372C Ward, Lem....................................................... 122, 376, 378 Ward Brothers ........7, 8, 144, 151, 196-201, 254, 255, 262, 264-267, 290-295 Watson, Dave.................................................................. 308 Weiler, Milton......................................................... 109, 121 Wheeler, Chauncey.......................................................110A Wheeler, Shang............................................ 204A, 206, 375 Whipple, Mark............................................................ 58, 59 White, Bob...................................................................... 246 Williams, Theodore......................................................... 316 Wilson, Gus...................................................195A, 338-340 Wozny, Eddie.................................................................. 203 Young, Ray “Paco”......................................................... 128


47th Annual

WATERFOWL FESTIVAL

All Festival proceeds benefit Waterfowl Chesapeake’s restoration and conservation efforts in the region.

®

in Historic Easton, Maryland NOVEMBER 10, 11, 12, 2017

THE ULTIMATE DESTINATION FOR THE SOPHISTICATED SPORTSMAN BUY, SELL, SWAP AND WATERFOWLING ARTIFACTS AT EASTON HIGH SCHOOL • • • •

Talk to experts about the value of your collection Find that perfect bird to complete your vision Enjoy swapping stories with other decoy enthusiasts Appreciate the rich history of the Eastern Shore sportsman

3-DAY TICKETS ARE $15 BEFORE NOVEMBER 1! $20 from November 1–12

Premiere Night Party! Thursday, November 9

Art • Cocktails • Cuisine • Conservation

VIP Packages Available

Tickets and info online WaterfowlFestival.org 410-822-4567


Collection Planning Program

Enjoy Collecting Now and Plan Ahead With a forty year history, you can rely on the Guyette & Deeter decoy auction house as the most trusted decoy auction firm to handle your estate planning and collection management needs. Whether it’s for tax purposes, estate planning, gifting, charitable giving or insurance purposes, let us manage and periodically update a comprehensive written appraisal of your collection. Gary and Jon are available to work with banks, attorneys, trust and estate officers, probate court, private clients and family members who may be responsible for the dispersal of estates and collections. Let professionals document your collection with accurate values and descriptions. We will work closely with you to ensure that your wishes are established at agreed upon terms and conditions now, to make it easier to administer your estate later.

Please contact Gary or Jon to discuss our Collection Planning Program today.

With several options, we make it easy for you to reach us: Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 • St. Michaels MD 21663 (410) 745-0485 • (410) 745-0487 fax decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com Jon Deeter 7980 Darbys Run • Chagrin Falls OH 44023 (440) 610-1768 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com For more information, visit our website: www.guyetteanddeeter.com


“Calling The Wild is a

fascinating and well -researched exploration of the history of the duck call in Arkansas and a tribute to the innovation and craftsmanship of the state’s callmakers.”

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Cheif Executive Officer, Ducks Unlimited Memphis | New Orleans


Spring Ritual

Lou Pasqua

Under the Open Sky

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NORTH AMERICAN

Vintage Decoy & Sporting Collectibles Show • The The largest largest decoy decoy aand nd sporting collectibles show sh how Pheasant Run Resort in North America – ST. CHARLES, IL – • Room-to-Room Trading • Guyette & Deeter Auction • MegaCenter Dealer Show • Exhibit of work by Pat Gregory • Stoughton, WI Decoy Display • Chautauqua Fish Display • And much more!

APRIL 24-28, 2018 Sponsored by the Midwest Decoy Collectors ors Assn.

For information on daily events, booking oking rooms, and reserving selling tables go to

midwestdecoy.org

OR CALL

586-530-6586


JJ


JJ


Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art

Glimpse the beauty of wildfowl from around the world

Gallery Hours: Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday: Noon-5 p.m. Members enjoy free admission 909 S. Schumaker Drive, Salisbury, MD 21804 410-742-4988

WARDMUSEUM.ORG

Ira Hudson Duck Family

The Museum features the world’s largest and finest public collection of decorative and antique decoys Join as a member, make a donation or plan a legacy gift today! Contact Executive Director Lora Bottinelli at 410-742-4988, Ext. 111


CONDITIONS OF SALE ‑- PLEASE READ 1.

GUARANTEE ‑ We have made a consistent effort in correctly cataloging and describing the property to be sold. The decoys and paintings have guaranteed condition reports. Should the need arise, the auctioneer reserves the right to make verbal corrections and provide additional information from the block, at the time of the sale. Absentee bids will not be executed on items that are found to be other than described in the catalog. Since opinions can differ, particularly in the matter of condition, the auctioneer will be sole judge in the matter of refunds. 2. DURATION OF GUARANTEE ‑ Request for refund for items purchased IN PERSON at the auction must be made within 3 days of the sale. If you are an absentee or phone bidder it is your responsibility to examine the lot immediately upon receipt. On items purchased absentee or online, the guarantee will end 3 days from the date of delivery. Therefore, all guarantees on items purchased will become null and void 7 calendar days from the date of shipment. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT IF YOU PAY LATE, YOU WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE GUARANTEE. Payment must be postmarked no later than 30 days after the auction. 3. PROTESTED BIDS‑ In the case of a disputed bid, the auctioneer is the sole determinant as to who the successful bidder is, and at his discretion, may reoffer and resell the article in dispute. If a dispute arises after the sale, the auctioneer’s sales records shall be conclusive as to who the purchaser was, and the purchase price. 4. BIDDING- Bidding usually starts below the low estimate and advances in increments of approximately 10% of the opening bid subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right, at his sole discretion, to refuse any bids that he deems unreasonable. The minimum bid increment guideline is as follows: $500 to $1000 - $25 $10,000 to $20,000 - $500 $100,000 and above - $2,000 $1000 to $10,000 - $100 $20,000 to $100,000 - $1,000 5. ABSENTEE BIDS‑ Phone or mail bids, at the discretion of the Auctioneer, will be accepted with a 20% deposit. In such case, the bookkeeper will execute such bids competitively. Absentee bids are executed by the bookkeeper on behalf of the bidder in accordance with the bid increment policy shown above. Please review the rules governing both absentee and phone bids in the back of the catalog. 6. TERMS‑ All items are to be paid for in U.S. funds at the day of the auction. No items will be released until they are paid for. Those who have not established an account with us and wish to pay by check, must do so prior to the beginning of the auction, by presenting a current letter of reference from their bank, or by providing references, that are suitable to the Auctioneer. The Auctioneer reserves the right to hold merchandise purchased by personal check, until the check has cleared the bank. Phone and absentee bidders ‑ You will be notified one week after the auction of your bids/results. PAYMENT IS DUE UPON RECEIPT. A late charge will be accessed on all balances not paid, at the rate of 12% A.P.R. commencing 30 days after the auction. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. Guyette & Deeter will not carry insurance on items that are not paid for within 35 days of the auction. Also, the auctioneer may retain and/or recover the deposit specified as liquidated damages. In addition, the property can be resold at public or private sale without further notice. Any deficiency resulting from such resale shall be paid to the auctioneer by the defaulting buyer, together with all charges, fees, and expenses incurred by such resale, or the enforcement of the obligation hereunder. Buyer agrees to pay all charges and expenses incurred by reason of any breach of the Terms and Conditions of sale, including without limitation, reasonable attorney fees. 7. PAYMENT FOR PURCHASES MAY BE MADE WITH VISA , MASTERCARD, CASH, CHECK, OR WIRE TRANSFER. 8. BUYERS PREMIUM- The buyer’s premium, assessed on each selling lot, is 15% of the hammer price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 10% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. For payments made using Visa or MasterCard, the buyer’s premium is 18% up to and including $1,000,000, plus 13% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. 9. TAX ‑ THERE IS A 6% SALES TAX IN MARYLAND. Tax is waived if buyer presents a valid resale certificate from any state or has purchases shipped out of Maryland. 10. ACCEPTANCE OF CONDITIONS ‑ Bidding on any articles in this catalog indicates your acceptance of all the above items. 11. BIDDING AGENT RESPONSIBILITY ‑ If you are registering for someone or if you execute a bid for someone else under your number, you are responsible for the settlement of that account. You are also responsible for examining the decoy(s) for your client regarding the guarantee. 12. WITHDRAWAL ‑ We reserve the right to withdraw any property before the sale and shall have no liability whatsoever for such withdrawal. 13. TITLE ‑ Title passes upon the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer. It will then be the responsibility of the buyer to make full payment prior to removing the goods from the premises. Removal is at both the buyer’s risk and expense, and must be made at the conclusion of the sale, unless other arrangements are made with the Guyette & Deeter staff. Any lots we might make arrangements for moving or storing are solely at the risk of the owner, and any damage or loss occurring after the fall of the hammer becomes that of the buyer. 14. LEGAL DISPUTE ‑ Any legal disputes arising from this auction shall be settled in the court system of the State of Maine. UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE - The Maine Uniform Commercial Code, Title II, Section 2328 applies to this auction. 15. All calls are sold “As Is”. THE OFFICE WILL NOT BE OPEN UNTIL NOVEMBER 14 AFTER THE AUCTION.


ABSENTEE, PHONE, AND ONLINE BIDS 1. Absentee bids are a service provided to our customers free of charge. Every effort is made to execute all absentee bids, however, in the event of an error of omission, or failure to properly execute absentee bids, the Auctioneer shall not be held liable. 2. All absentee bids must be accompanied by a 20% deposit, which will be refunded immediately after the auction if your bid is unsuccessful. If your bid is successful, the deposit will be applied to the purchase price and the balance due upon presentation of your bill. All absentee bidders are notified by mail, whether successful or unsuccessful. 3. Phone, absentee, and online bidders cannot pick up items at the auction (unless arrangements are made in advance) because it is assumed they are not present, and those items are packed and put on the truck after the hammer falls. Online bidder invoices cannot be calculated at auction. 4. Visa and Mastercard numbers can be given in place of a check deposit, if your bid is submitted by phone. Your card number will not be used to make payments for purchases, it is only used as collateral. Your card number will only be used to make payment for purchases if you default on payment. 5. To execute an absentee bid, fill out the enclosed form, listing catalog number, description and your top bid price (not including the 15% buyer’s premium). Send this together with your deposit as soon as possible. If your bids are sent seven days or less prior to the auction, you should call our office three days prior to the auction, to confirm that we have received your bids. If they have not been received at that point in time, we will take your bid over the phone. We cannot guarantee that bids received after the auction has started will be executed. 6. If two or more bids are received on the same item from different people, the bidding will open at the next logical raise above the second highest bid. If two absentee bids are received with the exact same amount, the first one received will take precedence. 7. All bids must be in even dollar amounts. Bids in fractions of dollars will be considered the next lower even dollar amount. 8. Bid increments: The bid increment policy, which also applies to both absentee and phone bidders, is listed under “CONDITIONS OF SALE” (item #4), in the front of the catalog. 9. Open bids, bids with no set top amount, or orders to just simply buy the lot, cannot be accepted. You must have a definite top limit before we can execute your bid. Alternatives to this are as follows: a. To bid over the telephone. This can be done by simply sending a 20% deposit for what you wish to bid on the object. This will bind whatever bid amount you wish to bid over the telephone. (NOTE: There are only 8 phone lines into the auction room and phone bids will be handled on a first come, first serve basis.) b. Some bidders concerned that a lot might just go for one bid above their top limit, leave a top bid plus one bid. This works as follows: the top bid submitted might be $1,000, but not wishing to lose the lot for simply $25 more, the party might bid $1,000 + 1 bid if they definitely don’t want to go over a certain price, they would indicate $1,000 +1 ($1,025) (NOTE: One possible problem that occasionally arises with absentee bids is when someone in the audience bids exactly the amount, which you specify is your limit. In such a case, we would not go one extra bid unless your bid sheet indicates “plus one” bid.). 10. If you are a successful bidder, a bill will be sent one week after the auction. Purchasers should indicate their desired method of shipment, if such is necessary. There is a charge for shipping, labor, materials, and insurance. Shipping is done on a first come, first serve basis, and can take up to 4 weeks. Please note that a certified check, Visa, Mastercard, or any other form of guaranteed funds will expedite shipping. 11. According to UPS regulations, we must now crate all paintings. In addition, for expensive oil paintings and delicate carvings, we need a written statement from the purchaser, assuming the responsibility of pursuing any claims, in the event of damage incurred during shipping. Valuable lots need to be sent 2 day air UPS due to values. Under no circumstances will we be liable for damage to glass or frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of cause. 12. TERMS — Phone and absentee bidders — You will be notified one week after the auction of your results. Online bidders will receive an invoice by email to the email address registered with their Invaluable or Ebay account. Payment is due upon receipt. Interest will be charged on all balances not paid within 30 days after the bill is sent at the rate of 12% APR. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. If an account is 75 days overdue, the items may be returned to the consignor and overdue buyer will pay the buyers premium and commission from the sale, if they wish to participate in future Guyette and Deeter auctions. 13. Bidding on any article(s) indicates your acceptance of these terms above. 14. If you would like any additional information on any of the lots, please contact: Gary Guyette at (410) 745-0485 or Jon Deeter at (440) 610-1768. nd

If you have any questions concerning absentee bids, please call us.


OFFICE: OFFICE:

ABSENTEE AND PHONE BID FORM

POBox Box1170 1170 PO St. Michaels, MD 21663 St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 410-745-0485 Fax410-745-0487 410-745-0487 Fax decoys@guyetteandschmidt.com decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

OFFICE USE ONLY TIME DATE OF BID AUCTION DATE MANAGER ABSENTEE OR PHONE BID

NAME ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

TELEPHONE DEPOSIT $

(Check Amount or Visa or MasterCard # & Exp.)

IIdesire following items in the sale.sale. The The bids bids are toare be to executed by Guyette & Deeter, up to but desiretotobid bidononthe the following items in the executed by Guyette & Schmidt, Inc.,not upexceeding to but notthe amount(s) on the below bids.on Allthe bidsbelow will be executed and will accepted subject to theaccepted Terms ofsubject Sale andtoAbsentee Bids exceedingspecified the amount(s) specified bids. All bids be executed and the Terms of Procedure outlined inBids the catalog. (Please be sure you understand before using thisour Absentee and Phone Sale and Absentee Procedure outlined in that the catalog. (Pleaseour be procedures sure that you understand procedures before Bid Form.) will not open until Wednesday after using this Office Absentee andbe Phone Bid Form.) Office willthe notauction. be open until Wednesday after the auction.

Signature A PREMIUM OF 15% WILL BE APPLIED TO ALL ITEMS SOLD, TO BE PAID BY THE BUYER OFFICE USE

IN CATALOG # ORDER

DESCRIPTION

A SECOND PAGE IS PROVIDED ON BACK SHOULD YOU REQUIRE ADDITIONAL SPACE TOTAL BIDS $

x 20%

EQUALS DEPOSIT ENCLOSED $

BID AMOUNT


Page 2

NAME OFFICE USE

PHONE IN CATALOG # ORDER

AUCTION DATE DESCRIPTION

BID AMOUNT


71

81

337

111

136


G u y e t te & Deeter, Inc. PO Box 1170, St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 | www.guyetteanddeeter.com

North American Decoys at Auction November 9, 2017  

Guyette & Deeter, Inc.'s annual Fall decoy and sporting art auction held in Easton, Maryland in conjunction with the Easton Waterfowl Festiv...