Page 1

Guyette & Deeter, Inc. North American Decoys At Auction July 25 & 26, 2017


387

121

141

117

397


Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

North American Decoys At Auction Sheraton Harborside Hotel 250 Market Street Portsmouth, New Hampshire 603-431-2300 50 Table Buy, Sell, Swap July 24, 25 & 26

Monday, July 24, 2017

Preview 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Join us for complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 Preview 8:00 AM - 10:45 AM Auction 11:00 AM

Wednesday, July 26, 2017 Preview 8:00 AM - 9:45 AM Auction 10:00 AM

For questions during the auction, call 410-745-0485.

Catalog $45. Out of Country $54 Absentee, Phone & Online Bidding accepted call 410-745-0485 for arrangements For Free Decoy Appraisal Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416


Important Notices: ■ Unofficial prices realized information will be available five business days after the auction. Official prices realized list will be available online approximately two weeks after the auction. ■ If you would like to consign decoys to our next auction, please contact; Gary Guyette 410-745-0485 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com or Jon Deeter 440-543-1416 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com. Free appraisals are available with no obligation to consign and all correspondences are strictly confidential. ■ For delicate carvings, a written statement from the purchaser assuming responsibility for pursuing any claims in the event of any damage incurred during shipping is required, these items are marked *. Under no circumstances will we be responsible for damage to glass, frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of the cause. ■ Auctioneer James D. Julia, Fairfield, Maine. ■ Stands are not included with the decoys or weather vanes unless specified in catalog. Plexiglass cases are not included with shotgun shell boxes. ■ No Sales Tax. ■ All duck calls have condition reports, but are sold “As Is”. ■ Trade Up Program - A limited numer of decoy purchases may be paid

for by consigning decoys to the next Guyette & Deeter. auction. Ask Gary or Jon for Details. Guyette & Deeter Harbor Cruise

Portsmouth Harbor Cruises - July 25 at 5:15 pm Guyette & Deeter will be hosting a harbor cruise for auction attendees who are staying at the Sheraton. The cruise departs at 5:15 and returns at 6:30. Cash bar will be provided. Space is limited! Only 49 passenger capacity. Call Guyette & Deeter at 410-745-0485 and reserve your complimentary ticket.

UPCOMING GUYETTE & DEETER, INC. DECOY AUCTIONS November 8 & 9, 2017

Talbot County Community Center Easton, Maryland

In Conjunction with the Easton Waterfowl Festival Featuring the collection of Sam Dyke 50 Dealer buy, Sell, swap.

February 2018

Marriott Hotel Charleston, South Carolina In Conjunction with the Southeastern Wildlife Expo To consign, Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-610-1768

We are fortunate to have Robert J. Koenke on staff as our Sporting & Wildlife Art expert. Feel free to contact him for an appraisal or consignment to one of our auctions: 410-758-1644, rjkoenke@verizon.net


Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

Dale & Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 Tel: 410-745-0485 Fax: 410-745-0487 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

Jon & Leigh Ann Deeter 7980 Darbys Run Chagrin Falls, OH 44023 Tel: 440-610-1768 Fax: 440-543-5405 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com

Zac Cote Online auction manager & Photography Freeport, Maine Tel: 410-253-8616 zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

Mike Stevenson Graphic Designer & Website Developer St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 michael@guyetteanddeeter.com

Bill Lapointe 344 Dillon Lane Swansea, Massachusetts 774-644-9426 toller2@aol.com We are pleased to announce Bill Lapointe as the newest member of the Guyette & Deeter organization. Bill will be focusing his efforts in the New York and New England area. He will also represent our company at decoy shows and our four live auctions each year. Bill has shown tremendous responsibility over the last 12 years working closely with Ted and Judy Harmon at Decoys Unlimited. He is a longtime decoy collector whose specialty is New England decoys with a focus on the Massachusetts south coast. Bill will immediately be available to discuss consignments for future live auctions or our online sales, as well as appraisals. We are confident that Bill will be an asset to both our company and our clients. Please feel free to contact Bill at any time to congratulate him on his new position.

Ed Kenney Merchandise Manager & Shipping St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 shipping@guyetteanddeeter.com

Lynda Brooks Office Manager St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 lynda@guyetteanddeeter.com

Denise Jarrell

Bookkeeper St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 billing@guyetteanddeeter.com


©Ducks unlimiteD canaDa

Brown collection to be sold by Guyette & Deeter, Inc. in 2017 - 2018 auctions

Above: Ducks Unlimited Canada’s (DUC) former national planned giving manager Lloyd Derry with Peter Brown (right), who donated a portion of his extensive antique decoy collection to DUC.

The tale of a consummate collector

P

eter Brown will never forget the first time he opened a box of antique Canadian waterfowl decoys. They’d been sent to him by decoy collector Bruce Malcolm, who, along with renowned carver Ron Gruber, thought Brown might be interested in a collection of his own as an investment. That was back in the 1980s. Brown, a Vancouver, B.C., businessman, had already acquired important artwork by Group of Seven and Haida artists. He had other collections, too. But hand carved decoys were different. “I’d never seen a great decoy before, and I thought: these are really something,” says Brown. “There’s no question they were works of art.” Brown was hooked. “As I got more interested, I thought it would be fun to put together the definitive collection of Canadian birds, pursue each of the great carvers and try to get

as many of the species that they made that I could. We ended up with a few thousand birds.” Drawing from sheds, boat houses, duck clubs and collections across Canada, over time, Brown would work with Malcolm and others to amass the remarkable collection of decoys ranging from mint condition to gunning repaints. “Peter liked all decoys, not just the best ones,” says Malcolm. “He had a passion for them. It was not about investment and money. He would interrupt a board meeting or stock trading session to take my call about a possible new acquisition.” “He had a powerful, positive influence on Canadian decoy collecting in the 1980s.”

ZZZ Now, at the age of 75, Brown has taken the unprecedented step of divesting his decades-long pursuit. In May, he donated 1,000 antique duck, geese and


“This is a rare opportunity for DU supporters, waterfowlers, folk art collectors and decoy enthusiasts to acquire a historical, important waterfowl hunting artifact while supporting DUC and its mission.” – bruce malcolm

From Ducks Unlimited Canada’s conservator magazine, fall 2016.

shorebird decoys, appraised at $1.5 million, to Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC). In turn, DUC is offering the majority of the collection to the public through auction by Guyette & Deeter, Inc., the world’s largest decoy auction firm based in Maryland. DUC will be the beneficiary of net proceeds from the sale. The majority of the decoys will be sold beginning April 2017, however, some are now being offered on Guyette & Deeter’s weekly online auctions at decoys forsale.com. Most of the birds are working decoys carved in the late 1800s and early 1900s, including a pair of Fernland pintails appraised at $260,000. “This is a rare opportunity for DU supporters, waterfowlers, folk art collectors and decoy enthusiasts to acquire a historical, important waterfowl hunting artifact while supporting DUC and its mission,” says Malcolm. “There are wonderful core decoys in the Brown/DUC collection: high value, sought-after decoys by all of the important Canadian makers. In addition, there are a large number of lesser known, well-carved decoys that are very collectible and offer great value.” “They’re beautiful things,” says Brown. “I was happy to have them. A collection like that will likely never happen again.”

ZZZ At Brown’s request, a portion of the collection will remain in Canada and displayed periodically at the Oak Hammock Marsh Interpretive Centre in Manitoba, site of DUC’s national office. That display

will be dedicated to Brown’s late long-time friend and best man,William McLallen Jr., who was a “phenomenal duck hunter and outdoorsman,” says Brown. “It took three days for DUC and Guyette & Deeter staff to pack, appraise and photograph the donated decoys at Mr. Brown’s home.” says DUC’s former national manager of planned giving Lloyd Derry, who spent months working on the logistics of acquiring and selling the collection. Derry, who retired in December 2016, adds “It was a nice but challenging way to end my career.”

ZZZ Malcolm, a DUC supporter, avid waterfowl hunter and decoy collector who lives on the north shore of Lake Erie in Norfolk County, Ont., says Brown’s generous gift is a perfect tribute to Canada’s – and DUC’s – waterfowling heritage. “Many extensive DUC projects exist where these decoys were used over the years,” says Malcolm. “Places like Ontario’s Lake St. Clair, Rondeau Bay, Turkey Point and Long Point and Prince Edward County and throughout Quebec, the Maritimes and B.C.’s Fraser Delta.” “I find it ironic that a group of decoys collected from coast to coast arrive in Vancouver, stay for 25-plus years, migrate en masse to Manitoba, ‘stage’ and are now about to redistribute throughout North America to people who will again admire and cherish them. Many will no doubt end up in homes in Canadian waterfowling areas where they were originally created and used, thanks to DUC and Peter Brown.”


Featuring Decoys From The Collections Of: Jim Andrews Ellen & Doug Miller Jim Barthe Harold O’Connor Dwight Belanger Carl Olson William Berry & Pat Kalinsky Denny Tracey Peter Brown Vinal Collection Gene Carr Private New Jersey Collection

Carl Olson Carl Olson lived on Seneca Lake in upstate New York. He was a duck and goose hunter, and a gold member of Ducks Unlimited. He collected Mason Factory, Ontario, and New York State decoys beginning around 1990. Carl was a regular at the Clayton Show and the Midwest Decoy Collector’s Show, and a board member of the Finger Lakes of Western New York Wildlife Association. He also was a 2016 DU sponsor in perpetuity, a member of the Delta Waterfowl Foundation and both the Seneca and Canandiagua Duck Hunters Association. Carl was a supporter of the friends of Montezuma and the Queen Catherine Swamp Refuge. Since Carl lived on Seneca Lake for so many years he was considered a local historian, and people came to him with questions about the history of the area and about decoys. Every spring and fall he would take his family to the nearby Montezuma Wildlife Refuge to watch the migrating waterfowl.


William Berry & Pat Kalinsky Bill Berry and Pat Kalinsky were regulars at the Richard Bourne, Richard Oliver, and the Julia & Guyette/Guyette & Schmidt decoy auctions from the mid 1980s through the mid 2000s, as well as the Easton Waterfowl Festival. They always came together and it obvious that they were there to enjoy the event, as much to purchase decoys for their collection. Their decoys were stunningly displayed on custom built cupboards in the living room and study of their home on a hill overlooking the Potomac River near Leesburg.

Doug and Ellen Miller Doug and Ellen Miller rapidly fell in love with the art form of decorative bird carving. Collecting the bird sculptures became their passion and obsession. For over forty years they have continued to support artists and events, all the while watching the art of decorative bird carving grow in popularity and complexity. The Millers have collected over 3,000 works by over two hundred of the most successful and talented bird carvers working in the United States. Mostly acquired during the last quarter of the twentieth century, their collection is an excellent document or study of the development of an art form over five decades. Kenneth A. Basile, First and now retired Director of the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD


Artfact is Now Invaluable

Online Bidding Through Invaluable Bidding through Invaluable.com features real time competitive bidding straight from the auction.

To bid using Invaluable: • Go to the Guyette & Deeter website and click on the Invaluable link below upcoming auctions. • Once on Invaluable’s website, click on the Create Account button on the top right navigation bar. It’s free and only takes a few minutes. • Create your own username and password, along with your email address so Invaluable can send you important information. • Input your information. On the following page, Invaluable will ask you for your interests. • Now that you are a member of Invaluable, not only can you browse and bid on our auctions, but you have access to all of Invaluable’s other auctions.

*Winning bids will be subject to a 5% Invaluable fee

Guyette & Deeter Online Auctions

Ben Schmidt - $2,300 Sold!

Sculptural Ontario Canvasback $1,214 Sold!

We e k ly O nline Au c t ions End ing E ve r y T hu r sd ay N ig ht G u a r a nt eed co n d i t i o n re p o r t s , m ul t i p l e p hot os , q u i ck s h i p p i n g , g reat d eal s o n q ual i t y i te m s Elmer Crowell - $1,667 Sold!

Herb Miller - $1,265 Sold!

For questions, contact: 410-253-8616

zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

PO Box 159, Freeport, Maine 04032 www.decoysforsale.com

Recent Sales


Session One

Miniatures by Elmer Crowell 1 - 12 13 - 15 Pacific Coast 16 - 25 Mark McNair 26 - 33 New Jersey Shorebirds Ontario 34 - 48 49 - 60 Fish 61 - 64 Bronze Sculptures 65 - 79 New Jersey 80 - 87 Jim Schmiedlin 88 - 92 New England 93 - 109 Maritime Canada Elmer Crowell 110 - 115 Sporting Art 116 - 124 Maine 125 - 140 Midwest 141 - 151 Shorebirds 152 - 160 Miniatures 161 - 171 Mason Decoy Factory 172 - 187 Sporting Art 188 - 200 Shorebirds 201 - 211 Contemporary 212 - 227 New York State 228 - 241 Elmer Crowell Decoratives 242 - 243 Miniatures by Elmer Crowell 244 - 256 Canada 257 - 284 Advertisements & Duck Calls 285 - 299 Delaware River & New Jersey 300 - 328 Contemporary 329 - 348

Session Two

Decoratives 349 - 373 New Jersey Shorebirds 374 - 381 Ontario 382 - 394 Joseph Lincoln 395 - 397 Miniatures 398 - 415 Midwest 416 - 428 Mason Shorebirds 429 - 437 Ward Brothers 438 - 446 Canada 447 - 453 Miscellaneous Decoys 454 - 458 Elmer Crowell 459 - 465 Items of Interest 466 - 482 Shorebirds 483 - 500 Virginia 501 - 505 Massachusetts 506 - 523 Ward Brothers 524 - 537 Factory 538 - 547 Maryland 548 - 554J Sink Box Decoys 555 - 560

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 11:00 AM Lots 1 - 348

Wednesday, July 26, 2017 10:00 AM Lots 349 - 560

Please read conditions of sale in the back of catalog


SESSION ONE

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 - 11:00 am

Miniatures by Elmer Crowell 1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts

1

10


1 Detail

1.

Extremely rare miniature flying black duck on wooden base, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside of the base. Quite large, with 8” wing span. Fluted tail, carved feet, and extremely fine paint detail.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Hampshire.

From a home in Exeter, New (10,000 - 14,000)

1 Detail

11


2

3

4

5

6 2.

Pair of miniature redheads, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s circular ink stamp is under the bases.  Reglued bill crack with touchup on drake, otherwise very good and original. (2,500 - 3,000)

5.

Very rare miniature shoveler drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Old label with numeral “25” written on the underside of base.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

3.

Larger than average size pair of miniature mallards, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Both have Crowell’s circular ink stamp on the base.  Excellent and original. (2,750 - 3,250)

6.

Very rare miniature scoter hen and drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Both are identified on underside of bases and hen has traces of round ink stamp.  Very good and original.

4.

Very rare miniature eider drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Identified on the underside of the base.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of David and Andi Fischer. (2,000 - 3,000)

12

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of David and Andi Fischer. (5,000 - 7,000)


7

8

9

10

11

12

7.

Rare miniature surf scoter, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s paper label is on the underside.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

8.

Miniature blue jay, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  An early pre stamp carving. Identified under the base. Fairly large, approximately 4” long.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

9.

Early miniature American merganser drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Identified on the underside of the base. Traces of Crowell’s ink stamp under the base. In unusual pose, with head reared back.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

10.

Early miniature Canada goose, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Identified under the base. Unusual pose with reared back head.  Professional repair to a neck crack and a bill chip, otherwise original and good. (2,000 - 3,000)

11.

Running spotted sandpiper, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.    Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

12.

Miniature sanderling, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.    Very good and original. (2,250 - 2,750)

13


Pacific Coast John G. Tornberg

1902 - 1971 San Francisco, California

John Thornberg was a successful businessman who eventually opened a metal scrap business in the Marina District of San Francisco in the 1930s. Thornberg was a charter member of the Corinthian Yacht Club and cofounder of the San Francisco Small Boat Racing Association. It is believed that while in San Francisco, he made his “classic� style decoys for which he is so well known. The hollow feeding chip carved pintails and this, possibly unique, chipped carved shoveler hen. To this date, no other Thornberg shovelers have been found.

John G. Tornberg after a good days upland game hunt. Photo courtesy of Wildfowl decoys of California, Mike Miller.

13 Detail

14


13

13.

Exceedingly rare shoveler hen, John G. Tornberg, San Francisco, California, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Layered feather carving at wings.  Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of California,” Mike Miller, p. 370, exact decoy (8,000 - 12,000)

15


14

14.

Hollow carved greenwing teal attributed to D. Davidson, near San Pablo Bay, California.  “C.B.” is painted on the underside.  Original paint with some shrinkage and wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson. (1,000 - 1,400)

Richard Ludwig “Fresh Air Dick” Janson, California’s greatest decoy carver, proudly displaying a full bag of canvasbacks and pintails on his ark moored on Sonoma Creek near its confluence with San Pablo Bay, ca. 1920. Note the drake pintail decoy on the deck in the back peeking out from behind the nail barrel. Photo courtesy “Wildfowl Decoys of California,” Mike Miller.

16


Richard Janson

1872 - 1951 Sonoma Creek, California

15

15 Detail

15 Detail

15.

Very rare rigmate pair of bluebills, Richard Janson, Sonoma Creek, California.  Both have built in skegs under the tail and relief wingtip carving. Three feather wingtips are very refined.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents; white lines at speculums have been professionally strengthened; professional touchup at various spots on decoys, mostly on skegs.

Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of California,” Mike Miller . “The Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor p. 266, exact decoys pictured. (8,000 - 12,000) 17


Mark McNair

Craddockville, Virginia

16

17

18

19

20

21

16.

Sleeping widgeon drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Well sculpted breast and neck.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

17.

Preening merganser hen, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Relief wing carving. Inlet head that is doweled in to the body.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (1,250 - 1,750)

18.

18

Large, hollow carved bufflehead drake in the style of Nathan Cobb, Jr., Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Signed. Inlet head and raised “V” wingtip carving. Original paint that has been aged. Provenance: Carr collection.

(950 - 1,250)

19.

Ruddy duck carved in style of Lee Dudley, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  “M” carved under the tail.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good.

Provenance: Carr collection.

20.

Hooded merganser drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Slightly turned head.  Original paint that has been aged; small dent in edge of crest.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Jack Connover. Connover collection stamp in underside. (800 - 1,200)

(900 - 1,200)

21. Ringbill drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Made for mounting on wall. Signed. Inscription on back “For Ducks Unlimited Virginia 1994, Mark McNair.”  Very good and original. (350 - 450)


22. Hollow loon carved in the Maine tradition with inlet head and relief wing carving, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Inserted bottom board.  Original paint that has been aged; crack in bottom board.

Provenance: Carr collection. (1,750 - 2,250)

22

23.

Large harlequin duck carved in the style of George May, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good.

Provenance: Carr collection. (1,750 - 2,250)

23 24. Large Canada goose, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.   Signed “McNair,” as well as “Waterfowl USA 6/3/89 O’Connor.” “1987” is stamped in the weight.  Original paint that has been aged; thin crack in underside.

Provenance: Carr collection. (2,000 - 2,500)

24 25.

Large eider drake with mussel in mouth, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Relief wing tip carving and inlet head.  Original paint that has been aged; small crack at part of neck inlet.

Provenance: Carr collection. (2,000 - 2,500)

25 19


New Jersey Shorebirds Daniel Lake Leeds 1852 - 1922 Pleasantville, New Jersey

Although a few duck decoys have been ascribed to him, Daniel Leeds concentrated his carving efforts primarily on shorebirds. James Doherty, in his “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” places him among the best of the New Jersey makers and classifies him as an important first generation carver meaning the bulk, if not all, of his carvings were created during the heyday of market gunning and well before the ultimate banning of all shorebird hunting for sport. He has been described in multiple references as a bayman and gunner but a review of the census records suggest that he may have also worked (at least occasionally) as a carpenter – a trade that would certainly give him View of Lake’s bay at Pleasantville, NJ c. 1880

the skills needed to sculpt his delightful shorebirds. His style of carving differed from the normal New Jersey carving tradition and would be considered rare by New Jersey standards. Robert Shaw, in his “Bird Decoys of North America,” notes that “all of (his shorebirds) have raised wing carvings, split tails and detailed paint patterns.” He further states that “the intricate lines that delineate his plumage are unmatched among New Jersey carvers.” Although he carved a number of different shorebird species, “his classic curlews are considered to be one of the most pleasing curlews made in South Jersey”

View of the old oyster wharf at Pleasantville, NJ c. 1880

(“Shorebirds: the Birds, the Hunters, the Decoys,” Levinson and Headley”). Examples such as the one offered today are represented in some of the best collections in the country.

26 Detail

20


26 Detail

26

26. Classic curlew, Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving with feather paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear, mostly on the bill.

Literature: “The Art of the Decoy,” Adele Earnest, p. 54. (13,000 - 16,000)

21


27 Detail

27

27 Detail

22

27.

Rare robin snipe in spring breeding plumage, Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and wide beetle head style.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on one wing; very slight roughness to tip of tail; bill is a professional replacement by Russ Allen.

Provenance: Decoy has been in the Leeds Family until recently. (9,000 - 12,000)


28 Detail

28

28.

Curlew attributed to a member of the Leeds, Family, Pleasantville, New Jersey.   Tack eyes. “DH” is carved under the tail for Daniel Horn, Oceanville, New Jersey.  Original paint with minor wear with subtle feather painting; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Daniel Horn, Oceanville, New Jersey

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (9,500 - 12,500)

28 Detail

23


29

30

30 Detail

29 Detail

29.

Black bellied plover, Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving.  Original paint with minor wear; small amount of touch up to worn areas on top of bill and face, near bill; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: From the estate of Dwight Belanger. (7,500 - 10,000)

24

30.

Rare sandpiper, Daniel Lake Leeds, Pleasantville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Fine wet on wet feather paint detail.  Near mint original paint with good patina; bill is a professional replacement by Russ Allen.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (4,000 - 6,000)


32

31

33 Detail

33

31.

Yellowlegs from New Jersey.  Branded “GEW”. Relief wing carving and carved eyes.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; hairline crack partway through head; small area under the tail that was whittled flatter after the decoy was made.

Provenance: From the estate of Dwight Belanger. (1,250 - 1,750) 32.

Yellowlegs, Rhodes Truex, Absecon, New Jersey.  Shoe button eyes.  Original paint with very slight wear; bill is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Private New Jersey collection. (900 - 1,200)

33.

Set of 12 folding tin yellowlegs, Strator and Sohier, Boston, Massachusetts.    Original and good.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of John Hillman. Hillman stamp on box, sticks, and inside of each decoy. (1,000 - 1,400)

25


Ontario

34

35

36

37

38

39

34.

Hollow carved black duck, D.K. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario, 1st quarter 19th century.  Relief wingtip carving.   Original paint with good feather paint detail and minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 119. “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 142. (1,500 - 2,000) 35.

Solid body style black duck, Addie Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Raised carved wingtips and slightly turned head.  Original paint; very minor wear; several tiny dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 118. (1,500 - 2,000) 36.

26

Pair of solid body bluebills, Bob May, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Both have relief wing carving, fluted tails, and comb paint. Drake has slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; a few specs of off white paint on the drake; hen has two shot scars in head. Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

37.

Rare pair of hooded merganser, Ed McNeil, Lansdowne, Ontario.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; numerous dents; a few shot marks.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 150. (1,500 - 2,000) 38.

Hollow carved redhead drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900.    Original paint with minor wear; small dents and shot marks; wear to the wood at the bottom edge of the bottom board.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

39.

Hollow carved lowhead style black duck, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “Pulling, JC, Rirodon” and “S Hendrie”. All St. Clair Flats Shooting Company members.  Worn original paint; a few small dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(1,250 - 1,750)

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 19. (1,200 - 1,500)


George Warin

1830 - 1905 Toronto, Ontario

40

40.

Very rare and early lowhead style canvasback drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1885.  Very thinly hollowed. Branded “AL”.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; several small paint rubs on head and body; one tiny shot mark on head; thin crack in underside.

Provenance: Decoy has been exhibited at the Ward Museum in Salisbury, Maryland and has been awarded 1st prize in the pre 1900 diver category at the Ohio Decoy Collectors and Carvers Association Show. Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, editor, p. 156, exact decoy pictured. (9,500 - 12,500)

40 Detail 27


42

43

45

44

46

47

42.

Canvasback drake, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  “D. Robbins,” is stenciled in the underside.  Original paint with slight wear; wooden keel has been removed taking a thin layer of the bottom board with it.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(800 - 1,200)

43. Two mallard hens, Ken Anger, Ontario.    Very good and original.

Dunnville,

Provenance: Olson collection.

44.

Hollow carved black duck in swimming pose, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original scratch paint with moderate wear; plug in underside was added to fill numerous tie strap nail holes, otherwise structurally good.

(1,500 - 2,500)

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

45.

Pair of black ducks, Mel Hall, Hamilton, Ontario.  Both have relief wing carving. One is in swimming pose, the other in feeding pose.  Original paint with minor wear; tiny dents; small chip missing from one side of feeder’s bill.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates p. 41. (1,000 - 1,400) 46.

Hollow carved canvasback drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “Geo M Hendrie” for St. Clair Flats member George Hendrie.  Appealing old in use repaint with very slight shrinkage and wear.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

47.

Hollow carved bluebill hen, D.K. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Detailed feather carving. Large “H” carved in underside.  Appealing old in use repaint; structurally good.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 123. (900 - 1,200)

28

(1,200 - 1,500)

(1,200 - 1,500)


The son of a hotel owner, William Humphrey lived on the shores of Lake Ontario close to Ashbridges Bay on the Toronto waterfront. His father, James Humphrey, was the proprietor of the Highland Creek Inn where it is believed that William “market gunned” at Ashbridges Bay to supply game for the inn. Humphrey made shore birds and classic “Toronto School Flats Decoys.” Several unused Humphrey decoys were purchased in the late 1980s, including this pair of bluebills, at a small country auction in Southwestern Ontario. Also found were a pair of goldeneye and redheads, a single redhead, and a single canvasback.

48

48. Pair of hollow carved bluebills, Walter Humphrey, Toronto, Ontario.  Finely sculpted with high neck seats and bill tacks. Subtle scratch feather paint on drake.  Very good and original. (7,000 - 9,000)

48 Detail

29


Fish

Frank Kuss (1871-1950) was born in Germany and migrated to the US with his mother and father in 1878. They settled on a farm in St.Clair Shores near Detroit, Michigan where he lived for the next 72 years. He was a farmer who also developed some of the family land by building and selling houses. In the early 1900s, he made his living as a merchant seaman on the Great Lakes, working on board ships transporting coal and iron ore. Kuss was an avid hunter and fisherman who never married. His family members recall him carving whimsical items like chains from one piece of wood, ship models, duck decoys, and fish decoys. His fish decoys were made for his own use. Kuss is one of the earliest identified Lake. St. Clair fish decoy carvers. It is believe that approximately 25 of his fish decoys exist. All known have a slightly curved wood body and tail, metal side fins, and a carved mouth detail

Photo credit: Gary Miller

30


49. Impressive trout fish decoy, Frank Kuss, St. Clair Shores, Michigan, 1871-1950.  11” long. Bold and impressive trout with tack eyes and five metal fins. Carved gill and mouth. Long belly weight and small tuning weight under front gills. Fish is boldly curved for swimming.  Tones of copper, green, and gold transitioning to a white painted belly, which has been strengthened by Kuss a very long time ago, otherwise very good and original. (5,000 - 7,000)

49

50.

50

51.

Pike fish decoy, Frank Kuss, St. Clair Shores, Michigan, 1871-1950.  10 1/2” long. Wide body, five metal fins, numerous metal weights, and glass eyes.  Silver paint has been added to underside otherwise original paint; damage at tail; wear around belly weights on underside. (4,000 - 5,000)

Very rare fish decoy, moon eye shad, Frank Kuss, St. Clair Shores, Michigan, 1871-1950.  6 1/2” long. Wonderful teardrop shape fish with four metal fins, tack eyes, carved mouth and gill.  Strong original paint; damage to tail and area of top of back. (4,000 - 5,000)

51

52

52. Impressive perch fish decoy, Frank Kuss, St. Clair Shores, Michigan, 1871-1950.  Glass eyes with four metal fins, one is missing. 10 1/2” long.  Underside has been strengthened; thick coat of silver paint, rest of body appears to be original; protected by an old coat of varnish; damage to tail and a few rough spots. (3,500 - 4,500) 31


53

54

55

32

53.

Three fish decoys, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.  Two brook trout and one pike. Approximately 7”, 7 1/4”, and 7 3/4” in length. All are tack eyes. Largest trout measures 3/4” wide at the belly.   All three have original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; all three have paint flaking; brook trout has chip reglued at tail. (1,800 - 2,200)

54.

Carved wooden fish plaque of a brown trout, John and Dhuie Tully.  Plaque is approximately 26” long with beveled edge. Fine detail on carving. Inscription reads “Killed June 26 1913 by Gertrude Greville, Willmott.”  Four scrapes ranging from 1/8” by 1/2”, otherwise very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

55.

Carved fish on plaque.  Well executed crappie from Canada. Thousand Island area. Cross hatch carving on body with wooden carved fins. Plaque measures 9” x 15”.  Three fins show signs of inpainting and probably have been broken and reattached. (1,500 - 2,000)


A passage in the US Commission of Fish and Fisheries annual report for 1901: “Within the hut, the spearer plied his trade. He was equipped with artfully crafted fish decoys in the likeness of trout, chubs, suckers, sunfish, or even muskellunge, a hand wrought spear, and a hand gaff.” “The start of spearing season was not unlike the beginning of major sporting seasons today ¬ filled with extensive preparations and high expectations. Fishermen would spend days before the season sharpening their spears and gaffs, carving or repainting decoys, sealing any openings in their fish coops, and, of course, recounting the success of seasons past. For several days prior to the start of the season, horse teams could be seen pulling wagon loads of fish coops to the lake from places like Ellery, Sherman, Gerry, Frewsburg, and even Warren, PA. The coops were hauled to Chautauqua Lake and staged on shore nearest the owner’s favorite spearing locations in preparation for the legal 6 am starting hour. On opening day of the season, the City of Jamestown added additional early morning streetcars, and special rail excursions were added to carry avid spearers to Chautauqua’s shores.” Research and text provided by Fletcher Ward

56 Detail

56 Detail Ice fishing huts on Chautauqua Lake, circa 1900.

56

56.

Very rare 12 1/2” muskie fish decoy, Lake Chautauqua, New York.  Carved gills and glass eyes. Metal fins and leather tail that is delicately carved with fin lines.  Original paint with slight wear on wood; a little more wear on some of the metal fins. (8,000 - 12,000)

33


57.

Wooden carving of a marlin, Byron Bruffee, Medomak, Maine.  Serifed “B” carved in the back. Approximately 37” long with good form and color.   Excellent and original. (950 - 1,250)

57 58. Rare Hans Janner fish decoy, Mt. Clemens, Michigan, circa 1920.  13” long. Metal fins. Tack eyes, carved gills and mouth.  Original and good. (1,200 - 1,500)

58

59

60 34

59

59.

Two carved trout.  Brook trout mounted on wooden plaque by Marty Collins. Plaque measures 22”. Excellent stylized paint and carved fins and is full body, mounted to fancy board. Other trout has wooden fins, measures approximately 18”, unknown maker.    (500 - 600)

60.

Reproduction of an Oscar Peterson 10” tall vase, with carved fish, Reg Birch, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed.  Very good and original. (600 - 900)


Bronze Sculptures

61

62

63

64

61.

Limited edition bronze sculpture of screech owl with mouse, William Koelpin.  Signed and numbered 7/25. Approximately 14” tall.  Very good and original.

63.

Limited edition bronze sculpture of a scaled quail, John Scheeler.  Signed and numbered 5/25. Approximately 11 1/2” long.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

Provenance: Miller collection.

62.

Limited edition bronze sculpture of a merlin, John Scheeler.  Signed and numbered 9/25. Approximately 12” tall.  Very good and original.

64.

Limited edition bronze sculpture of a woodcock, Jim Foote.  Signed and numbered 4/15. Approximately 10” long.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

(2,000 - 3,000)

(2,000 - 3,000)

(2,000 - 3,000)

35


New Jersey

65

66

67

68

69

70

65.

Very rare bufflehead drake, Joe King, Manahawkin, New Jersey, circa 1880.  Good form with well sculpted head and ice dip behind neck.  Appealing old paint with minor wear; rough area on one side of tail.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Jack Conover.

body; small cracks in tail.

Provenance: Purchased by the consignor from John Hillman in 1982. (1,250 - 1,750)

68.

Swimming black duck, Charles McCoy, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa 1900.    Original paint with very slight wear; minor roughness to one edge of tail. (1,250 - 1,750)

69.

Rigmate pair of hollow gunning model pintails, William Cranmer, Beach Haven, New Jersey.  Both have good form with lifted tails. Drake has turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear on hen’s head and bill; small rough spot above one eye. (950 - 1,250)

70.

Pair of hollow carved gadwalls, William Cranmer, Beach Haven, New Jersey.  Oversize with slightly turned heads. Signed and dated 1953.   Very slight roughness to edge of hen’s bill; very good original paint. (1,000 - 1,400)

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 146, exact decoy pictured. (1,500 - 2,000) 66.

Swimming brant, attributed to Birdsall Ridgeway, Barnegat, New Jersey.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; structurally good.  

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Davison Hawthorne, Hawthorne collection ink stamp on the weight. (1,250 - 1,750)

67. 36

Redhead drake, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey.    Old in use repaint on black and gray areas of


71

72

71.

Very rare hollow carved Canada goose, John Loveland, Lovelandtown, New Jersey.   Branded “JEL”.  Original paint with minor wear; minor wear to the wood on the tail; thin crack through neck; short hairline crack in tail.

Provenance: Private New Jersey collection.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty Jr, p. 140, exact decoy. (6,000 - 9,000)

72.

Very rare mallard drake, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear on the top half of the decoy; bottom half has a very thin wash of light gray paint that you can see through to the original paint; several cracks from body seam extending around 1 1/2” downward; slight separation at body seam on one side.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (6,000 - 9,000) 37


73

74

73.

Redhead drake, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; lightly hit by shot; thin strip of inpainting at part of body seam; touchup to worn spot on underside; a few small dents. Provenance: Private New Jersey collection.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (3,500 - 5,500) 38

74.

Rare bufflehead drake, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  Branded “SH Vandergrift”.  Original paint with moderate wear; neck crack repair; small dents.

Provenance: Private New Jersey collection. Formerly in the Noyes Museum collection, collection stamp on underside. (4,000 - 6,000)


75.

Very rare special order bluebill hen, Lloyd Parker, Parkertown, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Smaller and flatter than a typical Parker decoy. No ice dip and there is a pad weight on underside. Probably a special order for use on the Delaware River.  Original paint with minor wear; small filled area on back when the decoy was made; professional repair to a chip on one side of the bill.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Fred Ellenberg. Formerly in collection of William J. Mackey, Mackey collection stamp on underside.

75

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p.78, exact decoy. (3,000 - 4,000) 76.

Brant, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey.    A mix of original paint and old overpaint; minor wear on back.

Provenance: Private New Jersey collection.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (3,500 - 4,500)

76 77.

Black duck, Harry M. Shourds, Ocean City, New Jersey.  Subtle loop scratch feather paint.  Original paint with minor wear; some paint loss on small cracks at body seam, mostly at one side.

Provenance: Private New Jersey collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

77 78.

Brant, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Black and gray areas have a second coat of paint; the rest is original with moderate wear; a few small dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

78 39


Harry V. Shourds

1861 - 1920 Tuckerton, New Jersey The major authors that have documented the decoys and carvers of the region have all universally acclaimed Harry V. Shourds to be among the very best of the New Jersey carvers. James Doherty, in his “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” states that “the quality of his works ensures that he will be remembered as one of the best decoy carvers of all time.” Kenneth Gosner, in “Working Decoys of the Jersey Coast and Delaware Valley,” notes that, “his work was of consistently high quality and finish, and of constant pattern.” Henry Fleckenstein, in his seminal “New Jersey Decoys,” adds, “Shourds is one of the acknowledged master makers of New Jersey decoys,” and “his birds are as fine as any made in that state, and are prized collector’s items today.” His design and construction methods evolved to be used in conjunction with the “Barnegat sneak box” style of boat favored by gunners throughout that area. He was a prolific early commercial carver whose work was so popular that it influenced many future carvers and undoubtedly solidified the now famous “New Jersey style.” His mergansers are particularly striking with their classic four combs and well carved bills. They have always been among his most popular decoys with both the hunters and today’s collectors.

Barnegat sneakbox off Tuckerton with decoys

79 Detail

40


79.

Well carved merganser hen, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa 1900.    Bold original paint with with minor discoloration and wear; several tiny dents; short hairline crack at one side of neck base.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (15,000 - 20,000)

79

41


Jim Schmiedlin

1945 - 2015 Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania 80.

Goldeneye drake with open bill, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded, signed, and dated 1989. Carved crossed wingtips and fluted tail. Slightly lifted head.   Original paint with minor wear; slight wear to the wood on one edge of the bill. (3,500 - 4,500)

82.

Pair of early gunning model bluebills, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Both have heads hollowed out from under the chin. Inscription on underside is dated 1979.   Minor wear on underside of hen otherwise very good and original. (3,500 - 5,500)

80

81.

Very rare black bellied tree duck, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Special order, one of two ever made. Inscription on underside states the decoy was made for Louise and Dick Lancaster in 1984. Slightly turned head. Relief carved wingtips.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 5,500)

81

82

83.

Rare fulvous tree duck, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded, signed, and dated 1983. Weighted wooden keel and slightly turned head.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 5,500)

83 42


84.

Goldeneye drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded, signed, and dated 1985. Slightly turned head. Carved crossed wingtips and fluted tail.  Very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

84

85.

Decorative widgeon drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Signed and dated 1981. Slightly turned head. Raised carved wingtips and fluted tail.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

85

86. Bluewing teal hen, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded, signed, and dated 1986. Slightly turned head. Fluted tail.  Very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

86

87. Ring neck drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.   Branded, signed, and dated 1991. Slightly turned head. Detailed wingtip and tail carving.  Original and good. (3,000 - 4,000)

87 43


New England New England decoys are noted for their diversity. Unlike other major waterfowling areas such as the New Jersey shore or the Illinois River, there never emerged a generally accepted school of carving or a particular style. There were small pockets of exception to this such as Stratford, Connecticut, but in the larger picture, individuals felt free to express their own artistry and to carve decoys that met their particular gunning situation and tradition. In addition to this freedom from any convention, carvers understandably chose to create decoys for the species that frequented their local area. Coastal gunners were drawn to the abundance of “sea ducks� that frequented the offshore waters. Scoters were common throughout the region and eiders prevailed in the northern sections. These species obviously drew the most attention from the gunners, but old squaws were often encountered, and they presented very sporting targets. Decoys for them were certainly not the most commonly produced and, in general, any example would have to be considered somewhat of a rarity. Outstanding vintage examples, however, are few and far between and should be considered true treasures.

88 Detail

44


88.

Rigmate pair of old squaw, similar to the work of Steven Bedlam, Dorchester, Massachusetts.  Body surface has been stamped with a checkering tool to simulate feathers.  Original paint with moderate wear; a thin crack in each breast; hairline crack partway through drake’s head; crack in lower side of drake; white areas have early working touchup.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Formerly in the Toothill collection. (8,000 - 12,000)

88

45


Charles Safford

1887 - 1957 Newburyport, Massachusetts This singular sleeping goose is Charlie Safford’s undisputed masterpiece and one of the greatest of all American decoys. Its meticulous craftsmanship and elemental sculptural power place it in a rarified league with the finest of all Massachusetts working goose decoys—the back-preener and its rigmates made by Captain Charles Osgood and in the Shelburne Museum collection; the two hissers and unique sleeper made for the Brayton family by Joseph Lincoln (the sleeper and one of the hissers are currently in the renowned collection of Paul Tudor Jones II); and the three mortised-head geese by an as-yet-unidentified master that were discovered by Adele Earnest and have been treasured and cared for over the years since by such other legendary collectors as Stewart Gregory, Dr. James M. McCleery, Donal C. O’Brien Jr., and Jerry Lauren. While Safford carved a number of other geese, this is his only known sleeper. He did make floating birds, but many of his geese, including this one, were oversized, intended to be screwed onto metal triangles along with rigmates and left in the marsh throughout the hunting season. The majority of the two dozen or so geese he created for his own use have alert, upright heads, but he also carved subtle swimmers and at least one contented bird – its head and neck snuggled down and back into its chest, which is part of the Bertram and Nina Fletcher Little collection at Cogswell’s Grant in Essex, Massachusetts, a property owned by Historic New England.

89

46


89 Detail

Safford’s unique sleeper is all about the complex relationships between its big, powerful body and the elegant curves of its carefully observed, muscular neck pulled up from the right across its chest, its head then turned back laterally so the tip of its bill rests against the carved inside edge of its right wing. True sleepers, with heads that rest on—not arch over—the back of their bodies, are among the rarest of all decoy forms. Only Albert Laing, who carved an extraordinary sleeping swan and several impressive sleeping ducks, left us examples as sculpturally intense and imaginative as this one. Charlie Safford’s name is not nearly as well known as his work warrants, but the strength of this single carving is sufficient to place him in a pantheon that includes the aforementioned names and others familiar to all collectors—including Blair, Bowman, Caines, Cobb, Crowell, Holmes, Shourds, Ward, and Wilson. Safford lived his life on his own terms and devoted more than 30 years to living among, hunting, and, finally, protecting the geese and other game birds of his beloved Plum Island. He knew his birds well. This splendid goose, the pinnacle of Safford’s work as a decoy maker, speaks volumes about his lifelong passion for wild birds and the prodigious talents he brought to portraying them. —Robert Shaw Robert Shaw is the former curator of the Shelburne Museum and the author of North American Bird Decoys: Nature, History and Art, and Call to the Sky: The Decoy Collection of James M. McCleery, M.D.

47


89 Detail

89 Detail

48


89. Important sleeping Canada goose, Charles Safford, Newburyport, Massachusetts.  Oversize with finely sculpted breast, head and neck. Laminated construction. A short section of the top of one wing has been concavely carved to show the bill tip lifting it slightly.  Original paint with minor wear; age split in underside, extending in to lower part of breast; laminated construction with minor separating at some of the seams.

Provenance: Vinal collection.

Literature: “Massachusetts Masters: Ward Museum Wildfowl Art Exhibit,” p. 19, exact decoy pictured. “Bird Decoys of North America,” Robert Shaw, p. 158, exact decoy pictured. “Massachusetts Masterpieces, The Decoys as Art,” Gladys Hopkins, p. 21, exact decoy pictured. Decoy Magazine, May/June 2009, cover photo, exact decoy pictured. (400,000 - 600,000)

Although he is universally acknowledged as creating some of the finest decoys ever to have originated on Massachusetts’ fabled north shore, pitifully, little is known about this talented carver. Charles A. Safford was born in 1877 in the fishing hub of Gloucester, Massachusetts. He was the son of Charles N. and Addie (Pierce) Safford. He lived at 28 Oakland Street in Newburyport and moved to the town of Lynn for the last 15 years of his life. Safford was known as a highly skilled craftsman, working at various times as a cabinetmaker, boat builder, and sculptor. His true passion, however, was wildlife, especially the abundant ducks, geese, and shorebirds to be found amongst the dunes, marsh, and shoreline of neighboring Plum Island. It was here that he maintained a shack and gunning stand at Hale’s cove, and he spent as much time as possible at that location. For a number of years, he worked as a successful market hunter shipping his birds to nearby Boston. Ultimately, beginning in 1934, he became the first caretaker and warden for what was eventually to become a 1,500 acre “Annie Brown Bird Sanctuary” on Plum Island. As a warden, he patrolled the reservation on horseThe Plum Island gunner with a day’s bag. Courtesy of Candace Chapman Erickson

back attempting to protect the birds from what many locals saw as an unnecessary curtailment of their historical hunting rights. He remained in that position until the reservation was purchased from the Audubon Society in 1942 and expanded upon to become today’s 4,662 acre Parker River National Wildlife Refuge (ref: “Plum Island – The Way It Was”). Safford is said to have created a rig or two of geese for his own camp. These were monumental carvings not only in size, but in weight. Individual decoys must have been floated on triangles or similar apparatus. His geese were carved either from a single large section of a log or meticulously assembled from individual pieces of wood. Many of his carvings were in the classic pose, but he did vary the form of individual bird including this masterpiece. The only sleeper in the rig made from 15 pieces of laminated construction. Reference Massachusetts Masterpieces, The Decoy as Art, Gwladys Hopkins.

49


90

90.

Very rare pintail drake, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.    Original paint with moderate wear; several tiny dents; fairly large crack in underside.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Literature: “Joseph Lincoln,” Cap Vinal. (5,000 - 8,000)

90 Detail

50


91

92

91.

Self bailing scoter, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  Branded “Houteau”.  Original paint with slight wear; structurally very good.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. “Joseph Lincoln,” Cap Vinal. (5,000 - 7,000) 92.

Oversize merganser hen from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.  Large wooden crest.  Original paint with minor wear; hollowed out from the underside with a bottom board applied. (4,500 - 6,500)

92 Detail

51


Maritime Canada

93

94

95

96

97

98

93.

Merganser hen, Orren Hiltz, Indian Point, Nova Scotia.  Relief wing carving.  Old in use repaint with moderate wear; tiny chip missing from tip of crest; crack through neck; bill repair. Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 21. (1,000 - 1,400) 94.

Merganser drake, Alfred Murphy, Murphy’s Cove, Nova Scotia.  “ABM” is carved in the underside.  

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 22. (900 - 1,200) 95.

96.

52

Working loon decoy from Nova Scotia, mid 20th century. Original paint; minor wear; some filler that was added to a defect in the wood on the back when the decoy was made has lifted slightly; thin cracks; slight roughness to tip of bill. (500 - 700) Stick up brant, John Brooks, Freeland, Prince Edward Island, 1st quarter 20th century.  Root head construction

with slightly lifted head.  Original paint with minor wear; age split in underside. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 119. (600 - 900) 97.

Rare working Canada goose, Amateur Savoie, Neguac, New Brunswick, circa 1955.  Relief wingtip carving and feather stamping over the body and head.  Most of the decoy has original paint with minor wear protected by an old coat of varnish; the white areas have working touchup; age split in back; wear on underside.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 165, exact decoy pictured. (900 - 1,200) 98.

Very rare hooded merganser drake, John Smith, Barrington, Nova Scotia.  Believed to be one of only two known to exist.  Near mint original paint with an art deco character to it; small amount of filler missing at tail and a thin crack in the breast.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (500 - 800)


Charles F. Jacobs

Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick

99 Detail

99

99.

Rare oversize eider drake, Charles F. Jacobs, Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick.  Branded “CF Jacobs”.  Original paint with minor wear; plug in one side to correct defect in wood when decoy was made.

Provenance: Guyette & Schmidt/Sothebys, January 2000, Dr. James McCleery auction, rigmate to lot 23. Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette.

(5,000 - 7,000)

53


101

100

102

103

104

105

106

100. Eider drake, Jess Obed, Cape Negro, Nova Scotia.  Inlet head and carved eyes.  Paint has been restored in its original style; repair to about 1/2 of the bill.

103. Merganser drake, Irving Tumblin, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.    Old in use repaint; professional bill repair; crack in back; tail chip repair.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (900 - 1,200)

101. Eider hen, Jess Obed, Cape Negro, Nova Scotia, 1st quarter 20th century.  Inlet head, detailed bill carving, and glass eyes.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on head; cracks in underside; hairline crack in one side; beginning of two cracks in other side have been tightened with two small nails; minor touchup on one side of neck and breast.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (1,000 - 1,400) 102. Large merganser hen, Ron Boutlier, Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, last quarter 19th century.    Appealing old repaint on white areas, the rest appears to be original; minor wear; dent in tip of wooden crest; chip missing from one side of tail; small cracks and shot marks.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(650 - 950)

104. Old squaw hen, Jim Zwicker, Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick.    Old in use repaint on the white areas, the rest is original with minor wear; lightly hit by shot.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (400 - 600)

105.

Eider hen, Oscar Crowell, Smithville, Nova Scotia.  “OL Crowell” is carved in the underside. Relief wing carving and fluted tail.  Chip missing from underside where tie strap was attached, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 7. (400 - 600) 106. Stick up root head Canada goose decoy from Ostrea Lake, Nova Scotia.  Made to use with a combo of mud and ice mounded on the shore. Carrying hole at one end.  Original paint with moderate wear; small cracks.

54

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette p. 80. (400 - 600)

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (300 - 400)


107. Very rare rigmate pair of mergansers, Clarence Ernst, Indian Point, Nova Scotia.  Relief wing carving and carved wooden crests.  Original paint with minor wear; protected by a thin original coat of varnish; speculums on hen have old in use touchup; crack through drake’s neck.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased at August 1985 Julia & Guyette auction.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 84, exact decoys pictured. (3,000 - 4,000)

107

108.

Extremely rare swan, Orren Hiltz, Indian Point, Nova Scotia, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Tie strap is attached with square nails.  Old in use repaint; worn to the bare wood in many places; several cracks; professional repair to part of the bill; small amount of termite damage on part of the underside.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Jamie Stalker.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 21, exact decoy. “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, p. 46, exact decoy pictured. (3,000 - 4,000)

108

109. Rare loon decoy, William Raymond Levy, Little Tancook Island, Nova Scotia, circa 1940.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; crack through neck; slight separations at body seams.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 46, exact decoy pictured. (2,000 - 3,000)

109 55


Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts

Elmer Crowell outside his workshop.

110. Redhead drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, circa 1910.  Slightly lifted head and good feather paint detail. Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside.  Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents; small spot of touchup on back; several tiny spots of touchup, including one on the speculum. (18,000 - 22,000)

110 Detail

56


110 Detail

110

57


111

112 Detail

112

111.

Lowhead gunning model goldeneye hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Pre brand.  Original paint with almost no wear; small amount of filler missing from above two nails attaching head to body; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Formerly in the Quandy collection. Quandy collection brand in underside

Literature: “Massachusetts Masters: Ward Museum Exhibit, p. 83, exact decoy pictured. (5,000 - 7,500)

58

112. Early “sleigh” body style black duck, circa 1890s, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Carved crossed wingtips and fluted tail. Slightly turned head. Pre brand.  Original paint with minor wear; faint feathering on body; a few small dents and some wear, mostly at extremities.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(3,500 - 5,500)


113 Detail

113

113 Detail

113. Gunning model goldeneye drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, circa 1910.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside.  Original paint with good patina and very little wear; several paint rubs on each lower side; decoy was never rigged; structurally very good. (12,000 - 15,000) 59


114 Detail

114

114 Detail

114.

60

Wood duck drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Slightly turned head.  Original paint with good detail and patina. (10,000 - 14,000)


115. Canada goose, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside.   Original paint with good detail and minor wear; slight paint shrinkage behind neck; age split in underside.

Literature: “Songless Aviary,” Brian Cullity.

(9,500 - 12,500)

115

115 Detail

61


Sporting Art 116 116. “Flight’s In,” an oil on canvas, Richard Bishop, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1887 - 1975).  Image of strutting prairie chicken and bundled hay stacks field under blue sky. Image size 24” x 26 1/4”. Professionally framed. Signed “Richard E. Bishop” in lower right with copyright.   Small line visible at top where canvas pressed on stretcher, otherwise very good and original. (5,000 - 7,000)

117. Oil on board, David Maass, Minneapolis, Minnesota (b. 1929).  Highly detailed image of eight mallards landing in wooded creek area with cabin in background. Excellent detail from the mallards pitching in at the front, to the chimney smoke stack from the cabin in the background. Image measures 31 1/2” x 26 1/2”. Professionally matted and framed.  Very good and original. (5,000 - 7,000)

117

62


118

118.

Acrylic on board entitled “Afternoon Storm”, Morton Solberg.  Signed. Image size 24” x 24”.  Very good and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

119. Acrylic on board entitled “Palo Verde Paradise; Gambel’s Quail,” John Seerey Lester.  Signed. Image size 24” x 18”. Scene includes hunter and dog.   Very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000) 120. Watercolor and gouache of a duck hunter shooting at flying mallards, Lynn Bogue Hunt.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 19” x 14”.  Very good and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

119

120

63


Born in Seattle in 1916 and raised in California from the age of 3, Harry Adamson had a lifelong passion of observing, studying, and painting waterfowl of the west, up until his passing in 2012. ‘Although Adamson was never a hunter himself, many of his paintings, done from the position of a duck blind, evoke memories in the outdoors enthusiast, whether they be of an early-morning close-up view of a flock of mallards or of a stunning landscape experienced.’ Adamson was once described by internationally famous wildlife artist David Maass as “unsurpassed when it comes to portrayals of wildfowl on the wing in their natural surroundings.” Wildlife artist Owen Gromme said Adamson is simply “one of the finest waterfowl artists in the world.”

121

121 Detail 121. “Honkers in Lassen County,” Harry Curieux Adamson (1916-2012). Oil on canvas signed lower right. Measures 22” by 34”. Excellent and original.

64

Provenance: Coeur d’Alene 2006, lot 210. Christie’s New York, December 3, 2008, lot 134. Private New York estate. (9,000 - 12,000)


121A

121B

121C

121A. “Late Afternoon,” an acrylic on board by Chet Reneson. Signed and dated 1975. Image size 22” x 40”. Original and good. (2,000 - 3,000)

121C. “Favorite Spot,” oil on board by Jim Daly. Signed. Nicely framed. Image size 9 1/2” x 7 1/2”. Original and good. (1,500 - 2,500)

121B. Upland game scene by Charles D. Williams. Oil on board. Signed. Image size 14” x 16”. Old label on back says it was a gift of Outdoor Life Magazine to Ducks Unlimited dinner February 1958. (1,250 - 1,750)

65


121D. “Carnations & Oranges,” an oil on canvas by Romel De La Torey. Image size 16” x 20”. Very good and original. (1,400 - 1,800)

121D

121E. Watercolor of Canada geese near house, F.W. Thomas. Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 19” x 25”. Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

121E

121F. “Young Fox,” an acrylic on board by John Seerey Lester. Image size 11 1/2” x 8 1/2”. Signed and dated 1989. Very good and original. (1,000 - 2,000)

121F 66


122

123

122. Well executed painting of an Atlantic salmon on canvas.  Image measures 15 1/2” x 39 1/2”. Frame is from the Boston Store in Worcester, Massachusetts. Shows good age.  Canvas has a few small holes, mostly around the edge near the frame, otherwise original and good.

Provenance: Tracey collection. (800 - 1,200)

123. Oil on canvas, Deann De LaRonde Wilde.  Signed and dated 10/75. Pleasing Western scene of grazing buffalo with young calves. Image size 18” x 21 1/2”. Professionally framed and matted.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

124 124. Oil on canvas, Deann De LaRonde Wilde.  Western scene of buffalo with calf in winter blizzard. Signed and dated 4/76. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 24” x 27 1/2”.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200)

67


Maine

125

125. Solid body goldeneye hen, Oscar Bibber, South Harpswell, Maine.  Slightly turned head.   Original paint with minor wear mostly on underside; structurally very good.

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (6,000 - 9,000)

125 Detail

68


126. Large rocking head merganser drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes.  Original paint with moderate wear; repair at the base of the neck; lightly hit by shot; crack in underside; leather has been replaced. Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (6,500 - 9,500)

126

126 Detail

126 Detail

69


127. Hollow carved oversize goldeneye drake very similar to the work of Oscar Bibber, South Harpswell, Maine.  The decoy is very light and hollowed out to a very thin shell. Head is turned.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear.

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

127 128. Standing full size gull, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Inlet head and carved wings with extended wingtips.   Old paint that is weathered and worn; numerous small cracks in body; small cracks in head with one larger horizontal crack and vertical crack in one side of the head.

128

129

Provenance: collection.

Berry/Kalinsky

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (3,000 - 4,000) 129. M e r g a n s e r drake, George Huey, Friendship, Maine.  “RAS” is carved in the underside. And there is a large “Q” branded for the Quandy collection. Inlet head and wooden crest. Relief wing carving. A leather crest was added at a later date and a small piece is still there.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; shot scar in underside of bill.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (2,500 - 3,500)

130. Loon with inlet head from the Maine coast.    Worn original paint; cracks in body; bill has been slightly blunted. (3,500 - 4,500)

130 70


131

132

131. Preening scoter, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Inlet head, relief wing carving, and carved eyes.  Original paint with moderate wear; old touchup to speculums has mostly worn off; worn area on one lower side. Provenance: Jim Andrews collection.

132. Preening black duck, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Inlet head relief wing carving and carved eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; thin crack in one side of head. Literature: “Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor. (3,500 - 4,500)

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Del ph. (4,000 - 6,000)

71


133

134

135

136

137

138

133. Old squaw hen, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Made with a swivel head.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; thin surface crack in one side of neck.

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection. Made for use on Lake Champlain. (1,250 - 1,750)

134.

Eider hen, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Slightly turned inlet head, relief wing carving, and carved eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; crack in underside. (1,750 - 2,250)

135. Feeding black duck, Gerald Robinson, Blue Hill, Maine, circa 1930s.  Inlet head is slightly turned. Relief wing carving with extended wingtips.  Original paint with minor wear; short, thin crack in back. (1,000 - 1,400) 136. Large eider drake from Friendship, Maine, attributed 72

138A to George Huey.  Approximately 22” long. Inlet head and carving on face.  Original paint with moderate wear; small dents. (1,250 - 1,750) 137. Swimming loon used on Back Bay in Portland, Maine.  Carved eyes and inlet head.  Old in use repaint on most of the decoy; some of the white paint on breast and speculums is original with minor wear; crack in underside; bill has been very slightly blunted.

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection.

(450 - 650)

138. Oversize Monhegan Island style scoter, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Relief wing carving and inlet head.  Old in use repaint; reglued crack through head; small dents. (900 - 1,200) 138A. Preening oversize eider drake from the Maine coast. Inlet head and detailed bill carving. Appealing old paint with minor wear; cracks and shot marks. (500 - 700)


139

140

139.

Pair of old squaw, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Swivel headed models made for use on Lake Champlain in upstate New York and Vermont. Both have relief wing carving and carved eyes.  Both have several short surface cracks in bodies, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

140. Merganser drake, Lee Witherspoon, Friendship, Maine.  Inlet head with carved wooden crest and fluted tail.  Minor discoloration on lower sides otherwise very good

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection.

(5,000 - 8,000)

140 Detail 73


Midwest Ferdinand Bach 1888 - 1967 Detroit, Michigan

141 Detail

Ferdinand Bach in October 1919 on the Au Sable River, Michigan, during a camping and fishing trip. Courtesy Ferdinand Bach III.

141 Detail

74


141. Canvasback drake, Ferdinand Bach, Detroit, Michigan.  “F Bach” carved in the underside. Relief wing carving with carved wingtips and fluted tail. Fine carving detail in the bill.   Near mint original paint; two small shot marks in one side.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Roberta Holcomb, Birmingham, Michigan. Sold in the October 1991 Julia & Guyette decoy auction. Formerly in the collection of Phyllis Ellison, Southfield, Michigan and Savanah, Georgia.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (15,000 - 20,000)

141 Detail

141

75


142

143

144

146

145

147

142. Pair of mallards, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Both are branded “JLS”. Both retain Graves weights.  Original paint with moderate wear; two cracks in drake’s neck. (1,250 - 1,750) 143. Mallard hen with turned head, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Original and good. (800 - 1,200) 144. Wood duck drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1957.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 145.

76

Two hollow carved bluebills hens from Wisconsin.  One decoy has an interior fore and aft rolling weight.  Original paint; with minor wear; one has some paint spilled on one side of the breast; structurally good. (800 - 1,000)

148

146. Swimming Canada goose from Michigan.  Feather stamping and carved wingtips.  Original paint with minor wear; hairline cracks in breast and tail. (600 - 900) 147. Swimming redhead drake branded “G. Bros.”    Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear; primer and bare wood are visible in some places; a few tiny dents. (600 - 900) 148. Canvasback drake, Charles, Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Retains Perdew weight.  Paint has been restored in the Perdew style. (500 - 800)


149

150

149. Hollow carved Canada goose, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Three piece body construction. High neck pose.  Original paint with minor wear; some separation at body seam; small chip missing from back of neck; hairline crack in head and back; small tail chip missing. (3,000 - 5,000) 150. Rare and possibly unique rigmate pair of whistling ducks, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  Tree ducks are indigenous to the southern US. This pair was made special at request of Dick Lancaster from Detroit, Michigan. Quite possibly the only pair that exists. Heads are high and slightly turned. Well executed bill carving. Strong feather stamping.  Mint. (4,000 - 6,000)

150 Detail 77


Jacob Scholer Burlington, Iowa

Burlington, Iowa, located on the banks of the Mississippi River, has an important but not well known, duck hunting history. Iowa was once a paradise for migrating waterfowl. Burlington is located on the “Mighty Mississippi” River, the magnet for the migratory flights of birds in the fall and in the spring. The flights were nothing short of spectacular, and hunters from major cities traveled by train to enjoy the incredible gunning for ducks and geese. From a letter written by Larry McHenry 1873: “My grandfather and I had trap lines in several locations on the (Huron and Cody) Islands. We trapped animals and sold their hides in Keithsburg. We caught raccoon, skunk, mink, opossum, muskrat, pole cat, rabbits, and squirrels. Every spring and autumn, we also shot lots of ducks and geese. Until 1918, there was a spring, as well as a fall, duck hunting season. At these times, tents would be set up on the river side of the island to accommodate extra visitors.”

151 Detail

78


151. Outstanding oversize mallard drake, Jacob Scholer, Burlington, Iowa, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with slightly turned head. Fine paint pattern.   Original paint with minor wear mostly consisting of a few paint rubs on the lower sides; brown paint on breast is an old second coat; structurally good; the best example known by this maker. Provenance: Guyette & Schmidt, Inc./ Christies auction, January 2008, lot 324, exact decoy. (14,000 - 18,000)

151 Detail

151

79


Shorebirds

152

153

152. Black bellied plover on two wire legs, from Ashbridges Bay, Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.  Cloth thighs remain intact.  Original paint with minor wear protected by an old coat of varnish; structurally very good.

152 Detail

153. Robin snipe in spring plumage, Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.  Original wire legs and wooden base.  Original paint with minor wear; part of bill is missing and a chip has been touched up; hit by shot.

80

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. (6,500 - 9,500)

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. (2,500 - 3,500)


154

155

154. Ruddy turnstone, Harry Townsend, Ashbridges Bay, Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy, moderate wear on the underside; painted cloth thighs are coming apart; moderately hit by shot; tip of bill has been blunted. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: Peter Brown collection eBook. (6,000 - 9,000) 155. Black bellied plover from Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.  Slightly flat sided. On two wire legs attached to wooden base.  Original paint with slight wear and very good patina; base is a replacement; very lightly hit by shot.

154 Detail

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. (3,000 - 4,000) 81


According to Harold Riser, author of “Chance”, a book about Chauncey Wheeler, about six plovers were made as a special order for long time friend and lumber mill owner, Sterling Garlock. Wheeler bought all of his decoy wood from Garlock.

156

156. Very rare golden plover, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York.  Tack eyes, iron bill, and paddle tail. Fine feather paint detail. One of a set of six made in the 1920s.  Near mint original paint; very slight separation at a knot in the back.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Hal Evans. Evans collection stamp in underside.

Literature: “Chance,” Harold Reiser III, p. 166, exact decoy pictured. (9,500 - 12,500)

156 Detail

82


Described by many as a gentleman hunter, Gelston was a frequent visitor to the marshes around Quogue and Sheepshead Bay on Long Island. His decoys are often animated and possess particularly well carved heads and attractive, painted plumage detail. He did sell some of his carving output through sources such as Abercrombie and Fitch in New York, but his very best examples were likely retained for use in his own rig. By any standard, his shorebirds, particularly those created out of wood rather than cork, are regarded as among the very best created on Long Island. His work justifiably places him in the select company of such men as Bill Bowman and Obediah Verity. For a similar example, see “The Decoys of Long Island” by Sieger et al.

157

157.

Very rare cedar dowitcher, Thomas Gelston, Quogue, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Raised carved wingtips and shoe button eyes.  Original paint with slight discoloration and wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” John Levenson and Somers Headly. (14,000 - 18,000)

157 Detail

83


158

159

158. Black bellied plover, John Dilley, Quogue, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Written under the tail is “Birdsall bb plover.” Dilley shorebirds were originally thought to have been made by Jess Birdsall.  Original paint with moderate wear; shallow rough area near stick hole; very lightly hit by shot. (3,000 - 4,000)

84

159. Large curlew, Thomas Gelston, Quogue, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and shoe button eyes.  Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear; very lightly hit by shot.

Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” Somers Headley.

John Levinson and (3,000 - 5,000)


160 Detail

160 Detail

160. Black bellied plover, John Dilley, Quogue Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and shoe button eyes.  Original paint with fine detail; a small amount of wear, mostly on the extremities and slight fading; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: From the hunting rig of Chalres Dequilfeldt (1837-1922), Amityville, New York. Obtained by the consignor directly from a member of the Dequilfeldt Family, Amityville, New York.

Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” John Levinson and Somers Headley. (14,000 - 18,000)

160


Miniatures

161

162

163

164

165

165A

161. Pair of miniature flying goldeneye, A.J. Dando.  Signed and dated 1940.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 162.

Pair of miniature flying buffleheads, A.J. Dando.  Signed and dated 1939.  A couple of specs of paint dripped on wings, otherwise excellent and original. (650 - 950)

163. Two flying shorebirds, A.J. Dando.  A golden plover and a black bellied plover.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 164. Pair of miniature flying Barrow’s goldeneye, A.J. Dando.  Signed.  Very good and original. (650 - 950)

86

166

165. Two pair of carvings.  A pair of miniature mallards, Wendell Gilley, Southwest Harbor, Maine. Gilley ink stamp on underside. Pair of miniature swans attributed to Gilley.  Very good and original. (950 - 1,250) 165A. Miniature owl, Russ Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts. Burr stamp under the base. Original and good. (500 - 700) 166. Pair of miniature flying mallards.  Similar to work of A.J. Dando.  Very good and original. (250 - 350)


167

168

169

170 167. Very rare 1/3 size Monhegan Island style merganser drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Approximately 10” long. Inlet head that is turned slightly. Carved wooden crest and relief wing carving.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; wide shallow tail chip that has old touchup on it; most of the bill is a professional replacement.

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Del ph. (3,000 - 4,000) 168. Miniature chickadee, Jess Blackstone. Identified and numbered 567 under the base. Very good and original. (500 - 700)

169A

171 169. Miniature goldfinch, Jess Blackstone. Identified and numbered 160. Very good and original. (500 - 700) 169A. Miniature kinglet, Jess Blackstone. Identified and numbered 262 under the base. Chip missing from bill, otherwise very good and original. (350 - 550) 170. Miniature pair of quail, A.J. King, North Scituate, Rhode Island.  Signed on base. Fine paint detail.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000) 171. Chestnut bellied quail, A.J. King, North Scituate, Rhode Island.  Signed on base. Fine paint detail.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

87


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

172

173

174

175

176

177

172. Rigmate pair of bluewing teal, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; small cracks in neck filler; a few tiny dents; thin cracks in underside of drake.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

173. Pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit Michigan.  Premier grade, Seneca Lake models.  Original paint with minor wear; hen has been lightly hit by shot; drake has a small fairly thin crack in one lower side, also hairline crack through the head and some touchup to a rough area on the bill.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

174. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade.  Original paint with minor wear; some discoloration where a substance had dripped on the back and side and was cleaned off; two cracks in underside.

Provenance: See lot 181.

(1,500 - 2,000)

175. Pair of bluebills, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade low head models. Branded “HAC”.  Original paint with minor discoloration and 88

wear; lightly hit by shot; old touchup on part of the drake’s head. Provenance: Olson collection. Formerly in collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey. Hillman collection ink stamp on underside of both, also Hillman’s written tags are on the underside indicating the decoy was originally in the John Levins collection. Literature: Lot 3, in the Guyette & Schmidt, Inc. April 1996 decoy auction. (1,500 - 2,500) 176. Very early bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; much of the neck filler is missing; slight separation at a knot in one side.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(1,500 - 2,500)

177. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade with good snakey head style. Branded “JC Adams”. Traces of challenge stamp visible on underside.  Original paint with slight wear; thin crack in underside; two tiny chips missing from top of tail.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid p. 122. (2,000 - 3,000)


178. Rare greenwing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Branded with “FB & C” and “B”.  Original paint with slight wear; one side of body is separated slightly; thin in factory crack; very thin drying crack at top of tail.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Pete Van Tright.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 60. (6,000 - 9,000)

178

179. Merganser drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early challenge grade with lifted head.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on underside and edges of tail; thin surface crack partway down one side; slight wear to the edge of the front of the bill with a small amount of touchup in that area. (5,000 - 8,000)

179

178 Detail

179 Detail

89


180. Rare low head model bluebill hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear; small amount of touchup at neck seam; in factory crack in one lower side.

180

181

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (3,000 - 4,000)

181. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Very bold loop feather paint.  Near mint original paint; small crack in tail; filled in factory crack in lower side. Provenance: From the Peter Stroh collection. Stroh was the former CEO of the Stroh Brewery Co, Gross Pointe Farms, Michigan. Outside of his work in the beer business and the city of Detroit, Stroh made his mark as an avid outdoorsman and conservationist. He served as a member of the National Audubon Society board, did a great deal of fundraising for Ducks Unlimited. He traveled the world hunting birds and fishing. He felt that “Wading through a cypress swamp is every bit as much fun as treading through the art galleries. (2,500 - 3,500) 182. Bluewing teal hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with very slight wear; shot scar on top of tip of bill; dent in top of tail. (2,500 - 3,500)

182

183. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early premier grade.   Original paint with very slight wear; a few tiny dents; small filled tail chip.

183 90

Provenance: Olson collection. (2,000 - 3,000)


184. Rare hollow challenge grade mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.   Early snakey head style.  Original paint with slight wear; very small professional tail chip repair; slight discoloration on one lower side; a few tiny dents. (3,500 - 5,500)

184

185. Early slope breasted model bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1890s.  Premier grade. “Fuller” brand in underside.  Original paint with very minor wear; several paint flakes missing from head; several tiny chips in neck filler; three tiny shot marks.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (4,000 - 6,000)

185

184 Detail

185 Detail 91


186

186. Exceptional pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Both are branded “AJ DAVIS” several times in the underside and in the weight. Extra fine paint detail.   Near mint original paint; several tiny dents.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

Literature: “Mason Factory Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (14,000 - 18,000)

186 Detail 92


187

187. Rare pintail drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Branded “S” for the Sergeant Ranch, west of Sacramento.   Original paint with very slight wear; protected by an old coat of varnish; slight separation at a small knot in lower side.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. (8,000 - 12,000)

187 Detail 93


Sporting Art

188

188. “Before the Blow,” an oil on canvas by Roland Clark.  Signed. Image size 16” x 20”.  Very good and original. (7,000 - 9,000)

94


189

189. Oil on canvas of mallards landing in marsh, Roland Clark.  Signed. Image size 16” x 20”.  Very good and original. (7,000 - 9,000)

95


190

190. “The Valley Stream,” an acrylic on canvas by Jorge Mayol.  Signed. Image size 24” x 40”.  Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)

191. Oil on canvas of two goldeneye landing on a lake, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut.  Signed. Image size 18” x 24”. Written on back of painting, “Wedding present to Leo and Mabel (Weeks) Miller from Shang Wheeler 9/11/46”. The same is on a small plaque attached to the front.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 5,500)

191

96


192

193

192.

“Quail Covey,” an oil on board by David Maass.  Signed. Image size 13” x 18”.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 5,500)

193. “Waters Edge,” a large acrylic on canvas of a black bear near totem poles, Jorge Mayol.  28 1/2” x 40”.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 5,500)

97


Through the 1930’s Andrew Winter summered with other artists at the “Trailing Yew” guest house on Monhegan Island, Maine. In 1940 he moved to the Island permanently and built a studio on a bluff overlooking the Atlantic ocean.

194

194. Oil on canvas of shot eiders inside a Monhegan Island lobster shack, Andrew Winter (1893-1958).  Signed. Image size 30” x 25”.  Very good and original. (5,000 - 7,000)

98


Sir Peter Markham Scott was a naturalist, conservationist, artist, and author whose abiding passion was wildlife. He travelled the world painting rare birds, then later founded the Severn Wildfowl Trust (now the Wildlife and Wetlands Trust), and co-founded the World Wildlife Fund (now the World Wide Fund for Nature). Described as the “father of conservation,” he led a campaign for endangered wildlife that captured the imagination of a generation and inspired many to care about the environment long before it was fashionable to do so.

195

195. Oil on canvas entitled “King Eiders on Ice”, Sir Peter Scott.  Signed and dated 1949. Image size 24” x 29 1/2”.  Very good and original. (8,000 - 12,000)

99


196

196. “Battenkill Evening,” acrylic on board Paco Young.  Signed. Image size 13 1/2” x 21 1/2”.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

197

197. Watercolor of geese flying over marsh, Harry Richardson.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 16 1/2” 24”.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

198

100

198. “Going Fishing,” an oil on board by Jim Daly.  Signed and dated 1994. Image size 11 1/2 8 1/4”.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)


198A. “Startled Bluewings,” an oil on canvas by Roger Preuss. Of teal in marsh. Signed. Image size approximately 24” x 29 1/2”. Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500)

198A

198B. Watercolor of bluebills landing in marsh, David Hagerbaumer. Signed, “David Hagerbaumer, DTM”. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 14” x 18”. Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

198B

198C. Watercolor of geese flying in winter, David Hagerbaumer. Signed and dated 1958. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 12” x 16 1/2”. Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

198C 101


198D. Original Japanese silk embroidery mounted to board entitled “Triple point”. 11 1/4” x 18”. Very good and original. (600 - 900)

198D

198E. “Kitchen Window II,” an oil wash by Paul Landry. Image size 7 1/2” x 11 1/2”. Signed. Very good and original. (650 - 950)

198E

198F. “Northern Loon,” an acrylic on board by Michael Budden. Image size 8” x 13”. Signed and dated 1988. Very good and original. (650 - 950)

198F 102


199

200

199. Watercolor of ducks flying into marsh, Melvin Evans.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 18” x 28”.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

200. Watercolor of flying geese, Noel Dunn.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 22” x 29 1/2”.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

(2,000 - 3,000)

103


Shorebirds

201

202

201 Detail

201. Rare running yellowlegs, William Southard, Seaford, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Small “X” carved under the tail.  Original paint with very slight wear; bill is a professional replacement by Russ Allen. (15,000 - 20,000) 104

202 Detail

202. Black bellied plover, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes and relief wing carving.  Excellent original paint with good detail and great patina; bill appears to be a professional replacement. (14,000 - 18,000)


203. Very rare black bellied plover, William Bowman, Lawrence, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Believed by some to have been made by C.S. Bunn. Exceptional form with relief wing carving, extended wingtips, and shoe button eyes. Branded “Edgar” near the stick hole. Original paint with significant wear; lightly hit by shot. (17,500 - 22,500)

203 Detail

203

203 Detail

203 Detail Newbold Leroy Edgar | 1863-1924 Mr. Edgar was a very affluent attorney and an avid sportsman. He was married to Countess Marie de Forest Manice, a prominent member of New York and European society. He had a number of residences in New York including a stately home on Main Street in Southampton. He would often go big game hunting in Canada but one of his favored sporting locations was Montauk, Long Island where he enjoyed fox hunting and especially waterfowling. He is known to have used Charles Sumner Bunn as his personal guide. (Ref. Decoy Magazine, Nov/Dec 2014) 105


Cobb Island, Virginia

Joseph Crumb and sport gunner Mary Bell Watts standing among their Cobb shorebird rig with a handful of shorebirds.

204 Detail

106


204

204 Detail 204. Rare running curlew from Cobb Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes and raised “V” wingtip carving.  Old repaint on underside; paint on back appears to be original; significant wear to the bill; very lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Bill Mackey, Jr., Mackey collection stamp on underside.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. Swanson and Hall Exhibition Catalog, #45, exact decoy. (27,500 - 32,500)

107


205

206

206A

207

208

two of five shown

209

210

205. Willet in running pose, from the Shinnecock Reservation, Long Island, New York.  Tack eyes and applied wings with extended wingtips.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot. (1,500 - 2,500) 206. Black bellied plover, John Dilley, Quogue, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Shoe button eyes.  Old in use repaint; structurally good. Provenance: From a member of the Dequilfeldt Family, with lot 160. (1,500 - 2,000) 206A. Ruddy turnstone from New Jersey, last quarter 19th century. Old repaint; bill is an old replacement; hit by shot.

Provenance: Dwight Belanger estate.

(500 - 800)

207. Five folding tin yellowlegs, Strator and Sohier, Boston, 108

Massachusetts.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; a few shot marks. (350 - 450) 208. Four silhouette shorebirds from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, circa 1900.    Original and good. (400 - 600) 209.

Root head yellowlegs, William Rawlings, Musquodoboit Harbor, Nova Scotia.    Near mint original paint; small crack in underside.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (500 - 800) 210. Large willet with iron bill from Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; several tiny dents and shot marks. (650 - 950)


211

211

211. Rig of 12 yellowlegs from either Long Island, New York or the coast of North Carolina.  12 wooden stakes are included. Some of the decoys are fairly flat while others are more rounded.  Three have applied root heads, which may be working repairs; at least three of the others have replaced bills; the two rounder decoys appear to be older decoys that were repainted by the maker of the flatter examples; the others have original paint with minor to moderate wear; one bill is missing.

Provenance: Recently found in California. Before that they were in storage in Illinois for 40 years. (7,500 - 9,500)

109


Contemporary

212

213

215

214

217

218

212. Preening curlew, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes. McNair stand is included.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500)

216

219

216. Preening yellowlegs with lifted wing, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  An early example of Mark’s work with “MSM” carved into the underside.  Original paint that has been aged; small dents. (800 - 1,200)

213. Running curlew, Mark McNair, Craddockville Virginia.  Signed. Carved in the style of the world auction record running curlew sold by Guyette & Schmidt, Inc. in 1997.  Original paint that has been aged; a few tiny dents. (900 - 1,200)

217. Preening willet, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Lifted wing that is attached with four tiny pegs.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (800 - 1,200)

214. Pair of doves, William Gibian, Onancock, Virginia.  Signed. Raised extended wingtips.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

218. Preening yellowlegs, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Relief wing carving.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

215. Hollow carved dove, with extended wingtips, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed.   Original paint that has been aged; hollow carved. (800 - 1,200)

219. Two preening shorebirds, William Gibian, Onancock, Virginia.  Both are signed. Both have raised wingtips.  Very good and original. (700 - 900)

110


220

222

225

221

223

224

226

227

220. Hollow carved preening merganser drake, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  Signed. Relief wing carving with slightly raised wingtips. Bill is buried under one wing.  Excellent and original. (2,000 - 2,400)

224. Pair of oversize lowhead gunning mallards, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  “G Strunk” stamped in weights. Both have raised “V” wingtip carving.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,000)

221.

Hollow carved widgeon drake in content pose, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  “CTM” carved in underside.  Very good and original, with fine paint detail.

Provenance: Private New Jersey collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

225. Merganser drake with mussel in mouth, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  “CTM” carved in underside.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good.

222. Preening hollow carved mallard drake, William Gibian, Onancock, Virginia.  Signed. Raised carved wingtips.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750) 223. Pair of high head style canvasbacks, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Weights are stamped “G. Strunk”, also signed and dated 2000. Carved in the Delaware River tradition.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,000)

Provenance: Carr collection.

(1,200 - 1,600)

226. Hollow carved merganser drake, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  “CTM 1994” is carved in the underside. Relief wing carving.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good.

Provenance: Carr collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)

227. Breast preening merganser drake, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  Branded and signed. Relief wing carving and inlet head.  Original paint with minor wear; crack in one wing and underside. (1,000 - 1,500)

111


New York State

228

229

228. Extremely rare American merganser hen, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York, 1st quarter 20th century. Believed by some to have been made by Gus Rogers, a carving companion of Wheeler. Old tag on underside indicates the decoy was sold in the September 1984 Richard Bourne decoy auction.  Original paint with good detail and very minor wear; several tiny dents.

112

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

229. Pair of mergansers, William Southard, Seaford, New York, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with moderate wear; the hen’s head is a professional replacement; crack in hen’s back and in side of drake. (4,000 - 6,000)


230. Red breasted merganser drake, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow body, two piece decoy with centerline seam. Made with square nails. Relief wing carving, upturned tail, graceful neck, chip carved comb and painted eyes.  Body and head in good original detailed paint showing little wear for its age; bill professionally partially restored; tight crack in neck.

Provenance: Found with an old squaw body by the same maker. Stamped on bottom “M2.” Formerly in the collection of Bud Ward.

Literature: “Decoys,” Linda and Gene Kangas, 1991, p. 209 & p. 169 color, exact decoy. (10,000 - 14,000)

230

230 Detail

230 Detail

113


231. Bluebill hen, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York.    Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

231 232. Swimming brant, David Cochran, Blue Point, New York.    Original paint with minor wear; crack in head was secured with a nail a long time ago, appears to be when the decoy was made.

232

Provenance: From the Soydam rig, branded “WL Soydam” twice in underside. Formerly in collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey, Hillman collection stamp on underside. (1,600 - 2,000) 233. Two decorative decoys, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  A mallard drake and a greenwing teal drake. Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Olson collection. (1,250 - 1,750)

233 233A. Well carved brant, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1920s. Branded “WFB”. Notch feather carving with heart shaped wing motif carved into back. Original paint with minor wear; slight wear to carved feathers in center of back; small crack in back; tiny chip missing from one edge of tail. (2,500 - 3,500)

233A 114


234

236

235

237

239

238

240

234. Bluebill drake, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with moderate wear on most of body; head and breast appear to have working repaint; a few small dents.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Formerly in collection of the Shelburne Museum, their stamp is on the underside. (950 - 1,250)

235. Root head merganser probably Long Island, New York, 1st quarter 20th century.  Head has been carved from a root or branch to create effect of a raised crest at back of the head. Tail is slightly extended over back of body.  Old paint appears to be mix of original with strengthening to white areas; rough area at tail; several gouges in back; age splits at back of head. (600 - 800) 236. Goldeneye hen from Alexandria Bay, New York.    Original paint with good patina and minor wear; small shot scar across back; tiny shot hole near eye. (250 - 350) 237. Large mallard drake, F.J. Patterson, Toronto, Ontario.  Original paint with shrinkage and a small amount of wear; reglued crack in tail. (600 - 900)

241 238.

Pair of black ducks, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  One has an iron keel.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (750 - 950)

239. Pair of canvasbacks, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Drake has an iron keel.  Original paint with minor wear; drake has 6 shot marks in one side and several tiny holes in the top of the head. (900 - 1,200) 240. Pair of bluewing teal, D.W. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.    Near mint original paint; hairline crack through drake’s neck.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 121. (600 - 900)

241. Hollow carved bluebill hen, Abraham Rundle, Bloomfield, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in collection of William J. Mackey, Mackey collection stamp on the underside.

Literature: “American Decoys,” William Mackey, p. 109. (600 - 900) 115


Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts

242

242. Full size kingfisher with fish in its mouth, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Fine paint detail and carved tail feathers. Carving is typical of Crowell’s decoratives that bare the oval brand, but is unbranded because size of base is too small.  Professional repair to sliver missing from one edge of the tail by Russ Allen; small amount of jesso missing from one foot. (9,000 - 12,000)

116

242 Detail


243. Very rare decorative snipe, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the base three times. Dropped wingtips and highly detailed feather paint.  Crack through the jesso in one thigh; approximately 25% of one jesso foot is missing; otherwise very good and original. (15,000 - 20,000)

243

243 Detail

117


Miniatures by Elmer Crowell 1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts

244

245

246

247

248

249

244. Rare miniature ringneck pheasant, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Tiny chip missing from tip of tail, otherwise excellent and original.  

Provenance: Cunningham collection, mark in underside of base. (1,750 - 2,250)

245. Running miniature spotted sandpiper, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.    Professional bill repair, otherwise very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500) 246. Miniature old squaw hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Identified on the underside of the base.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

118

247. Miniature Baltimore oriole, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s circular ink stamp is on the underside of the base.  Tiny chip repair to top of beak and small paint flake missing from top of head, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 248. Miniature catbird, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.   Traces of Crowell’s circular ink stamp under the base.  Professional repair to a chip in the end of the bill, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 249. Miniature red wing black bird, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Traces of Crowell’s circular ink stamp under the base.  Professional repair to small chip at the top of the bill, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)


250

251

252

253

254

255

256

250. Miniature ruddy duck hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Identified on the underside of the base. Applied texturing to base.  Tiny scratch on one side of neck. (1,250 - 1,750)

254. Miniature black neck stilt, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  An unusual species for Crowell. Identified on underside of base.  Professional bill repair, otherwise excellent and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

251. Miniature widgeon drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.    Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

255. Miniature wood duck drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Identified on underside of the base.  Professional bill repair and repair to a small chip at the tip of the tail, otherwise very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

252. Miniature bluebird, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s paper label is under the base.  Professional restoration to a small tail chip and a chip in the bill, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 253. Miniature pintail hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  No label or stamp.  Original and good.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

256. Miniature Baltimore oriole, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is under the base. Chip missing from bill, otherwise original and good. (650 - 950)

(1,200 - 1,500)

119


Canada 257. Pair of American mergansers from Valleyfield, Quebec, circa 1930s.  Relief wing carving.  One has original paint with minor to moderate discoloration and wear; the other has been repainted; repainted decoy has thin crack through neck and lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. (1,500 - 2,000)

257 258. Redhead drake with open bill, Alain MacDonald, Verdun, Quebec, circa 1930.  One of only two known redheads. Previously attributed to Robert Paquette. Head is turned with open bill and visible tongue. Finely detailed layered feather carving. Head is turned approximately 30 degrees.  Very good and original with good patina..

258

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased by Peter Stanley from Jamie Stalker. (2,500 - 3,500)

259.

High neck hollow carved black duck, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario 1st quarter 20th century.  Scratch feather paint detail. Initials “FA” carved in the underside.  Original paint; minor wear; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

259

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 104, exact decoy pictured. “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 123, exact decoy pictured. (2,500 - 3,500) 260. Solid body style greenwing teal hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.    Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; small dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 67. Peter Brown Collection eBook, exact decoy pictured. (2,000 - 3,000)

260 120


261 Detail

261

262

261.

Extremely rare wood duck hen, Orel Leboeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec.  Detailed feather carving and raised carved wingtips.  

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased by Jamie Stalker at the Julia-Guyette August 1985 decoy auction.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. Peter Brown Collection eBook, exact decoy pictured. (4,000 - 6,000)

262. Pair of bluebills, Orel LeBoeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec.  Hen is a low head model. Highly detailed feather carving and subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint with slight wear; several small rough spots on edges of wing carving; short crack in hen’s back; hairline crack in hen’s side; drake has minor roughness on top of tail and at one wingtip and a plug in the breast that was put in the defect in wood when the decoy was made.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. (3,000 - 4,000) 121


263

264

265

266

267

268

269

263. Greenwing teal drake, Ben Coughlan, Valleyfield, Quebec.  Detailed wing carving.  Very good and original. (650 - 950)

266. Goldeneye drake, Orel LeBoeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec.  “OL” Stamped in underside.  Appealing old in use repaint; a few small dents. (800 - 1,200)

264. Bluebill drake, carved in the style of Orel LeBoeuf, 2nd half 20th century.     Original paint; structurally good. (650 - 950)

267. Canada goose, Willie Leduc, Valleyfield, Quebec, 2nd quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; age split in back; several cracks.

265. Rare oversize hollow carved black duck, Bill Cooper, Verdun Quebec, mid 20th century.  Slightly turned head. Fine feather carving detail.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents and tiny rough spots on feathers. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. (800 - 1,200)

122

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(650 - 950)

268. Pair of bluewing teal, Emile Lacombe, Trois Rivier, Quebec.  Relief wing carving.  Very good and original. (400 - 600) 269. Goldeneye drake, Hormidas Tribert, St. Anicet Quebec.  Good feather carving detail.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (500 - 800)


270. Exceptional short body style canvasback drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Hollow carved with good comb paint detail.  Near mint original paint; tiny shot mark on head and one on breast. (4,000 - 6,000)

270

271. Very rare pair of hooded mergansers, D.K. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario, circa 1900.  Relief wing carving.   Original paint with minor to moderate wear; wear and small chips to wing tips; small chip missing from one side of tail; one eye missing from drake. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in collection of Bernie Gates. (3,500 - 4,500)

271

270 Detail

271 Detail

123


Markham Rig

Markham, Ontario

In the 1970s there was a farm sale outside of Markham, Ontario. At the sale, a number of decoys were sold, which are now known as the “Markham Rig.� Some of the decoys were thought to have been made by Walker Moorley and some by a talented unknown maker. The most interesting decoys in the group, attributed to the unidentified maker, had heavily carved mandibles and nostrils as this pair exhibits.

272 Detail

124


272. Rare rigmate pair of redheads from the Markham Rig, Markham, Ontario.  Hollow carved with wide spoon bills. Subtle feather paint detail on hen.  Dry original paint with some shrinkage on one side of the drake; several paint rubs on each decoy; narrow wood patch on one side of drake from when the decoy was made, otherwise structural very good.

Provenance: From a Crystal Lake, Illinois estate.

(14,000 - 18,000)

272

272 Detail

272 Detail

125


273. Set of three black ducks, Angus Lake, West Lake, Ontario.  Two have weights with “AGL” embossed on them. Decoys are in feeding, swimming and content poses. Good subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 112.

(4,000 - 6,000)

273

274. Hollow carved black duck, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.   Branded “JR W MAKER”, also the initials “FN” are painted on the underside. Subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint; minor wear; moderately hit by shot mostly on one side; small shot scar on one edge of bill.

Provenance: Berry/ Kalinsky collection.

(6,000 - 9,000)

274

274 Detail

273 Detail 126


275

276

275.

Long body style canvasback drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Hollow carved with bottom board. Branded “JT McMillan,” a member of the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company.  Strong original paint with fine combing on back and subtle feathering on side pockets; paint has worn off on a few small areas on body and one side of bill; two very tight hairline cracks in neck. (4,000 - 6,000)

275 Detail

276. Hollow carved canvasback hen, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Long body style. Branded “JT McMillan” for St. Clair Flats Shooting Company Member James McMillan, 1889 - 1900.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly near tail; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. (4,000 - 6,000)

127


277

278

282

283

277. Merganser hen, Lawrence Davis, Toronto, Ontario.  Relief wing carving and slightly lifted head.  Original paint with minor wear; crest has been very slightly blunted; tiny chip missing from underside of tip of bill.

Provenance: Youngman.

Formerly in the collection of Robert

Literature: “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 75. (500 - 800) 278. Hollow carved Toronto school canvasback drake in transition plumage.  Rare low head style.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; slight roughness to back of neck.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Found at the Oak Lake Club in Manitoba in a rig of JR Wells decoys. (800 - 1,200)

279. Hollow carved bluebill hen, William Rundle, Prince Edward County, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “AR” under the tail.  Original paint with significant shrinkage and minor wear; overpaint was taken off of the bill; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 137. (400 - 600) 128

281

280

279

284 280. Bobtail redhead drake.    Old paint has some discoloration and crazing; minor wear on neck and parts of tail; lightly hit by shot; crack in back; approximately 1/3 of bill has been professionally replaced. (500 - 700) 281. Black duck, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Signed on the underside by Anger.  Very good and original, never used. (400 - 600) 282.

Hollow carved canvasback drake found in Peterborough, Ontario.  Made by the same carver as the decoys with the Queens Hotel brand in them.  Original paint with minor wear; heavily hit by shot; hairline crack partway through neck base.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in collection of Bernie Gates.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 218. (400 - 600) 283. Bluebill hen from Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Glass eyes. Alert head pose.  Very good and original. (350 - 450) 284. Black duck, Billy Ellis, Whitby, Ontario.  Good feather paint detail.  Lightly hit by shot; otherwise very good and original.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates.

(350 - 450)


Advertising and Calls 286

285 288 287

288

285. Ballisite and Empire smokeless shotgun powder poster.  Copyright 1910.  Several folds from when it was rolled up; several tiny tears in upper left corner; retains both metal bands. (2,000 - 3,000) 286. Winchester advertising poster of hunting dogs, from a painting by M.R. Poore.  In what appears to be original frame. Image size 25 1/2” x 35”.  Original and good. (2,500 - 3,500)

287. Mallard distilling company advertising sign of a painting of duck hunters in boat drinking whiskey. Signed “SHABEILTZ. 22 1/4” x 28 1/4”.  Small nail hole in top of frame area probably how it was hung at one time; minor discoloration, otherwise good. (650 - 950) 288.

Two posters.  The struggle for existence, Maas and Steffen calendar, and a Maas and Steffen furs poster of a possum family and raccoon in a tree. Top band remains.  Ocelot fighting with a boa has been cut at bottom; the other appears to be good. (650 - 950)

129


289

291

290

292

289. Two 50 count Winchester Leader shot shell boxes.    One has some scotch tape on the corners and tears on part of lid, the other is better; some discoloration. (950 - 1,250) 290. Rare and desirable Winchester rival 100 count paper shot shell box.  12 gauge. Colors have not faded.  Boxes structurally good; with some wear at corners and edges; one pair with piece missing near top edge and on one side. (6,000 - 8,000) 291. Rare and desirable checkered duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois.  Three checkered panels with typical Rule stopper.  Wedge block appears to be a later replacement; wear at tip of mouth piece; some discoloration on stopper.

130

Provenance: Consigned directly from the Rule family. (2,500 - 3,000)

293

294

292. Duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois.  Smaller size.  Unused; small imperfection in stopper.

Provenance: Consigned directly from the Rule family. (1,500 - 2,000)

293. Duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois.    Small imperfection in barrel, otherwise unused. Provenance: Consigned directly from the Rule family. (1,500 - 2,000) 294.

Rare duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois.  Smooth body.  Unused; small chip in stopper, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Consigned directly from the Rule family. (1,500 - 2,000)


295. Rare and important duck call display rack, Bill Clifford, River Forest, Illinois.  10” tall. Laminated wood construction. Holds 12 Clifford calls. Very few of these display racks exist. Clifford provided them for stores that offered his calls for example VL&A.  Very good and original. (7,000 - 9,000)

296.

Rare highest grade duck call with brick lamination, Bill Clifford, River Forest, Illinois. Five different types of wood.   All parts appear to be original; one very slight imperfection where wedge block meets stopper. (7,000 - 9,000)

295 296

297. Rare duck call, Bill Clifford, River Forest, Illinois.  Two color panel lamination. Which forms eight squares on barrel.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500) 298.

297

298

299

Rare duck call, Bill Clifford, River Forest, Illinois.  Ring lamination.   Original and good. (2,500 - 3,500)

299. Duck call, Bill Clifford, River Forest, Illinois.  Metal ring at top of barrel.  Two very small imperfections near ring on barrel, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

131


Delaware River and New Jersey

300

300 Detail

300. Rare pair of wood ducks, Harry Fennimore, Bordentown, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear; hen has a small dent in one side of the tail.

Provenance: Tags on underside say the decoys were deaccessioned by Stoney Brook Museum and sold at the Bourne auction July 1981 to Somers Headly, who sold them in 1996 to Bruce Williams. It also states the decoys were a gift to Stoney Brook Museum from Robert H. Staniford, Jr.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Linda and Gene Kangas, hen is exact decoy pictured on p. 61. (4,500 - 6,500) 132


301.

Philadelphia school black duck, last quarter 19th century.  Removable head attached with a brass key mechanism. Body halves are joined by two small dowels. Shoe button eyes. By the same hand as the pintail sold in our November 2016 auction.  Excellent original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; thin crack through neck. (6,000 - 9,000)

301

301 Detail

133


302

303

304

305

306

307

302. Blair school, canvasback drake, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “R.A. Sauer”.  Old in use repaint; two cracks through neck. Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Formerly in the Toothill collection. (1,000 - 1,400) 303. Two decoys, Larry McLaughlin, Edgely, Pennsylvania.    Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: From McLaughlin’s personal hunting rig, his brass name tag is on the underside of each. Purchased by the consignor in 1984 from McLaughlin. (950 - 1,250)

304. Philadelphia School pintail hen in swimming pose.  Hollow carved with 3 piece body construction joined by small dowels.  Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; head is an old replacement. Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. 134

(900 - 1,200)

305. Hollow carved pintail drake, John Blair, Jr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Branded “Biddle” three times in the underside.  Paint has been professionally restored; small cracks in neck and head; scratch in back. (800 - 1,200) 306. Pair of canvasbacks from the Delaware River.  Relief wing carving with detailed feather carving.  Original paint covered with an old coat of varnish that has shrinkage on some parts of the decoy; structurally good. (650 - 950) 307. Hollow carved pintail drake from the Delaware River.    Original paint with moderate wear; crack through neck.

Provenance: Huster.

Formerly in the collection of Harrison (600 - 900)


308

310

312

309

311

311A

313

314

308. Hollow carved mallard drake, Tony Bianco, Trenton, New Jersey.  Branded “Bianco”. Branded with “T” under the bill. Relief wing carving.  Shrinkage on breast, otherwise very good and original.

311. Hollow carved teal from the Delaware River, 1st quarter 20th century.  Relief wing caving and slightly turned head.   Original paint with moderate wear; thin crack through neck.

Provenance: Huster.

Formerly in the collection of Harrison (500 - 700)

309. Canvasback drake, Charles Allen, Bordentown, New Jersey.  Branded “CL Allen”. Relief wing carving with feather detail.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (550 - 850) 310. Lowhead model pintail drake, Tony Bianco, Trenton, New Jersey.  Raised “V” wingtip carving.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Somers G Headley, stamped SGH twice in underside. (600 - 900)

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(500 - 800)

311A. Merganser drake, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton New Jersey. Old repaint; small cracks. (400 - 600) 312. Canada goose, Russ Allen, Galloway, New Jersey, circa 1990.  Slightly turned head.  Original and good. (450 - 650) 313. Bluebill drake, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey.  Signed by the carver.  Very good and original. (350 - 450) 314. Black duck, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  From the Conover rig.  Old in use repaint; roughness to end of tail. (400 - 600) 135


315. Black duck in rare low head pose, Tom Fitzpatrick, Delanco, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (1,250 - 1,750)

315

316. Rare black duck, Jess Birdsall, Barnegat, New Jersey.  High neck seat and tack eyes. Body halves are joined by two small dowels. Small “B” stamped in weight.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; tiny dents.

Provenance: Private New Jersey collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

316

317. Canada goose, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Old in use repaint; repair to two cracks in the neck.

Provenance: Formerly in the Toothill collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

317

318. Rare swimming Canada goose, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Old in use repaint; a few small dents.

318 136

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (2,000 - 3,000)


319. Mallard drake, John Updike, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa 1930.    Second coat of paint by Updike; originally painted as black duck; professional repair to a chip at the end of the bill; thin crack through neck. (1,000 - 1,500)

319

320. Canada goose, Harry M. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Old in use repaint; neck repair; small cracks in body and neck base; slight roughness to bill. (1,200 - 1,600)

320

321. Black duck, John Updike, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear; speculums have been redone; thin crack in bill. (1,000 - 1,400)

321

322. Brant, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Paint appears to be a second coat by Horner; structurally good.

Provenance: Olson collection. (900 - 1,200)

322 137


323

324

325

326

327

328

323. Very rare hollow carved gull decoy, William Cranmer, Beach Haven, New Jersey.  Signed and dated 1956. Slightly turned and lifted head relief wingtip carving.  Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; moderate on lower breast and wingtip; crack extending from breast down neck base to back; crack in underside. (650 - 950) 324. Brant silhouette, Peachy Prime, New Jersey, circa 1930s.    Thin crack through neck; very minor flaking on one side of tail; paint appears to be a later working repaint. Provenance: Formerly in collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey. Hillman collection stamp on underside. (400 - 600) 325. Pair of mallards, John Updike, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  From his hunting rig. Both have a small lead tag with his name stamped in it. Hen is in swimming pose.  Old repaint; drake has lightly been hit by shot; hen 138

has numerous small dents; each has a small crack in the tail.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (600 - 900)

326. Hollow carved Canada goose, William Cranmer, Beach Haven, New Jersey.    Some paint loss on the weight, otherwise very good and original. (600 - 900) 327. Oversize hollow carved gunning model black duck, William Cranmer, Beach Haven, New Jersey.  Signed and dated 1958. Slightly turned head. Good paint detail.  Very slight wear; small rough spot above one speculum (500 - 700) 328. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, William Cranmer, Beach Haven, New Jersey.  Both have slightly turned heads. Both were made for a 1957 Ducks Unlimited dinner and have brass tags indicating such on lower side.  Original paint with slight wear; crack in back of drake. (900 - 1,200)


Contemporary

329

330

331

332

333

334

329. Two shorebirds, Eddie Wozny, Cambridge, Maryland.  A dowitcher in resting pose and a preening yellowlegs. Both are signed and have a “W” carved in the underside. Both have carved crossed wingtips.  Very good and original. Provenance: Carr collection.

(1,000 - 1,400)

330. Pair of ruddy ducks, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded and signed. Both have raised carved wingtips and fluted tails.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400) 331. Pair of black ducks, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  “G Strunk” stamped in weights. One is in content pose the other has a turned head. Both are caved in the Delaware River tradition.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,000)

332. Life size carving of a hen turkey, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Wing and tail feather carving.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 333. Carved great horned owl with crow on wooden pedestal, Bob Moreland.  Signed and dated 1996. Detailed feather carving on owl. Crows wing flaps when a string is pulled.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 334. Carved great horned owl on stand, Bob Moreland.  Signed. Included is a carved duck call with an owl and crows on it. Back of owl is hinged and a hollow crow inside. The crow is hinged with spot for duck call to be stored.  Very good and original. (900 - 1,200)

139


335

336

337

338

339

335. Two reproduction Ken Anger decoys.    Mallard is very good and original; hooded merganser has minor wear; slight roughness to one edge of tail.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(800 - 1,200)

336. Pair of wood ducks, Reggie Birch, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Signed.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 337. Two decoys, Miles Hancock, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Both have original paint with slight wear at the extremities. (600 - 900)

140

340

338. Hollow black duck, carved in the eastern shore tradition, Ira Skees.  Signed and dated 2006. Inlet head and glass eyes.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (600 - 900) 339. Three plover, Pete Peterson, Cape Charles, Virginia.  Two are branded, signed, and dated 1994. One has “Pete” carved in the underside.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Carr collection.

(500 - 800)

340. Pair of swimming mallards, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia.  Both have a large “C” carved in the underside.  Very good and original. (500 - 800)


341

342

343

344

346

345

347

341. Two decoys, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia.  A merganser drake and teal hen. Both have large “C” in underside. Merganser is signed and dated 2003.  Original and good. (500 - 800) 342. Two decoys, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia.  A swimming coot and redhead drake. Both have large “C”.  Very good and original. (500 - 800) 343. Pair of teal carved in the Delaware River tradition, John “Jack” Wood.  Signed and dated 2009.  Very good and original. (350 - 550) 344. Two decoys, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia.  Both have large “C” carved in the underside. Mallard hen is signed and dated 2004.  Very good and original. (500 - 800)

348

345. Stick up pintail drake, Reggie Birch, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Removable head. Signed.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (400 - 600) 346. Two decoys, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia.  Widgeon drake and ringbill drake. Both have a large “C” carved in underside. Widgeon is signed.  Original and good. (450 - 650) 347. Reproduction of a root head merganser drake.    Paint has been worn and aged; small crack in underside.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(300 - 400)

348. Pair of mergansers, Bob Biddle, Media, Pennsylvania.  Both are stamped RGB in the weight and signed.  Original and good. Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(300 - 500)

End of Session One 141


Session Two

Wednesday, July 26, 2017 – 10:00 AM

Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts

349 Detail

349 Detail

142


349. Extremely rare yellowlegs with both wings up in landing pose, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is under the base. Highly detailed feather paint and good patina. Carved tail feathers.  Original paint with slight wear and a very small amount missing from the filler under one wing; thighs are a professional repair with a small amount of touchup in that area; very small amount of jesso missing from each ankle. Provenance: From an estate in Rhode Island. Literature: “Songless Aviary,” Brian Cullity.

(30,000 - 35,000)

349 Detail

349

143


350

350. Very rare full size feeding least sandpiper, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. Split tail carving.  Original paint with good detail and patina; several paint flakes missing from jesso feet; chips missing from backs of jesso knees.

350 Detail

144

Provenance: Formerly in the Carolyn Rowland collection. (7,000 - 10,000)


351

351. Rare full size white rumped sandpiper, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Fine feather paint detail and split tail carving.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. Signed “A.E. Crowell, Cape Cod”.   Excellent and original.

Provenance: Formerly in the Carolyn Rowland collection. (7,000 - 10,000)

351 Detail

145


352. Preening greater yellowlegs, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp in in the base. Highly detailed tail feather carving and carving under the lifted wing. Beak is open slightly with metal feather in it. Exceptional paint pattern under wing.  Tiny chip missing from jesso in back of one foot; part of one jesso thigh is missing otherwise excellent and original. (17,500 - 22,500)

352 146


352 Detail

352 Detail 147


353

354

353. Full size standing robin, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside of the base. Fine feather paint detail and dropped wings.  Original paint with slight wear; jesso thigh, part of a jesso foot, and very tip of bill have been restored; several small spots of touchup on back and top of head. (4,000 - 5,000)

148

354. Very rare pair of mallard bookends, Elmer Crowell East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Full size.  Near mint original paint; drake has a professional bill crack repair; hen has professional neck crack repair by Russ Allen.

Literature: “The Songless Aviary,” Brian Cullity. (3,500 - 4,500)


355

356

355. 3/4 size pintail drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. Very slightly turned head.  Excellent and original.

356. 1/2 size flying mallard drake on painted background, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Backboard is 14” x 18 1/2”.  Painting and carving are very good and original; paint on frame is crazed.

Provenance: Tag on back reads “made for Wilson’s daughter Celia about 1936.” (3,000 - 4,000)

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (4,500 - 6,500)

149


357. Two full size robins, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  “Lubec” is written on the underside of one.  Original paint with slight wear, a few small scratches.

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

357

358. Grosbeak, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Original wire legs. Raised carved wingtips and fluted tail.  Original paint with very minor wear; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,000)

358

359. Robin, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Raised carved wingtips and fluted tail.  Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,000)

359

360. Running rail, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Raised extended wingtips.  Near mint original paint; minor discoloration on one side of the neck; structurally good.

360 150

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection. (950 - 1,250)


361

361.

Well carved full size flying mallard drake in unusual pose, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.    Some of the paint and filler has flaked away where the wings join the body, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Jim Barthe collection. Formerly in collection of noted folk art collector David Morse, Portland Maine. From the collection of Fred Anderson, early decoy collecter from South Portland, Maine who obtained it directly from Wilson. (8,000 - 10,000)

361 Detail

151


362

362

363

364

365

365

365

362. Three sets of 1/4 size duck carvings, Larry Tawes, Sr., Salisbury, Maryland and a pair of Ken Harris shovelers by Tom Fergeson.  Signed and dated 1999 and 2004.  Original and good. (1,500 - 2,000) 363. Two carvings of flying birds.  A Canada goose, measures 14” and signed “Reinbold” under wing. And a pintail. Both have fine detailed painting.  Original paint; pintail wings have separated slightly from body; goose is original and good.

152

Provenance: Tracey collection.

(600 - 800)

364. Pied billed grebe in summer plumage, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Signed and dated 1970. Slightly lifted and turned head.  Very good and original. (750 - 950) 365. Six decoys, Armand Carney, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  A pair of wood ducks, pintails, and old squaw. Old squaw are signed and dated 1974, the others 1972.  All have turned heads. Old squaw drake and pintail drake have minor tail damage, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)


366

367

366. Large flying mallard drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.    Original paint with minor wear; protected by an old coat of varnish; filled crack in back from when the decoy was made; paint flakes missing where wings join body with small amount of touchup in that area.

367. Very rare flying wood duck drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Tack eyes and extended crest. Incised feather carving.  Old touchup on parts of the head, neck, and back; the rest is original with minor discoloration and wear; shallow saw cut mark most of way across tail.

Literature: “The Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor. (2,500 - 3,500)

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection.

(3,000 - 5,000)

153


368

369

370 368. Pair of 1/3 size mallards, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both have slightly turned heads and raised carved wingtips. Both are signed and dated 1959.  Fairly small and thin chip on one edge of hen’s extended wingtip, otherwise very good and original. (900 - 1,200) 369. Pair of 1/3 size pintails, Wendell Gilley, Southwest Harbor, Maine.  Raised carved wingtips and slightly turned heads.  Feet on drake are bent; thin crack partway through drake’s neck, otherwise very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

371

370. Pair of 1/2 size flying hooded mergansers, Norman Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Back board has moderate wear; approximately 1/3 of the surface area on the ducks has had the paint restored; one of hen’s wingtips has a reglued chip and the other wing is slightly loose. (1,400 - 1,800) 371. Pair of Canada geese, George Reinbold.  Signed on hardwood base. Watch gander stands 7 1/4” tall. Detailed feather paint.  Very good and original. (750 - 950)

154


372

372. Pair of pintails, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey.  Signed. Both have carved wingtips and slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

373. Folky 1/2 size seagull, George Huey, Friendship, Maine.  Mounted with feet on bottom board. In pencil written on board, “By G.R. Huey”. Typical carved eyes and bill carving. Stands 9” tall.  Very good and original. Provenance: Vinal collection. (3,000 - 3,500)

373

373A. Full size goldeneye drake doorstop, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in underside twice. Excellent and original. (1,750 - 2,250)

373A

155


Selected Locations Where Decoy Carvers Worked

156

Courtesy “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James R. Doherty


New Jersey Shorebirds Harry V. Shourds

1861 - 1920 Tuckerton, New Jersey

374 Detail

374. Exceptional robin snipe in spring breeding plumage, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Good wide body style.  Several tiny spots of discoloration on one side of breast, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Joe French. Acquired by Joe from Bud Ward at the Virginia Beach show in 1980. Identified with invisible ink on underside of tail. (17,500 - 22,500)

374

157


375

376

375. Rare curlew, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint that has darkened with age; minor wear; bill is a professional replacement; thin crack through neck.

Provenance: Private New Jersey collection. (6,000 - 8,000)

376. Golden plover, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey. Golden plover in winter plumage. Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear on one side of breast and head; thin crack at neck; very lightly hit by shot.

375 Detail

158

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” Jim Doherty, Jr. (4,500 - 6,500)


377 Detail

377

377. Black bellied plover in rare transitional plumage, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey. Good wide body style.  Original paint with minor wear; thin crack most of the way through bill; tip of bill has been blunted very slightly; lightly hit by shot. (9,500 - 12,500)

377 Detail

159


378

378 Detail

160

378.

Outstanding yellowlegs, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  Good wide body style.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Peter Bartlett. Formerly in the collection of the Shelburne Museum and so marked.

Literature: “North American Decoys at Auction,” Guyette & Schmidt, Inc., November 1995, lot 67, exact decoy. “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty. (9,500 - 12,500)


379. Rare yellowlegs, Taylor Johnson, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with very slight wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Milt Weiler collection. Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey, Mackey collection stamp on underside.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr.

(17,500 - 22,500)

379

379 Detail

379 Detail

161


380

381

382

381 Detail

380. Dowitcher from Chincoteague, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.   Small “N” brand in underside, as well as the Mackey stamp.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; age split in one side. Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Formerly in collection of DC North. Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey, Jr. (2,000 - 3,000) 381. Leeds Family curlew, Pleasantville, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Very wide plump body style with relief wing carving and tack eyes.  Original paint with 162

good feather detail, protected by an old coat of varnish; a few small dents.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(5,000 - 8,000)

382. Golden plover, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with some flaking and wear; bill is a professional replacement. Provenance: Private New Jersey collection. Formerly in the collection of Joe French, tiny “JF” near stick hole. (1,600 - 2,000)


Ontario 383. Hollow carved bluewing teal hen, last quarter 19th century.  Head is turned approximately 45 degrees.  Original paint with minor wear; hairline crack partway through neck; lightly hit by shot; two filled shot holes in breast. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 11. (2,000 - 3,000)

384. Rare bufflehead drake, Peter Pringle, Dunnville, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Good form with relief wing carving and gouge feather carving on the whole decoy.  Original paint with moderate wear protected by an old coat of varnish; several shot scars, including one on one edge of the bill.

383

384

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

385. Hollow carved feeding mallard drake, carver unknown, Ladner, British Columbia.  Applied bottom board.  Original paint with minor wear; thin crack in bottom board; small defect in one side of back. Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson, p. 20. (1,750 - 2,250)

385

386. Canvasback hen and drake, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Both are signed by Anger.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; structurally excellent.

Provenance: Olson collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

386 163


Phineas Reeves

1833 - 1896 Port Rowan, Ontario

St. Clair flats geese are exceedingly rare. Phineas Reeves, John Reeves, Tom Chambers, George and/or James Warin geese are all found in the Brown collection. They date from the 1860s through to the early 1900s and were primarily used at prestigious waterfowl hunting clubs in Ontario Canada. These geese exemplify the qualities that make these “Flats Decoys” so sought after, their features so compelling.

387 Detail

387

387. Hollow carved Canada goose, Phineas Reeves, Port Rowan, Ontario, 3rd quarter 19th century.    Original paint; minor discoloration and wear; hairline surface crack in back; underside appears to have had a brand or two planned off and was partially repainted. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from the Morgan estate, in upstate New York. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 17. (17,500 - 22,500)

164


George Warin

1830 - 1905 Toronto, Ontario

388

388 Detail

388. Rare solid body style Canada goose, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “G & J Warin Maker, Toronto” and “GH” in underside. From Lake Seagog, Ontario. Believed to be from the Segram family.  Original paint with minor wear; white cheek patches have been repainted; fairly large chip missing from tail; thin crack through neck; numerous tiny dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Bob Youngmen by Bruce Malcolm.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 65, exact decoy pictured. (9,500 - 12,500)

165


Ken Anger

1905 - 1961 Dunnville, Ontario

Ken Anger lived in Dunnville on the banks of the Grand River a few miles north of where it enters the north shore of Lake Erie at Port Maitland, Ontario. Dunnville, with its river, marshes, and proximity to Hamilton Bay to the northeast and Long Point Bay to the southwest, was an area where quality decoys were in demand. Ken was an avid fisherman and hunter – duck and woodcock hunting with his cocker spaniels was his passion. Ken became a commercial decoy maker in the late 1930s. As with most prolific carvers, his styles changed quite dramatically between the 1930s until his death in 1961. Dunnville’s other internationally renowned carver, Peter Marshall Pringle (1878-1953), is said to have influenced Ken’s work, particularly his use of heavy texturing with the wood rasp. Ken entered the “National Decoy Contest” in New York USA in 1948 and again in 1949 taking multiple first place Blue Ribbons each year. American sportsmen and collectors had found Dunnville’s Ken Anger. The international demand for Anger decoys continues to this day. In addition to his gunning blacks, mallards, redheads, canvasbacks, bluebills, whistlers, buffleheads, teal, and pintails, collectors were now commissioning decorative species – wood duck, shovellers, mergansers and old squaw. Ken made several thousand gunning decoys for local sportsmen from Dunnville, Long Point, Hamilton Bay, Niagara, and Buffalo areas. As his fame spread, his distribution area increased, especially for his decorative work in the mid 1950s until his death. Several extremely rare or one-of-a-kind decoys including shovellers and red breasted merganser decoys are included in the Brown/DU Canada collections. Ken’s gunning decoys were hollow using the best materials including Japanese oil paint. The wood was always rasp textured especially the head. His decoys were on the large size; highly visible; extremely durable structure and paint, true to species and species’ profile. They were a serious duck hunter’s decoy – no thin bills to break or fragile tails to chip. They were expensive, but they were quality. In addition to several thousand gunning decoys, Ken made a few geese, possibly a hundred decorative decoys, plus wall plaques and book ends featuring ducks and upland birds. Ken “The Rasp Master” Anger’s decoys are still highly sought after some 60 years after construction. Anger made very few Canada geese: carving two distinct styles – one a short, taller form with a short tail – the other elegant, slightly lower profile decoy with an extended, wide tail often referred to as a “paddle tail” or “beaver tail.”

389 Detail

166

390 Detail


389

390

389. Rare pair of widgeon, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Hen has slightly turned head.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

390. Hollow carved Canada goose, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear; slight roughness to one edge of tail; small dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(3,500 - 4,500)

167


Ivar Fernlund

1881 - 1933 Hamilton Bay, Ontario

A pattern maker by trade, Fernlund worked for Westinghouse and eventually lived at “The Beach Strip” on Hamilton’s waterfront at Burlington Bay. Fernlund made approximately 150 decoys for his personal use that were lightweight, hollow, and precisely carved having wonderfully blended and textured artist oil paint. The heads were well carved and precise with varied head positions and always with the great attitude. He made his rig starting around 1910 – Hamilton Bay’s finest which contained at least 10 species of ducks. A significant portion of the “Fernlund” rig, including a screening boat and trailer, was purchased by Frank Schmid (deceased 2012) of Mississaugua, Ontario in the mid 1970s. Frank was a top flight competitive decoy carver who was also an avid duck hunter that frequently hunted Long Point Bay on Lake Erie for divers. Frank stopped for a beer at a local Hamilton, Ontario hotel where a black duck and a pair of Fernlund canvasbacks were displayed behind the bar. The hotel owner had “the rig” at his home. Frank purchased the decoys, including canvasbacks, redheads, bluebills, blacks, pintails, greenwings, bluewings, and mallards. Bruce Malcolm met Frank duck hunting on Long Point Bay in the 1970s and eventually acquired decoys from the Fernlund (Schmid rig) that were subsequently sold to Peter Brown including the pintail pair, the black duck pair, the bluewing teal pair, canvasbacks, redheads, bluebills, and mallards. The Brown collection Fernlund bluewing teal are believed to be the only pair known. In addition, they are both in late winter/early spring plumage – a rarity in Ontario teal decoys since bluewing teal usually leave Ontario by late September or very early October while still in their “brown plumage” except for speculums. It is possible they were used to hunt “spring bluewings” circa 1915 or maybe spring plumage was just a more attractive option for Ivar to paint. Regardless, the hollow, pinched breast bluewing teal pair with tall Hamilton Bay body profile and wonderfully detailed wings and body paint are a decoy rarity.

391 Detail

168


391. Extremely rare pair of hollow carved bluewing teal, Ivar Fernlund, Hamilton, Ontario.  Hen has turned head. Bold scratch loop feather paint.  Original paint with minor wear; hen has a professional bill chip repair and tiny tail chip repair; each has several small spots of touchup.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 34. Peter Brown collection eBook. (20,000 - 25,000)

391 Detail

391

169


392

393

392. Pair of hollow carved redheads, Ivar Fernlund, Hamilton, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Both have turned heads.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; old in use repaint on the undersides; numerous dents; a few scrapes under the drake’s bill.

393. Hollow carved canvasback drake, Ivar Fernlund, Hamilton, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Head is turned approximately 45 degrees to one side.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; the breast, head, and bill have old in use repaint.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 34. (3,000 - 4,000)

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 34. (3,000 - 4,000)

170

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.


394. Pair of hollow carved mallards, Ivar Fernlund, Hamilton, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hen has turned head.  Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear; several small spots of professional touchup to the bodies; working touchup on white areas of speculums and on the drake’s neck ring.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 34. Peter Brown collection eBook.

(6,500 - 9,500)

394

394 Detail

394 Detail

171


Joseph Lincoln

1859 - 1938 Accord, Massachusetts

The long-tailed duck was historically referred to as the old squaw or quandy by those that ventured offshore after waterfowl. They received this name due to their melodious calls and whistles. Their range is limited as they are a cold water duck that would winter on the Northeast and Northwest coasts and in portions of the Great Lakes. Their diet consists primarily of mollusks and crustaceans. This dietary preference did not place them very high on an epicure’s list of favorites. If hunting strictly for the table, the larger scoters and eiders were a better choice – if only slightly so. They can dive to 200 feet in search of food and, for this, are seldom seen very close to shore. For these reasons, they were seldom the primary target of the hunt. They would commonly be seen, however, when “seaducking” as they skirted the offshore rigs and they presented as a small, fast flying, and sporting target. Seldom were decoys specifically needed for them. For these reasons, few old squaw decoys were produced. Lincoln was one of the very few major decoy carvers to produce them in any quantity, and even his production was limited when compared to his more common species such as blacks, geese, and brant. Elmer Crowell, for example, is known to have made perhaps only a handful of old squaws. It only makes sense that Lincoln would concentrate his time on those species where the market demand for those decoys was strong. Lincoln must have admired this beautiful little duck, and he must have enjoyed making these decoys for he lavished the same high degree of care and attention to detail on them as he did his equally colorful wood ducks. All of Lincoln’s decoys are to be admired, but certainly his rare old squaws deserve the highest level of praise. Joe posing behind his work bench with canvas covered geese, a canvas covered white wing scoter, old squaw, and a rig of ruddy ducks.

395 Detail 172


395. Important and very rare old squaw drake, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear, mostly on lower breast; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Vinal collection. Formerly in the Wick collection. Formerly in the Hollander collection.

Literature: “Joseph W. Lincoln,” Cap Vinal. “Decoys of Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr. “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (75,000 - 100,000)

395 Detail

395

173


A Unique and Innovative Design

Hunting on the coast of Massachusetts for large waterfowl such as brant and scoters required sizable rigs of equally large decoys. This fact presented the hunters with an important concern when transporting the rig and loading the boat for the trip offshore - - weight! One solution to this problem was the tried and true traditional hollow decoy but these had their shortcomings as they became awkward if and when they started to leak or take on water. Canvas over frame decoys showed much promise in regards to solving the problem but their construction made them susceptible to rips and tears in the course of daily use. Lincoln surely recognized these issues and finally arrived at his own unique and very innovative design. A traditional body style would be completely hollowed out from below to a thin shell and attached to a bottom board for flotation. The concept was to leave the stern of the decoy completely open so that water could easily escape. This solved the leakage problem and gave the decoy a significant degree of ruggedness over its canvas covered counterparts. Well aware of local gunning traditions, Lincoln thoughtfully included sloping fore and aft holes in the bottom for setting out the decoys in “strings” as was common for this type of hunting. His craftsmanship and pride in construction shows in the chamfered bottom board which was probably an unnecessary but desirable addition. It has been suggested that the idea came to Lincoln as an evolution of the well-known “shadow on a raft” style decoy.

396 Detail 174


396

396. Self bailing brant, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  A highly desirable example of this unique and innovative design by one of North America’s master carvers.   Excellent original paint allows Lincoln’s subtle yet beautifully painted feather detail to shine. Surface exhibits a fine patina with only a scattering of very minor rubs. Structurally excellent. Typical chamfered bottom board with fore and aft stringing holes.

Literature: “Joseph Lincoln,” by Cap Vinal, p. 35. (4,500 - 6,500)

396 Detail

175


397 Detail

397 176


Considered the smallest dabbling duck in North America, greenwing teal are excellent table fare. Hunting them, however, does not require the use of teal decoys as they are attracted to other puddle duck decoys. For this reason, teal decoys were not ordered by hunters in New England. In fact, as far as we know, this is one of only two working greenwing teal made and used in New England by a known decoy maker. Charles Hart made a small rig of teal, and Joe Lincoln made at least this single drake.

Greenwing Teal Decoy Artist: Bob Piscatori

397 Detail

397. Important and very rare greenwing teal drake, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; old overpaint has been professionally removed from the lower sides and neck area; old overpaint remains on the underside; several tiny dents; one tiny shot mark. Provenance: Vinal collection. Formerly in the collection of Jim McCleery (lot 435 Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s auction January 2000). Formerly in collection of William J. Mackey, Richard Bourne auction, July 1973, lot 530. Literature: “Joseph W. Lincoln,” Cap Vinal, p. 42, exact decoy. “Call to the Sky,” Robert Shaw, p. 31, exact decoy. “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph p. 154. “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, Jr. p. 129. “Massachusetts Masters,” Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, exhibit p. 56 exact decoy. 2003 Massachusetts Duck Stamp, this exact decoy is represented. (45,000 - 55,000)

177


Miniatures by Joseph Lincoln

Joseph Lincoln outside of his shop “Joseph W. Lincoln,” Cap Vinal.

Unlike other carvers of miniature waterfowl, Lincoln’s presentations are all carved in decoy form and are practically exact copies of his full size working decoys. He is not known to have carved any miniatures that do not hold true to this rule. This may be due to the fact that he was such an early creator of this type of carving. As pointed out in “Birds in Wood and Paint” by Joseph Ellis; “Many have argued that Lincoln was the first of the decoy carvers to carve miniatures and that Elmer Crowell did so only after vising Lincoln at his workshop in 1904”. Throughout his carving career he remained true to his hunting heritage and carved miniature decoys as opposed to producing more “decorative” styles in life-like poses for the tourist trade.

178


398

399

400

401

402

403

398. Rare miniature goose by Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  Carved in decoy form in the seldom seen sleeping pose. Head and neck are gracefully carved back over the body in a restful pose.  Outstanding original paint and condition. Once part of a collection of eight and so noted in pencil on base. A very fine example. Certainly one of Lincoln’s more appealing miniatures. (2,500 - 3,500)

401. Miniature red breasted merganser drake, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  With an expertly carved crest.  Excellent original paint and with only a few very tiny flakes or rubs to tip of crest and bill; retains the strong Lincoln ink stamp on the base; once part of a collection of eight and so noted in pencil on base. (2,000 - 3,000)

399. Miniature mallard drake by Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  Excellent original paint and condition in every regard. Retains the strong Lincoln ink stamp on the base. Once part of a collection of eight and so noted in pencil on base.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

402. Pair of miniature goldeneye, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.    Very good and original.

400. Miniature Canada goose by Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.    Outstanding original paint and condition. Lincoln’s instantly recognized painted feather detail on sides remains crisp and sharp. Retains the strong Lincoln ink stamp on the base. Once part of a collection of eight and so noted in pencil on base. (2,000 - 3,000)

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection.

Literature: “Joseph Lincoln,” Cap Vinal.

(3,000 - 4,000)

403. Miniature pintail hen, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.    Very good and original.

Provenance: Jim Andrews collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

179


Miniatures by Elmer Crowell

404

406

408

404. Miniature widgeon hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.    Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750) 405. Miniature pintail hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s paper label is on the underside of the base.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750) 406. Miniature bluewing teal drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Traces of Crowell’s ink stamp under base.  Several tiny flakes of paint missing from back of neck and in painting on bill, otherwise very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

180

405

407

409

407. Miniature pintail drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Identified under the base. Fairly large, approximately 5 3/4” long.  Approximately 1/4” of tip of tail has been professionally replaced, otherwise excellent and original. (1,400 - 1,800) 408. Miniature feeding canvasback drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Traces of Crowell’s round ink stamp on underside.  Touchup on bill, otherwise very good and original. (1,400 - 1,800) 409. Rare miniature gadwall hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Number 28 is written under the base.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)


410

411

413

412

414

415

410.

Miniature Canada goose, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is under the base.  Tiny dent in back, otherwise very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

411.

Miniature running brant, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s paper label is on underside of base.  Very good and original. (1,750 - 2,250)

412. Miniature pair of buffleheads, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.    Very minor paint loss to base of hen, otherwise excellent and original. (2,500 - 3,000)

413. Miniature running black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s paper label is under the base.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 414. Miniature canvasback hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s paper label is under the base.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 415. Miniature pair of goldeneye, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.   Each has been signed by Crowell and identified on the underside of bases.  Very good and original. (2,750 - 3,250)

181


Midwest Enoch Riendahl 1904 - 2000 Oshkosh, Wisconsin

Reindahl was not born with this ability to capture waterfowl in such realistic forms, he earned it, and he spent years perfecting his skills. On his twelve-acre marsh near his home, he fed, raised, and photographed ducks. The marsh had three duck ponds, planted with wild rice, sago pondweed, and other plants for wildlife food. He became such a distinguished photographer that many of his photos were published in nature magazines in the 1930s and 40s. Reindahl was a remarkable man who made some of the country’s best decoys in his time. He only made one order for sale, the rest of his output was for his own use. This resting or sleeping black duck was likely made in the early 1930s. Self portrait of Reindahl painting a bluebill decoy, part of a rig he made for his friend, Russel “Raz’ Berry.

416 Detail 182


416. Rare sleeping blackduck, Enoch Reindahl, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.  Bill is buried in feathers. Carved crossed wingtips.  Original paint with good detail and minor wear; crack in underside; small chip missing from one wingtip.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(15,000 - 20,000)

416

416 Detail

183


Bert Graves 1887 - 1956 Peoria, Illinois 417. Pintail hen, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.   Early “white sided” style. Retains Graves’ weight, Branded “GSO”. Fine feather paint detail.  Original paint with very slight wear, mostly at the extremities.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (6,500 - 9,500)

417 418.

Pintail drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Retains Graves’ weight, Branded “GSO”. Fine feather paint and combing detail.  Original paint; minor wear; structurally very good.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (3,000 - 5,000)

418

417 Detail

184

418 Detail


419 419 Detail

419 Detail

419. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois. Drake has a longer and more graceful neck than typical. Puddle duck tails. Graves’ weight is on the underside of each.  Original paint with very slight wear; a few tiny dents; minor discoloration on parts of one side and the back of the drake.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(8,000 - 12,000) 185


420. Canvasback drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Diver tail.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (2,500 - 3,500)

420

421. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Perdew weight in underside with ten small dots at the back.  Original paint with moderate wear; structurally good.

Provenance: tion.

Berry/Kalinsky collec(2,000 - 3,000)

421

422. Pintail drake, Stephen Lane, Lacon Illinois, last quarter 19th century. Branded “EVC”. Original paint with good comb paint detail on back and tail; the rest has working repaint; shallow chip in underside of bill was repaired a long time ago with some sort of filler.

Literature: ”Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway” Alan Haid. (2,500 - 3,500)

422

423. Carved balsa owl, John Hyatt, Pekin, Illinois.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; touchup to parts of the head; numerous dents. (800 - 1,200)

423 186


424 Detail

424

424. Rare pintail drake, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois.  Good comb and feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear; head has been professional reset with professional touchup at the neck seat. Provenance: Rigmate to lot 9 in our April 2017 auction. From a farm in Kentucky. (12,000 - 15,000)

424 Detail

187


Charles Perdew 1874 - 1963 Henry, Illinois

425

425 Detail

425. Pair of mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Retain Perdew weights, with eight small dots at the end.  Original paint with moderate wear; small dents in lower half of drake, otherwise structurally good.

Provenance: lection.

Berry/Kalinsky col-

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (5,000 - 8,000)

188


426. Rigmate pair of pintails, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Both have slightly turned heads. Charlie’s paint.  Original paint with minor wear; hairline crack through hen’s bill and crack through hen’s neck.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (9,000 - 12,000)

426

426 Detail

189


427

427

427. Rig of ten mallard decoys, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois.  All ten are unused and two piece body with tack eyes. One has been primed but not painted.  Paper wrapping has stuck to sides of several of the decoys; some have small areas of flaking; otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Consigned directly from the Rule family. (4,500 - 5,500)

Newt Rule

190


George Kessler 1868 - 1955 Pekin, Illinois

428

428. Rare pair of widgeon, George Kessler, Pekin, Illinois.   Branded “ECB” for Earnest C. Burhams who owned Green Head Hunt Club on the Illinois River in Woodford County, Illinois.  Original paint with minor wear on the hen; minor wear on most of the drake, except for a worn area on lower side and underside; small rough spot on drake’s bill. (7,500 - 9,500)

428 Detail

191


Mason Factory Shorebirds

429

431

430

432

433

429. Rare dunlin in fall plumage, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model with detailed paint pattern.  Original paint with minor wear; filled crack in one side with touchup in that area; touchup on center area of underside.

432. Golden plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model. Good paint detail on back.   Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; old overpaint has been taken off the underside; small crack in one side.

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

430. Yellowlegs, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Tack eye model.  Original paint with very little wear that has darkened with age; structurally good. (2,000 - 3,000) 431. Dove, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model with simple paint pattern.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot. 192

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

433. Black bellied plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Tack eye model.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)


434

435

434. Three yellowlegs, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Tack eye models.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; iron bills are pitted with minor damage where the bills join the wooden heads; lightly hit by shot; one has a crack in the tail and one has a hairline crack in the breast.

Provenance: From a hunting rig in North Carolina. (4,500 - 6,500)

436

435. Yellowlegs, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model with highly detailed feather paint.  Original paint with slight wear, mostly on top of head.

Provenance: From a hunting rig in North Carolina. (3,000 - 5,000)

436. Yellowlegs, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Tack eye model.  Original paint with minor wear; specks of off white paint on back; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: From a hunting rig in North Carolina. (2,500 - 3,500) 193


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

437

194


437 Detail

437. Large sickle billed curlew, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eyes. Good feather paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; refilled “in factory” crack in back; small amount of filler added to the back of the neck seat.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (15,000 - 20,000)

437 Detail 195


Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland 438 Detail

438

439

438. Very rare bluebill drake, circa 1920s, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Head is turned approximately 80 degrees.  Worn old paint; hairline cracks; wear to the edges of the tail. (4,000 - 6,000)

439. 1932 model redhead drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.    All the drakes in this rig had the heads repainted as bluebills; body has original paint and good stipling and minor wear; the head has had old overpaint taken off; lightly hit by shot.

196

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Brian McGrath and Ron Gard. (5,000 - 8,000)


440. Pair of canvasbacks, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both have slightly turned heads and are signed.   Minor paint shrinkage on lower portions of hen’s breast, otherwise original and good.

Provenance: collection.

Berry/Kalinsky (3,000 - 5,000)

440

441.

441

Canada goose, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930.  Signed by Lem Ward at a later date.  Old in use repaint; worn to the original paint and to bare wood in some places; numerous cracks; filler added to separations at back of neck; age split in underside; lightly hit by shot. (2,500 - 3,500)

442. Pair of shooting stool model bluebills, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1966. Both have turned heads.  Very good and original. (3,000 - 5,000)

442

443. Pair of shooting stool model canvasbacks, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Both are signed and dated 1973 and have a poem written on the bottom. Both have turned heads.  Very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

443

197


444

445

444 Detail

444. 1948 model merganser drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1949. Slightly turned cedar head and inserted cedar tail. Balsa body.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(5,000 - 8,000)

445. Pair of mergansers, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1967. Both have slightly turned heads.  Both have near mint original paint; small amount of paint shrinkage on hen’s breast.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath. (5,000 - 8,000) 198


446

446 Detail

446 Detail

446. 1936 model bluebill hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint; minor wear; structurally good. (8,000 - 12,000)

199


Canada

447

447 Detail

447. Hollow carved bluebill hen; JR Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “JRW Maker”. Subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear; hit by shot, mostly on one side. (5,000 - 7,000) 448. Rare canvas over wood widgeon drake, Charles Reeves, Port Rowan, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hollow carved. Branded “GHR” for George H. Richardson, 1914 Long Point Club member. Also branded “R Winthrop”.  Old in use repaint on underside and parts of the rest of the decoy; some original paint with minor wear on head, breast, back, and tail; several small shot marks.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 18. (1,500 - 2,000)

Charles Reeves’ wife, Sarah Ann, applied the canvas to the decoys prior to their painting by Charles. Charles was a duck club manager, boat builder, and decoy maker who worked at the Toronto Big Creek Shooting Club and later, around the turn of the century, moved to the Long Point Company, both on the north shore of Lake Erie at Long Point, Ontario. His father, Phineas Reeves (1833-1896), was the patriarch of 3 generations of decoy makers and had worked at the “Company” since its founding in 1866. Charles guided and built decoys for the members, built boats, fished commercially, and trapped at the Long Point Company.

448

200


449 Detail

449

449. Extremely rare rigmate pair of hooded mergansers, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.   Each are branded “CWC” on bottom board and “C” on chins.  Both have appealing old in use repaint with slight wear; a few tiny dents; very small wedge shape chip missing from one side of drake’s neck base; drake has bill repair.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Sam Stuart. (5,000 - 8,000)

449 Detail 201


450. Hollow carved short body style canvasback drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “HMJ” and “WLM”.  Original paint with good combing detail with minor rubs in that area; structurally good. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 14. (2,500 - 3,500)

450 451. Hollow carved redhead drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “JTN” for James T. Nichol, St. Clair Flats Shooting Company Member 19011935.  Original paint; very minor wear; several small dents in back. (2,000 - 3,000)

451 452. Pair of goldeneye, Sam Hutchins, Jones Falls, Ontario.    Hen is in original paint with minor wear; drake has old repaint; each has a chip missing from one side of tail; hen has chip missing from top of the tail as well; small dents and chew marks on hen’s bill; thin cracks in drake’s neck base.

452

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 178. (3,000 - 4,000)

453. Goldeneye drake, Henry Sorby, Gores Landing, Ontario.    Original paint; minor wear; very lightly hit by shot. (700 - 900)

453 202


Miscellaneous Decoys 454. Canvasback drake, Mark McCool Whipple, Bourg, Louisiana.  Classic Whipple tufted head.  Repainted by Max Whipple, the carver’s son.

Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie, p. 18. (1,500 - 2,000)

454

455

456

457

455. Pintail drake, Skip and Chris Couvillion, Shreveport, Louisiana.  Signed. Underside has a Louisiana duck stamp attached to it and inscription that reads “decoy was hunted over by Phil Robertson and the duck men in 2014.”  Original paint with slight wear and discoloration; structurally good. (350 - 450) 456. Mallard drake, Skip and Chris Couvillion, Shreveport, Louisiana.  Signed. Underside has a duck stamp attached and has inscription, “Hunted over by Phil Robertson and the duck men, 2014.”  Original and good. (350 - 450)

458

457. Large gull, circa 1900.  Old tag on underside reads “ex. Collection Quintina Collio.”  Old in use repaint; numerous cracks; tail chip missing. (1,250 - 1,750) 458. Gull with slightly lifted head.    Original paint with moderate wear on most of the decoy; black paint applied to much of the breast and down one side; age split in underside; numerous cracks; chip missing from neck base.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Bill Staplin. (400 - 600)

203


Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts

459

459 Detail

459 Detail

459. Sleeping black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. Long graceful neck and good paint detail.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent. Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. “Songless Aviary,” Brian Cullity. (12,000 - 15,000) 204


460 Detail

460 Detail

460. Early hollow carved goldeneye hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Slightly turned head, applied bottom board, and carved crossed wingtips. Pre oval brand, last quarter 19th century. Branded “JWW” for John Ware Willard. Willard had a hunting lodge on Pleasant Bay near Chatham, Massachusetts. He was the grandson of Simon Willard the famous New England clock maker.  Original paint; good patina and very minor wear; a few specs of off white paint on the back. Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(12,000 - 15,000)

460

205


461

462

461. Black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Pre brand. Slightly turned head with good feather paint detail.  Neck seat has separated slightly, otherwise very good and original. (3,000 - 5,000)

462. Oversize black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  19 1/2” long. Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Very slightly turned and lifted head.  Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; protected by an old coat of varnish; a few tiny dents.

206

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(4,000 - 5,000)


463. Merganser hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Low head gunning model with slightly turned head and Crowell’s oval brand in the underside.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; three shot holes in one side.

463 Detail

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. (12,000 - 15,000)

463

463 Detail

207


464 464 Detail

464. Rare sleeping goldeneye drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside.  Original paint with minor wear; hairline crack in back and partway through neck base.

208

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. (12,000 - 15,000)


465 465 Detail 465. Lowhead bluebill drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. Slightly turned head, relief carved wingtips, and fluted tail.  Near mint original paint; very slight roughness to one edge of tail; underside was never painted.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (9,000 - 12,000)

209


Items of Interest

466

467 Detail

468

466. Carved wooden salmon trophy fish, H.N. Ashford.  Plaque approximately 50” long, fish approximately 44”. Caught in the Nomsen River in Norway.  Original paint on most of the decoy several small scrapes have been professionally touched up; top of tail fin is missing. (3,000 - 4,000) 467. Contemporary cane, Lloyd Cargile, Baltimore, Maryland.  Carving on top is a black man with patriotic hat and tie.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

467 210

468. Vintage metal weathervane, circa 1930.  Biplane with single prop. Measures 19” x 21”. Surface is a mix of verdigris and areas of light rust.  All parts appear to be original. Provenance: Tracey collection.

(800 - 1,000)


469

469

470

471 469. Set of 14 souvenir canoe paddles from the first half of the 20th century.  They vary in length from 18” to 37”. Various decorations including eagle with coat of arms, various animals, fish, flowers, Canadian and American flag, etc.  A couple have cracks otherwise the condition is good. (2,000 - 3,000) 470. Wooden carved cane with snake.    Original and good.(250 - 350)

471 Detail

471. Wooden carved cane of a hand holding a fish.     Fair to good. (350 - 450)

211


472

474

473

475 472. Two wooden gunning boxes, circa 1900.  One is 6” x 7” x 9”. The other is 4” x 11 1/2” x 15”. One has 66 brass shotgun shells and some loading tools.  Larger one has damage at the hinges; the other is good. (400 - 600) 473. Two fish decoys and one fishing lure, Ralph Johnson, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1940 and one unfinished fish decoy, Frank Kuss, St. Clair Shores, Michigan.  Purchased directly from Ralph Johnson’s tackle box. Both fish decoys have glass eyes and attached aluminum fins. Each measures 4” in length and are slightly curved. Kuss is probably carved from mahogany, shaped out with carved gill and mouth. This fish was never weighted or painted.  Paint on black and white fish has bubbled slightly on face and flaked in other areas; red and white fish is structurally good, appears to be protected by an old coat of varnish; lure has two treble hooks and is in original paint with a few small rubs; Kuss is very good and original. (600 - 900) 212

476 474. Two carved fish plaques.  A blue gill that shows good age and fish measures 7” in length. Detailed original paint; two fins that have been cracked and reglued. A brown trout, fish is 6 1/2” long. Original paint protected by coat of varnish; missing bottom fin.   Provenance: Tracey collection.

(400 - 600)

475. Early wooden sculpture possibly from a circus wagon.  40” x 34”.  Multiple coats of paint over highly carved figures with a mirror in the center.

Provenance: Tracey collection.

(400 - 600)

476. Grenfel mat.  Image of man with two leaping dogs. Mounted in frame. Mat measures 9 1/2” x 10 1/4”.  Original and good.

Provenance: Tracey collection.

(300 - 500)


478

477

479

482 480

481 477. Group of five northwest totem poles.  Three are attached to a bottom board, which is signed on underside, “Done by Billy Samson, Kanakabar Litton BC”. Largest measures 11” in length. Other two are mounted on their own base.  Original paint with very little wear.

Provenance: Tracey collection.

(600 - 800)

478. Memorial carving of a dog.  With alert head and raised tail. Painted base has brass plaque with the name “Dan 1938-1949”. Measures 8 1/2” tall.  Old paint has crazed; very tip of tail appears to be broken off. Provenance: Tracey collection.

(400 - 500)

479. Two painted boxes.  Largest measures 31” x 10” x 6”. Original gray paint with image of protractor and ruler painted on the top. Smaller box measures 11” x 6.5” x 5”. Original paint with early metal latch.   Provenance: Tracey collection.

480. Folk carving of a woman made from pine.  Appears to have some age. Measures 26” tall.  Original and good.

Provenance: Tracey collection.

(400 - 500)

481. Carved wooden plaque of a shorebird in the marsh.  Measures 8 1/2” x 7 3/4”. Shows good age.  Original and good. (150 - 250) 482. Northwest coast carving of an animal figure.  With colorful paint and elaborately carved face. Professionally mounted on base. Carving measures 8” in height x 8” wide. Appears to be circa 1st quarter 20th century.   Provenance: Tracey collection.

(800 - 1,000)

(600 - 800) 213


Shorebirds

483

485

484

486

483. Well sculpted golden plover from Nantucket, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Beetle head style.  Excellent and original. (3,000 - 4,000) 484. Golden plover from Nantucket, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with very slight wear; very minor roughness to wingtips. (3,000 - 4,000) 485. Early hollow carved willet made by a member of the Coffin Family, Nantucket, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with very minor wear; tip of tail has been blunted slightly; bill is a professional replacement by Russ Allen. (2,250 - 2,750) 214

486. Greater yellowlegs or willet from the Massachusetts coast. Unknown carver but similar in some respects to the work of the Thomas family of Assinnippi, Mass. A large decoy, measuring twelve inches from the top of the head to the tip of the tail. Very deeply carved wings terminate on the back with “Vee - shaped” wingtips. Attractively carved facial features. Original bill with bead or shoe button eyes. Attractive old gunning paint shows overall light wear. Lightly hit by a small size shot.

Literature: Decoy Magazine, Nov/Dec, 2003. (1,000 - 1,400)


487

488

489

487. Two silhouette golden plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Tack eyes and wingtip and tail carving. Original carrying holes through the back.  Excellent and original, never used. (6,500 - 9,500) 488.

Golden plover silhouette, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Tack eyes. Detailed wing tip and tail carving.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

489. Hollow carved golden plover, John Ramsey, Somerside, Prince Edward Island, last quarter 19th century.  Very thinly carved with shoe button eyes.  Original paint with significant shrinkage; structurally good. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (2,000 - 3,000)

215


490

491

490 Detail

490. Black bellied plover, from Nantucket, last quarter 19th century.  Baleen bill. Wide beetle head and chined bottom edge of body. Two wooden stakes appear to be original.  Original paint with minor rubs; very lightly hit by shot. (4,500 - 6,500)

216

491 Detail

491. Rare running sandpiper, Obediah Verity, Seaford, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Carved eyes and relief wing carving.  Worn original paint; hit by shot; shot scar above one eye. (3,000 - 4,000)


492. Fine curlew attributed to Gordon Fox, Duxbury, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century. Beautiful rendition of this popular species. Deeply split tail. Expertly blended original paint and retaining the original bill. Outstanding and original except for a few small rubs or flakes on the left side.

Provenance: A few decoys by this maker were discovered in the Hingham or Duxbury area of Massachusetts and a small rig by the same hand surfaced in Chatham, Mass on Cape Cod with the “Fox” brand – thus the attribution which has been attached to decoys by this maker.

Literature: For a similar example see pp34-35 in “Massachusetts Masters” by the Ward, Museum and the expertly written essay on this carver on pp42 and 43 of “Massachusetts Master – The Decoy as Art” by Gigi Hopkins. (12,000 - 15,000)

492

492 Detail

492 Detail 217


493

494

495

496

498

497

493. Golden plover from Massachusetts, circa 1900.  Bead eyes.  Original paint; minor wear; structurally good. (1,750 - 2,250) 494. Golden plover from Massachusetts.    Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; moderate wear on sides; one bead eye is missing. (1,000 - 1,400) 495. Lincoln type yellowlegs, Hingham, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear. (1,250 - 1,750) 496 Curlew, Eugene “Chief” Cuffee, Shinnecock Reservation, Long Island, New York. Typical applied wings with dropped wingtips. Carved eyes. Original paint with very subtle painted feather detail. Some flakes to 218

filler and paint where neck joins the body with some light rubs along lower wing edges. Small chip on left wingtip, mostly on inside edge. Bill may be a replacement. (500 - 800) 497. Yellowlegs from Nantucket, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving with extended wingtips. Tack eyes.  Original paint with moderate wear; bill as well as plug in top of head are replacements. (1,250 - 1,750) 498. Pair of root head yellowlegs, William Rawlings, Musquodoboit Harbor, Nova Scotia.    Original paint with minor wear; each has an age split in underside.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (1,200 - 1,500)


499

499. Running Black bellied plover, Elijah Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts.  Relief wing carving with extended tips, and shoe button eyes. Feather carving on wingtips.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; very lightly hit by shot; tip of bill has been blunted slightly.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (6,500 - 9,500)

500. Feeding yellowlegs, Clarence Hinkley, Beverly, Massachusetts.  Tack eyes. Original paint with minor to moderate wear on most of the decoy; the white area was repainted and someone has taken most of the repaint off; structurally good. (1,000 - 1,400)

499 Detail

Clarence Hinkley

500

219


Virginia 501. Rare hollow carved black duck, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, circa 1920s.   Early three piece body construction. Loop scratch feather paint. From the Kruger rig.  Original paint with minor wear; small dent in one side of bill. (4,000 - 6,000)

501

502. Hollow carved brant, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Fine feather paint detail.  Original paint on back, underside, and sides; black and white areas have working repaint, appears to have been done by Hudson; thin crack in underside.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Mort Hanson, Sr. (4,500 - 6,500)

502

501 Detail

502 Detail

220


503

503. Swimming Canada goose, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Original paint with minor wear; hairline cracks and small dents; age split in underside. Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (5,500 - 8,500)

503 Detail

504. Rigmate pair of bluebills, Ike Phillips, Wachapreague, Virginia.    Original paint with little wear; small surface cracks on bodies.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (2,250 - 2,750)

504 221


Ira Hudson

1876 - 1949 Chincoteague, Virginia

Ira Hudson outside his workshop

505 Detail

222


505 Detail

505. Extremely rare greenwing teal drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, circa 1920s.  Detailed scratch loop feather paint.  Original paint with minor wear; small spot of touchup on one side of breast; hairline crack partway through neck; slight wear to the wood on one edge of the tail. (20,000 - 25,000)

505

223


Massachusetts 506. Black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside.  Near mint original paint; several tiny dents and shot marks. (2,000 - 3,000)

506 507. Oversize Canada goose, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  34” long. Weighs over 20 lbs.  Old paint; moderate wear; surface roughess on one side; age split in underside.

Provenance: Vinal collection.

Literature: “North American Decoys Magazine,” Fall 1976. p. 7. (2,000 - 3,000)

507

508. Cork body black duck, Lou Rathmell, Stratford, Connecticut.  Slightly turned head.  Paint appears to be second coat by Rathmell; a few small dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

508

509. Oversize canvas over wooden slat Canada goose, Joseph Lincoln,Accord, Massachusetts.  Approximately 29” long.   Repaint on the white areas, the rest is original with minor wear; a few very small worn spots in canvas. Provenance: Vinal collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

509 224


510. Black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is on the underside.  Slightly turned head. Original paint with minor wear, mostly on each side; short hairline surface cracks on one side of the area where bill joins face; several shot marks. (1,750 - 2,250)

510 511.

Large pair of mergansers, by a member of the Swift Family, Sagamore Beach, Massachusetts.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Drake is branded “FB Rice”.  Original paint with moderate wear; age crack in one side of hen and underside of drake; numerous cracks; several nails were added to the side of the hen to keep the age split from opening more. (2,000 - 3,000)

511 512. Large black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Branded “Pequaw - Honk Club” under the tail.  Original paint with minor fading and wear; several small dents; head is slightly loose; hairline crack in breast. (1,500 - 2,500)

512 513. Oversize hollow carved black duck, Charles Hart, Gloucester, Massachusetts.  Detailed feather carving.  Original paint with minor wear; small gouges in wood on one side; bark line visible at the bottom of the other side; bottom board has been replaced. (2,000 - 3,000)

513 225


514. Solid body black duck, Charles Hart, Gloucester, Massachusetts.  Detailed wing and tail carving.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on one side and the back of the head; small tail chip missing. (1,500 - 2,500)

514 515. Rare old squaw drake, Cassius Smith, Milford, Connecticut, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “DA Young”.  Paint is a very well done restoration; structurally good.

Provenance: Found on Long Island by Bud Ward.

Literature: “Connecticut Decoys,” Henry Chitwood. (1,250 - 1,750)

515

516. Merganser drake from Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Large “J” carved in underside. Raised neck seat.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; wear to the wood at the edge of the tail; a few tiny dents. (1,250 - 1,750)

516

517. Very rare merganser drake, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  Branded “CF Spear”.  Old in use repaint, much of which has been taken off; numerous cracks; age split in underside. (900 - 1,200)

517 226


518

520

521

522

523

518. Old squaw hen from Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents. (900 - 1,200) 519. Large black duck, Keyes Chadwick, Oak Bluffs, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.    Original paint with minor to moderate shrinkage and minor wear; thin crack partway through neck.

519

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (900 - 1,200)

520. Rare goldeneye hen, George Boyd, Seabrook New Hampshire.    Original paint with a lot of shrinkage; decoy appears to have been near a fire and much of the decoy has darkened from the heat; small shot mark on top of head. (500 - 800)

521. Goldeneye hen from Osterville, Massachusetts.  Relief wing carving.  Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear and discoloration on underside; small shot mark on both sides of bill; lightly hit by shot on one lower side. (500 - 800) 522. Hollow carved widgeon hen, from Massachusetts.     Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot. (500 - 800) 523. Two silhouettes from Massachusetts.  A merganser and a brant. Both show good age.  Cracks in brant’s neck, otherwise original and good. (600 - 900)

227


Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

524 Detail 524. Well sculpted 1936 model canvasback hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Head is turned approximately 45 degrees to one side.  Strong original paint with pleasing tone; very minor wear; thin crack most of the way through neck base and in underside; very slight wear to the wood at one edge of tip of bill; hairline surface crack in one side of bill. (17,500 - 22,500)

524

228


524 Detail

524 Detail 229


525

526

525. Hollow carved scoter, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Dated 1971. Slightly turned head and raised carved wingtips. Signed on the underside with a poem and statement saying it was made for Captain Ellery Clark’s collection.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500) 526.

525 Detail 230

1948 model redhead hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa body with slightly turned cedar head.   Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; surface crack in one side of head; and in neck filler. (3,500 - 4,500)


527. Classic 1936 model canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and has the “LT Ward and Bro” stamp under the tail.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; much of the black on the breast appears to be working repaint; some of the neck filler was replaced a long time ago; thin crack partway through bill with a tiny nail securing it from the underside. (9,000 - 12,000)

527

527 Detail 231


528. 1936 model mallard drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish that has darkened with age; paint flaking and missing on back and sides; old repaint to chip at base of neck. (3,000 - 5,000)

528 529.

1948 model mallard hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa body with slightly turned cedar head.  Original paint with very slight wear; crack through neck; small dents in balsa. (2,500 - 3,500)

529 530. Hollow carved canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1974. Old tag around neck indicated decoy was purchased at the April 1986 Julia & Guyette decoy auction for $1,100.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

530 531. 1948 model pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Stamped “LT Ward & Bro” and signed. Balsa body with slightly turned cedar head and inserted tail.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; old touchup around tail and upper breast; small dents; some filler under the tail may have been replaced.

531 232

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. (2,000 - 3,000)


532

533

534

535

536

537

532. Pair of shooting stool model bluebills, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1972 with a poem on the underside. Both have turned heads.  Minor paint shrinkage on one lower side of hen’s breast, otherwise very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

535. 1948 model black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa body with turned cedar head.  Original paint with moderate discoloration and wear; numerous dents in balsa; wear to bottom edge along one side. (900 - 1,200)

533. 1948 model canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa body with slightly turned cedar head.  Second coat of paint appears to be by the Ward Brothers; minor denting to balsa. (600 - 900)

536. Pair of black ducks, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1989. Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (1,400 - 1,800)

534. Rigmate pair of Glen L. Martin style canvasbacks, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa early 1930s.    Old in use repaint; fairly large crack through hen’s neck.

537. Pair of bluebills, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1983. Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

Provenance: From a hunting rig used in Ontario. (900 - 1,200) 233


Factory Decoys

538

539

539 Detail

538. Coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Branded “WGH” as well as “PG”.  Original paint with minor wear; tail chip repair; some touchup at neck filler. (2,500 - 3,500) 539. Rare special order George Bacon model goldeneye hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.   Challenge grade.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; moderate wear on breast; crack in underside.

234

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. (4,500 - 7,500)


541

540

542

545

543

546

540. Coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1900.  Challenge grade. Branded “WTB” on underside for William T. Barbour.  Original paint with moderate wear; tail chip and repairs to tail and bill; shot scars in one side. (1,200 - 1,500) 541. Redhead hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents. (1,200 - 1,500) 542.

544

Rare greenwing teal hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; some of the neck filler is missing; two cracks in back.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 60. (1,000 - 1,400) 543. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; hen has been hit by shot; drake has a thin crack in the underside.  (900 - 1,200) 544. Rare pair of greenwing teal, Wildfowler Decoy Factory, Quogue, New York.  Relief wing carving and wooden keels. Fewer greenwing teal were produced than bluewing teal at the Wildfowler factory.  Original paint with minor

547 wear; a few dents.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of George McGovern, Stowe, Vermont. (650 - 950)

545. Rare hollow carved mallard drake, Dodge Decoy Factory, circa 1880s.  Very slightly turned head. Probably a special order.  Original paint on most of the decoy, with minor wear; discoloration on top of back with varnish that has darkened; some of the neck filler is missing; lightly hit by shot; small crack in back; old touchup on bottom of decoy. (600 - 900) 546. Redhead hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early premier grade.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; thin chip missing from underside of body; small chip missing from front of neck base; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(650 - 950)

547. Rare goldeneye hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents and shot marks.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(600 - 900) 235


Maryland

548

549

550

551

553

552

554

548. Pair of pintails, John Glenn, Rock Hall, Maryland, 1st quarter 19th century.    Original paint with moderate wear; crack in underside of drake; a few small dents in the hen. (1,750 - 2,250) 549. Canvasback drake, John “Daddy” Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Traces of old paint some of which appears to be original; crack at neck; a few small imperfections in body in underside; much of paint on head appears to be original. (800 - 1,000) 550. Standing widgeon drake, Lloyd Sterling, Crisfield, Maryland.   Mounted with legs on board, which has painted feet. Head is slightly turned.  Original paint that has darkened; tight crack in back; a few small rubs.

236

Provenance: Tracey collection.

(800 - 1,000)

551. Coot with turned head, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. Relief carved wingtips.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 552. Widgeon drake, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 2011. Slightly turned head and carved crossed wingtips.  Very good and original. (600 - 900) 553. Balsa merganser drake, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1960.  Repainted by Lawson at a later date; repaint condition is structurally good. (400 - 600) 554. Wooden wing duck  Old tag on underside reads “Kenneth Sinclair, circa 1918, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania”.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good; a few small dents. (400 - 600)


544A. Canvasback hen, Robert McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland.    Original paint with slight wear; crack in underside; filled “in the making” crack in back; retains McGaw dogbone weight. (1,000 - 1,400)

554A 554B. Canvasback drake, John “Daddy” Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Edgewood Aresenal brand in underside.  Old repaint; several cracks and dents. (800 - 1,200)

554B 554C. Bluebill drake, John “Daddy” Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, circa 1870s.  Carroll’s Island Gun Club brand in underside.  Old repaint; small shot marks and dents; short crack in tail; neck crack repair. (2,000 - 3,000)

554C 544D. High head style pintail drake, Robert McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland. Original paint with good patina and almost no wear; numerous specks of off white paint on tail and part of back; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,500)

554D

237


554E

554F

554G

554H

554I

554J

554E. Canvasback drake, John Graham, Charlestown, Maryland, circa 1870s.  “BRILLIARD” brand in underside.  Old repaint; numerous cracks and dents. (650 - 950)

554H. Redhead drake, Ben Dye, Perryville, Maryland, 3rd quarter 20th century.    Old in use repaint; crack through bill. (500 - 800)

554F. Canvasback drake, Joe Dye, Perryville, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century.  “S” brand in underside.  Old in use repaint; small dents. (600 - 900)

554I. Canvasback drake, John Graham, Charlestown, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Old repaint; neck chip and crack repair; lightly hit by shot. (400 - 600)

554G. Canvasback drake, Ben Dye, Perryville, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century.    Old repaint; weight appears to be a replacement. (600 - 900)

554J. Bluebill drake, James Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Old repaint; neck crack repair; thin cracks in body. (400 - 600)

238


Cast Iron Wing Ducks

555

557

556

558

560

559

555. Cast iron canvasback wing duck from Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Worn paint; structurally good. (400 - 600)

558. Cast iron bluebill wing duck from Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.    Most of paint is missing; structurally good. (400 - 600)

556.

559. Cast iron wing duck from Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Good. (400 - 600)

Cast iron bluebill wing duck decoy probably from Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.    Minor pitting and wear. (400 - 600)

557. Cast iron canvasback wing duck from Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    No paint; structurally good; small rough area on one edge of bill. (400 - 600)

560. Cast iron wing duck from Maryland, last quarter 19th century.    Old paint with some wear; structurally good. (400 - 600)

End of Session Two 239


Index of Carvers Adamson, Harry Curieux..........................................................121 Allen, Charles...........................................................................309 Allen, Russ................................................................................312 Anger, Ken...................................42,43,238,239,281,386,389,390 Ashford, H.N.............................................................................466 Bach, Ferdinand........................................................................141 Ballisite and Empire ................................................................285 Bianco, Tony......................................................................308,310 Bibber, Oscar............................................................................125 Biddle, Bob...............................................................................348 Birch, Reggie................................................................60,336,345 Birdsall, Jess.............................................................................316 Bishop, Richard.........................................................................116 Blackstone, Jess.......................................................168,169,169A Blair, Jr., John...........................................................................305 Bouetlier, Ron...........................................................................102 Bowman, William.....................................................................203 Boyd, George............................................................................520 Brooks, John...............................................................................96 Bruffee, Byron.............................................................................57 Budden, Michael.................................................................... 198F Burr, Elijah................................................................................499 Burr, Russ...............................................................................165A Cargile, Lloyd...........................................................................467 Carney, Armand........................................................................365 Chadwick, Keyes......................................................................519 Chambers, Tom......................................270,275,276,383,450,451 Chesser, Grayson....................................................... 340-344,346 Chrysler, William..........................................................44,259,449 Clark, Roland.....................................................................188,189 Clifford, Bill...................................................................... 295-299 Cochran, David.........................................................................232 Coffin Family ..........................................................................485 Cooper, Bill...............................................................................265 Coughlan, Ben...........................................................................263 Couvillion, Skip and Chris.................................................455,456 Cranmer, William.......................................69,70,323,326,327,328 Crowell, Elmer...................1-12,110-115,242-256,349-355,373A, 404-415,459-465,487,488,506,510,512 Crowell, Oscar..........................................................................105 Cuffee, Eugene..........................................................................496 Daisey, Cigar.............................................................................330 Daly, Jim.........................................................................121C,198 Dando, A.J......................................................................... 161-164 Davis, Lawrence.......................................................................277 Dilley, John.................................................................158,160,206 Dodge Decoy Factory .............................................................545 Dunn, Noel................................................................................200 Dye, Ben......................................................................554G,544H Dye, Joe.................................................................................. 554F Ellis, Billy.................................................................................284 Ernst, Clarence..........................................................................107 Evans, Melvin...........................................................................199

Fennimore, Harry......................................................................300 Fernlund, Ivar.................................................................... 391-394 Fitzpatrick, Tom........................................................................315 Foote, Jim....................................................................................64 Fox, Gordon..............................................................................492 Gelston, Thomas................................................................157,159 Gibian, William...........................................................214,219,222 Gilley, Wendell..........................................................................369 Glenn, John...............................................................................548 Graham, John.................................................................554E,544I Graves, Bert............................................................... 142,417-420 Haertel, Harold..........................................................................364 Hagerbaumer, David.................................................... 198B,198C Hall, Mel.....................................................................................45 Hancock, Miles.........................................................................337 Harris, Ken................................................................................233 Hart, Charles......................................................................513,514 Hiltz, Orren..........................................................................93,108 Hinkley, Clarence......................................................................500 Holly, James............................................................................ 554J Holly, John “Daddy”............................................. 549,554B,554C Horner, Rowley..........................................................67,72,76,322 Hudson, Ira................................................................. 501-503,505 Hudson, Norman.......................................................................370 Huey, George..............................................................129,136,373 Humphrey, Walter.......................................................................48 Hunt, Lynn Bogue.....................................................................120 Hutchins, Sam...........................................................................452 Hyatt, John................................................................................423 Jacobs, Charles F.........................................................................99 Janner, Hans................................................................................58 Janson, Richard...........................................................................15 Johnson, Ralph..........................................................................473 Johnson, Taylor.........................................................................379 Kessler, George.........................................................................428 King, A.J............................................................................170,171 King, Joe.....................................................................................65 Koelpin, William.........................................................................61 Kuss, Frank........................................................................... 49-52 Lacombe, Emile........................................................................268 Lake, Angus..............................................................................273 Landry, Paul........................................................................... 198E Lane, Stephen............................................................................422 Lawson, Oliver.................................................... 536,537,551-553 LeBoeuf, Orel......................................................261,262,264,266 Leduc, Willie.............................................................................267 Leeds, Daniel Lake......................................................26,27,29,30 Leeds Family ......................................................................28,381 Lester, John Seerey......................................................... 119,121F Levy, William Raymond...........................................................109 Lincoln, Joseph.................................. 90,91,395-403,507,509,517 Loveland, John............................................................................71 Maass, David......................................................................117,192


MacDonald, Alain.....................................................................258 Markham Rig, Markham...........................................................272 Mason Decoy Factory, ........................172-187,429-543,546,547 May, Bob.....................................................................................36 Mayol, Jorge......................................................................190,193 McCoy, Charles...........................................................................68 McGaw, Robert............................................................554A,554D McIntyre, Cameron.....................................................221,225,226 McLaughlin, Larry......................................................303,313,372 McNair, Mark............................................16-25,212,213,215-218 McNeil, Ed..................................................................................37 Moreland, Bob...................................................................333,334 Mueller, Keith....................................................................220,227 Murphy, Alfred............................................................................94 Nichol, Addie..............................................................................35 Nichol, D.K.....................................................................34,47,271 Nichol, D.W..............................................................................240 Obed, Jess..........................................................................100,101 Parker, Lloyd...............................................................................75 Perdew, Charles....................................................148,421,425,426 Peterson, Oscar...........................................................................53 Peterson, Pete............................................................................339 Phillips, Ike...............................................................................504 Preuss, Roger.........................................................................198A Prime, Peachy...........................................................................324 Pringle, Peter.............................................................................384 Ramsey, John............................................................................489 Rathmell, Lou...........................................................................508 Rawlings, William..............................................................209,498 Rawlings, William.....................................................................498 Reeves, Charles.........................................................................448 Reeves, Phineas.........................................................................387 Reinbold, George......................................................................371 Reindahl, Enoch........................................................................416 Reneson, Chet........................................................................121A Richardson, Harry.....................................................................197 Ridgeway, Birdsall......................................................................66 Robinson, Gerald......................................................................135 Rule, Newt................................................................. 291-294,427 Rundle, Abraham......................................................................241 Rundle, William........................................................................279 Safford, Charles...........................................................................89 Savoie, Amateur..........................................................................97 Scheeler, John........................................................................62,63 Schmidt, Ben........................................................143,144,149,150 Schmiedlin, Jim.................................................................... 80-87 Scholer, Jacob...........................................................................151 Scott, Sir Peter..........................................................................195 Shourds, Harry M.................................................................77,320 Shourds, Harry V..... 73,74,78,79,311A,314,317,318,374-378,382 Skees, Ira...................................................................................338 Smith, Cassius...........................................................................515 Smith, John.................................................................................98

Solberg, Morton........................................................................118 Sorby, Henry.............................................................................453 Southard, William..............................................................201,229 Sterling, Lloyd..........................................................................550 Stevens Brothers .....................................................................234 Strator and Sohier ..............................................................33,207 Strunk, George.....................................................223,224,331,332 Tawes, Sr., Larry.......................................................................362 Thomas, F.W.......................................................................... 121E Torey, Romel De La...............................................................121D Tornberg, John G.........................................................................13 Townsend, H.............................................................................154 Tribert, Hormidas......................................................................269 Truex, Rhodes.............................................................................32 Tully, John and Dhuie.................................................................54 Tumblin, Irving.........................................................................103 Updike, John...............................................................319,321,325 Verity, Obediah..................................................................202,491 Walker, Charles.........................................................................424 Ward Brothers, ...........................................368,438-446,524-535 Warin, George.................................................................39,40,388 Wells, John R....................................................38,46,260,274,447 Wheeler, Chauncey...........................................156,228,231,233A Wheeler, Shang.........................................................................191 Whipple, Mark..........................................................................454 Wilde, Deann De LaRonde................................................123,124 Wildfowler Decoy Factory ......................................................544 Williams, Charles D...............................................................121B Wilson, Gus........126,128,131-134,138,139,167,356-361,366,367 Winchester ................................................................286,289,290 Winter, Andrew.........................................................................194 Witherspoon, Lee......................................................................140 Wood, Jim.................................................................................343 Wozny, Eddie............................................................................329 Young, Paco..............................................................................196 Zwicker, Jim..............................................................................104


Collection Planning Program

Enjoy Collecting Now and Plan Ahead With a forty year history, you can rely on the Guyette & Deeter decoy auction house as the most trusted decoy auction firm to handle your estate planning and collection management needs. Whether it’s for tax purposes, estate planning, gifting, charitable giving or insurance purposes, let us manage and periodically update a comprehensive written appraisal of your collection. Gary and Jon are available to work with banks, attorneys, trust and estate officers, probate court, private clients and family members who may be responsible for the dispersal of estates and collections. Let professionals document your collection with accurate values and descriptions. We will work closely with you to ensure that your wishes are established at agreed upon terms and conditions now, to make it easier to administer your estate later.

Please contact Gary or Jon to discuss our Collection Planning Program today.

With several options, we make it easy for you to reach us: Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 • St. Michaels MD 21663 (410) 745-0485 • (410) 745-0487 fax decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com Jon Deeter 7980 Darbys Run • Chagrin Falls OH 44023 (440) 610-1768 • (440) 543-1466 fax jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com For more information, visit our website: www.guyetteanddeeter.com


47th Annual

WATERFOWL FESTIVAL

All Festival proceeds benefit Waterfowl Chesapeake’s restoration and conservation efforts in the region.

®

in Historic Easton, Maryland NOVEMBER 10, 11, 12, 2017

THE ULTIMATE DESTINATION FOR THE SOPHISTICATED SPORTSMAN BUY, SELL, SWAP AND WATERFOWLING ARTIFACTS AT EASTON HIGH SCHOOL • • • •

Talk to experts about the value of your collection Find that perfect bird to complete your vision Enjoy swapping stories with other decoy enthusiasts Appreciate the rich history of the Eastern Shore sportsman

3-DAY TICKETS ARE $15 BEFORE NOVEMBER 1! $20 from November 1–12

Premiere Night Party! Thursday, November 9

Art • Cocktails • Cuisine • Conservation

VIP Packages Available

Tickets and info online WaterfowlFestival.org 410-822-4567


NORTH AMERICAN

Vintage Decoy & Sporting Collectibles Show • The largest decoy and sporting collectibles show in North America • Over 30,000+ items for sale. • Room-to-Room Trading • Collector Seminars and Displays • Guyette & Deeter Auction • MegaCenter Dealer Show • And much more!

Pheasant Run Resort – ST. CHARLES, IL –

APRIL 2428, 2018 Sponsored by the Midwest id dwest Decoyy CCollectors ollectors Assn.

For information oon n daily eevents, vents, bookingg ervving selli ing ta ablees ggo o tto o rooms, and reserving selling tables

midwestdecoy.org

OR CAL CALL LL

586-530-6586


Spring Ritual

Lou Pasqua

Under the Open Sky

The Boys of Yellowstone

Kathryn Mapes Turner

Mark Kelso


The Sheraton Portsmouth Harborside Hotel

Situated in the heart of the downtown historic waterfront district, our neighborhood includes historic homes and sites, boutiques, galleries, fine dining, and live entertainment. Harbor cruises depart from the dock directly across from the hotel. Located just one hour north of Boston, MA and south of Portland, ME, our hotel offers 181 beautifully appointed guestrooms.

250 Market St., Portsmouth, NH 03801 603-431-2300 www.sheratonportsmouth.com


Consign With Us

James D. Julia is one of the top 10 auction houses in North America, as measured by gross sales. With our far reaching marketing program, our reputation for honest and fair dealings, the most competitive seller’s commission in the industry and a history of proven results, James D. Julia is unquestionably the best venue to bring your collection or single high-value item to market.

Fine Art, Asian & Antiques Division This is the oldest division in our company and has expanded dramatically over the years to now be our most expansive division; focusing on Americana, Fine Art, Antiques, Victoriana and Asian items. This division has a sterling reputation for excellence and has established numerous world and national records. Julia’s has expertise and experience to successfully handle complete estates, collections and high value individual items in almost any antique collectible category. Next Auction: August 16-18, 2017 Contact: Bill Gage, Tony Greist or Katya Tilton antiques@jamesdjulia.com

Daniel Ridgway Knight “At the Well” (est. 200,000-300,000)

Sold for $310,500

Rare Firearms Division James D. Julia is the worldwide leader for marketing high value rare and important historical firearms. While others may focus on sheer volume over quality, we have maintained our focus on rare and collectable high-end firearms, including important Winchesters, rare Colts, high art shotguns, Civil War, and Class 3 machine guns, among many others. As a result, we have an impressive, loyal, and global customer base for our high-grade firearms and militaria. Next Auction: Oct. 31, Nov. 1 & 2, 2017

Contact: Tony Wilcox or Jeremy Hatch firearms@jamesdjulia.com

Colt SAA from the Battle of Little Bighorn (est. 175,000-275,000)

Sold for $460,000

Rare Lamps, Glass & Fine Jewelry Division When considered based on quality, rarity, prolific number of lots and total dollar value, our Rare Lamps, Glass & Fine Jewelry division has earned an international reputation for bringing the most interesting rare and exciting items to auction. Our specialty is rare collectible lighting and high-quality art glass with occasional sterling silver and fine jewelry. Following a record year in 2016, Julia’s is the clear choice for collectors of high-value antique lighting, quality art glass and sterling silver. Next Auction: November 2017

Contact: Mike Fredericks or Julie Killam lg@jamesdjulia.com

Tiffany Studios Drop-Head Dragonfly Table Lamp (est. 120,000-180,000)

Sold for $515,470

(207) 453-7125 | jamesdjulia.com | Fairfield, ME | Boston, MA | Auctioneer: James D. Julia | Lic#: ME: AR83, MA: AU1406, NH: 2511


Extraordinary Firearms Auction October 31–November 1 & 2, 2017

James D. Julia, Inc. is now accepting individual consignments and entire estate collections for our Fall 2017 sale. James D. Julia, Inc. is the leading auction house in the world for rare, high-end and expensive guns. Why not consider the best auction house in the world, offering the lowest terms in the world, to sell your quality goods for some of the best prices in the world.

Dana Tauber Estate The Finest Collection of A.H. Fox Shotguns to Ever Come to Auction

One of the Finest A.H. Foxes Extant-FE Grade 20 ga with Fabulous Provenance

Dr. Tom Bouwkamp Collection

Morris Racker Estate

Extraordinary M66 Centennial Expo Rifle with rare relief engraving (NRA Silver Medal 2006) Outstanding Estate Collection of Confederate and Historical Arms

Prestigious and Lifetime Parker and Winchester Collection

Finest Known Cofer Percussion Revolver, SN 11

Warren Buxton Estate Experimental Walther PP

Superb Parker A-1 Special 12 ga. (Originally J. Simpson III, CEO of Marshall Field & Company, illus. in The Parker Story)

Fantastic Walther Armee-Pistole

Extraordinary Estate Coll. of Important & Rare Walther Arms

(207) 453-7125 | jamesdjulia.com | Fairfield, ME | Boston, MA | Auctioneer: James D. Julia | Lic#: ME: AR83, MA: AU1406, NH: 2511


M u s e u m o f A m e r i ca n B i rd A rt at Mass Audubon

Massachusetts Masterpieces: The Decoy as Art by Gigi Hopkins

THE NEW BOOK / AVAILABLE JULY 2016 Featuring the exceptional Massachusetts decoys gathered by curator Gigi Hopkins for the unprecedented 2013 exhibition at the Museum of American Bird Art, and including new historical research and never-before-published photographs. Books may be purchased directly from the Museum of American Bird Art at Mass Audubon. Contact Amy Montague, director: amontague@massaudubon.org, 781-821-8853.

963 Washington St

p

Canton, MA 02021 massaudubon.org/maba 781-821-8853 amontague@massaudubon.org p

p

p


EVANS FACTORY DECOYS

A Collectors Comprehensive Pictorial Reference Guide NEW RELEASE Ready at the Midwest Decoy Collectors Assn. show. Save shipping with pick-up at the show! Advance orders will not process until the book is shipped in April. Order Your Copy Today!

TThe first comprehensive pictorial

✠ Over 200 hard-bound pages

reference guide by Evans Society ✠ Over 350 full color photos Members Andy Schoneich and Terry ✠ Factory history Smart detailing the Evans Duck Decoy Factory. Filled with never-before ✠ Grade identification published information, this book is a ✠ Head & speculum identification must for any Evans enthusiast or dealer ✠ Toys, doorstops & paperweights of wildfowl decoys and collectibles. ✠ Miniature replicas & more... Published by L&M Design. A Limited First Edition of 1,000 books $75.00 + $6.00 S&H for first book / $2.00 each add. book (Cont. US)

www.decoyrelics.com

Please find the Evans Decoy Book tab. Print and complete the order form and mail or email (depending on method of payment) to: Andy Schoneich, 9345 West 119th Street, Palos Park, IL 60464

If no Internet access to print the order form:

708-448-3061 for help ordering


CONDITIONS OF SALE ‑- PLEASE READ 1.

GUARANTEE ‑ We have made a consistent effort in correctly cataloging and describing the property to be sold. The decoys and paintings have guaranteed condition reports. Should the need arise, the auctioneer reserves the right to make verbal corrections and provide additional information from the block, at the time of the sale. Absentee bids will not be executed on items that are found to be other than described in the catalog. Since opinions can differ, particularly in the matter of condition, the auctioneer will be sole judge in the matter of refunds. 2. DURATION OF GUARANTEE ‑ Request for refund for items purchased IN PERSON at the auction must be made within 3 days of the sale. If you are an absentee or phone bidder it is your responsibility to examine the lot immediately upon receipt. On items purchased absentee, the guarantee will end 3 days from the date of delivery. Therefore, all guarantees on items purchased will become null and void 7 calendar days from the date of shipment. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT IF YOU PAY LATE, YOU WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE GUARANTEE. Payment must be postmarked no later than 30 days after the auction. 3. PROTESTED BIDS‑ In the case of a disputed bid, the auctioneer is the sole determinant as to who the successful bidder is, and at his discretion, may reoffer and resell the article in dispute. If a dispute arises after the sale, the auctioneer’s sales records shall be conclusive as to who the purchaser was, and the purchase price. 4. BIDDING- Bidding usually starts below the low estimate and advances in increments of approximately 10% of the opening bid subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right, at his sole discretion, to refuse any bids that he deems unreasonable. The minimum bid increment guideline is as follows: $500 to $1000 - $25 $10,000 to $20,000 - $500 $100,000 and above - $2,000 $1000 to $10,000 - $100 $20,000 to $100,000 - $1,000 5. ABSENTEE BIDS‑ Phone or mail bids, at the discretion of the Auctioneer, will be accepted with a 20% deposit. In such case, the bookkeeper will execute such bids competitively. Absentee bids are executed by the bookkeeper on behalf of the bidder in accordance with the bid increment policy shown above. Please review the rules governing both absentee and phone bids in the back of the catalog. 6. TERMS‑ All items are to be paid for in U.S. funds at the day of the auction. No items will be released until they are paid for. Those who have not established an account with us and wish to pay by check, must do so prior to the beginning of the auction, by presenting a current letter of reference from their bank, or by providing references, that are suitable to the Auctioneer. The Auctioneer reserves the right to hold merchandise purchased by personal check, until the check has cleared the bank. Phone and absentee bidders ‑ You will be notified one week after the auction of your bids/results. PAYMENT IS DUE UPON RECEIPT. A late charge will be accessed on all balances not paid, at the rate of 12% A.P.R. commencing 30 days after the auction. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. Guyette & Deeter will not carry insurance on items that are not paid for within 35 days of the auction. Also, the auctioneer may retain and/or recover the deposit specified as liquidated damages. In addition, the property can be resold at public or private sale without further notice. Any deficiency resulting from such resale shall be paid to the auctioneer by the defaulting buyer, together with all charges, fees, and expenses incurred by such resale, or the enforcement of the obligation hereunder. Buyer agrees to pay all charges and expenses incurred by reason of any breach of the Terms and Conditions of sale, including without limitation, reasonable attorney fees. 7. PAYMENT FOR PURCHASES MAY BE MADE WITH VISA , MASTERCARD, CASH, CHECK, OR WIRE TRANSFER. 8. BUYERS PREMIUM- The buyer’s premium, assessed on each selling lot, is 15% of the hammer price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 10% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. For payments made using Visa or MasterCard, the buyer’s premium is 18% up to and including $1,000,000, plus 13% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. 9. TAX ‑ THERE IS NO SALES TAX IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 10. ACCEPTANCE OF CONDITIONS ‑ Bidding on any articles in this catalog indicates your acceptance of all the above items. 11. BIDDING AGENT RESPONSIBILITY ‑ If you are registering for someone or if you execute a bid for someone else under your number, you are responsible for the settlement of that account. You are also responsible for examining the decoy(s) for your client regarding the guarantee. 12. WITHDRAWAL ‑ We reserve the right to withdraw any property before the sale and shall have no liability whatsoever for such withdrawal. 13. TITLE ‑ Title passes upon the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer. It will then be the responsibility of the buyer to make full payment prior to removing the goods from the premises. Removal is at both the buyer’s risk and expense, and must be made at the conclusion of the sale, unless other arrangements are made with the Guyette & Deeter staff. Any lots we might make arrangements for moving or storing are solely at the risk of the owner, and any damage or loss occurring after the fall of the hammer becomes that of the buyer. 14. LEGAL DISPUTE ‑ Any legal disputes arising from this auction shall be settled in the court system of the State of Maine. UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE - The Maine Uniform Commercial Code, Title II, Section 2328 applies to this auction. 15. All calls are sold “As Is”. THE OFFICE WILL NOT BE OPEN UNTIL AUGUST 2, 2017 AFTER THE AUCTION.


ABSENTEE, PHONE, AND ONLINE BIDS 1. Absentee bids are a service provided to our customers free of charge. Every effort is made to execute all absentee bids, however, in the event of an error of omission, or failure to properly execute absentee bids, the Auctioneer shall not be held liable. 2. All absentee bids must be accompanied by a 20% deposit, which will be refunded immediately after the auction if your bid is unsuccessful. If your bid is successful, the deposit will be applied to the purchase price and the balance due upon presentation of your bill. All absentee bidders are notified by mail, whether successful or unsuccessful. 3. Phone, absentee, and online bidders cannot pick up items at the auction (unless arrangements are made in advance) because it is assumed they are not present, and those items are packed and put on the truck after the hammer falls. Online bidder invoices cannot be calculated at auction. 4. Visa and Mastercard numbers can be given in place of a check deposit, if your bid is submitted by phone. Your card number will not be used to make payments for purchases, it is only used as collateral. Your card number will only be used to make payment for purchases if you default on payment. 5. To execute an absentee bid, fill out the enclosed form, listing catalog number, description and your top bid price (not including the 15% buyer’s premium). Send this together with your deposit as soon as possible. If your bids are sent seven days or less prior to the auction, you should call our office three days prior to the auction, to confirm that we have received your bids. If they have not been received at that point in time, we will take your bid over the phone. We cannot guarantee that bids received after the auction has started will be executed. 6. If two or more bids are received on the same item from different people, the bidding will open at the next logical raise above the second highest bid. If two absentee bids are received with the exact same amount, the first one received will take precedence. 7. All bids must be in even dollar amounts. Bids in fractions of dollars will be considered the next lower even dollar amount. 8. Bid increments: The bid increment policy, which also applies to both absentee and phone bidders, is listed under “CONDITIONS OF SALE” (item #4), in the front of the catalog. 9. Open bids, bids with no set top amount, or orders to just simply buy the lot, cannot be accepted. You must have a definite top limit before we can execute your bid. Alternatives to this are as follows: a. To bid over the telephone. This can be done by simply sending a 20% deposit for what you wish to bid on the object. This will bind whatever bid amount you wish to bid over the telephone. (NOTE: There are only 8 phone lines into the auction room and phone bids will be handled on a first come, first serve basis.) b. Some bidders concerned that a lot might just go for one bid above their top limit, leave a top bid plus one bid. This works as follows: the top bid submitted might be $1,000, but not wishing to lose the lot for simply $25 more, the party might bid $1,000 + 1 bid if they definitely don’t want to go over a certain price, they would indicate $1,000 +1 ($1,025) (NOTE: One possible problem that occasionally arises with absentee bids is when someone in the audience bids exactly the amount, which you specify is your limit. In such a case, we would not go one extra bid unless your bid sheet indicates “plus one” bid.). 10. If you are a successful bidder, a bill will be sent one week after the auction. Purchasers should indicate their desired method of shipment, if such is necessary. There is a charge for shipping, labor, materials, and insurance. Shipping is done on a first come, first serve basis, and can take up to 4 weeks. Please note that a certified check, Visa, Mastercard, or any other form of guaranteed funds will expedite shipping. 11. According to UPS regulations, we must now crate all paintings. In addition, for expensive oil paintings and delicate carvings, we need a written statement from the purchaser, assuming the responsibility of pursuing any claims, in the event of damage incurred during shipping. Valuable lots need to be sent 2 day air UPS due to values. Under no circumstances will we be liable for damage to glass or frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of cause. 12. TERMS — Phone and absentee bidders — You will be notified one week after the auction of your results. Online bidders will receive an invoice by email to the email address registered with their Invaluable or Ebay account. Payment is due upon receipt. Interest will be charged on all balances not paid within 30 days after the bill is sent at the rate of 12% APR. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. If an account is 75 days overdue, the items may be returned to the consignor and overdue buyer will pay the buyers premium and commission from the sale, if they wish to participate in future Guyette and Deeter auctions. 13. Bidding on any article(s) indicates your acceptance of these terms above. 14. If you would like any additional information on any of the lots, please contact: Gary Guyette at (410) 745-0485 or Jon Deeter at (440) 610-1768. nd

If you have any questions concerning absentee bids, please call us.


OFFICE: OFFICE:

ABSENTEE AND PHONE BID FORM

POBox Box1170 1170 PO St. Michaels, MD 21663 St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 410-745-0485 Fax410-745-0487 410-745-0487 Fax decoys@guyetteandschmidt.com decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

OFFICE USE ONLY TIME DATE OF BID AUCTION DATE MANAGER ABSENTEE OR PHONE BID

NAME ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

TELEPHONE DEPOSIT $

(Check Amount or Visa or MasterCard # & Exp.)

IIdesire following items in the sale.sale. The The bids bids are toare be to executed by Guyette & Deeter, up to but desiretotobid bidononthe the following items in the executed by Guyette & Schmidt, Inc.,not upexceeding to but notthe amount(s) on the below bids.on Allthe bidsbelow will be executed and will accepted subject to theaccepted Terms ofsubject Sale andtoAbsentee Bids exceedingspecified the amount(s) specified bids. All bids be executed and the Terms of Procedure outlined inBids the catalog. (Please be sure you understand before using thisour Absentee and Phone Sale and Absentee Procedure outlined in that the catalog. (Pleaseour be procedures sure that you understand procedures before Bid Form.) will not open until Wednesday after using this Office Absentee andbe Phone Bid Form.) Office willthe notauction. be open until Wednesday after the auction.

Signature A PREMIUM OF 15% WILL BE APPLIED TO ALL ITEMS SOLD, TO BE PAID BY THE BUYER OFFICE USE

IN CATALOG # ORDER

DESCRIPTION

A SECOND PAGE IS PROVIDED ON BACK SHOULD YOU REQUIRE ADDITIONAL SPACE TOTAL BIDS $

x 20%

EQUALS DEPOSIT ENCLOSED $

BID AMOUNT


Page 2

NAME OFFICE USE

PHONE IN CATALOG # ORDER

AUCTION DATE DESCRIPTION

BID AMOUNT


188

374

110

151

195

492


G u y e t te & Deeter, Inc . PO Box 1170, St. Michaels, MD 21663 | 410-745-0485 | www.guyet teanddeeter.com

North American Decoys at Auction July 25 & 26, 2017  

Guyette & Deeter, Inc.'s annual summer decoy and sporting art auction held on July 25 & 26, 2017 at the Sheraton Harborside Hotel in Portsmo...