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Guyette & Deeter, Inc. North American Decoys At Auction April 27 & 28, 2017


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Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

North American Decoys At Auction Pheasant Run Resort 4051 East Main Street St. Charles, Illinois 630-584-6300 Held in conjunction with the Midwest Decoy Collectors Association Show

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Preview 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Join us for complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres

Thursday, April 27, 2017 Preview 8:00 AM - 10:45 AM Auction 11:00 AM

Friday, April 28, 2017 Preview 8:00 AM - 10:45 AM Auction 11:00 AM

For questions during the auction call 410-745-0485

Catalog $45. Out of Country $54 Absentee, Phone & Online Bidding accepted call 410-745-0485 for arrangements For Free Decoy Appraisal Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416


Important Notices: ■ Unofficial prices realized information will be available five business days after the auction. Official prices realized list will be available online approximately two weeks after the auction. ■ If you would like to consign decoys to our next auction, please contact; Gary Guyette 410-745-0485 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com or Jon Deeter 440-543-1416 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com. Free appraisals are available with no obligation to consign and all correspondences are strictly confidential. ■ For delicate carvings, a written statement from the purchaser assuming responsibility for pursuing any claims in the event of any damage incurred during shipping is required, these items are marked *. Under no circumstances will we be responsible for damage to glass, frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of the cause. ■ Auctioneer James D. Julia, Fairfield, Maine. ■ Stands are not included with the decoys or weather vanes unless specified in catalog. Plexiglass cases are not included with shotgun shell boxes. ■ Sales Tax - There is an 8% sales tax on purchases over $200 unless you have a Sales and Use Tax License* (from any state) or have your purchases shipped outside of Illinois. If you are exempt, please have a copy of your certificate with you. You will be required to sign an Illinois sales and Use affidavit for us to keep on file. ■ Reserve a room at a discounted rate of $119 by calling the Pheasant Run Resort at 800-474-3272 and mention the Guyette & Deeter room block. ■ All duck calls have condition reports, but are sold “As Is”. ■ Trade Up Program - A limited numer of decoy purchases may be paid

for by consigning decoys to the next Guyette & Deeter. auction. Ask Gary or Jon for Details.

UPCOMING GUYETTE & DEETER, INC. DECOY AUCTIONS July 25 & 26, 2017

Sheraton Harborside Hotel Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Consignments accepted until June 8, or until full 50 Dealer buy, Sell, swap. *NO SALES TAX

November 8 & 9, 2017

Talbot County Community Center Easton, Maryland

In Conjunction with the Easton Waterfowl Festival Featuring the collection of Sam Dyke 50 Dealer buy, Sell, swap. To consign, Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416

We are pleased to announce that Robert J. Koenke has accepted the position of Guyette & Deeter, Inc.’s Sporting and Wildlife Art Expert. He will be an excellent fit within our organization.


Guyette & Deeter, Inc.

Dale & Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 Tel: 410-745-0485 Fax: 410-745-0487 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

Jon & Leigh Ann Deeter 7980 Darbys Run Chagrin Falls, OH 44023 Tel: 440-543-1416 Cell: 440-610-1768 Fax: 440-543-5405 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com

Zac Cote Online auction manager & Photography Freeport, Maine Tel: 410-253-8616 zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

Mike Stevenson Graphic Designer & Website Developer St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 michael@guyetteanddeeter.com

Ed Kenney Merchandise Manager & Shipping St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 shipping@guyetteanddeeter.com

Lynda Brooks Office Manager St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 lynda@guyetteanddeeter.com

Denise Jarrell

Bookkeeper St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410-745-0485 billing@guyetteanddeeter.com


©Ducks unlimiteD canaDa

Brown collection to be sold by Guyette & Deeter, Inc. in 2017 - 2018 auctions

Above: Ducks Unlimited Canada’s (DUC) former national planned giving manager Lloyd Derry with Peter Brown (right), who donated a portion of his extensive antique decoy collection to DUC.

The tale of a consummate collector

P

eter Brown will never forget the first time he opened a box of antique Canadian waterfowl decoys. They’d been sent to him by decoy collector Bruce Malcolm, who, along with renowned carver Ron Gruber, thought Brown might be interested in a collection of his own as an investment. That was back in the 1980s. Brown, a Vancouver, B.C., businessman, had already acquired important artwork by Group of Seven and Haida artists. He had other collections, too. But hand carved decoys were different. “I’d never seen a great decoy before, and I thought: these are really something,” says Brown. “There’s no question they were works of art.” Brown was hooked. “As I got more interested, I thought it would be fun to put together the definitive collection of Canadian birds, pursue each of the great carvers and try to get

as many of the species that they made that I could. We ended up with a few thousand birds.” Drawing from sheds, boat houses, duck clubs and collections across Canada, over time, Brown would work with Malcolm and others to amass the remarkable collection of decoys ranging from mint condition to gunning repaints. “Peter liked all decoys, not just the best ones,” says Malcolm. “He had a passion for them. It was not about investment and money. He would interrupt a board meeting or stock trading session to take my call about a possible new acquisition.” “He had a powerful, positive influence on Canadian decoy collecting in the 1980s.”

ZZZ Now, at the age of 75, Brown has taken the unprecedented step of divesting his decades-long pursuit. In May, he donated 1,000 antique duck, geese and


“This is a rare opportunity for DU supporters, waterfowlers, folk art collectors and decoy enthusiasts to acquire a historical, important waterfowl hunting artifact while supporting DUC and its mission.” – bruce malcolm

From Ducks Unlimited Canada’s conservator magazine, fall 2016.

shorebird decoys, appraised at $1.5 million, to Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC). In turn, DUC is offering the majority of the collection to the public through auction by Guyette & Deeter, Inc., the world’s largest decoy auction firm based in Maryland. DUC will be the beneficiary of net proceeds from the sale. The majority of the decoys will be sold beginning April 2017, however, some are now being offered on Guyette & Deeter’s weekly online auctions at decoys forsale.com. Most of the birds are working decoys carved in the late 1800s and early 1900s, including a pair of Fernland pintails appraised at $260,000. “This is a rare opportunity for DU supporters, waterfowlers, folk art collectors and decoy enthusiasts to acquire a historical, important waterfowl hunting artifact while supporting DUC and its mission,” says Malcolm. “There are wonderful core decoys in the Brown/DUC collection: high value, sought-after decoys by all of the important Canadian makers. In addition, there are a large number of lesser known, well-carved decoys that are very collectible and offer great value.” “They’re beautiful things,” says Brown. “I was happy to have them. A collection like that will likely never happen again.”

ZZZ At Brown’s request, a portion of the collection will remain in Canada and displayed periodically at the Oak Hammock Marsh Interpretive Centre in Manitoba, site of DUC’s national office. That display

will be dedicated to Brown’s late long-time friend and best man,William McLallen Jr., who was a “phenomenal duck hunter and outdoorsman,” says Brown. “It took three days for DUC and Guyette & Deeter staff to pack, appraise and photograph the donated decoys at Mr. Brown’s home.” says DUC’s former national manager of planned giving Lloyd Derry, who spent months working on the logistics of acquiring and selling the collection. Derry, who retired in December 2016, adds “It was a nice but challenging way to end my career.”

ZZZ Malcolm, a DUC supporter, avid waterfowl hunter and decoy collector who lives on the north shore of Lake Erie in Norfolk County, Ont., says Brown’s generous gift is a perfect tribute to Canada’s – and DUC’s – waterfowling heritage. “Many extensive DUC projects exist where these decoys were used over the years,” says Malcolm. “Places like Ontario’s Lake St. Clair, Rondeau Bay, Turkey Point and Long Point and Prince Edward County and throughout Quebec, the Maritimes and B.C.’s Fraser Delta.” “I find it ironic that a group of decoys collected from coast to coast arrive in Vancouver, stay for 25-plus years, migrate en masse to Manitoba, ‘stage’ and are now about to redistribute throughout North America to people who will again admire and cherish them. Many will no doubt end up in homes in Canadian waterfowling areas where they were originally created and used, thanks to DUC and Peter Brown.”


Featuring Decoys From The Collections Of: Bill & Carol Bender William Berry & Pat Kalinsky Peter Brown Gene Carr Richmond Guy

Harold & Nancy O’Connor Carl Olson Maunsel & Ann Pearce Hank Thomas

Hank Thomas Hank Thomas grew up on a farm near Lacon, Illinois during the Great Depression. He learned to hunt and fish off the land as a means of existence. He recalls shooting four black bellied plovers one day, which were some of the finest eating he can remember. Thomas knew Charlie Perdew as the man that fixed guns in Henry. He also remembered that Charlie made a duck and crow call for his father. After four years service in the Air Force, 5th Photo Squadron in WWII Hank returned to Lacon. He spent time hunting ducks at clubs on the river from Granville to Chiado Brothers in Spring Valley. He also helped start the Marshall County Conservation property. In 1958, Hank started collecting decoys and attending decoys shows, including Don Clark’s first show in 1968. He always focused on Illinois River and Mason decoys and said more than once. “I love duck hunting, but believe buying and trading duck decoys is, and was, my most favorite thing to do.” Hank passed away on December 31, 2016 at the age of 96, while enjoying in his favorite room of the house, the decoy room, of course.


William Berry & Pat Kalinsky Bill Berry and Pat Kalinsky were regulars at the Richard Bourne, Richard Oliver, and the Julia & Guyette/Guyette & Schmidt decoy auctions from the mid 1980s through the mid 2000s, as well as the Easton Waterfowl Festival. They always came together and it obvious that they were there to enjoy the event, as much to purchase decoys for their collection. Their decoys were stunningly displayed on custom built cupboards in the living room and study of their home on a hill overlooking the Potomac River near Leesburg.

Carl Olson Carl Olson lived on Seneca Lake in upstate New York. He was a duck and goose hunter, and a gold member of Ducks Unlimited. He collected Mason Factory, Ontario, and New York State decoys beginning around 1990. Carl was a regular at the Clayton Show and the Midwest Decoy Collector’s Show, and a board member of the Finger Lakes of Western New York Wildlife Association. He also was a 2016 DU sponsor in perpetuity, a member of the Delta Waterfowl Foundation and both the Seneca and Canandiagua Duck Hunters Association. Carl was a supporter of the friends of Montezuma and the Queen Catherine Swamp Refuge. Since Carl lived on Seneca Lake for so many years he was considered a local historian, and people came to him with questions about the history of the area and about decoys. Every spring and fall he would take his family to the nearby Montezuma Wildlife Refuge to watch the migrating waterfowl.

Maunsel and Ann Pierce Maunsel and Ann Pierce began purchasing decoys in 1979 during a trip to Hyannis where they attended the Richard Bourne decoy auction and shopped for decoys at the Craigville Motel. They became seriously interested in Mason Factory Decoys in the early 1980s and met Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid at that time. Many of the best decoys have been in their collection for 25-30 years and are pictured in the first edition of Russ and Alan’s book, “Mason Decoys.”


Artfact is Now Invaluable

Online Bidding Through Invaluable Bidding through Invaluable.com features real time competitive bidding straight from the auction.

To bid using Invaluable: • Go to the Guyette & Deeter website and click on the Invaluable link below upcoming auctions. • Once on Invaluable’s website, click on the Create Account button on the top right navigation bar. It’s free and only takes a few minutes. • Create your own username and password, along with your email address so Invaluable can send you important information. • Input your information. On the following page, Invaluable will ask you for your interests. • Now that you are a member of Invaluable, not only can you browse and bid on our auctions, but you have access to all of Invaluable’s other auctions.

*Winning bids will be subject to a 5% Invaluable fee

Guyette & Deeter Online Auctions

Charlie Joiner - $937.25

We e k ly O nline Au c t ions End ing E ve r y T hu r sd ay N ig ht G u a r a nt eed co n d i t i o n re p o r t s , m ul t i p l e p hot os , q u i ck s h i p p i n g , g reat d eal s o n q ual i t y i te m s Art Chilton - $1,322.50

John McLoughlin - $2,070.00

For questions, contact: 410-253-8616

zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

David Ward $1,437.50

PO Box 159, Freeport, Maine 04032 www.decoysforsale.com

Recent Sales


Session One

Ben Schmidt 1 - 8 Illinois River 9 - 16 17 - 21 Marty Hanson 22 - 40 Mason Decoy Factory Ontario 41 - 55 Midwest 56 - 66 Miniatures 67 - 76 Michigan 77 - 96 Contemporary 97 - 109 Ontario 110 - 130 Fish Decoys 131 - 153 Pacific Coast & Louisiana 154 - 160 Sporting Art 161 - 170 Shorebirds 171 - 178 Illinois River 179 - 192 Quebec 193 - 205 Mason Decoy Factory 206 - 215 Wisconsin 216 - 222 Factory 223 - 235 Duck Calls 236 - 248 Contemporary 253 - 263A Shell Boxes 264 - 282 Items of Interest 283 - 287 Fish Decoys 299 - 292 Midwest 293 - 309

Session Two

Decoratives Ontario Jim Schmiedlin Items of Interest Ward Brothers NJ & Delaware River Shorebirds Illinois River New York State New England Mason Shorebirds Ontario Sporting Art NC and VA Illinois River Ontario New England Maryland Factory New York State Items of Interest

Thursday, April 27, 2017 11:00 AM Lots 1 - 309

Friday, April 28, 2017 11:00 AM Lots 310 - 541

310 - 328 329 - 346 347 - 349 350 - 353 354 - 366 367 - 383 384 - 403 404 - 412D 413 - 428D 429 - 434 435 - 442 443 - 458 459 - 471 472 - 485A 486 - 495 496 - 504 505 - 510 511 - 515 516 - 529 530 - 535 536 - 541

Please read conditions of sale in the back of catalog


SESSION ONE

Thursday, April 27, 2017 - 11:00 am

Ben Schmidt

1884 - 1968 Detroit, Michigan

1.

Very rare pair of shovelers, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  High heads, feather stamping, and raised split tail.  Strong original paint that has mellowed nicely; very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

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Stylish tucked head greenwing teal drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, 2nd half 20th century.  Unusual head position. Small amount of stamping and feather carving.   Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

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3. Gunning model pintail drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, 1st half 20th century.  Excellent feather stamping and tail carving. Inserted metal tail. Slightly turned head.  Paint missing from metal tail, otherwise good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

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Greenwing teal drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Sticker on underside dated 1955. Feather stamping with raised wings and carved tail.  Very good and original. (1,800 - 2,200)

5.

Greenwing teal hen, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  Strong feather stamping on body with carved tail. Slightly turned head.  Small area of paint rub at end of bill; otherwise good and original. (1,500 - 1,800)

6.

Rigmate pair of mallards, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1940.  Both have feather stamping and

carved wings. Hen has slightly turned head.  Worn original paint; tight cracks in hen run the length of body. (1,200 - 1,500) 7.

Pintail hen, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  Full body feather stamping with turned head.  Small amount of wear on bill; slight separation at neck seam, otherwise very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

8.

Wall plaque of carved heads, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Nine heads including pair of redheads, pair of mallards, pair of shovelers, two canvasbacks, and one that is unpainted.   (1,200 - 1,500)

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Illinois River Charles Walker 1876 - 1968 Princeton, Illinois

Charles Walker was born in Princeton, Illinois and never really left the area, choosing to stay where waterfowl shooting was at its best. Walker hunted locally including at the Princeton Club, a club exclusive to Princeton area hunters. While Walker was not a full time professional carver like Robert Elliston and Charles Perdew, and he produced significantly fewer birds, he is still considered one of the best of the Illinois River region by today’s collectors. He produced between 500 and 700 decoys later in his life from about 1925 to 1950, many of which were made and sold to members of the Princeton Fish and Game Club.

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Rare pintail drake, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois.  Slightly turned head. Good comb and feather paint detail.  Small amount of touchup at neck base and breast, otherwise original and very good.

Provenance: Recently found on a farm in Kentucky.

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(15,000 - 18,000)


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Rigmate pair of mallards, Haddon Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 2nd half 20th century.  Hen is in sleeping pose. Drake has slightly turned head.  Both have Perdew weights, and are very good and original.

Provenance: Recently found on a farm in Kentucky. (1,750 - 2,250)

13.

Bluebill drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “KH” in underside.  Old overpaint has been taken off of the white area with good comb paint showing and minor wear; the rest has original paint with minor wear and subtle feather detail; retains Elliston weight. (2,500 - 3,000)

Rare redhead drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1900.  Branded “JS” on underside.  Original paint; numerous shot scars; tight crack near tail; protected by an early and old coat of varnish; small rough area at top of head. (1,500 - 2,000)

14.

Mallard drake, Walker Family, Princeton, Illinois, 1st quarter 19th century.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint with minor wear; professional tail chip repair by Russ Allen.

Early three piece deep “V” body style pintail drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.    White areas have old in use repaint; the rest has original paint with minor wear; crack through neck. (1,200 - 1,500)

15.

Black duck, Ed Keller, Bartonville, Illinois.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint with a few small rubs; structurally good. (1,200 - 1,500)

Provenance: Thomas collection. 11.

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(2,500 - 3,000)

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Charles Perdew 1874 - 1963 Henry, Illinois

16 Detail

Made prior to 1929, Harold Haertel traded to gain ownership of this pair in the early 1960’s. Haertel remained the owner until the Haertel collection was sold by Julia and Guyette, Inc. in 1990. The pair exhibits the finest quality paint by Edna Perdew, making them the finest pair of Perdew bluebills known.

16 Detail 14


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Important rigmate pair of bluebills, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Graceful and wide form with exceptional paint by Edna Perdew. Hen has very slightly turned head. Both have wide cheeks.  Near mint original paint.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Formerly in the collection Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois, Haertel collection stamp on underside. Lot 42 in the April 1990 Julia & Guyette, Inc. auction.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(25,000 - 30,000)

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Marty Hanson

Hayward, Wisconsin

For 47 years Marty Hanson considered Prior Lake his home. On the underside of his carvings both his signature and stamp contained that location. Over the last decade however Marty and his wife Barb have been building a wonderful secluded home and studio on a lake near Hayward, Wisconsin. The carving shop which was just completed in the last two years is where Marty solely creates all his decoys, duck calls and art. According to Hanson, “The Gadwalls were made in 2015 and are the best pair of Gadwalls I have made, I haven’t made many gadwalls, 3 pair and two single drakes in my life. They are very time consuming and the Gadwall as a species does not get the recognition they deserve, they are quite beautiful with their warm muted colors and intricately detailed breast feathers on the drake. They are hollow gunning models, and no line attachment was applied, as the previous owner had no intention of using them. Since moving to my new studio (2 years ago, that I have been working on for 10+ years) it has enabled me to expand and be more creative, building the decoys and pieces I want to make…this pair of gadwalls was a product of that. “ “The loon was made in the mid 1990’s and was the last Loon I have made since then. I have made 6 loons in total.” “The teal, lot 20, were made in 1998, they are hollow gunning teal.” “The two boards were made in 1998 and were bought by the owner of Keepers in St Michaels MD and sold through his Orvis shop, I have only made 4 of those plaques.” Marty Hanson

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17. Hollow carved loon, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Hanson stamp on underside.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750) 18.

19.

Pair of half size flying canvasbacks mounted on wooden plaque, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  “Hanson” stamp on back. Plaque is 20” long. Fine paint detail on birds.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750) Pair of half size goldeneye mounted on wooden plaque, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Stamped on the back. Plaque is 20” long. Carvings have very good paint detail.  Excellent and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

20. Rigmate pair of bluewing teal, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Both are signed by Marty on underside and have a white maker stamp. Hollow carved with bottom board. Excellent and textured original paint with raised wingtips and slightly turned heads.  Both are mint. (2,500 - 3,000) 21.

Pair of hollow carved gadwalls, Marty Hanson, Hayward, Wisconsin.  Both have “MH” carved in the undersides. Both have slightly turned and lifted heads as well as raised wingtips.  Excellent and original. (3,000 - 5,000) 17


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

This rare and magnificent rigmate pair of handmade Mason slope breast mallards were special enough to be selected for the cover of the definitive book on the Mason Decoy Factory.

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Important rigmate pair of slope breasted mallards circa 1890s, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Hen has slightly lifted head. Outstanding paint pattern. Both retain original Mason weights.  Original paint with very slight wear; both have had grime and dirt professionally removed from forward part of back on hen and from grey areas of lower side on drake; each has a small tail chip repair and a tiny chip missing from each bill tack.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, front cover, exact decoys. “Mason Decoys,” Byron Cheever. Lot 5 in the February 1991 Guyette & Schmidt, Inc. decoy auction. (35,000 - 45,000)

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22 Detail

22 Detail

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23. Exceptional black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade with early snakey head style. Challenge stamp on underside. This decoy was the logo bird for the 1986 Midwest Decoy Collectors Show.  Small amount of paint touchup at front of neck seat and very slight blunting on one side of tip of bill, otherwise excellent and original.

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Provenance: Pearce collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 29, exact decoy. (4,000 - 6,000) 24. Widgeon drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Rare challenge grade model. The initials “HB” have been punched into the underside with a nail.  Original paint with minor wear; one shot mark on back; some paint loss and neck filler missing at neck seat; small crack partway through front of neck seat; a few tiny dents; thin crack in underside.

Provenance: Pearce collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

25. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910.  Rare oversize Atlantic coast model. Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear; slight wear to the wood at the edges of the bill; fairly wide crack in underside; filled crack in one lower side; professional touchup on both lower sides.

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Provenance: Pearce collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 28, exact decoy. (3,000 - 5,000) 26.

Very rare rigmate pair of scoters, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade, with glass eyes.  Both have had the neck filler professionally replaced; otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Pearce collection. (3,000 - 5,000)


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Rare pair of bluewing teal, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1900.  Paint eye model.  Strong original paint; structurally very good; hen has small area of discoloration and a few rubs on one side; drake has rough area near breast and small dent in top of head; neck filler replaced on both. Provenance: Thomas collection.

(1,750 - 2,250)

28. Mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Stamped “DAS” for Don Sunderland.  Original paint with minor flaking and wear; professional tail chip repair; small thin chip in one edge of neck seat; several small dents in underside.

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

29. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Rare hollow challenge grade model.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; some of the neck filler is missing; hairline surface crack in one side of head just above eye.

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

30. Redhead drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early style premier grade, circa 1900.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Olson collection.

31.

Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Very rare early standard grade, glass eye model with slightly turned and lifted head.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small chips missing from neck filler; a few tiny dents; thin crack partway down underside.

Provenance: Pearce collection.

(1,250 - 1,750)

(2,500 - 3,500)

32. Redhead drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. From the Gavitt Rig, Seneca Lake, New York. Branded “SB Gavitt”.  Original paint with slight discoloration and wear; small repair to tip of bill; lightly hit by shot; retains Mason weight.

Provenance: Pearce collection.

(2,500 - 3,500) 21


33. Exceptional bluewing teal hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Near mint original paint; small dent in back; short hairline crack at neck seat.

Literature: “Mason Factory Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (8,000 - 12,000)

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Very rare pintail hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early slope breasted, premier grade, circa 1890s. Slightly turned head.  Original paint with slight wear; small spot of touchup on top of head and on back; very lightly hit by shot; thin crack at neck filler.

Provenance: O’Connor collection. Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 33, exact decoy. (6,000 - 9,000)

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Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1900.  Early premier grade, double blue model. Branded “WHW” in underside.  Original paint with minor wear; crack in underside; slight separation at body seam; head has been reset with small amount of neck filler added and professional touchup in that area.

Provenance: Pearce collection. Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey, Jr. Purchased at the Richard Bourne, Mackey Collection auction, 8/20/74. Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 56, exact decoy. (3,000 - 4,000)

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Bluebill hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Very rare flat bottom, challenge grade, “George Bacon” model.   Original paint with minor wear; small area of worn paint near a knot in one side; knot has some filler in it from when the decoy was made.

Provenance: Pearce collection. (3,000 - 4,000)

37.

Redhead hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. From the Gavitt rig, Seneca lake, New York. Branded “SB Gavitt” in underside.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents; retains original Mason weight.

Provenance: Pearce collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

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Rare Mason/Dodge St. Clair Flats model Canada goose, Dodge Decoy factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1890.  This was made when Mason and Dodge worked together, in the later years of the Dodge Factory. Branded “Meredith” and “HNT”, both St. Clair Flats Shooting Club members.  Worn original paint on much of the decoy, some old touchup; most of the filler has come out of the seam where the head joins the neck; some is missing from the neck base; several cracks including two on the back that were filled and opened more at a later date; professional bill chip repair.

Provenance: Pearce collection. (2,000 - 3,000)


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39 Detail 39.

Exceptional mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910.  Very rare hollow challenge grade with exaggerated snakey head style with slightly lifted head.  Near mint original paint; small dent at one side of neck; small chip missing from neck filler near back of head.

Provenance: Pearce collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 25 center, exact decoy pictured. (5,000 - 8,000)

40 Detail 40.

Exceptional mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910.  Challenge grade with good snakey head style. Special order hollow.  Near mint original paint (never used); very small chip missing from top of tail.

Provenance: Pearce collection. Formerly in collection of William J. Mackey, Jr., Mackey collection stamp on underside.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 25 center, exact decoy pictured. (5,000 - 8,000) 25


Ontario

41

42

43

44

45

46

41.

Very rare greenwing teal hen, Bud Tully, Peterborough, Ontario.  Exaggerated relief wing carving and slightly turned head.  Original paint; minor wear; filled crack in one side appears to be from when the decoy was made; minor roughness to one edge of bill.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Bernie Gates.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 100, exact decoy pictured. (2,000 - 3,000) 42.

Rare greenwing teal hen with lifted and slightly turned head, Jess Baker, Trenton, Ontario.  Baker’s stencil on underside.  Original paint with very slight shrinkage and wear; very slight roughness to tip of tail.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

43.

Small pair of bluebills, Don Reid, Hamilton, Ontario, circa 1900.  Both are branded “DR” in underside.  Subtle comb painting; few tiny dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 33. (2,000 - 3,000) 44. 26

Extremely rare hooded merganser hen and drake, Billy Ellis, Whitby, Ontario.   Hen has original paint and

excellent condition; no structural flaws; drake has old in use repaint and varnish that has shrunk on much of the decoy; small cracks in neck and back; tiny chip missing from tail.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, p. 102, pair. Hen is pictured in “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 92. (2,000 - 3,000) 45.

Rare hollow carved mallard drake, D.K. Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario, circa 1900.  Raised carved wingtips.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on the edges of the bill and tail; several small tail chips missing; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 120, exact decoy. DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (3,000 - 4,000) 46.

Bluebill hen, Bud Tully, Peterborough, Ontario.  Relief wing carving with crossed wingtips and turned head. From Tully’s hunting rig. Branded “JD Tully.”  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 76. (2,000 - 3,000)


47.

Pair of hollow carved redheads, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Both are branded “G AND J WARIN BOAT BUILDERS TORONTO.”   Original paint with subtle feather detail; raised neck seats; original paint with very minor wear; drake has been lightly hit by shot and has a hairline crack in the neck base.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: Drake pictured in “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates p. 66. DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (12,500 - 17,500)

47

47 Detail

27


48

49

50

51

52

53

48.

Solid body redhead drake, Buck Crawford, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Better carving detail.  Original paint with minor wear; crack in underside and in front of neck; black paint on breast appears to be a second coat.

51.

Rigmate pair of hollow bluebills, William Chrysler, Bellville, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  From Chrysler’s personal hunting rig, branded “CWC” twice in underside of each.  Original paint with minor wear on hen; drake has minor wear on one side and significant wear on other side; very lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bernie Gates.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bernie Gates. (1,500 - 2,500)

52.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene & Linda Kangas, p. 145. “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 118. (950 - 1,250)

Solid body redhead drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1880.  Branded, “PHD for St. Clair Flats shooting company member Paul H. Deming 19121955.”  Original paint; minor to moderate wear; small dents; short hairline crack in back; minor restoration to a crack in the neck and a shot scar in the bill.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Bill Butler, Washington, DC. (1,250 - 1,750)

50.

Hollow carved bluebill drake, Addie Nichol, Smiths Falls Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Raised carved wingtips and fluted tail.  Appealing old in use repaint on much of the decoy; original combing on back; slight roughness to raised wingtips.

53.

Rigmate pair of bluebills, Ray Andress, Gananaque, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  From the hunting rig of Jack Kid, former mayor of Trenton, Ontario.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 150, exact decoy pictured. (1,250 - 1,750) 49.

Hollow carved bluebill hen, DK Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Highly detailed feather carving.  Appealing old in use repaint by DW Nichol; very slight wear.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

28

(1,500 - 2,000)

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 38. for info on Andress, p. 140 for info on the Kid rig. (1,250 - 1,750)


In the 1970s there was a farm sale outside of Markham, Ontario. At the sale, a number of decoys were sold, which are now known as the “Markham Rig.” Some of the decoys were thought to have been made by Walker Moorley and some by a talented unknown maker. The most interesting decoys in the group, attributed to the unidentified maker, had heavily carved mandibles and nostrils as this redhead drake exhibits.

54

54 Detail

54.

Hollow carved redhead drake from the Markham rig, last quarter 19th century.  Believed to be one of only four drakes known.  Original paint with a few small rubs; structurally very good; never rigged.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bob Youngman.

Literature: DU Canada eBook, exact decoy.

(8,000 - 12,000) 29


Thomas Chambers 1860 - 1948 Toronto, Ontario

The Toronto School Flats geese is the name that renowned collector, author, and historian Barney Crandell coined to identify this style of Ontario decoy when he wrote his decoy maker research articles. Thomas Chambers was a highly skilled waterfowl hunter from Toronto, Ontario who, as a young man, hunted the Toronto waterfront and surrounding area centered on Ashbridges Bay. He moved to Wallaceburg and the Walpole Island “Flats Marshes” in the mid 1880s to manage the St. Anne’s Club for George Warin and David Ward after they left the St. Clair Flats Shooting Co. (“SCFSC” Canada Club). He moved to the “SCFSC” to become manager there on the recommendation of George Warin in 1900. (John Reeves worked there until his untimely death in 1896.) Chambers was a rugged individual over 6 feet tall, nicknamed “King Tom,” apparently, for his dictatorial style when dealing with native Canadian guides, and would manage the Club for the next 43 years – one of Canada’s finest and most prestigious hunting clubs. Most importantly to collectors, Chambers carved many decoys including his Flats/Toronto School geese for the wealthy sportsmen of the “SCFSC” who hunted the vast St. Clair marshes. Chambers’ geese had only one head and body style with meticulously carved head and bill work, graceful and beautifully proportioned, with a simple paint pattern. His goose decoys were completed early in his years at the club. Probably fewer than a dozen exist in original paint today. This decoy tapers from a higher back to an extremely low breast profile creating an exceptionally striking profile. It is lightweight and hollow, with a 1/4” bottom board. It has a graceful swept back neck – a simple understated elegance – is very lifelike in the water, and was functional given the fact that Chambers was a market hunter. It was originally collected by Joe Tonnelli in the 1970s and eventually acquired by Peter Brown in the mid 1980s. 30


55.

Hollow carved Canada goose, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “Tom Chambers Maker”, and “JT McMillan”. McMillan was a St. Clair Flats Shooting Club member 1913-1946.  Original paint with minor wear; some paint missing; a long time ago the seam at the bottom board and the area near it was repainted and more nails were added to the bottom board; someone has removed the overpaint from the lower sides and in the process has removed some of the original paint so there is bare wood showing; a few small dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Found at the Canada Club, Wallaceburg, Ontario. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 15. DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (25,000 - 30,000)

55 Detail

55

31


Midwest

56

57

58

59

60 56.

57.

61 Redhead hen, Jack Rider, Port Clinton, Ohio, circa 1925.  Rare turtle back style with carved wingtips. Signed “J F Rider” on underside.  Original paint with even wear throughout decoy; several tight cracks in body that have not opened up. (800 - 1,200) Rare pair of crow decoys, Jack Rider, Port Clinton, Ohio, circa 1930.  Two different styles with tack eyes and metal hangers. One crow has been made from a single piece of wood while the other has been laminated. Both have thick black paint.  Both appear to be original and good. (1,200 - 1,500)

58. Mallard hen, Ben Yeargen, North St. Louis, Missouri.  “BY” painted under bill.  Two coats of paint by Yeargen; structurally good. 32

Literature: “Decoys of Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (400 - 600)

62 59.

Stuffed canvas mallard drake, John Tax, Osakis, Minnesota.  Tax ink stamp on underside.  Original paint with moderate wear; some wear to canvas. (600 - 900)

60.

Early canvasback drake, unknown maker, Heron Lake, Minnesota, 1st quarter 20th century.  Multiple coats of old paint; cracks in neck.   (300 - 500)

61.

Rigmate pair of bluewing teal, attributed to John Tax, Osakis, Minnesota.    Multiple coats of old paint have been scraped down; glass eyes have deteriorated; structurally good. (400 - 600)

62.

Rigmate pair of canvasbacks from the Delta Marsh area of Minnesota.    Minor wear, otherwise very good and original. (400 - 600)


63.

Rare hollow carved redhead drake, Paul Lipke, Whiting, Indiana.  Stamped “PL” in weight.  Original paint with good patina and very slight wear; structurally excellent. (3,500 - 4,500)

63 64.

Redhead drake from Ohio, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Shoe button eyes and ice dip behind neck. Hollow carved with inset circular weight. Branded “JH PORTER,” a member at Winous Point Shooting Club, 1875.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; a few tiny dents; thin crack through neck.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Gene and Linda Kangas. Kangas brand on underside. (2,500 - 3,500)

65.

64

Important feeding mallard drake, Jack Rider, Port Clinton, Ohio.  Carved and crossed wingtips. Branded “JR” on underside. Rider fastened this decoy to a post so that it could be manually pulled to imitate a feeding motion of mallard drake. Decoy has not been offered for sale since original Jack Rider estate sale in Port Clinton.   (2,000 - 3,000)

65 66. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, unknown maker, from Clinton River, Michigan.  At one time believed to have been made by a neighbor of Ferdinand Bach’s. Weight on underside is stamped “WGS”.  Original paint; drake has paint missing from a few wear spots on head, otherwise good and original; hen has small nick where bill meets head. (1,200 - 1,500)

66 33


Miniatures

67

68

69

70

67.

71

Pair of miniature pintails, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Both have raised carved wingtips and are approximately 5” long.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Recently found on a farm in Kentucky. (1,500 - 2,000) 68.

69.

34

1/2 size old squaw drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Well executed carving. Snakey head style. Inset metal tail and fine feather carving on back. Approximately 12” long.  White paint has mellowed; slight separation at neck seam; otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) Pair of miniature pintails, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Approximately 5” long. Both have raised carved

wingtips.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Recently found on a farm in Kentucky. (1,600 - 2,000)

70.

Pair of miniature nestled headed mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Both have raised carved wingtips. Approximately 4 1/2” long.  Original and good.

Provenance: Recently found on a farm in Kentucky. (950 - 1,250) 71.

1/4 size preening mallard hen from the Illinois River.  Hollow carved, approximately 6” long.  Original and good. (1,250 - 1,750)


72

73

74

75

75A

72.

Pair of miniature buffleheads, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Both have Crowell’s circular ink stamp on underside of base.  Very small amount of touchup on one side near neck base, otherwise original and good. (2,000 - 3,000)

73.

Running black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  No marking under the base.  Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

74.

Two 1/4 size carvings, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Pintail drake and old squaw drake. Both have balsa bodies with slightly turned cedar heads. Both have inserted cedar tails.  Near mint original paint; old squaw’s neck and tail have been reset; tiny chips missing from tip of tail.

76

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath. (800 - 1,200)

75. Miniature merganser drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Relief wing carving.  Very good and original. (400 - 600) 75A. Miniature canvasback drake, Tom Schroeder, Detroit, Michigan. Tucked head with carved sleepy eyes. Fine comb painting on body with carved wings and tail. Very good and original. (500 - 800) 76.

Miniature Canada goose, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts.  6 1/2” long.  A few tiny worn spots, otherwise very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

35


Ferdinand Bach 1888 - 1967 Detroit, Michigan

When hunting the unpredictable waters that prevail in the days of November on Lake St. Clair, carver Ferdinand Bach found that his particular design of large full body, solid decoys met his expectations for imitating the look of the migrating canvasbacks. Bach was a student of design. Employed as a draftsman at both Dodge and Chrysler, he was a perfectionist. His meticulous care and practice of placing each decoy in its own individual bag helped to maintain the pristine condition of his decoys from season to season.

77 Detail

36


77.

Very desirable canvasback drake, Ferdinand Bach.  “F. Bach” is carved in underside. Classic wingtip and tail carving. From a rig picked by Ed Denavarre in Detroit, Michigan.  Strong original paint; rub at one side of head; hairline crack partway through bill; otherwise very good and original. (17,500 - 22,500)

77

77 Detail 37


78. Very rare pair of canvasbacks, Ferdinand Bach, Detroit, Michigan, 2nd half 20th century.  Approximately 1/2 size, both are 9 1/2” in length. With classic back and tail carving. Excellent detailed bill carving.  Strong original paint. (2,250 - 2,750)

78

79. Rigmate pair of redheads, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Both are hollowed out on the undersides and are branded, “GEB.”  Original paint; good patina and very minor wear; small crack in hen’s lower breast. (2,000 - 3,000)

79

80.

Important redhead drake in sleeping pose, Ted Vandenbosche, Mount Clemens, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Head is turned with bill tucked into body.  Very old paint; black areas appear to be strengthened; gray and much of head appear to be original; small chip at base of neck a few shot scars and rubs to wood. (2,000 - 2,500)

80

81. Pair of redheads, Nate Quillen, Rockville, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow lowhead style with inlet heads. Both are branded “JCM” for J. Morse, Pointe Mouillee club member 1894-1900.  Old in use repaint worn to the bare wood; some original in places; very small hole in drakes back. Provenance: Olson collection.

81 38

Literature: “Waterfowl Decoys of Michigan,” Lowell Jackson and Clune Walsh, plate 10. (1,250 - 1,750)


82

83

84

85

86

87

82. Canvasback drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Near mint original paint; structurally excellent. (800 - 1,200) 83.

Large mallard drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1930s.  Good carving detail and fluted tail. Part of a leather tail sprig remains.  Original paint with minor wear; protected by a very old coat of varnish; a 1/2” piece has been added to the underside of decoy. (600 - 900)

84.

Early black duck, William Finch, Saginaw Bay, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Hollow carved with bottom board. Scratch feather detailing on back that has partially worn away.  Original paint; small gouge in back; rough area at end of tail; a few shot marks in head and body; cracks in bottom board. (800 - 1,200)

85.

Hollow carved mallard hen, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Inlet head.

Branded “JCM” for J.C. Morse who was a member of Point Mouillee Club on Lake Erie.  Appealing old in use repaint; bill chip repair. (900 - 1,200) 86.

Very rare ringbill drake, Miles Pirnie, East Lansing, Michigan.  “M.D.P.” is carved in the underside. Relief wing carving and very slightly turned head.  Excellent and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

87.

Widgeon drake, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow with bottom board. Branded “HHB” in the underside for Harvey H. Brown from Cleveland Ohio, who was president of the Pointe. Mouillee Shooting Club from 1896-1923. Inlet head with carved shoulders and glass eyes.  Paint is a mix of worn original with some strengthening that is worn to bare wood on much of the decoy; cracks in neck, head, and bill; chip missing from underside of bill. (1,200 - 1,500)

39


Nate Quillin

1839 - 1908 Rockwood, Michigan Quillin was Michigan’s earliest and finest commercial decoy craftsman. According to Jim Marsh, a Quillin authority, his most productive years were between 1880 and 1900. The majority of his decoys and boats were sold to members of the Pointe Mouillee Shooting Club where he worked as a guide. Lot 89, which remains in near mint condition, was pictured twice in an article on Nate Quillin written in the Spring 1972 issue of North American Decoys. At that time, it was owned by famed early Michigan collector Dr. Edmund Bowman. Joe Tonelli purchased it from Bowman in the late 1970s and then later sold it to finance a college education for his children. When pioneer collector Joel Barber set sight on Quillin’s boat body style decoys, he was so impressed that he created an architectural drawing of the cross section in 1951. He went on to write in his book about Quillin, “He took great pride in his work. Nate Quillin

He was very neat and everything had to be in perfect order. Not only would he make decoys, but he also painted them, and every bit of color was applied with great exactness and care. His appearance and temperament were this of an artist.”

88.

Hollow carved mallard hen, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Inlet head. Branded “JCM” for J.C. Marsh who was a Pointe Mouillee Shooting Club member in 1894.  Original paint that has some shrinkage from varnish; crack through neck; lightly hit by shot.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (6,500 - 9,500)

88

40


89 Detail

89. Very rare canvasback drake, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan.  Branded “CJS” in underside for Charles J. Shefield 1843 - 1887 Pointe Mouillee Shooting Club. Sheffield (1843-1895) was a business partner of Harvey H. Brown, both were from Cleveland, OH. Sheffield bought his share of the Pte. Moullee Shooting Club in 1887. Edges of bill are extremely thin and delicate, as with the classic Quillin tail on this style of decoy. Hollowed from a drill hole underneath the tail. Very thin inlet head.  Original paint that has been applied over a coat of sealant which is the same process Quillin used with his lowhead redheads; crack in neck has been secured; small dent in one side of head; small amount of flaking on body otherwise very good and original. (10,000 - 15,000)

89

41


90

91

92

93

94

95

90. Black duck, William Finkle, Saginaw Bay, Michigan.  Hollow construction with bottom board. Fine scratch feather painting on body.  Original paint; rough area under tip of bill; areas of wear on head and body, including where line tie made marks on the back of the decoy. (800 - 1,200) 91.

92.

42

Sleeping canvasback hen, Tom Schroeder, Detroit, Michigan.  Stamped “Tom Schroeder” in underside twice and 1960. Composite body with wooden bottom board and head.  Some seam separation to an area where body attaches to board, otherwise good and original. (800 - 1,200) Bufflehead hen, attributed to Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan.   Hollow construction with bottom board. Branded “ESH” in underside. Hollow with bottom board. Glass eyes.  Old working repaint; crack in neck; two rough areas on back; end of bill and tail are worn. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Ed Denevrro. (800 - 1,200)

93.

Bluebill hen, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan.  Inlet head that has been secured with a hinge and is removable. Carved ice groove behind neck. Glass eyes.  Paint is a mix of original with some strengthening; neck repair; numerous shot marks; wear at tail and bill. (800 - 1,000)

94.

Folky redhead drake, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Unknown carver. Inletted neck. Hollow construction with bottom board. Glass eyes.  Multiple coat of very old paint; several shot marks and areas where paint has flaked away. (800 - 1,000)

95.

Goldeneye hen from Harsons Island, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with low head style.   Old in use repaint with scratch feathering on breast; a few small dents.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Gene and Linda Kangas. Kangas brand in underside, also GE4 marked.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, plate 310, exact decoy. (800 - 1,200)


Tom Schroeder 1885 - 1976 Detroit, Michigan

96

96.

Rare and important bluebill drake, Tom Schroeder, Detroit, Michigan.  An experimental style of decoy made by Schroeder with removable head and a so called hydrofoil keel. Strong feather and tail carving. Head sits back slightly on breast.  Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish. (8,000 - 10,000)

96 Detail

“Waterfowl Decoys of Michigan and the Lake St. Clair Region,” by Walsh and Jackson, exact decoy pictured.

43


Contemporary Carvings

97

98

99

100

101

102

97.

Large merganser hen, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Relief wing carving. McNair carved in the underside.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good.

Provenance: Carr collection.

98.

Hollow carved Hogg Island style brant in swimming pose, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  CTM carved in underside.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (2,000 - 3,000)

(1,250 - 1,750)

99. Preening merganser drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Hollow carved with relief wing carving.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (1,250 - 1,750)

44

100. Hollow pintail drake carved in the Delaware River tradition, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Slightly turned head. Keel with weight attached to underside.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 101. Gull with large keel, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed and dated 1995. Hollow carved.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,500) 102. Nathan Cobb, Jr. style Canada goose, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed. Approximately 23 1/2” long. Hollow carved.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (2,000 - 2,500)


103

104

105

106

107

108

103. Mallard drake, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  Branded “CTM” in underside. Long and sleek hollow carved body with snakey head. Carved and raised wingtips. Comb painting on back.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 104. Gunning style black duck, Jimmie A. Vizier, Galliano, Louisiana.  Dated 1991 on underside, and also signed. Slightly turned and cocked head with raised and crossed wingtips.  Excellent. (800 - 1,200) 105. Stylish widgeon drake, William Gibian, Onancock, Virginia.  Hollow carved. “Gibian” carved in underside with his signed business card under Plexiglas, attached to the underside. Cocked and slightly turned head. Extended and carved tail. Fine body combing.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 106. Rigmate pair of pintails, Bob White, Tullytown, Pennsylvania.  Both have pad weights with quail embossed. Both are signed “Bob White 1999.” Both are

109

hollow carved with high necks and slightly turned heads. Raised wingtips. Drake has comb paint on body.   Tip of tail is slightly blunted on hen, otherwise both are very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 107. Pair of ringneck plovers, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed.   Original paint that has been aged; structurally very good. (950 - 1,250) 108. Yellowlegs, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Carved in the style of Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia. Drop tail with wing separation carving. Signed “McNair” on underside.  Shot marks and stressed areas made to look old. (500 - 800) 109. Massachusetts style golden plover, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Slightly raised wing carving. Mounted on base with wire legs. “McNair” brand carved in underside.  Very good and original. (650 - 950)

45


Ontario

110 Detail

110

110.

46

Hollow carved pintail hen, very similar to the work of John R. Wells, last quarter 19th century. Low head style with raised neck seat. Subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; wear to the wood at edges of bill. (5,000 - 8,000)


111 Detail

111

111.

Low head style black duck, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900.  Hollow carved. Small “MCC” brand in underside. Original paint; minor wear; bottom board seam was repainted a long time ago to seal it; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Guyette and Schmidt,” April 2009 auction catalog for rigmate. (5,000 - 7,000) 47


112

113

114

115

116

117

112.

Pair of bluebills, Bud Tully, Peterborough, Ontario.  His earlier style with relief wing carving and very slightly turned heads.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 76. (2,500 - 3,500) 113. Pair of wood ducks, DW Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Both are signed and identified on the undersides.  Tiny chip missing from one of the drake’s wingtips, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 153. (2,000 - 3,000) 115. Hollow carved bluebill drake, Thomas Dalton, Hamilton, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Good scratch paint detail.  Original paint; very minor wear; structurally good. (2,000 - 4,000) 116. Pair of hollow carved mallards, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1920.  Both are branded “JRW Maker”.  Original paint with moderate wear; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Found at Oak Lake Hunting Club.

Literature: “North American Decoys,” Summer 1972 issue, p. 16. (2,500 - 3,500)

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 46. (2,500 - 3,500)

114. Pair of hollow carved redheads, Art and George Wilkinson, Rockville, Ontario.  Good comb paint detail. Both have “E.C. Cossitt” painted on the underside.  Original paint; minor wear; lightly hit by shot.

117.

Pair of solid body goldeneye attributed to David Ward, Toronto, Ontario, 3rd quarter 19th century.    Original paint; minor wear; chip in one of drake’s eyes; several tiny dents and shot marks.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

48

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(2,500 - 3,500)


Ivar Fernlund

1881 - 1933 Hamilton, Ontario

118

A pattern maker by trade, Fernlund worked for Westinghouse and eventually lived at “The Beach Strip” on Hamilton’s waterfront at Burlington Bay. Fernlund made approximately 150 decoys for his personal use that were lightweight, hollow, and precisely carved having wonderfully blended and textured artist oil paint. The heads were well carved and precise, with varied head positions and always with great attitude. He made his rig starting around 1910 – Hamilton Bay’s finest – which contained at least 10 species of ducks. A significant portion of the “Fernlund” rig, including a screening boat and trailer, was purchased by Frank Schmid (deceased 2012) of Mississaugua, Ontario in the mid 1970s. Frank was a top flight competitive decoy carver who was also an avid duck hunter who frequently hunted Long Point Bay on Lake Erie for divers. Frank stopped for a beer at a local Hamilton, Ontario hotel where a black duck and a pair of Fernlund canvasbacks were displayed behind the bar. The hotel owner had “the rig” at his home. Frank purchased the decoys including canvasbacks, redheads, bluebills, black ducks, pintails, greenwings, bluewings, and mallards. Bruce Malcolm met Frank duck hunting on Long Point Bay in the 1970s and eventually acquired decoys from the Fernlund (Schmid) rig that were subsequently sold to Peter Brown including the pintail pair, the black duck pair, the bluewing teal pair, canvasbacks, redheads, bluebills and mallards. 49


The Brown collection pintails are believed to be the only pair known. Guyette & Schmidt sold the rigmate drake in July 2007. Only three pintails are known to exist. The Brown pair is somewhat oversized and in extremely fine condition. The drake, having a double sprig tail and classic high and alert head with a wonderful artistic blended paint – especially the speculum and tertial coverts – along with the hen, true to species, form understated elegance‌ a truly magnificent pair. Some seasoned collectors believe this pintail pair is the finest pair of Canadian decoys known.

118 Detail

118 Detail

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118.

Exceedingly rare and important rigmate pair of hollow carved pintails, Ivar Fernlund, Hamilton, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Both have raised neck seats. Drake has long inserted forked tail and fine scratch as well as comb paint detail. Drake also has very slightly turned head. Hen has shorter inserted tail.  Original paint with very slight wear; professional repair to a thin crack in the hen’s neck by Russ Allen.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Obtained them from Frank Schmid, Burlington, Ontario. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 34, exact pair. “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming p. 151, exact decoys. DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (200,000 - 240,000)

118 Detail

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119. Lowhead style mallard, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario.  “BUNBURY” brand in underside. Hollow carved.  Original paint; minor wear that has darkened with age; a few small dents and shot marks. (4,000 - 6,000)

119 120. Hollow carved mallard hen and drake, George Warin, Toronto Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Low head models. Hen is branded “Riordan” St. Clair Flats Shooting Club 1885 - 1901.  Original paint with moderate wear; drake has been heavily hit by shot; hen has a professional repair to a chip on one side of the bill and a small tail chip missing; several hairline cracks in drake’s body.

120

121 Detail

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Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 43. (2,500 - 3,500) 121.

Hollow carved goldeneye drake found in Peterborough, Ontario.  Branded “Queens Hotel” twice in the underside.   Paint appears to be original; moderate flaking and wear; several small dents and shot marks.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bernie Gates.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 219. “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, p. 114. (1,500 - 2,500) 122. Redhead hen and drake, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario, first quarter 20th century.  Drake is branded “CWC” twice in underside.   Original paint; minor wear; drake has two crack in the back; both have a few small dents.

122 52

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bernie Gates.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys I,” Bernie Gates, p. 105, exact decoys pictured. “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates, p. 128, exact decoys pictured. (3,000 - 4,000)


The circa 1910 Fernlund black ducks in the Brown collection are two of four known Fernlund blacks – all part of the Fernlund (Schmid) rig. Whether carved as a pair, as some have suggested, or the result of being carved at different times, the two black ducks differ significantly in form and attitude. The larger has an upright posture and a larger head with a very regal, bold attitude. The smaller is diminutive in form with soft flowing lines and a relaxed, resting posture. Both have dry paint and subtle raised body feathering with skillfully blended, true-to-species head paint. The pair is lightly hollowed and possesses an understated elegance. No question… this is a compelling pair, whether on the waters off the beach strip on Hamilton’s waterfront in 1910 or in a collection today.

123

123. Very rare hollow carved black duck, Ivar Fernlund, Hamilton, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Head is in slightly resting pose with raised neck seat. Subtle scratch feather paint.  Small paint rubs at one speculum; otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in collection of Frank Schmid, Burlington, Ontario.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 51. DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (10,000 - 14,000)

123 Detail 53


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124. Commercial grade goldeneye hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Solid body with raised neck seat.  Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; short thin crack in one lower side. (900 - 1,200) 125.

Hollow carved hooded merganser hen from the Toronto area, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with very minor wear; mostly on extremities; very lightly hit by shot. Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(800 - 1,200)

126. Hollow carved black duck, Harry Hitchins, Belleville, Ontario, first quarter 20th century.  Scratch paint detail.  Original paint moderate wear; tail chip missing.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 107. (800 - 1,200) 127. Hollow carved canvasback drake, James Barr or Don Reid, Hamilton, Ontario.    Original paint; minor wear; a few tiny dents; cork plug added to underside at a later date. 54

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Hugh Valiant. (900 - 1,200)

128. Hollow carved bufflehead drake from the Toronto area, last quarter 19th century.    Appealing old in use repaint; small shot scar on one side of bill; thin cracks in underside.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Sam Stuart.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, p. 12, exact decoy. “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 65. (900 - 1,200) 129. Pair of hooded mergansers, DW Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.    Near mint original paint; structurally excellent.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bernie Gates.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys I,” Bernie Gates, p. 124, drake, exact decoy pictured. (1,000 - 1,400)


130. Very rare hollow carved black duck, Ivar Fernlund, Hamilton, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Subtle scratch feather paint detail. Very slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint that has darkened somewhat with age; small drip of off white paint on one side. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in collection of Frank Schmid, Burlington, Ontario. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 35. DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (10,00 - 14,000)

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Fish Decoys

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131. Walleye fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.  Early style with carved eye. 8 3/4” long x 7/8” wide x 1 1/2” high. Carved eye fish by Peterson are considered very rare.  Strong original paint that is protected by an old coat of varnish that is aged to create a nice appealing surface; professional tail restoration to top part of fin appears to have been done quite some time ago. (1,800 - 2,200)

133. Brook trout fish decoy, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Signed and dated ‹90. 8 1/2” long.  Paint separation under one fin, otherwise very good and original. (800 - 1,000)

132.

135. Rainbow trout fish decoy, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1991.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

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Fish decoy, Northern Michigan, Native American.  With original line tie and jig stick. Measures 7” long with four metal fins and a belly weight. White paint on head and along underside of body. Fish has raised tail and semi circular body contour.   Provenance: Found in Northern Michigan by Ron Swanson in the late 1960s. (1,200 - 1,500)

134. Very rare musky fish decoy, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1987.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

136.

Perch fish decoy, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1992. 9 1/2” long.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)


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142A 137. Well carved bluegill fish decoy, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1989. Excellent anatomical carving 5.5” long.   (800 - 1,200)

140. Bluegill fish decoy, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Detailed scale carving on body. 5 1/2” long.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,000)

138. Walleye fish decoy, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1991 on belly weight. Carved wood with acrylic fins and painted eye.  One fin appears to have been broken and reglued, otherwise very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

141. Large mouth bass fish decoy, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1990. 7” long.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,000)

139. Small mouth bass fish decoy, Jim Foote, Gibraltar, Michigan.  Signed and dated 1993. Carved open mouth with detailed scale carving. Approximately 10” long.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

142. Perch fish decoy, Butch Scram, Mount Clemens, Michigan.  Round body with delicate wooden tail. 4 3/4” long. Tack eyes.  Nice original paint with fine mellowing. (800 - 1,200) 142A. Rare fish spear, W.H. Kellogg, Michigan. Hand forged with seven tines measuring 8” in length. Spear length is 36”. Kellogg is stamped on both sides. Original and good. (800 - 1,000) 57


Lake Chautauqua

History of Spearing on Lake Chautauqua, New York 1841

Spear fishing and use of tents on ice made illegal.

1857

Illegal to posses a spear or fish house.

1896

Spear fishing for Gar reinstated.

1897

Spear fishing for Muskey made legal from Februay 1st - 20th.

1898

Season is extended until 3/10, but only two days per week.

1899

Spear fishing for Muskey and Billfish may be taken legally with spears and fish houses & decoys. Spearing permitted Mondays and Thursdays for five weeks beginning the first Monday in February. Fish houses only allowed on the ice between 6 am and 6 pm.

1903

Spearing on Thursdays only.

1905

Spearing of Musky prohibited on Lake Chautauqua. Spearing was closed forever.

142B

142B. Trout fish decoy, Harry Seymour, Lake Chautauqua, New York. Approximately 7� long with metal fins and curved leather tail. Carved gills and mouth and tack eyes. Highly detailed paint. Small amount of touch up to worn area on center of underside; original paint with a few flakes missing from metal fins; structurally good. (7,000 - 9,000)

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Ted Vandenbosche

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143. Bass fish decoy, Ted Vandenbosche, Mount Clemens, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  12 1/2” in length. Carved gills and mouth, tack eyes. Well executed paint job with multiple shades of green. Belly weight has been partially drilled for tuning.  Small dent near one eye; edge wear near mouth and tail otherwise very good and original. (8,000 - 10,000)

144. Cisco fish decoy, Ted Vandenbosche, Mount Clemons, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  11” long. Vandenbosche fish are very rare in any condition. Tack eyes with carved gills and mouth. Belly weights on underside have been partially drilled out for tuning. Excellent paint that is multiple shades of blue to white with hints of black on the back of fish.  White areas show some discoloration and small areas of paint flaking on copper fins. (8,000 - 10,000)

Vandenbossche was a master mechanic, tool and die maker, carpenter, gun smith, dredge and tugboat operator, and hunting and fishing guide on Lake St. Clair. He also made duck and fish decoys as well as fishing spears. It is not known if Vandenbossche just did not make many fish, or if they have simply disappeared over time. Those that have survived are highly sought after by collectors of large St. Clair fish decoys.

143 Detail

144 Detail

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145. Two fish plaques.  Carved wall plaque of a perch and hake fish, Tom Singleton, Michigan. Plaque measures 18” x 10”. Signed “T. Singleton” on back. And other brook trout John Kalash. Signed by Kalash on the back. Board measures 16” in length.  Very good and original. (600 - 800) 146. Carved walleye, Lou Schifferl.  Metal fins. Measures 27” in length and 10” high. Signed “Schifferl” near tail. Strong body combing paint. Carved mouth eyes and gills. Inset metal fins.   (600 - 800) 147. Perch with tack eyes, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.   Approximately 8” long.  Original paint with minor wear; old touchup on underside as well as underside of fins. (600 - 900) 60

148. Trout fish decoy, Lake Chautauqua, New York, circa 1900.  Leather tail with tack eyes, carved gill and metal fins.  Multiple coats of paint. (600 - 800) 149. Decorative carving of a pike, Stefke, Michigan.  Approximately 21” in length. Highly detailed with good muscular carving very realistic replica of a pike.  Excellent and original. (600 - 800) 150. Three hollow painted tin fish decoys, Dr. Thomas Parnassos, St. Louis, Missouri.  A crappie, perch, and jumbo perch. Lengths vary from 15” to 10 1/2” in length.  Original paint with a few small rubs; structurally very good.

Literature: Article about Dr. Parnassos, March/April 2016 Decoy Magazine. (600 - 900)


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151. Three fish decoys, from Michigan.  Auggie Janner with bat wings and carved open mouth, 4 1/2” long, minor paint flaking on underside of fish and on fins. Perch by Frank Brogan, Saginaw Bay, Michigan. 6 3/4” long, light wear. Shiner by Alfred Dreshel, four belly weights, painted eyes area of tail damage.  Otherwise original and good. (800 - 1,000) 152. Three fish decoys, A.J. Downey, Sr., Newbury, Michigan.  Brown trout, 12”, Brook trout, 12”, Rainbow

trout, 10”. Brook trout is signed “A.J. Downey,” other two have name or initials impressed in belly weight.  Excellent. (1,200 - 1,500) 153. Two perch fish decoys, Isaac Goulette, Mount Clemens, Michigan.  Both fish are 8 1/2” long, have tack eyes. Wooden tails with metal fins.  Slight wear around belly weight on underside and on one fish at tip of mouth; otherwise good and original. (700 - 900)

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Pacific Coast Horace Crandall

1892 - 1969 San Francisco, California

Crandall was born in Ashaway, Rhode Island in 1892. He spent his younger days on the east coast and moved to Benicia, California in 1917 where he took a job as a ferry boat engineer. His job was carrying trains across the Sacramento River before the bridges were built. He made his first decoys while in Benicia, but they were all lost in a fire. In 1931, he moved to Westwood, California on Lake Almanor where he eventually took a job with Red River Lumber Company. This is when he made the decoys that collectors covet the most. “Hi,” as he was known, began selling decoys locally through the San Francisco sporting goods stores including, Phillips Sporting Goods. He was even asked to display his carvings at the 1939 World’s Fair on Treasure Island in San Francisco Bay. Known mostly for his mallards and pintails, his greenwing teal have always been highly sought by collectors around the country.

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154. Unused pair of greenwing teal, Horace “Hi” Crandall, San Francisco, California.  Signed under the bills. Written on underside of each is “These birds were carved by Horace Crandall in 1943.”Both have raised carved wingtips and slightly turned heads.  Excellent and original.

Literature: “Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson. (16,000 - 20,000)

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155. Pair of mallards, Luigi Andreuccetti, Sacramento, California.  Cork bodies with wooden bottom boards and slightly turned wooden heads.  Original and good.

Literature: “Wildfowl Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson, p. 338. “North American Decoys,” Fall 1976 issue, p. 22. summer 1979 issue p. 8. (600 - 900)

156. Bluebill drake, Charles Gay, New Orleans, Louisiana.  Relief wing carving.  Original paint with moderate wear; rough area on one side of the back. (1,750 - 2,250) 157. Mallard hen, Jules Fredrick, Sr., New Orleans, Louisiana.    Cyprus root decoy with mixture of old in use repaint and original paint; filled defect in wood in back; eyes are missing. (1,250 - 1,750) 64

158. Mallard drake, Eddie Logel, Pilottown, Louisiana, circa 1900.  Mississippi River style with relief wing carving.  Worn paint; small cracks and dents. (1,000 - 1,500) 159. Canvasback hen, Jett Brunet, Galliano, Louisiana.   Dated 11/1/89. A competition style gunning decoy with cocked and turned head. Wingtips are raised and crossed. Fine detail feather carving on head. Painting on body creates a soft puffy texture. Jett is a world champion carver and son of world champion carver Tan Brunet.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 160. Pintail drake, Ernest Vidacovich, Avondale, Louisiana.  Ernest was the grandson of Nicole Vidacovich, Sr. Relief wingtip carving.  Original paint with slight wear; structurally good. (1,250 - 1,750)


Sporting Art

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161. “Covey Rise, Bobwhite,” a watercolor by Maynard Reece.  Signed and dated 1991. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 9” x 15”.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

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162. “Red Barns,” an acrylic on board by Richard Plasschaert.  Signed. Image size 18” x 30”  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

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163. “Setter and Pheasants,” an oil on board by Lynn Bogue Hunt.  Image size 11 1/2” x 8 1/2”. Used for magazine cover.   (5,000 - 7,500)

164. Watercolor of goose hunters in field blind, Chet Reneson.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 21” x 29”.  Excellent and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

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165 165. “Downward Flight,” a watercolor by A. Lassell Ripley.  Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 17 1/2” x 14”. Signed and dated 1937.   Very good and original. (6,000 - 9,000)

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166. “Quail Wagon Lab,” an oil on canvas by Robert Christie.  Signed and dated 2002. Image size approximately 17 1/2” x 24”.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

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167. “Flight Path, Bobwhite Quail,” an acrylic on board by John Seerey-Lester.  Image size 24” x 18”. Signed.  Very good and original.(3,500 4,500)

168 168. “Dog Head Studies,” a pastel and chalk on paper by Thomas Blinks.  Signed. Professionally mounted and framed. Image size 14” x 10”.  (3,500 - 4,500)

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168A

168A. Watercolor of duck hunters in an off shore blind, A. Lassell Ripley. Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 20� x 28 1/2�. Very good and original. (15,000 - 18,000)

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168B

168C

168B. “Elk,” a large acrylic on canvas by Jorge Mayol. Signed. Image size approximately 28” x 38”. Very good and original. (6,500 - 9,500)

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168C. Watercolor of duck hunters, Milton Weiler Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 20” x 27 1/2”. Very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500)


George Cope

1855 - 1929 Westchester, Pennsylvania 168D

168D. “After the Hunt: Two Mallards,” an oil on canvas of two mallards, George Cope. Unsigned. Image size approximately 20” x 14 1/8”. Very good and original. (10,000 - 15,000)

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168E

168E. Oil on board of black ducks, Lynn Bogue Hunt. Signed “To the Schafers, Lynn Bogue Hunt.” Image size 12 1/2” x 10 3/4”. Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

168F. Oil on canvas of black ducks coming in to decoys, Lynn Bogue Hunt. Signed. Image size 25” x 21”. Very good and original. (3,000 - 5,000)

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168F


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169. Watercolor of three dogs, Edmund Osthaus.  Professionally matted and framed. Image size 10” x 20”. Signed.  Very good and original. (5,000 - 8,000)

170. “Trails End,” an acrylic on canvas by Jorge Mayol.  Image size 10” x 18”. Signed.  Very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000)

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Shorebirds At least ten different species of Toronto Harbor shorebirds have been identified including, yellowlegs, curlews, knots, ruddy turnstones, dunlins, sanderlings, golden plovers, black bellied plovers, blue herons, and gulls. Common characteristics include having two wire legs – many bound with cloth or leather at the transition point from the wooden body to the wire legs, simulating thighs. Bills are both iron and wood, and bodies vary from plump full figures to “flatties.� Eyes vary from glass to tacks to simply paint.

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171 Detail

171. Extremely rare greater yellowlegs from Ashridge Bay, near Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.  Shoe button eyes. Two wire legs with wrapped cloth thighs and original carved wooden base.  Near mint original paint with good detail; protected by an old coat of varnish; structurally good.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Malcolm rig from the collection of Bruce Malcolm, one of 11 shorebirds in that group.

Literature: DU Canada eBook, exact decoy.

(8,000 - 12,000)

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172. Rare black bellied plover from Toronto Harbor, last quarter 19th century.  Very full body style with shoe button eyes and two wire legs.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; minor roughness to end and underside of bill; canvas thighs are missing; several tiny dents. (9,500 - 12,500)

172 Detail

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173. Ruddy turnstone from Toronto Harbor, circa 1900.  Two wire legs with wooden thighs. Fairly round body style.  Original paint with minor wear; tip of bill has been blunted; lightly hit by shot; minor damage to wooden thigh; wooden base is not original. (6,000 - 9,000) 174. Robin snipe in spring plumage, Toronto Harbor, Ontario.   On two wire legs attached to original wooden base.  Original paint with good patina and very slight wear; tip of bill has been slightly blunted.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (4,000 - 6,000) 175. Rare dunlin from Toronto Harbor, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  With two wire legs, on original wooden base.  Original paint with minor wear; hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (4,000 - 6,000)

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Obediah Verity 1813 - 1901 Seaford, New York

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The information known on the man to whom the Verity decoys have been attributed since 1975 is somewhat sketchy, however, the most compelling story attaching the name “Obediah Verity” to these decoys stems from a visit by three knowledgeable collectors to Andrew “Grubie” Verity, once a bayman and, himself, a decoy carver in Seaford, New York. Bud Ward, George Combs, Sr, and George Combs, Jr. went to the nursing home where Grubie was living, with a basket of shorebirds to present to him for his reaction. He correctly identified two of the known makers among the basket of birds, and then when presented with the “Verity” birds, which had previously been attributed to H.F. Osborn, his response was “Diah, Obediah.” The conclusion drawn from this visit with Andrew Verity helped to establish that Obediah Verity was the maker of these wonderfully carved full-bodied decoys – a conclusion which has been widely accepted by collectors since that visit in 1975.

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176 Detail

176. Rare whimbrel in running pose, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Deeply cut relief wing carving and carved eyes.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; a small worn spot on each side; tiny dents.

Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr.

(35,000 - 45,000)

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177. Rare robin snipe in spring plumage, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long island, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes.  Near mint original paint with good patina; bill is a professional replacement.

Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” John Levinson and Somers Headly. (15,000 - 18,000)

177 Detail

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178. Black bellied plover, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century.  In very rare running pose. Round body with beetle head and somewhat forward looking carved eyes. Relief wing carving.  Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; moderate wear under side; there is a line of tiny nail holes on the underside perhaps where feathers were attached; working repaint on black area of breast; tiny dents.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of William Purnell, “P” brand in underside.

Literature: “Shorebird Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (25,000 - 30,000)

178 Detail

178

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Illinois River 179. Pair of wood ducks, Otto Garren, Pekin, Illinois.  Exhibit exaggerated carved wooden crests. Large glass eyes, characteristic of Garren’s early work.  Original paint with a coat of shellac or varnish some repair to the end of the drake’s bill, otherwise structurally good.

Literature: “Fish and Fowl of the Great Lakes,” Donna Tonelli, pp. 117-119. (8,000 - 10,000)

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180. Rare preening mallard hen, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Deep body style.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; retains Perdew weight; structurally good. Provenance: lection.

Berry/Kalinsky col(10,000 - 14,000)

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181. Late black duck, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Charlie’s paint. Retains Perdew weight.  Original paint with slight wear, mostly on underside; structurally good.

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Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

182.

Mallard hen, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois.  Relief wing carving. #25 is painted on the underside for Princeton Fish and Game Club member Joseph Zearing.  Original paint; minor wear; old touchup on speculums; weight is missing. (4,000 - 6,000)


183. Mallard drake, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois.  Flat bottom with raised wings. Number “25” is painted on underside to represent owner Princeton member and owner of decoy Joseph Zearing.  As with many of the decoys in this rig, the head has been repainted as well as wing patches; additional green paint has been added at top of tail; the rest of decoy has original protected by an old coat of varnish that has darkened; some crazing to brown areas around neck; body and bill have areas of crazing; two small areas of brown paint have been added to top of back; dowel has popped slightly at top of head.

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Provenance: Thomas collection. (2,500 - 3,000)

184. Mallard hen, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Retains Perdew weight. Slightly turned head, with Charlie’s paint.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (2,500 - 3,500)

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185. Pair of mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinios.  Charlie’s paint.   Original paint with minor flaking and wear; structurally good. Provenance: Recently found on a farm in Kentucky. (3,000 - 4,000)

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Charles Perdew 1874 - 1963 Henry, Illinois

186 Detail

This important pair of mallards was carved by Charles Perdew in 1924 to exhibit at the 1924 Abercrombie & Fitch Wildfowl Decoy Show in New York City, where they won a second place ribbon. This exact pair of decoys is pictured on the cover of “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,� by Ann Tandy Lacy. They were from the estate of Haddon Perdew.

186 Detail

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186. Extremely rare and important pair of mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1924. Outstanding original paint by Edna Perdew. Both are stamped “Chas H Perdew, Henry Ill” on the underside and have early style Perdew weight. Hen is a sleeper. This is the pair of mallards that Perdew exhibited at the Wildfowl Decoy Exhibition in New York City in 1924. The exhibition ribbon is included. Original paint with very slight wear; protected by an old coat of varnish; no structural flaws. Provenance: Formerly in the Perdew estate.

Literature: “Perdew, An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacy, cover, exact decoys.

(45,000 - 55,000)

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191

191

187. Mallard drake, Princeton, Illinois.  Appears to be early example by Charles Walker.  Mix of appealing old in use repaint and original paint; crack through neck. Provenance: Recently found on a farm in Kentucky. (600 - 900) 188. High neck style canvasback drake, Jack Eppel, Peoria, Illinois.  From the hunting rig of Andy Anderson. “A.L.A.” carved in weight.  Original paint; crack in neck; small spot of touchup to one dent in tail.

Provenance: Thomas collection.

189.

Mallard hen, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, 1st half 20th century.   Retains original Graves weight.  Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; several areas of wear

88

189

(800 - 1,200)

to bill, top of head, and tail; a few rubs on sides of body. Provenance: Thomas collection.

(800 - 1,000)

190. Four decoys, Virgil Lashbrook, Pekin, Illinois.  A pair of widgeon and pair of hooded mergansers. All have slightly turned heads and all have Lashbrook’s stamp on undersides.  Very good and original. Provenance: Olson collection.

(650 - 950)

191. Four decoys, Virgil Lashbrook, Pekin, Illinois.  Pair of mallards and pair of bluebills. Both are stamped. Mallards also are signed and dated 1981 by Lashbrook.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)


Robert Elliston 1849 - 1915 Bureau, Illinois

192

192 Detail 192 Detail

192. Rare pintail drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “WHW.” Retains Elliston weight.  Original paint; minor wear; a few small dents and shot marks.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(8,000 - 12,000) 89


Orel LeBoeuf

1886 - 1968 St. Anicet, Quebec 193. Pair of canvasbacks, Orel LeBoeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec, 1st quarter 20th century.  Fine feather carving detail and comb painting. Both are stamped “G&D”.   Original paint with minor wear, mostly at the wingtips and edges of tail; chip missing from hen’s tail; wear to the wood at some of the feathering; each has a professional bill repair; lightly hit by shot. Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

193

Literature: “Decoys A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 124. (5,000 - 8,000) 194. Goldeneye drake, Orel LeBoeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec.  Highly detailed feather carving and some detailed feather painting.   Original paint with good patina and very slight wear; structurally good. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Harold Evans. Four small “e”s stamped in underside. Formerly in the collection of Alan and Elaine Haid. (4,000 - 5,000)

194 195. Bluebill hen, Orel LeBoeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec.  Fine paint and feather carving detail. Stamped “OL” twice on the underside.  Very good and original. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey, Jr. He gave it as a gift to Dr. Jack Conover.

195

Literature: “Deocys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. (2,500 - 3,500)

196.

Pair of bluebills, Orel LeBoeuf, St. Anicet, Quebec.  His earlier style.  Original paint; minor wear; slight roughness to edges of feather carving on back; each has a thin crack in one side.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Jamie Stalker.

196 90

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Linda and Gene Kangas, p. 130. (3,000 - 4,000)


196A Detail

196A 196A. Large working loon decoy from Tancook Island, Nova Scotia.  Approximately 27” long.  Original paint with minor wear; small piece of wood has been added to top of head to fill a small chip there; head and neck made with a used piece of wood, which is why there is paint underneath the area that wasn’t whittled when shapped; tape was added to the neck to repair a crack a long time ago.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, exact decoy. (8,000 - 12,000) 91


196B

196C

196D

196E

196B. American merganser drake, Hormidas Thibert, Valleyfield, Quebec.  “HT” stamped in the underside. One of two known.  Original paint with slight wear; repair to 1/3 of the bill; thin crack in the underside.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Jamie Stalker.

196D. Stick up roothead Canada goose, George Skerry, Lot #16, Prince Edward Island.    Original paint; minor wear; small area in one side where a defect in the wood was filled when the decoy was made; thin crack in underside.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming. (1,500 - 2,000)

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette. (500 - 800)

196C. Preening brant, Prince Edward Island, circa 1900.  Tag on underside reads, “Found by Fred MacLeod,” many years ago in an old building on the family farm. Believed to have been made by his great grand uncle, Angus MacLeod of French River, PEI. JA Clark Summerside PEI, February 21-75.” Arthur Clark was an antique dealer in Summerside PEI for many years. He sold quite a few PEI decoys.  Peeling old in use repaint; crack in one side.

196E. Merganser hen, Lindsey Levy, Little Tancook Island, Nova Scotia.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; small chip missing from tip of crest; fairly wide crack in underside.

92

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(500 - 800)

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Gene and Linda Kangas. Kangas brand in underside. Purchased from Jamie Stalker.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, pg. 18. “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, pg. 121. (650 - 950)


197

198

200

201

202

203

204

205

197. Rare hollow carved Canada goose, William Beck, Vancouver, British Columbia.  Used at the Pitt Lake area. Raised carved wingtips. “W Beck” is painted in the underside.  Appealing old in use repaint with some original showing; filler added under tail.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of KW Reed. Branded “KWR” on underside. Reed acquired it from the Paka’s Collection, Ltd. (1,000 - 1,500)

198. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, William Beck, Vancouver, British Columbia, circa 1930s.  Branded “KWR”. Relief wingtip carving.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the Paka’s collection. Formerly in the KW Reed collection. (900 - 1,200)

199. Large Canada goose, A. Viau, Joliette, Quebec.  Relief wing carving and fluted tail.  Original paint; minor discoloration and wear; crack in back runs from the breast through the tail, a 5” section is opened up to be a split; filled defect in wood; defects in wood in one lower side and under the tail. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 139, exact decoy pictured. (500 - 800) 200. American merganser hen from Valleyfield, Quebec.  Detailed wingtip and tail feather carving.  Original paint with very minor wear on most of the decoy; wear on the top of the head and the bill; thin crack partway through bill; very lightly hit by shot.

199

Provenance:

Peter Brown collection. Purchased from a

Quebec hunter by Bernie Gates.

(1,000 - 1,400)

201. Rigmate pair of goldeneyes, Dan Stevens, Owls Head, Nova Scotia.  Carved eyes and incised wing carving. From the hunting rig of Parker Cooper, Tangier, Nova Scotia.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents.

Literature: “Decoys of Maritime Canada,” Dale and Gary Guyette, p. 95, rigmates. (400 - 600)

202. Canvasback hen and drake, Duncan Ducharme, Delta Marsh, Manitoba.    Cracks in hen’s body, otherwise original and good. Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, p. 158. (2,000 - 2,500) 203.

Two decoys.  Canvasback hen and a bluebill hen, Charles Fournier, Quebec, circa 1930. Hollow carved with bottom board. Bluebill is branded “V.L”. Both have slightly raised carved wingtips.  Rough areas at tails and bills; shot scars and some paint loose at bodies. (1,200 - 1,500)

204.

Pair of canvasbacks from Manitoba.    Paint on hen’s body appears to be second coat; black on drake is second coat; minor to moderate wear; small cracks.

Literature: “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, p. 159. (600 - 900) 205. Goldeneye hen from Quebec, 1st quarter 20th century.  Detailed wingtip carving and fluted tail.  Appealing old in use repaint; minor roughness to one edge of tail; lightly hit by shot. (500 - 750) 93


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

206

207

206. Rigmate pair of goldeneyes, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Hen has slightly turned head.  Original paint with very minor wear; some neck filler is missing; each has a crack in the underside.

207. Pair of bluebills, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Round body style.  Near mint original paint; hen has a thin factory filled crack in the back.

Provenance: Pearce collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 65 bottom, exact decoy. (4,500 - 6,500) 94

Provenance: Pearce collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)


208. Canada goose, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade, circa 1900.   Original paint with minor to moderate wear; small dents; small chip missing from one edge of neck base; fairly large crack in underside; area approximately 3” x 7” on underside with no paint; decoy was used at one time as a stick up.

Provenance: O’Connor collection. (12,000 - 15,000)

208 Detail

208

95


209. Canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Rare premier grade, Chesapeake Bay model.  Original paint with minor wear; three short surface cracks in back with paint loss in a narrow area near them; crack through neck; hairline crack in underside; a piece from another Mason canvasback has been spliced in to repair a thin chip in bill; knot in one lower side.

209

Provenance: Pearce collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

210. Canvasback hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Rare premier grade, Chesapeake Bay model.   Original paint with minor wear; small dents and a few shot marks; thin crack in underside; paint missing from the back of the neck base, small amount of filler missing from that area.

210

Provenance: Pearce collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 52 center, exact decoy. (2,000 - 3,000) 211.

Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early premier grade.  Professional tail chip repair; scratch in lower breast; otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: O’Connor collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

211 212. Coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Branded, “WCH” and “LPJ”. Retains Mason weight.  Original paint; very minor wear; professional tail chip repair; thin line of touchup at neck seam; lightly hit by shot. (3,000 - 5,000)

212 96


213

213. Brant, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early challenge grade model, circa 1890s.  Original paint with very slight wear; hairline crack partway down one side; small amount of neck filler professionally replaced.

Provenance: Pearce collection. (5,000 - 7,500)

213 Detail 97


214. Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early premier grade with double blue paint on back.  Near mint original paint; thin line of touchup at neck seam; very lightly hit by shot. Provenance: O’Connor collection. (8,000 - 12,000)

214

214 Detail

98


215. Bluewing teal hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early challenge grade with slightly lifted head.  Near mint original paint; short, thin surface crack at a knot in one side; part of the neck filler has been professionally replaced; hairline surface crack at one side of neck.

Provenance: Pearce collection. (10,000 - 14,000)

215

215 Detail

99


Wisconsin

216

216. Hollow carved canvasback hen, Ferd Homme, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Carved crossed wingtips, with carved secondaries and fluted tail. Slightly turned head.  Original paint with good patina and minor wear; a few tiny dents.

216 Detail

100

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (6,500 - 9,500)


217

217. Well carved pintail drake, Mandt Homme, Stoughton, Wisconsin.  Detailed feather carving with carved, crossed wingtips and fluted tail. Stylish head and neck with raised neck seat. Detailed scratch and comb paint on back and sides. “Tom Alberti” is carved in the underside. Alberti was Homme’s friend and hunting partner.  A few tiny paint flakes missing at neck seat, otherwise very good and original.

Literature: “Fish and Fowl of the Great Lakes,” Donna Tonelli, p. 208 exact decoy. (7,000 - 9,000)

217 Detail

101


218

219

218. Mallard drake, Walter Lowery, Lacrosse, Wisconsin.  1936 model. Turned head with exceptionally fine feather painting and blending. Protected by a coat of varnish.  Small areas of flaking in the varnish; light wear to one side of bill; otherwise very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

102

219. Rare bluewing teal hen, Otto Weinert, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.  Head is turned approximately 45 degrees to one side. Detailed feather paint.  Professional bill repair; original paint with good patina and very minor wear; two thin surface cracks in back; body seam is slightly visible. (2,250 - 2,750)


220

220A

220.

Hollow carved canvasback drake, Gus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin, circa 1930.  Bottom board has been champhered slightly.  Dry original paint; minor wear; hairline crack in neck.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (4,500 - 6,500)

220A. Canvasback drake, Ferd Homme, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Carved crossed wigtips, fluted tail and slightly turned head. Original paint with moderate wear; a few small dents.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (4,000 - 6,000)

220 Detail

103


Gus Moak

1852 - 1942 Tustin, Wisconsin

The four known Gus Moak geese with the RWA brand are believed to be the earliest geese he made. Roberts Andrews, “RWA,” was a guide on Long Point Island on Lake Winnebago. He claimed the geese at the end of one season after the owner apparently abandoned them. Andrews eventually showed up at one of the early Wisconsin Decoy shows with all four, which quickly sold to seasoned collectors, who recognized their rarity and importance. At the time Moak painted this early rig of geese, it’s evident that he had little experience with their anatomy. Painting the white cheek patch in the incorrect area simply reflects the rarity of Canada geese of Lake Winnebago at the turn of the last century.

104


221

221. Very rare Canada goose, Gus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “RWA” on underside. Hollow carved with bottom board.  Very strong original paint with crazing at white patch on cheek and small areas of white at side of body; neck has several hairline cracks; a few rubs and small dents that expose natural wood on body head and tail. (7,500 - 10,000)

221 Detail

105


Born in 1904, Reindahl always lived in or near Stoughton, Wisconsin, a river town situated just south of Madison. His output was roughly 100 decoys, which included cedar body Canada geese, mallards, pintails, bluebills, canvasbacks, silhouettes, and a rig of four Canada geese constructed of denim cloth stretched over wood frame and stuffed with straw. The incredibly realistic details found in his carvings and paint came as a result of his meticulous wildlife studies through the extensive collection of photographs that he took in his privately owned marsh. Some of his photographs were published in a 1948 article in Field and Stream Magazine by Reindahl entitled “How to Make Decoys.” Reindahl was an exceptional artisan whose attention to quality and detail was unequaled among his contemporaries. Decoy Magazine, Nov/Dec, 1989, article by Donna Tonelli, “Enoch Reindahl: Wisconsin’s Pride”, pp. 10-15.

222 Detail 106


222. Outstanding mallard drake, Enoch Reindahl, Stoughton, Wisconsin.  Hollow carved with turned head, carved crossed primaries and fluted tail. Outstanding paint detail on entire decoy. “R. Haven” is carved in to the underside in approximately 1/4” tall letters.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Purchased by the consignor in Madison, Wisconsin in the early 1970s, where it sat on a fireplace mantel.

Literature: “Fish and Fowl of the Great Lakes,” Donna Tonelli, pp. 214-217. “Wildfowl Carving Collection,” Spring 1988. “Decoy Magazine,” Joe Engers editor, November/December 1989. “Field & Stream,” August 1949. (35,000 - 45,000)

222 Detail

222

107


Factory Decoys 223. Widgeon drake, Peterson Decoy Factory, Detroit Michigan, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor wear; professional tail chip repair; bill has been broken off and professionally reattached; most of neck filler is replaced. (1,500 - 2,000)

223 224.

Black duck, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Good feather paint detail.  Near mint original paint; small crack in underside; neck filler is intact; small dent in one side of bill.

Literature: “Dodge Decoy Dynasty,” Bill Dodge and Ron Sharp. (2,500 - 3,500)

224 225. Rare gadwall hen, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor wear, mostly on the back; small defect to the wood in one side; neck filler has been professionally replaced.

225

Literature: “Mason Decoys Expanded Edition,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 157, exact decoy pictured. (1,500 - 2,000) 226.

226 108

Rare Canada goose, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century.  Premier grade.  Original paint; rough area around edge of bill; paint missing at top of head; high spots at side of body and around one knot; wear on edge of tail; crack runs length one side of body where nails have been applied a very long time ago to close the gap. (2,500 - 3,500)


227. Extremely rare old squaw drake, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1880s.  The only other example we are aware of has a replaced head and is pictured in “Dodge Decoy Dynasty.”  Original paint with minor wear that is darkened with age; approximately 3/4 of neck filler is missing, but because this happened a long time ago the wood that is showing has darkened a great deal with age making this less noticeable; crack through one eye; tip of bill was repaired by Byron Bruffee; numerous holes in the underside from different weights being attached over the years.

Provenance: Recently found in a home in Brookline, Massachusetts.

Literature: “Dodge Decoy Dynasty,” Ron Sharp and Bill Dodge. (8,000 - 12,000)

227

227 Detail

109


228. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade. Early style head and body. Appears to have never been rigged.  Minor paint flaking on back; very small dent at one side of body; light wear at edge of bill; strong original paint. (2,000 - 3,000)

228

229.

Rigmate pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Both in strong original paint; crack running length of body in hen has darkened a little bit; one small rub on back; small abrasions on head; drake has original chip at tail reglued; a few hairline cracks in body and one in underside that has been reglued where glue has darkened; small area of paint loss at neck. (1,750 - 2,250)

229

230. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Early premier grade, slope breasted model, circa 1890s.  Original paint with minor wear; small dents; small amount of touchup on one side of neck seat; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: O’Connor collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

230

231. Pair of lesser scaup, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with very slight wear; hen has been very lightly hit by shot; drake has a couple of small dents in one lower side and two thin cracks in the breast.

231 110

Provenance: O’Connor collection. (3,000 - 5,000)


232. Grey coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Branded “WB”.  Original paint with minor wear; age crack in underside, extending up onto the breast; small amount of touchup on one side of body; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: O’Connor collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

232

233. Rigmate pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.   Original paint with minor wear; moderate wear on drake’s beast; thin cracks in drake’s back; also a small chip missing from drake’s back; factory filled age split in breast.

Provenance: O’Connor collection. (2,500 - 3,500)

233

234. Pair of redheads, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier grade.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on bottom edges; small cracks, dents, and shot marks. (2,000 - 3,000)

234

235. Rare crow, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.    Original paint with numerous small rubs to primer; structurally good.

Provenance: O’Connor collection. (1,250 - 1,750)

235 111


Calls

236

237

238

236. Match pair of duck calls, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. One is VL&A style checkered walnut call, the other has carved and painted flying mallards. Both have the initials “JLD”. Minor wear to the carved and painted call; otherwise both are very good. (4,000 - 6,000) 237. Duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 1st half 20th century. Two mallards in flight with a single mallard landing. Green mouth piece. All parts appear to be original (2,500 - 3,500) 238.

Early duck call, Sharpie Shaw, Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee. All parts appear to be original. (1,500 - 2,000)

239. Rare and important duck call, Tiff Roseberry, Sr. Three checkered panels on walnut barrel. With cedar stopper and wedge block. An “X” is carved at end of stopper. Measures 5” in length. Very little wear. (1,500 - 1,800)

112

239


239A

239C

239B

239D

239E

239A. Four duck calls. Found in a home in Louisiana. Two have metal bands, one has checkered carving. (600 - 800) 239B. Four duck calls, Grubbs Manufacturing, Illinois. One has metal band that has cracked; all four show different levels of wear. (600 - 900) 239C. Duck call, Charles W Grubbs. Perfection model. A few rough areas on barrel. (500 - 700) 239D. Duck call, Richard Burns, Peoria, Illinois. Bakelight with brass ring. Measures 5 3/4”. Original and good. (500 - 700)

239F

239G

239H

239E. Rare duck call, Morgan Leader, St. louis Missouri. Possible Osage wood. 7” long. Barrel has wear at short end and a few cracks that extends in to the barrel; parts appear to be original. (400 - 600) 239F. Very rare Tom Turpin crow call with bakelight mouthpiece. Excellent. (400 - 600) 239G. Rare duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Cedar call. Stamped “Chas H Perdew, Henry ILL”. Unusual call with three grooved lines in barrel. Wood imperfection in barrel, otherwise original and good. (400 - 600) 239H. Duck call J.G. Reed, Elkville, Illinois. Arkansas style stopper. Original and good. (400 -600) 113


239I

239N

239J

239K

239O

239I. Red cedar crow call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1920. Stamped “Chas. Perdew & CO, Henry ILL.” Flaw in wood on one side, otherwise very good and original. (350 - 450) 239J. Red cedar duck call with two silver bands Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Stamped “Chas H Perdew, & CO Henry ILL.” Reed, stopper, and wedge block were replaced by Hadden Perdew, otherwise very good. (950 - 1,250) 239K. Duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. St. Francis style. Walnut with four checkered panels. Small chip at collar at top of barrel; otherwise original and good. (600 - 800) 239L. Duck call, Russel Lanham, Springfield, Illinois. Approximately 6 1/2” long. Multiple lays turnings. Wedge

114

239L

239M

239P

block appears to be a later replacement; Purchased from the Lanham family by Bob Summers in 1994. (600 - 800) 239M. Rare crow call, C.H. Ditto. Made of bakelight. Original and good. (600 - 800) 239N. Two calls from Minnesota. Natural duck call, in original box with original instruction. Unused. And Oscar Quam duck call with round barrel. Which retains Quam label on barrel. In original shipping container. (700 - 900) 239O. Two duck calls, unknown makers from Illinois. Both appear to be circa 1940 and show light use. (400 - 500) 239P. Four calls. Fred Allen, unusual purple color. Grubbs. Metal C.H. Ditto. And Olt magnum in original box with original instructions, unused. (800 - 1,000)


240

243

241

244

240. Crow call with owl and crows in tree, Haddon Perdew. Stamped “Charles H. Perdew, Henry, ILL”. Very good and original. (600 - 900) 241. Set of VL & A style and carved mallard duck calls, Haddon Perdew. Both have the initials “BJM”. Very good and original. (650 - 950) 242. Very rare and important duck call, Claude Stone, Hornersville, Missouri.  The so called “golden tongue model.” Developed by James T. Beckhart. These calls are more rare than Stone’s checkered calls. Made of walnut.  Parts appear to be original moderate wear near mouth piece; and one very small stain on barrel. (2,000 - 2,500) 242A. Rare duck call, Vern Taylor. 7” in length. Cedar with brass ring. Exact call pictured in “Duck Calls of Illinois,” Robert Christensen, p. 167. Reed appears to be a replacement; varnish has flaked off brass ring. (800 - 1,000)

242

245

242A

245A

243. Rare and exceptional crow call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  All letters have retained gold stamping. Box is in original shipping container from Chicago’s V L & A store. Also includes directions on how to use your crow call printed by Charles Perdew.  Very rare to find all three of these pieces in such clean condition. (600 - 800) 244. Duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Rare and early call style. Walnut barrel with cedar stopper. Barrel is plain with two small dents and one wood imperfection.  All parts appear to be original. (600 - 800) 245. Duck call, Bill Clifford, Chicago, Illinois.  Smooth barrel style with metal ring showing around top of barrel.  All parts appear to be original; excellent. (800 - 1,200) 245A. Rare duck call, Trutone. Made of bakelight. Wedge block and reed are missing; otherwise original and good. (800 - 1,000)

115


246

“Duck Shooting: 700 acres of fed grounds, best to be had, two miles northeast of the City of Beardstown. Have eight pens, (for live decoys), accommodate ten to sixteen shooters per day. Write for particular date.” This was Newton Rule’s advertisement for his duck hunting club near Peoria, Illinois in 1930. Rule, born 1870, had established himself as a successful hunter and fisherman in central Illinois by 1890. Like Charles Perdew, Rule made both duck decoys, which he sold for $60 per dozen, as well as duck calls, for which he charged $5. In the summers, Rule operated his own traveling shooting gallery pictured here.

247

248

246. Duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.  Slightly different model than other two, turnings at top of barrel are slightly different as well as curvature near mouth piece.  Unused; light coat of varnish has worn away slightly; small chips where stopper enters barrel.

Provenance: Consigned by a family member of Newt Rule. (2,000 - 2,500)

247. Duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.  Realfoot design and stopper. 5” in 116

For more information about John “Newt” Rule, see Decoy Magazine May/June 1992, article by Donna Tonelli.

length.  Unused; protected by a light coat of varnish.

Provenance: Consigned by a family member of Newt Rule. (2,000 - 2,500)

248. Duck call, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.  Realfoot design and stopper. 5” in length.  Unused; protected by a light coat of varnish.

Provenance: Consigned by a family member of Newt Rule. (2,000 - 2,500)


250

249

251

249. Three pintail drakes, Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.  One of the few makers of decoys who also made duck calls. All three are center cut hollow. Two are weighted. Does not appear they were ever used. Tack eyes.  Protected by a light coat of varnish.

Provenance: Consigned by a family member of Newt Rule. (2,500 - 3,500)

250. Rigmate pair of mallards Newt Rule, Beardstown, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.  Center cut hollow with tack eyes, slightly reared back head.  Very strong original paint; appears they have not been used. Weight removed from hen; both have light coat of varnish; small area of paint loss on back of hen.

252

Provenance: Consigned by a family member of Newt Rule. (1,200 - 1,500)

251. Crow decoy, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 1st half 20th century.  Glass eyes, bill that appears to be slightly longer than normal.  Original paint; very minor flaking at neck seam and imperfections in wood on one side; a few very minor rub spots.

Literature: Exact crow decoy is pictured in “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (1,200 - 1,500)

252. Crow, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Three piece construction with hollow body and wire legs. Tack eyes.  Original paint; rough area at tip of bill; imperfections in wood, otherwise original and good. (800 - 1,200)

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Contemporary

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256

257

257

253. Gadwall hen, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia.  Signed and dated 1996. Relief wing carving.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (1,500 - 2,000) 254. Rigmate pair of pintails, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Both have cork bodies and are branded “Cigar” on underside. Gunning model with slightly tilted and turned heads. Drake has comb painting on body and inset hard wooden tail.   (1,200 - 1,500) 255. Bluewing teal hen and drake, Hurley Conklin, Manahawkin, New Jersey.  Both are branded “H. Conklin” and have very slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (650 - 950) 118

256. Large merganser drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Relief wing carving. Signed and dated 1994.   Original paint that has been aged; structurally good.

Provenance: Carr collection.

(1,250 - 1,750)

257. Four decoys, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Pair of shovelers and pair of old squaw. All are stamped “G. Strunk” in weight. Pair of old squaw are also signed.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(1,000 - 1,400)


258

259

261

260

262

263

258. Working black duck, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded.  Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents. (450 - 650) 259. Yellowlegs carved in the Cobb Island tradition, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia.  Signed.  Original paint that has been aged; a few small dents in back of head. (650 - 950) 260. Two hooded mergansers, Lou Schifferl.  One is signed.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (300 - 400) 261. Pair of 1/3 size resin canvasbacks that are reproductions of Ward Brothers 1936 model decoys.  In original

263A

box.  Very good and original.

(300 - 400)

262. Mallard drake, William Gibian, Onancock, Virginia, circa 1980s.  Hollow carved and signed.  Original and good. (800 - 1,200) 263. Pair of wood ducks, George Strunk, Glendora, New Jersey.  Signed and dated with “Strunk” stamped in weight. Hollow carved with turned heads. Raised wingtips and fluted tails. Extra fancy paint.  Excellent. (700 - 900) 263A. Large swan, Frank Finney, Cape Charles, Virginia, circa 1990. Made in the style of John Williams’ famous look down swan. Bill is made separately from the head. Body has crack in underside, otherwise original and good. (800 - 1,200) 119


Shell Boxes

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268

269

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273

264. Very rare shotgun shell box, California Powder Works, Perfection.  10 gauge. Buff box with full wrap label.  Very good; some staining to bottom side label. (1,500 - 2,000) 265. Rare shotgun shell box, Chamberlain Cartridge Company, Cleveland, Ohio.  Blue rocks. 12 Gauge, buff box with full wrap label.  Small stains; factory staple in middle of front label used to hold seam together. (1,200 - 1,500) 266. Rare shotgun shell box, Indian Black Powder.  Buff box with full wrap label.  Good with a little wear on one top label and edges. (800 - 1,200) 267.

Shotgun shell box two piece, Peters League.  With image of rabbit on front. Box is full and sealed.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

268. Rare two piece shotgun shell box, The Chamberlin Cartridge Co., Gilt Edge Cartridges, 12 gauge.  Two piece buff box that is full and unopened. For the Henry C. Squires Sporting Good Store in New York.  Label has some discoloration; about 1/3 is missing on bottom side 120

label.

(700 - 900)

269. Two piece shotgun shell box, Schoverling Daly and Gales.  12 gauge hand loads. Buff box with paper label wrapping around three sides.  Label has separation in the front where the box folds; edge wear to the bottom label; small areas of staining. (500 - 700) 270. Shotgun shell box, Referee Peters Cartridge Company.  10 gauge, full sealed box.  Very good. (700 - 900) 271. Peters league shotgun box with rabbit.  10 gauge. Ammunition inside.  Good. (650 - 950) 272. Shotgun shell box, Peters, High Velocity.  Image of redhead on front label. Box is full of shells.  Full wrap label is very good with a few small areas of stain. (500 - 700) 273. Shotgun shell box, Sport Loads, Mallard, DuPont.  12 gauge. Buff box with full wrap label. Full of shells.  Seam split partway down one side, otherwise very good and original. (400 - 600)


274

275

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279

274. Rare and exceptional gun powder tin, Austin Powder Co., Akron, Ohio.  Paper label with image of a pointer. Measure 4” tall.  Label has some discoloration and pencil writing, otherwise very good and original. (600 - 800) 275. Rare gun powder tin, One California Powder Works.  One California Powder Works. 3 1/2” tall. Black can with two black labels. Other Peters High Velocity shotgun shell box with teal, 12 gauge. Ammunition inside. 4” tall. Two paper labels. Number five grain.  California has tear to small part of front label; back label is torn on one side; Warren good. (600 - 800) 276. Three Peters target shot shell boxes with quail.  Ammunition inside.  One is fair; two are good. (650 - 950) 277. Three one piece shotgun shell boxes.  Monarch Trap

Shells, 12 gauge, full. Climax Heavies, 12 gauge. Defiance Trap Load, 12 gauge, full.  Monarch has very small amount of edge wear at two corners; Climax has small compression crease on one side; Defiance has very small amount of fading on front top label. (500 - 700) 278. Two shotgun shell boxes, Peters Trap Load and Peters Skeet Load.  Both two piece boxes. Both are buff boxes with full wrap labels and 12 gauge shells.  Light rubbing on label of skeet load. Incorrect bottom box on trap load. (400 - 600) 279. Two shell Boxes.  Remington nitro club game loads, 12 gauge. Brant load. Peters High Velocity shotgun shell box with teal, 12 gauge. Ammunition inside.  Remington has small tear in corner of brant label, otherwise good. Peters is good. (500 - 700)

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280

281

282

283

280. 100 count shot shell box, Squires Conical Paper shot shells, New York, New York.    Some wear to the corners and one edge, otherwise good. (400 - 600)

282. Three Peters shotgun shell boxes.  High velocity with two bluewing teal hen, Ideal with bluewing teal hen, and High Velocity with mallard.  Good. (400 - 600)

281. Shotgun shell box, Nitro Club.  U.M.C. 12 gauge. Buff box with full wrap label.  Very little wear. (400 - 600)

283. Early rifle with very heavy octagon shaped barrel.  Gun measures 63” in length and is percussion fired. “R.H.” initialled in side. Finely made brass patch box and stock. Fancy scroll carving on forearm and stock. Ramrod is missing. Gun weighs approximately 30 lbs.  (800 - 1,200)

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285

284

286

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284. Early Gunning box.  Measures 35” x 10” x 4”. Numerous contents; well made compartments for holding 12 gauge shotgun shells of which there are approximately 20, tools for reloading, primers, and a 12 gauge hammer firing L. C. Smith double barrel, side by side with double triggers and Damascus barrel.  Hairline crack at one side of stock; checkering and forearm is nearly worn away; some scratches in stock; overall very nice patina. (800 - 1,200) 285. Two vases in the style of Oscar Peterson, Reggie Birch, Chincoteague, Virginia.  All carved fish in both vases have glass eyes. One vase is 13” and one is 6 1/2”.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 286. Group of four canes, 1st half 20th century.  One with a snake, one with a horse’s head and a man, one with a goose, and girl.  Good. (950 - 1,250)

287

287. Carving of Uncle Sam riding on a pig, Louis Schiffryl.  Approximately 18” tall.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (650 - 950)

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Fish

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288. 18 fish decoys form Michigan.  Bill Burgers, Mose Sears, three Avers, Isaac Goulette, One Arm Kelly, Musky Manor, Marvin Tucker, Mike Reno, Bill Fenkell, two Abe Dehate, Hank Walters (signed), Alex Meldrum, and Dinny Pentrom, two Rodents, a muskrat similar example in volumn one the fish decoy p 94, and a beaver.  Vary from original paint with light wear to working repaint likely by the makers. (2,500 - 3,000)

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290

291

292

292

292

289. Three fish decoys perch, Isaac Goulette, Mount Clemens, Michigan.  All with tack eyes, metal fins and wooden tail. 4”, 5 1/2”, and 5 1/2”.  One is near mint; other two have small areas of flaking on underside; otherwise good and original. (800 - 1,000) 290.

Perch fish decoy, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan.  7” long. Tack eyes.  Chip and tail paint flaking on head, fins and body. (400 - 600)

291. Two fish decoys.  Perch, signed Jerry Adams on underside. 9 1/2” long. Bass, made in the style of Hans Janner

by John Kalasky with John’s metal tag in underside. 11” long.  Very good and original. (400 - 600) 292. Six fish decoys, five Oscar Peterson and one unknown.   Two Peterson pike, one sucker, one perch, and one shiner. Ranging from 5” to 7” in length. Shiner has been repainted; both pike and sucker are original paint with wear on underside and fins and flaking; one pike has small chip at tail; perch has second coat of white on underside of fins and belly. Unknown maker, probably Lake St. Clair, small bass 5.5” long.  Good scale carving; original paint with flaking on fins. (1,200 - 1,500) 125


Midwest

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293. Black duck, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.  Turned head. Full body feather stamping.  One shot mark in head, otherwise very good and original. (600 - 800) 294. Bluebill drake, John Zachman, Detroit, Michigan.  Snuggled head with shoulder and tail carving. Underside of decoy is signed, “John Zachman 1960, in own rig.”  Strong original paint; slight wear at end of tail; otherwise original and good. (600 - 800) 295. Canvasback drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Dry original paint; good and original. (500 - 700) 296. Bluebill, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan.  Hollow construction from underneath tail with inlet neck.  Bill has been repaired; old repaint; numerous dents and shot scars. (600 - 800) 126

297. Canvasback drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan.    Very good and original. (500 - 700) 298. Canvasback hen, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  Strong stamping over much of body. Good bill carving.  Very good and original. (500 - 700) 299. Hollow carved redhead drake, Dave Sanpere, Pearl beach, Michigan.    Original paint with minor wear; moderately hit by shot; short crack in tail. (600 - 900) 300. Canvasback drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  Head is slightly turned.  Strong original paint; several shot scars otherwise original and good. (500 - 700) 301. Canvasback hen, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950.  Feather stamping and fine wing patch carving.  Original paint original and good. (500 - 700)


302

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302. Coot, Frank Strey, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.  “F.S.” brand carved in underside.  Two shot marks, one in bill one in body; otherwise good and original. (700 - 900) 303. Bluebill hen, Tom Schroeder.  Slightly turned head. Relief wing carving.  Original paint; minor wear; bill appears to be an old replacement. (500 - 800) 304. Hollow carved redhead hen, Chris Smith, Algonac, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “CS”.   Appealing old in use repaint with shrinkage and rubs; structurally good. (500 - 800) 305. Rigmate pair of bluebills, August Guhl, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, circa 1930.  Made in the style of Mason premier. Fine original paint with feathering detail. Drake has slightly turned head and both have glass eyes. Both branded “A.O.G.” for August O. Guhl.  Both have paint flaking around neck; hen has a few shot scars. (400 - 600) 306.

Pintail drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.    Original paint with moderate wear on most of decoy, white area old

repaint; thin crack in neck; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Recently found on a farm in Kentucky. (800 - 1,200)

307. Owl decoy, Leonard Doren, Pekin, Illinois.  Two piece balsa body glass eyes.  Original paint with wear over most of the decoy; some dents and scratches exposing bare wood. (800 - 1,200) 308. Full size great horned owl and crow call, Jerry Siloski, Peoria, Illinois.  Crow call is stamped 1988. Owl is carved in two pieces and houses three folding metal crow decoys. Fine feather paint detail with slight crazing in some areas. Crow call is stamped “JS” and “J Siloski”.   (500 - 700) 309. Four crows, Jerry Siloski.  Stamped “JS”.  Tiny chip missing from tip of one bill; otherwise original and good. (350 - 450)

End of Session One 127


Session Two

Friday, April 28, 2017 – 11:00 AM

Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1954 East Harwich, Massachusetts

310 Detail 310

310 Detail

310. Decorative black bellied plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside as well the “AE Crowell and son” paper label with the word “Beetle” head written on it.  Near mint original paint ; structurally excellent.

128

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Carolyn Rowland, Boston and Osterville, Massachusetts. (17,500 - 22,500)


Decoratives

311 311 Detail

311. Full size standing mallard hen, Lacon, Illinois, circa 1930s.  Carved feet. Raised wingtip carving. Brass rod attached to underside for mounting near blind. Rod was clipped off when decoy was put on wooden base.  Original paint with very minor wear; a few dents. (6,000 - 9,000)

129


312

313

314

315

316

317

312. Ringbill drake, John Zachman.  Hollow carved with detailed feather carving and fluted tail.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Olson collection.

313.

Bluebill hen, John Zachman, Detroit, Michigan.  Signed and dated on underside 1974. Bobby Richardson collection stamp on underside. Tucked head with rasp texture carving on body and head.  Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

(1,250 - 1,750)

314. Mallard drake, William Schultz.  Signed and dated, “Merry Christmas, Matt 1974.”  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500) 315. Pair of bluewing teal, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  “Harris” brand is in underside of each. Both have

130

slightly turned heads and detailed feather paint.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(1,000 - 1,500)

316. Bold canvasback drake, Bill Schultz, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, circa 1970.  Hollow carved with heavily detailed comb painting on body. Slightly raised wingtips and exaggerated shoulder carving. Head is slightly turned and tucked.  Small paint chip behind neck and flaking around one eye, otherwise very good and original. (2,200 - 2,500) 317. Lowhead style redhead drake, William Schultz.  Signed and dated, “Merry Christmas, Matt 1978”.  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)


318. Pair of 1//2 size mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Approximately 9 1/2” long. Both have slightly turned heads, and raised carved wingtips.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: collection.

Berry/Kalinsky (4,000 - 5,000)

318 319. Very rare canvasback hen, Larry Hayden, Farmington, Michigan.  Signed and dated on the underside 1969. Slightly oversized with strong comb painting on body. Carved wings and tail.  Excellent. (2,500 - 3,500)

319

320. Blue wing teal drake, William Schultz.  Gifts from Schultz to his children. Signed and dated, “Merry Christmas, Matt 1979.”  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

320 321. Greenwing teal drake, William Schultz.  Gifts from Schultz to his children. Signed and dated, “Merry Christmas, Matt 1980.”  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

321 131


322

324

323

325

326

328

327 322. Canvasback drake, William Schultz.  Gifts from Schultz to his children. Signed and dated, “Merry Christmas, Matt 1981.”  Very good and original. (2,000 - 2,500)

325. Mourning dove, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois.  Stamped “HH” on underside.  Excellent and original. (800 - 1,200)

323. Three flying wall mount mallards, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Three different sizes. 13” drake, and 8-1/4” drake, and 10-1/2” hen. All have incised feather carving and feet.  The smaller drake has moderate wear on one wing; the other two are very good and original.

326. Greenwing teal hen, John Garton, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Signed and dated 1970. Detailed feather carving and subtle paint detail.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

(950 - 1,250)

324. American merganser drake, Leo McIntosh, Adams, New York.  “McIntosh” stamp in underside. Raised carved primaries and secondaries and fluted tail. Slightly turned and lifted head.  Original paint with slight discoloration and no wear; structurally very good. (950 - 1,250)

132

Provenance: Olson collection.

(650 - 950)

327. Two carvings, Marv Meyer, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Signed. Detailed feather carving with crossed wingtips and slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (350 - 450) 328. Two duck carvings, Marv Meyer, Minneapolis, Minnesota.  One is signed with an emblem and dated 1987, the other is signed and dated 1980. Detailed feather carving.  Original and good. (350 - 450)


Ontario

329

330

331

332

333

334

329. Solid body black duck, Charles Reeves, Port Rowan, Ontario.  One of two known to exist. Branded “HSM” and stencilled “HSM” on underside for Henry Morgan.   Original paint; minor wear; several shot scars on back.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Bruce Malcolm.

Literature: Rigmate to teal on front cover of “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gates. (950 - 1,250) 330. Hollow carved black duck, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; tip of tail has been blunted slightly; small chip missing from tip of bill; a few small dents. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 46. (950 - 1,250) 331. Hollow carved bluebill hen, Addie Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario, circa 1900.  Raised wingtips with detailed feather carving.  Old in use repaint; lightly hit by shot; thin crack through neck base.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 118. (650 - 950)

332. Hollow carved redhead drake, Buck Crawford, Brockville, Ontario, first quarter 20th century.  Branded “WJ Crawford, builder Brockville.” Also the initials “DP” are carved into the underside. Similar name and the same nickname as WA Crawford, Smiths Falls, Ontario. Detailed comb paint.  Old in use repaint on back area of breast, the rest is original with minor to moderate wear; heavily hit by shot.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 187. (800 - 1,200) 333. Hollow carved bluebill drake, Norm McDonald, West Lake, Ontario.  Comb painting on back. Slightly turned head.   Provenance: Peter Brown collection Literature: “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” Doc Starr. (800 - 1,200) 334.

Hollow carved black duck, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario.  Scratch paint detail.  Original paint; minor wear; approximately 20 shot marks in one side.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 123. (1,500 - 2,500) 133


Sam Hutchins

1894 - 1995 Jones Falls, Ontario As far as we know, Hutchins only produced Goldeneyes and Hooded Mergansers. While living in what decoy collectors refer to as the “Smiths Falls School” of decoy making, Hutchins was not influenced by anyone. No other decoys have been found with the cross hatch or checkering pattern closely mirroring the patterns found on gun stocks. His earliest decoys are a bit naive and indicate a progression that eventually leads to the quality of carving found in this lazy crest drake. In his best examples, the petite bodies are painstakingly hand carved in a diamond pattern covering everything but the bill. It is believed that Hutchins made decoys between 1908 and 1914, consisting of one or two rigs of mergansers and several pairs of goldeneyes. What the family didn’t use for their rig, Hutchins sold for $4 a piece to local hunters for their hunting rigs.

335

335. Very rare hooded merganser drake, Sam Hutchins, Jones Falls, Ontario, circa 1910.  Detailed crosshatch feather carving. Relief wing carving.  Original paint with very minor wear; tiny chip missing from top of tail and back edge of crest. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. 134

(25,000 - 35,000)


335 Detail

335 Detail

135


336 Detail

336

336 Detail 336. Hollow carved canvasback hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “HNT” and “Meredith” for St. Clair Flats Shooting Company members Howard G. Meredith club member 1894 - 1935 and Harry N. Torrey club member 1935 1946.  Original paint with very minor wear; a few tiny dents in center of back.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (6,000 - 9,000)

136


337. Exceptional rigmate pair of solid body mallards, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Outstanding paint with fine detail and good patina. Branded “JRW Maker” on undersides.  Near mint original paint; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 46. “Traditions in Wood,” Patsy Fleming, p. 129, exact decoys. DU Canada eBook, exact decoys. (6,000 - 9,000)

337

337 Detail 137


338

339

340

341

342

343

338. Solid body black duck, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  “AC” stamped in underside.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; small dents. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates p. 104. (1,250 - 1,750) 339. Hollow carved black duck, Robert Rennardson, Toronto, Ontario, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Branded “Geo M. Hendrie” for St. Clair Flats Club member George Hendrie member 1889 - 1943. Also “FHS” is painted on the underside.  Original paint with moderate wear; hit by shot; thin crack through neck.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Decoys of Southwest Ontario,” Paul Brisco p. 52. (1,250 - 1,750) 340. Hollow carved black duck, DW Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario.  Relief wingtip carving and slightly turned head.   Original paint with minor wear; slight roughness to one wingtip and one edge of tail; two shot marks in one side. 138

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Sam

Stuart.

(1,000 - 1,400)

341. Mallard drake, Pat Godin, Paris, Ontario.  Inscribed on the underside, “Drake mallard 1985 for the Ducks Unlimited dinner, Cambridge Ontario.” Slightly turned head. Raised wingtips. Comb painting on sides.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000) 342. Pintail drake, Frank Reeves, Long Point, Ontario.   Branded “A Hemingway” for Long Point Shooting Club member Augustus Hemingway, 1883 1931.   Second coat of paint by Reeves on body and bill; paint on head is original with significant wear; lightly hit by shot; thin crack partway through bill.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoy,” Bernie Gates, p. 21. (800 - 1,200) 343. Pair of canvasbacks, Frank Dolson, Chatham, Ontario, first quarter 20th century.  “FAD” brand in underside.  Original paint; minor wear; drake has been lightly hit by shot and has minor discoloration on one lower side.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 27. (950 - 1,250)


344

345 344. Short body style canvasback drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded, “JTN.” for St. Clair Flats Shooting Company member John T. Nichol.  Original paint; minor wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates. (4,500 - 6,500)

345.

Pair of flat back style bluebills, Bud Tully, Peterborough, Ontario.  Both have slightly turned heads and raised neck seats.  Very good and original.

344 Detail

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 76. (3,000 - 4,000) 139


John R. Wells

1861 - 1953 Toronto, Ontario John Rice Wells (J.R.W.) was an accomplished boat builder, decoy maker and legendary wing shot who worked for 43 years for the Ackroyd Boat Company on the Toronto waterfront. Wells, along with his friends the Warins, Chambers and the Reeves was an integral member of Toronto School of decoy makers. His decoys, both solid and hollow were carved and painted true to the species including separating juvenile plumage from adult. Wells, who made most species, sold to members of the elite waterfowl clubs and was a frequent guest. Wells hunted at Long Point on the north shore of Lake Erie over many decades. Wells made a well known rig of decoys known as “The Oak Lake Decoys” (see Donna Tonnelli’s excellent article on Well’s decoys and The Oak Lake Shooting Club). Very light and hollow, beautifully proportioned, his best paint, they were some of his finest work including this pair of Shovelers. They are hollow, made around 1910 by John Rice Wells to be used in southeastern Manitoba Canada at The Oak Lake Shooting Club. They are two of six known Shoveler decoys by Wells (JRW Maker). The hen – very high head with great feathering; the drake - bold, bight, duck-attracting paint. Extremely rare – some of Well’s finest.

346 Detail

140


346

346.

Pair of extremely rare shovelers, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Branded “JRW Maker”. Hollow carved with subtle feather paint detail. From the Oak Lake Shooting Club in Manitoba, Canada.  Original paint with minor wear; both have been very lightly hit by shot; each has a few very small dents.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in collection of Bruce Malcolm. Purchased at the 1998 Richard Oliver decoy auction.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates. DU Canada eBook, exact decoys. (20,000 - 30,000)

346 Detail

141


Jim Schmiedliln

1945 - 2015 Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania

While demand for Jim’s decoys increased throughout his carving career, he would sell decoys to friends that visited his house, through the mail and at decoy shows he frequented. Those that were lucky enough to make it to his home and carving shop in Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania know that he also maintained a special collection at his home. It consisted mostly of decoys in his personal gunning rig, early examples that had historical significance and select pieces that were too special to let go. Those pieces that remained in the home upon Jim’s death have now been branded with the “Schmiedlin Private Collection Stamp”.

347. Rare brant, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Made in October of 2002. Underside indicates this decoy was hunted in New York and Erie, Pennsylvania. It is branded “JAS” on underside. Retains Schmiedlin private collection stamp. Excellent feather carving detail on back and extended through wing and tail. Head is slightly turned.  Strong original paint; two small scratches at one side; otherwise excellent and good. (7,500 - 10,000)

347 Detail

142

348. Exceptional and rare back preening mallard drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Dated 2004. Branded “JAS” on underside. Writing indicates it used in Chautauqua, New York, Kelly Island, Ohio, and Erie, Pennsylvania. This decoy retains the Schmiedlin private collection stamp on underside. Has raised crossed wingtip. Bill is reaching and rested on back. Excellent paint blending.  Light wear at tip of tail, edge of bill, and around edge of body. (6,000 - 8,000)

348 Detail


347

348

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348A

349

348A. Ruddy duck with turned head, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Signed “8-02” and branded “JAS”.  Original paint with very minor wear; thin crack in underside tail and in lower breast. (3,500 - 5,500)

144

349. Pair of buffleheads with turned heads, Jim Schmiedlin Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania.  Branded “JAS” and signed and dated Feburary 1994.  Original paint with slight wear; structurally very good. (6,000 - 8,000)


Related Items

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351

352

353 350. Four glass target balls.  Green with diamond pattern and two window images with hunter holding gun. Maroon with diamond pattern by W.W. Greener, London. Clear with diamond pattern from N.B. Glass Works, Perth. Amber that is unmarked.  Original and good. (500 - 800) 351. Three blue glass target balls.  One with diamond pattern from W.W. Greener, London. One with lateral lines, and unmarked with small area of cracks in glass. And one with no pattern.  Good. (350 - 450)

352. Four wooden ears of corn.  All vintage, appear to be two different makers.  Two with eye hooks at end are near mint; other two have heavy wear from use. (400 - 600) 353. Two very rare and early cast iron andirons.  Each with a mallard with curled tail. 36” in length. Each says “Memphis Tennessee” on the side. And each weighs approximately 40 lb.   (2,000 - 3,000)

145


Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

Photo credit byabodine

In the late 1930s the Ward Brothers made three pairs of decoys for Walter Larrimore. A pair of mallards, bluebills, and black ducks, to be used as models when he carved decoys for his own use. All six of the decoys had exceptional form and the Ward’s very best paint. The decoys were handed down to Walter’s son, Garrett, and then to his son, Richard. For years Garrett and Richard displayed these decoys in their booth at various decoy shows. Richard sold the decoys to Jon and Virginia Chua, who kept them as prized decoys in their collection for many years. Beginning in 2013 Guyette & Deeter, Inc. has been selling the decoys for Jon and 354 Detail

Virginia. This black duck is the final, and favorite, decoy from the group.

146


354 Detail

354. Outstanding black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  One of the very finest 1936 model Ward black ducks known to exist. Slightly turned and lifted head. Highly detailed feather paint.  Small spots of touchup on head; bottom has been planed for signature, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Rigmate to lot 160 in our July 2016 auction. Part of a group of three pairs of decoys made for Richard Larrimore’s grandfather as models when he began carving. There were a pair of black ducks, a pair of bluebills, and a pair of mallards. This was the finest of the group.

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath. (55,000 - 75,000)

354

147


355. 1948 model goldeneye drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1948. Balsa body with slightly turned cedar head and inserted cedar tail.  Original paint with very slight discoloration and wear; small chip on one edge of tail has been glued back on

355

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath. (3,500 - 4,500)

356. 1948 model widgeon, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1952. Balsa body with turned cedar head and inserted cedar tail.  Original paint with minor wear and a few very small dents. (3,000 - 5,000)

356 357. Pair of goldeneye, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1967. Both are carved in an early 1930s style. Both have slightly turned heads.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

357 358.

358 148

Black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1948 model with balsa body, slightly turned cedar head and inserted cedar tail. Good feather paint detail.  A few tiny dents, otherwise, very good and original. (3,000 - 5,000)


359

359 Detail

359 Detail

359. Rare 1936 model goldeneye hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed. Slightly turned head.   Small chip missing from one edge of tail; slight separation at neck seam.

Provenance: From the estate of Jon Longfellow. In the 1930s Longfellow was a purchasing agent for E.S. Atkins Lumber Company in Salisbury, Maryland who supplied wood to the Ward Brothers. (15,000 - 18,000)

149


360

361

362

363

364

365

360. Rigmate pair of bluebills, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed and dated 1973 by both Lem and Steve. Stipple painting on drake. Both have turned heads.  Very small spot of pitch bleed on back of drake; a few small scratches otherwise very good and original. (2,500 - 3,500) 361.

Bluebill hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa body. Underside says, “Best grade”. Fine stipple painting on back. Turned head with extra details around tail feathers.  Very good and original. (1,800 - 2,000)

362. Pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Gunning model, circa 1948. Inserted hardwood tail. Slightly turned head.  Strong original paint; small areas of rubs and one small piece missing near top of back; otherwise very good and original. (1,750 - 2,250)

150

363. Canvasback hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  Balsa bodies with slightly turned cedar heads and keels. Both are signed.  Original paint; minor wear; a few small dents in balsa. (1,800 - 2,200) 364. Pair of widgeon, Charlie Joiner, Chestertown, Maryland.  Signed but not dated.  Original paint with minor discoloration on the white areas; structurally good. (800 - 1,200) 365. Rigmate pair of widgeon, Oliver Lawson, Crisfield, Maryland.  Signed “Oliver Lawson, 1957” on underside. Gunning model decoys with slightly turned heads, pinched breasts.  Dowels at top of heads have slightly pushed up; edge wear at bills and tip of tail; otherwise good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)


366

366 Detail

366 Detail

366. Pintail hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland.  1936 model with slightly turned head. Extra fine feather paint detail.  Professional repair to a chip of filler missing from the back of neck; otherwise very good and original; repair to a small chip on underside of bill; two small shot scars in back. Provenance: From the estate of Jon Longfellow. In the 1930s Longfellow was a purchasing agent for E.S. Atkins Lumber in Salisbury, Maryland who supplied wood to the Ward Brothers. (12,000 - 15,000)

151


New Jersey and the Delaware River

367

368

369

370

371

367. Black duck, Thomas Fitzpatrick, Delanco, New Jersey.  Fine feather paint detail on head.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (1,750 - 2,250) 368. Rare bluewing teal hen, Reg Marter, Burlington, New Jersey.  Raised “V” wing carving and fluted tail.  Original paint with very minor wear; a few tiny dents. Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (2,000 - 3,000) 369. Extremely rare, possibly unique sleeping black duck, John Blair, Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Same brands as the bluebill in this sale, “T” under the rear and “JD NORCOM.”  Multiple coats of old paint which have separated near the seam; nails holding two halves of decoy have slightly popped; much of the body appears to be covered by a coat of filler, that has flaked away on area where bill lays on the back. (1,750 - 2,250) 370. Pair of hollow carved canvasbacks, Joe Morgan, Tullytown, Pennsylvania.  Relief wingtip carv152

372 ing.  Original paint with very slight wear; structurally very good.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight, p. 94. (1,500 - 2,000)

371. High head style black duck, Reg Marter, Burlington New Jersey, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Raised “V” wing carving and fluted tail. Subtle scratch feather paint detail. Marter’s brass hunting tag is on the underside.  Original paint with very minor wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (1,200 - 1,500)

372. Oversize black duck, Jess Heisler, Burlington, New Jersey, 2nd quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear; small dent in wing; several tiny dents in body; thin crack through neck. Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Harrison Huster and Doug Knight. (1,500 - 2,000)


Lloyd Parker

1858 - 1921 Parkertown, New Jersey

373

373. Rare brant in original paint, Lloyd Parker, Parkertown, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Ice dip behind neck.  Original paint with minor wear; mostly on back; two hairline surface cracks in back from when the decoy was made; professional neck crack repair.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (8,000 - 10,000)

373 Detail

153


374

375

376

378

377

379

374. Bluebill drake, John Blair, Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century.  Two brands in underside. One is “T” other is “JD NORCOM”. Hollow carved. Tack eyes.  Very old dry crazed paint; appears to be a second gunning coat in the same style as Blair; rough areas near tail; paint flaking on parts of body and head; structurally good. (800 - 1,200) 375. Pair of goldeneye, Harry Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Worn old paint; small cracks and dents. (1,500 - 2,000) 376. Redhead drake, Stanley Grant, Barnegat, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear; slight separation at body seam.

154

Provenance: Formerly in collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey, Hillman collection stamp on underside. Branded “JAH”. Formerly in collection of Peter Bart lett. (600 - 900)

380

377. Gadwall drake, John Blair, Sr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.    Paint has been completely restored in the Blair style; a well executed restoration job; structurally sound. (800 - 1,200) 378. Black duck from the Delaware River, 1st quarter 20th century.  In resting pose.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (300 - 400) 379. Bufflehead drake, Charles Allen, Bordentown, New Jersey.  Branded “CEL” in underside.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Somers G. Headly. Headly collection stamp in underside multiple tim es. (400 - 600)

380.

Frigate gull, Jay Parker, Parkertown, New Jersey.  Relief wingtip carving.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; hairline surface crack in one side of neck; short crack in underside. (500 - 700)


381

382

381. Black duck, Jess Heisler, Bordentown, New Jersey, circa 1920s.  His early 3 piece body construction.  Original paint with very slight wear.

382. Rigmate pair of mergansers, Jay Parker, Parkertown, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear; body halves are joined by small wooden dowels. (3,500 - 4,500)

Provenance: Formerly in collection of John Hillman, Hillman collection stamp on underside.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, p. 60. “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr, p. 191. (4,000 - 5,000) 155


Harry V. SHourds 1861 - 1920 Tuckerton, New Jersey

Noted collector and author of “Classic Jersey Decoys,” Jim Doherty, wrote that “H.V. Shourds’ Canada goose decoys rank among the finest anywhere.” They are hollow carved from large hand selected, choice cedar slabs, then skillfully painted using a wet-on-wet technique that creates a series of dark and light brown stripes on the side. Bill Mackey believed that Jersey geese were the “finest” carved anywhere, and he felt that Shourds made the best of them all.

Harry V. Shourds

383 Detail 156


383. Classic Canada goose, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.  Good paint detail.  Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; slight separation at body seam; small crack in underside.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (20,000 - 25,000)

383 Detail

383

157


Shorebirds George Boyd

1873 - 1941 Seabrook, New Hampshire

384

385

384 Detail

385 Detail

384. Exceptional black bellied plover in spring plumage, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire, 1st quarter 20th century.  Extra fine paint detail.  Near mint original paint; minor wear on bill; very lightly hit by shot.

158

Literature: Cullen.

“Finely Carved and Nicely Painted,” Jim (7,000 - 9,000)

385. Rare black bellied plover in winter plumage, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire.  A gunning decoy with fine feather paint detail and good patina, as well as shoe button eyes.  Near mint original paint; light discoloration on part of the underside extending up on to the breast; structurally good. (6,500 - 9,500)


386

387

386 Detail

386. Fine working yellowlegs decoy, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire, 1st quarter 20th century.  Exceptionally fine feather paint detail and shoe button eyes.   Near mint original paint; professional neck crack repair; very small shot scar on tail. (6,000 - 9,000)

387 Detail

387. Exceptional yellowlegs, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Near mint original paint; appears to never been used; very slight discoloration on underside.

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, Jr. (9,500 - 12,500)

159


388

389

390

391

392

388. Curlew with tack eyes and raised “V” wingtip carving, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with slight wear; structurally good. (2,500 - 3,500) 389. Running black bellied plover, Obediah Verity, Seaford, long Island, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Beetle head style with carved eyes and relief wing carving.  Second coat of paint appears to be by Verity with good patina and very little wear; lightly hit by shot. (3,000 - 5,000) 390. Running robin snipe in spring plumage, Cobb Island, Virginia, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with 160

moderate wear; several hairline surface cracks. (1,750 - 2,250) 391.

Hollow carved golden plover from Massachusetts.  Tack eyes.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; bill has been off and reattached. (1,500 - 2,000)

392. Golden plover from Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century.  “JAS” is carved in the underside for John Seabury.  Original paint with very minor wear; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Wick collection.

(1,750 - 2,250)


393. Flat sided tern, Long Island, New York, circa 1900.  Split tail.  Original paint; minor wear; lightly hit by shot. (3,500 - 4,500)

393

394. Rare black bellied plover in winter plumage, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey.    Original paint with minor wear; mostly on one side of head and neck; thin crack partway through neck; four tiny shot marks.

Literature: “Shorebirds Decoys,” John Levinson and Somers Headly. (5,000 - 8,000)

394

395. Yellowlegs, Charles Clark, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Bill is an old replacement, otherwise original and good. (2,000 - 3,000)

395 161


John Dilley

Quogue, New York Unlike any other area of the country, shorebirds are Long Island’s dominant decoy form. The birds were popular all over Long Island and were also a staple of the wild game stands in New York’s Fulton and Washington markets where they were purchased by city restauranteurs. The proximity to New York City’s wealthy sportsmen, and the abundance of many different species of shorebirds, made it a great place to sell shorebird decoys of the finest quality. The highly refined and skillfully controlled brush work and vast knowledge of plumage within a species of shorebird, make the work of John Dilley some of the most sought after. His feather painting was rendered with meticulous attention to detail through hundreds of delicate brush strokes.

396

162


396. Rare dowitcher in spring plumage, John Dilley, Quogue, Long Island, New York.  Fine feather paint detail and good patina. Feather painting under tail. Identical to the New York State Fair’s museum collection decoy which was on display at Massachusetts Audubon Museum.  Original paint with good patina; very slight wear, mostly on bill; several very small dots of blood on breast and underside; structurally excellent. (50,000 - 60,000)

396 Detail

396 Detail 163


397

398

399

401

400

397. Golden plover from Nantucket.  Tack eyes.  Crack full length in body; bill is an old replacement.

Provenance: Passed down through the Mayew, Pinkham, Coleman estate. (800 - 1,200)

398. Black bellied plover from Nantucket, last quarter 19th century.  Tack eyes.  Original paint; minor wear; lightly hit by shot. Provenance: Passed down through the Mayew, Pinkham, Coleman estate. (800 - 1,200) 399. Two tin shorebirds with metal stands.  Golden plover 164

and a peep.  Both in very strong condition; small rub in one side of peep; light area of rust near tail; plover very good and original. (500 - 800) 400. Golden plover from Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with shoe button eyes.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; minor roughness to end of tail; lightly hit by shot. (700 - 900) 401. Lesser yellowlegs, William Randall, New Hampshire, circa 1940s.    Original paint; minor discoloration and wear; structurally good. (250 - 350)


402

403

402. So called ‘Brigantine Bullhead’ plover, Bill Harris, Atlantic City, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of Dr. Jack Connover, Connover stamp on underside.

403. Black bellied plover by a member of the McCarthy Family, Cape May, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century.  Shoe button eyes.  Original paint with moderate wear; lightly hit by shot; bill appears to be original. (1,500 - 2,000)

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (3,500 - 4,500)

165


Illinois River Robert Elliston 1849 - 1915 Bureau, Illinois

404. Rare bluewing teal hen, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.  Subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; professional repair to worn areas on edge of bill; minor in painting to a worn spot on the back and the left speculum; retains Elliston weight. Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

404

404 Detail 166

(8,000 - 12,000)


405 Detail

405 Detail While residents of Chicago, the Dupee family owned a second home in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. William H. Dupee and his father were both founding members and frequent shooters of the Diana Shooting Club on the Horicon Marsh located in south central Wisconsin. Dupee’s good friend, Charles Dearing, was also a member at the Diana club, and the two gentlemen often traveled and hunted together. (Elliston Decoys can also be found with his brand, “Dearing.”) In addition to the Diana Shooting Club, both gentlemen were also members of the Under Cliff Shooting Association, which was the predecessor of the Schenchwine Duck Club in Putman, Illinois. The Undercliff Hotel is where these gentlemen stayed when shooting at the club. Coincidently, Robert Elliston moved to the hotel in 1886 and lived there for five years, until 1891. This is likely where W.H. Dupee first met Robert Elliston. The Dupee rig of decoys was likely ordered around 1900. The decoys are characterized by having fat round bodies, which indicate they are Elliston’s earliest period and most desirable style.

405 405. Rare round body style bluebill drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880s.  From the Dupee Rig, “WH Dupee” brand has been mostly cut off of the underside.  Original paint with minor discoloration and very minor wear; professional restoration to a small sliver of wood missing from one edge of bill; retains Elliston weight; structurally very good.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(20,000 - 25,000) 167


Bert Graves

1887 - 1956 Peoria, Illinois

406

406 Detail

406 Detail 406. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Retain Graves weights. Fine comb and feather paint detail.  Near mint original paint protected by its original coat of varnish; very small defect in wood at one side of drake’s back; thin crack through hen’s neck.

168

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(7,500 - 9,500)


407

408

407. Rare canvasback drake in juvenile plumage, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, circa 1925.  From Graves’ personal hunting rig, retains Graves weight.  Near mint original paint; a few tiny dents.

408. Canvasback hen, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  His earlier more squared off body style. Retains Graves weight.   Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (2,500 - 3,500)

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (4,000 - 6,000)

169


Bert Graves (right) and his brother-in-law George Snider outside his home and workshop after a day of canvasback shooting on Upper Peoria Lake, circa 1920

Bert Graves of Peoria was actively making decoys in the 1930s and early 1940s. His output included several species of ducks including, mallards (both standard size and several oversized models), pintails, black ducks, canvasbacks, and a rig of at least three brant. Graves modeled his decoys after the work of Robert Elliston of Bureau, Illinois the premier early carver of the Illinois River style. He worked with the assistance of his wife Millie who was responsible for painting many of the decoys. Graves also sent decoys to Catherine Elliston for painting, wife of Robert Elliston Eventually, Catherine taught Millie her painting skills, and passed along her husband’s tools and patterns to Bert. 1 1

Bird Decoys of North America, Nature History, Art, Robert Shaw, copyright 2010 Robert Shaw, Published by Sterling Publishing Co., Toronto, Ontario.

409 Detail

170


409

409 Detail

409. Rigmate pair of pintails, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Original paint by Catherine Elliston with fine feather detail. Both retain Graves weights.  Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; structurally good. Provenance: Formerly in collection of Gene Konopasek. Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(17,500 - 22,500) 171


Charles Perdew 1874 - 1963 Henry, Illinois

410

411

410. Pintail drake, Charles Perdew, Henry Illinois, circa 1930s.    Original paint; minor to moderate wear; small amount of touchup on bottom edge of neck; a few tiny dents. (6,000 - 9,000)

411. Canvasback drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Raised carved wingtips.  Near mint original paint; weight is missing; hairline crack partway through bill.

172

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(6,000 - 9,000)


412

412 Detail

412 Detail

412. Rare rigmate pair of pintails, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Fine paint by Edna Perdew. Both retain Perdew weights.  Hen is original paint with very slight wear, mostly on bill; drake has original paint with significant wear to the bare wood on much of underside, original paint with very minor wear on rest of decoy; hairline crack in drake’s neck and in underside of body.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Lot 262 in Guyette & Schmidt, Inc. November 2001 decoy auction. (15,000 - 20,000) 173


Charles Perdew 1874 - 1963 Henry, Illinois

Two rigmate pair of Charles Perdew mallards were originally found by Joe Tonelli and Randy Root in a home in Spring Valley, Illinois. Both Tonelli and Root each bought a pair. Tonelli eventually sold his pair to Bill Humbracht. At the Humbracht auction in the early 1980’s, Tom Figge purchased the pair originally owned by Tonelli. They are photographed in his book “Masterworks of the Illinois River”, page 68. Root kept his pair for approximately 30 years until selling them about 10 years ago.

412A

174


412A Detail

412A. Early rigmate pair of mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.  Fine original paint by Edna Perdew. Both retain Perdew’s early pencil weights. Both are covered by a light coat of varnish that has mellowed with age.  Hen has tight crack near base of neck; a few small dents; drake has two shot marks and a few small areas where varnish and paint has flaked; area of restoration to one side of bill on drake. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Randy Root. From a home in Spring Valley, Illinois. (20,000 - 25,000)

175


412B

412B Detail

412B. Exceptional and rare black duck, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois.  Branded, “CJC” twice on the underside designating that it is from the Caswell rig. Extra fine paint detail with well blended feathering. Retains Graves weight.  Original paint; very minor wear; several small dents.

176

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

(9,000 - 12,000)


412C. Pintail drake ice duck, Jake Uhl, Peoria, Illinois.    Original paint with minor wear on much of decoy; white area has old touchup; structurally good. (4,000 - 6,000)

412C

Historians agree that Hiram Hotze of Peoria, Illinois, was a talented and meticulous decoy maker. It is said he only used the finest pieces of pine and the highest quality artist oil paints available. His production has been reported as being around one hundred canvasback and mallard decoys. A devoted outdoorsman, who stamped “H.H.” on most of the weights attached to his decoys, he even went as far as to sign and date the inside of the hollow bodies.

412D. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks Hiram Hotze, Peoria, Illinois.    Appealing old in use repaint on the white areas; the rest is original with minor wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (7,000 - 9,000)

More recent information has surfaced proving that Hotze decoys were often sold through the well known Portman’s Sporting Goods Store in Peoria, Illinois.

412D

177


New York State 413. Rare brant, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1920s.  Heart shaped wing carving in back and fluted tail. Branded “WFB”.  Original paint with minor wear; one very small chip on tip of tail; small crack through one wing. (3,000 - 5,000)

413 414. Bluebill hen, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York.  Subtle feather paint detail. Stamped “JJF” eight times in the underside, some are more obvious.  Original paint with minor wear; mostly on lower sides; a few tiny dents.

414

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of George Ross Starr, Duxbury, Massachusetts. Starr collection stamp on underside.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. (3,000 - 5,000) 415. Rare black duck, Frank Coombs, Alexandria Bay, New York.    Near mint original paint; professional tail chip repair.

415

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. (1,500 - 2,500)

416. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Julius Mittlestaedt, Rochester, New York.  Hen has turned and slightly lifted head.  Original paint with minor wear; thin crack in underside of drake; hairline crack in one side of hen’s neck base. (1,500 - 2,500)

416 178


417

417 Detail

417. Very rare hooded merganser drake, Julius Mittelstaedt, Buffalo, New York.  One of only six made.  Original paint with good detail; and only slight wear; structurally very good.

Provenance: Haid collection. Formerly in the collection of Bill Towner.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas.

(9,000 - 12,000)

179


Stevens Brothers Weedsport, New York

“Stevens Brothers Decoys,� Peter and Peggy Muller

418 Detail 180


418. Very rare bluewing teal hen, Harvey Stevens.  “Harvey Stevens Maker” stencil on underside. Stamped “HSB” in underside.  Original paint that has darkened with age; structurally very good.

Literature: “Stevens Brothers Decoys,” Peter and Peggy Muller. “Stevens Decoys,” Shane Newell. (17,500 - 22,500)

418

181


419

419 Detail

419.

Black duck, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Strong loop feather painting and paddle tail.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly at center of underside; short hairline crack in back.

Literature: “Stevens Decoys,” Shane Newell. “Stevens Brothers,” Peter and Peggy Mueller. (4,000 - 6,000)

182


420 Detail

420

420 Detail 420. Mallard drake, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, last quarter 19th century.  Detailed comb painting. Branded “C.W. Whittier” on underside for Charles Whittier of Cape Cod. The Elmer Crowell widgeon in Guyette & Deeter, Inc.’s February 2017 auction also had the “C.W. Whittier” brand.  Original paint; minor wear; thin line of professional touchup on neck where head was reset; very small sliver off one edge of bill.

Literature: “Stevens Brothers Decoys,” Peter and Peggy Muller. “Stevens Decoys,” Shane Newell. (9,500 - 12,500) 183


421

422

423

424

426

425 421. Goldeneye hen, Frank Coombs, Alexandria Bay, New York, 1952.  From the Horace Green rig, and so stamped.  Mint, never used. (950 - 1,250) 422. Canvasback drake, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, circa 1880s.    Old repaint on head and black areas of body; the rest has original with moderate wear; small rough area on underside.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(800 - 1,200)

423. Bluebill drake, Frank Coombs, Alexandria Bay, New York.    Old in use repaint on black areas; the rest appears to be original; minor wear; lightly hit by shot. (850 - 950) 424. Hump back style goldeneye hen, Stevens Brothers Weedsport, New York, circa 1880s.    Old in use repaint 184

with moderate wear; thin chip missing from underside of bill; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(800 - 1,200)

425. Greenwing teal drake, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  Harris’s ink stamp on the underside. Decoy is signed under the tail, as well as identified on the underside. Included is a photo of Harris holding this decoy.  Excellent and original.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(800 - 1,200)

426. Pair of canvasbacks, Seymour Smith, Dresden, New York, 2nd quarter 20th century.    Original paint; very minor wear; thin crack in drake’s back; slight roughness on one edge of drake’s tail.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(750 - 1,000)


427

428 427. Large merganser drake, Smith Clinton Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, circa 1900.  Carved eyes.  Original paint; minor to moderate wear; minor discoloration on the light areas; lightly hit by shot; shot scar in back. (4,000 - 6,000) 428. Merganser hen and drake from Long Island, New York.  One has relief wing carving with extended wingtips.   Original paint with minor wear; each has a thin crack in the underside. (3,500 - 4,500) 428A. Merganser hen, Smith Clinton Verity, Seaford, New York, circa 1900. Original paint with moderate wear on white areas the rest has a second coat by Verity; lightly hit by shot. (1,250 - 1,750)

428A

185


New England

429

430

429. Rare black duck, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut.  In sleeping pose with slightly twisted neck and bill resting on back. Painted on underside “Made by Chas. E. Wheeler, 1888/1/2.” Retains original Wheeler weight.  Body appears to be second coat of paint; most of head is original; bill paint appears to have been strengthened; 1” chip out of tail; flaking on neck and top of head and top of nails that attach head to body; small chip under one eye. (5,000 - 7,000)

186

430. Bluebill drake, Albert Laing, Stratford, Connecticut.  Probably made when Laing was living in New York. Hollow carved with bottom board. Head has a slight turn with faint ice groove carving down the back. Mackey stamp twice on underside.  Multiple layers of paint; some of which may be original; separation from bottom board; several shot marks in head and body; edge wear on tail and bill.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Bill Mackey, Jr. (3,500 - 4,500)


430A. Sleeping black duck, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  Signed. Hollow carved.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

430A

430B. Oversize eider drake, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  Signed. Inlet head with mussel and open mouth. Raised wingtips.  Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (1,200 - 1,500)

430B 430C. Canvasback drake, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  Signed. Hollow carved with slightly turned head.  Tiny dent in one side otherwise very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500)

430C

430D. Merganser drake, Keith Mueller, Killingsworth, Connecticut.  Mueller stamps in underside. Raised wingtips.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500)

430D 187


Joseph Lincoln

1859 - 1938 Accord, Massachusetts

Early Lincoln business card. “Joseph W. Lincoln,� Cap Vinal

431 Detail

188


431.

Exceptional self bailing brant, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century.    Near mint original paint with good detail and patina; a few small spots on back where it appears something was cleaned off of the surface; structurally very good.

Provenance: From the Muskeget Island Brant Club, Nantucket, Massachusetts. Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 135. “Joseph W. Lincoln,” Cap Vinal. (7,000 - 9,000)

431 Detail

431

189


Gus Wilson

1864 - 1950 South Portland, Maine

432 432 Detail

432 Detail

432. Classic white wing scoter, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine, last quarter 19th century.  Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Inlet head with bill tucked down almost touching neck.  Old overpaint has been taken off the white areas revealing original paint with minor wear; the rest has original paint and minor wear as well; vertical crack through head and neck, otherwise structurally good.

Provenance: Purchased in 1977 on Beale’s Island, Maine.

Literature: “Decoys,” Joel Barber, “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph.

190

(3,500 - 5,500)


433

433. Merganser drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine.  Relief wing carving, inlet head and carved eyes. Bill has a piece of leather through it to simulate sea weed.  Original paint; minor wear; crack through neck; horse hair crest and piece of leather appear to be old replacement. Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (10,000 - 15,000)

433 Detail

191


Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1954 East Harwich, Massachusetts

Elmer Crowell outside his shop in the 1940s

434 Detail

192


434.

Exceptional and very rare oversize pintail drake, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts.  17 1/2” long. Crowell rectangular stamp is in the underside. Slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint with good patina; tip of tail has been blunted slightly; crack in underside.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph.

(20,000 - 25,000)

434

434 Detail

193


Mason Factory Shorebirds

435

435 Detail

435 Detail

194

435.

Exceptional black bellied plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model with good form and finely detailed feather paint.  Original paint with slight wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 101, exact decoy. (6,500 - 9,500)


436

437

436 Detail

436. Robin snipe in spring plumage, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Tack eye model.  Near mint original paint; several tiny dents in one side.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Joe French, Marathon, Florida. Tiny “JF” stamp near stick hole. (4,000 - 6,000)

437 Detail

437. Very rare ruddy turnstone, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model with the wooden bill and split wooden tail, circa 1895. In Spring plumage.  Original paint with very minor wear; very lightly hit by shot; slight roughness to one edge of upper tail.

Provenance: O’Connor collection. Formerly in the collection of Dr. James McCleery, McCleery collection stamp on underside. McCleery shorebird stand is included. Decoy was lot 505 in the Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s January 2000 auction catalog.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 97, exact decoy. (4,000 - 6,000) 195


438

439

439 Detail

438 Detail

438. Rare yellowlegs, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model with wooden bill and split tail.  Original paint with very slightly wear; tiny chip at one edge of tail; the other edge has been blunted slightly.

196

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(3,500 - 4,500)

439. Dove, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model with finely detailed feather painting on back and tail.   Slight separation at knot in one side.

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(3,500 - 5,500)


440

441

442

440 Detail

441 Detail

440. Very rare dunlin, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910.  Glass eye model.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; filled crack in one side approximately 3” long with touchup; several tiny dents and shot marks.

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(3,000 - 4,000)

441. Yellowlegs, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model with detailed paint pattern.  Original paint with minor wear, mostly on one side

near tail; one tiny shot mark in head; small spot of touchup on back; discoloration under tail.

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(2,500 - 3,500)

442. Robin snipe in fall plumage, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Tack eye model.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

197


Ontario

Angus Lake was a salesman, road maintenance supervisor and later a farmer and tourist boat operator in Prince Edward County in Eastern Ontario. He was an avid sportsman including waterfowl hunting. He probably made his black duck decoys around 1900. Some are in unusual poses best illustrated by this extremely rare and important swimming pose black duck.

443

443. Sculpturesque black duck in exceedingly rare swimming pose, Angus Lake.  Signed and dated 1940. Heart shaped, raised wing carving and inlet head.  Original paint with minor wear; some paint strengthening to speculums; slight separation at back of neck inlet. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: DU Canada eBook, exact decoy.

198

(15,000 - 20,000)


The Warins were boat builders and decoy makers who hunted extensively on the Toronto waterfront and Lake St. Clair. They sold boats and decoys to members of the elite duck clubs as well as to individual sportsmen. Warin implemented “shooting rules” to increase the harvest at several clubs at the Flats. At the St. Clair Flats it was the height of the market hunting era. Ducks were sold. Warin personally shot over 800 ducks at the Canada Club in 1876. Some of his rules included: only shoot every other day; stop shooting before sundown; feed ponds daily - clearly a recipe for success.

444

444. Hollow carved Canada goose, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario.  His earlier style, early 4th quarter 19th century. Branded “FH Walker” for St. Clair Flats Shooting Company member Harrington E. Walker, club member 1913 - 1934.  Original paint that has darkened with age and has some shrinkage mostly on the back; small short cracks in tail.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates. DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (15,000 - 20,000) 199


John R. Wells 1861 - 1953 Toronto, Ontario

J. R. Wells of Toronto – 4th from the left with P. Reeves, Charles Reeves and Frank Reeves.

200


445. Rigmate pair of hollow carved mallards, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario.  Both are branded, “JRW maker” and have the initials “GB” painted on undersides for Judge Gregory Barrett. From the Oak Lake Club. Subtle feather paint detail.  Original paint; minor discoloration and wear; two small cracks in hen’s tail; tiny chip missing from tip of hen’s bill; hen is also lightly hit by shot; drake has two small shot scars and a short crack in the breast. (6,500 - 9,500)

445

445 Detail

445 Detail

201


Ken Anger 1905 - 1961 Dunnville Ontario Ken lived in Dunnville on the banks of the Grand River a few miles north of where it enters the north shore of Lake Erie at Port Maitland Ontario. Dunnville with its river, marshes and proximity to Hamilton Bay to the N.E. and Long Point Bay to the S.W. was an area where quality decoys were in demand. Ken was an avid fisherman and hunter; duck and woodcock hunting with his cocker spaniels was his passion. Ken became a commercial decoy maker in the late 1930’s. As with most prolific carvers, his styles changed quite dramatically between the 1930’s until his death in 1961. Dunnville’s other internationally renowned carver Peter Marshall Pringle (1878-1953) is said to have influenced Ken’s work, particularly his use of heavy texturing with the wood rasp. Ken entered the “National Decoy Contest” in New York USA in 1948 and again in 1949 taking multiple first place Blue Ribbons each year. American sportsmen and collectors had found Dunnville’s Ken Anger. The international demand for Anger decoys continues to this day. In addition to his gunning Blacks, Mallards, Redheads, Canvasbacks, Bluebills, Whistlers, Buffleheads, Teal and Pintails, collectors were now commissioning decorative species - Wood Duck, Shovelers, Mergansers and Old Squaw. Ken made several thousand gunning decoys for local sportsmen from Dunnville, Long Point, Hamilton Bay, Niagara and Buffalo areas. As his fame spread, his distribution area increased especially for his decorative work in the mid 1950’s until his death. Several extremely rare or one-of-a-kind decoys including Shovellers and Red Breasted Merganser decoys are included in the Brown/DU Canada collections. Ken’s gunning decoys were hollow using the best materials including Japanese oil paint. The wood was always rasp textured especially the head. His decoys were on the large size; highly visible; extremely durable structure and paint; true to species and species’ profile. They were a serious duck hunter’s decoy - no thin bills to break or fragile tails to chip. They were expensive, but they were quality. It is believed that Ken made several thousand gunning duck decoys, a few geese, possibly a hundred decorative decoys plus wall plaques and book ends featuring ducks and upland birds. Ken “The Rasp Master” Anger’s decoys are still highly sought after some 60 years after construction.

446 Detail 202


446. Extremely rare pair of red breasted mergansers, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Both have incised wing carving and are signed on underside by Anger.  Near mint and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bruce Malcolm. Purchased from Keith Nevills who purchased them from his hunting partner, Ken. The only pair of Red Breasted Mergansers known.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 44. “Traditions in Wood,” Patricia Fleming, p. 28. DU Canada eBook, exact decoy. (5,000 - 8,000)

Ken Anger

446

203


John Reeves

1860 - 1896 Port Rowan, Ontario

John Reeves

John Cooper Reeves was the eldest son of Phineas Reeves (1833-1896) who was the patriarch of three generations of decoy carvers, boat builders, duck guides, and club managers. John Reeves was the first bookkeeper of the Long Point Company, which was established in 1866 as a prestigious hunting club on the North Shore of Lake Erie in Ontario, Canada. Working at Long Point with his father Phineas, the father/son team guided and made decoys for club members. They used the same patterns, and their decoys were very similar. John made teal, black, mallard, pintail and goose decoys. In the late 1880s, John moved to the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company (established as a hunting club in 1874) as the club manager. The club is often referred to as The Canada Club and/or The Toronto Club. In the early 1890s, John Reeves made a small rig of “Flats Geese” for St. Clair Flats Shooting Club member Howard G. Meredith. John Reeves death in 1896 at the age of 36 obviously contributed to the rarity of his Flats decoys. Many “Flats” decoy collectors believe these “Meredith Geese” to be John Reeves’ finest work. Some believe these strikingly handsome goose decoys with their swept back necks, full stylish head position, long elegant thin tails, and wonderfully rich, blended paint detail are the finest Toronto School Flats Geese. This John Reeves “Meredith Goose” is branded “MEREDITH” and was acquired in the early 1970s directly from the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company by Judge Harry Seitz and Bernard Crandall of Michigan.

204


447 Detail

447. Rare hollow carved Canada goose, John Cope Reeves, Port Rowan, Ontario.  Branded “FBG”, “MEREDITH”, and “HNT” for Frank B. Gaylord, Howard G. Meredith and Harry N. Torrey, all St. Clair Flats Shooting Company members.  Original paint with minor wear; professional touchup to very small area of one white cheek patch; knot in tail has fallen out and professionally replaced with touchup in that area.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 17.

(27,500 - 32,500)

447

205


448. Very rare pair of bluewing teal, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.    Excellent and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Bruce Malcolm. (3,500 - 4,500)

448

449. Rare pair of greenwing teal, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.    Excellent and original.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Bruce Malcolm.

Literature: E-book.

(3,500 - 4,500)

449

450. Very rare hooded merganser hen and drake, DW Nichol, Smiths Falls, Ontario, circa 1930.  Drake has relief carved wingtips. Hen has relief carved wingtips with additional feather carving.  Hen is near mint; drake has original paint with minor wear and paint rubs; crack in the underside.

450

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bernie Gat es. (2,000 - 3,000)

451. Rigmate pair of mallards, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Made in 1955.  Mint in all respects. (2,000 - 2,500)

451 206


452

453

454

455

457

456 452. Pair of bluewing teal, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.    Original paint with minor to moderate wear; a few small dents. Provenance: Olson collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

453. Solid body black duck, Ontario.  Delicate form with slightly turned head and good scratch paint detail.  Near mint original paint; slight wear to the edge of the tail; two tiny shot marks; several specks of off white paint. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Jamie Stalker. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 112. (900 - 1,200) 454. Rigmate pair of buffleheads, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  Drake has slightly turned head. Hen has “KIRELL” painted on underside.  Both are in original paint; drake’s bill has been blunted and cracked then secured with a tiny screw; a few rubs and possible very tiny beetle holes in back. (1,500 - 2,000) 455. Rare early style greenwing teal, Ken Anger, Dunnville,

Ontario, circa 1930s.    Original paint with minor wear on top, moderate wear on sides; structurally good.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 25. (1,500 - 2,000) 456.

Pair of black ducks, Art Chilton, Toronto, Ontario.  Both have relief wing carving. One is in preening pose, the other is in swimming pose with head turned slightly to one side. Both are branded, “AC” and stamped, “ARC.”  Original paint with very slight wear; one shot mark on swimmer; old wax on the backs of each one has left a thin off white film in some areas of the back.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 59. (800 - 1,200) 457. Redhead hen, George Warin.  Branded “G&J Warin Builders Toronto.” Solid body.  Original paint that has worn to bare wood around edge of bill, tail and areas on head and back; a few small shot scars; small areas of flaking. (800 - 1,000) 207


Ivar Fernlund

1881 - 1933 Hamilton, Ontario

Fernlund decoys circa 1910-1920 in the Brown collection are of two distinct styles, probably made at different times. The low profile, long body, elegant form with full lower head profiles are very much in the “Flats Toronto School,” form of J. R. Wells and George Warin. The second style – higher heads, shorter wider bodies with the same elegance and grace are classic Burlington Bay screening decoys. Regardless of style, Fernlund Cans have “the look”, varied head posture, meticulously blended combed painting simulating feathering including the primaries. Fernlund Cans – true to life, some of Fernlund’s and Canada’s finest.

458 Detail

208


458

458. Rare rigmate pair of hollow carved “high neck” style canvasbacks, Ivar Fernlund, Hamilton, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century.  Both have slightly turned heads and comb paint detail.  Original paint with very minor wear; drake has two filled shot marks in one side; hen has 16 shot marks in one side.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 34. DU Canada eBook, exact decoy.

(17,500 - 22,500)

209


Sporting Art 459

459. Oil on board by Lynn Bogue Hunt.  Signed and dated 1953. Image of three mallards pitching in to marsh. Image size 15 1/2” x 23 1/2”.  Very good and original. (2,250 - 2,750)

460 460. Gouache by Lynn Bogue Hunt.  Image of hunter in blind with mallards in flight. Signed “Lynn Bogue Hunt”. This is an illustration used for the “Fox Gun” Catalog Cover, and also pictured on p. 118 of John Delph’s book “Firearms, Tacker and Memorabilia.” Image size 8 1/2” x 8 1/2”. Professionally framed and matted.   (1,800 - 2,200)

461 461. Watercolor by Chet Reneson.  Image of hunters walking towards field blind with goose decoys stacked in a pile. Image size 18 1/2” x 27”. Professionally matted and framed.   (1,500 - 2,000)

210


461A

461C

461B

461A. Oil on board of a duck hunter and his dog, William J. Koelpin.  Signed. Image size approximately 16” x 12”.  Very good and original.

461C. Limited edition bronze of two herons, William J. Koelpin, #8/45.  Signed. Approximately 25” tall.  Original and good.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(650 - 950)

Provenance: Miller collection.

(3,000 - 4,000)

461B. Acrylic on board of a decoy, shotgun, and shot ducks, William J. Koelpin.  Signed. Image size approximately 16” x 11-1/2”.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection.

(650 - 950) 211


461D

461D. Acrylic on board of grouse in forest, Harry Antis.  Signed and dated 1982. Image size approximately 26” x 21”.  Very good and original.

Provenance: Miller collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

461E 461E. Watercolor of a pigmy owl in a tree, Guy Coheleach.  Signed. Image size approximately 20” x 16”.  Very good and original.

212

Provenance: Miller collection. (1,500 - 2,500)


462

463

464

462. Watercolor by BK Hall.  Caught by FW Blackmer and RB Dodge, Jr. Feb. 26, 1892 at Tatnuck Mills weight 5 1/2 lb. Image of pike near weedy bottom with small bait fish swimming above. Image measures 12” x 33 1/2”. Professionally framed.  Small area of stain on the left side against the frame. (2,000 - 2,500) 463. “Daybreak,” an oil on board by Romel de la Torre.  Signed. Image size approximately 16” x 20”.   (2,000 - 2,500) 464. Acrylic on board of pileated woodpecker, Richard Plasschaert.  Signed and dated 1984. Image size 19” x 23”.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

213


466

465

467

468 465. Watercolor of woodcock in forest, David Hagerbaumer.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 8.25” x 10.25”.  Very good and original. (600 - 900) 466. Pen and Ink drawing of Shang Wheeler painting a portrait of himself.  Signed. Included are various flying game birds, a hunter, two men in a canoe, and trophy fish. Caption reads, “How th’ell can a feller do one thing when he has his mind on half a dozen others.” Image size approximately 15-1/2” x 12-1/2”.  Minor discoloration; small area in upper right corner with minor damage from tape; several tack holes. (650 - 950)

214

467. Oil on canvas of pheasant, George Rienbold.  Signed. Image size approximately 24” x 21”.  Original and good. (1,000 - 1,400) 468. “Well I’m Ready,” an oil on canvas of dog with hunting pack, John Seerey-Lester.  Signed. Image size approximately 11 1/2” x 8 1/2”.  Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500)


468A

468A

468A

468A

468B

468A. Lot of 4 Christmas card etchings, Richard Bishop.  All say, “Merry Christmas - George W. Mason,” and are signed by Bishop in the margin. Image size approximately 6-1/2” x 4-1/2”.  Original and good. (1,400 - 1,800) 468B. “Old Tom,” an etching of a duck hunter by Frank Benson.  Signed in the margin. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 15” x 10”.  Very good and original. (3,500 - 4,500)

215


468C

468D

468E

468F

468C. “Quail Covey,” a large watercolor by David Hagerbaumer.  Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 24” x 36”.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500) 468D. Remington calendar, 1933.  With January calendar page included. Top band is retained and is visible. Professionally framed.  Small tear in upper left approximately 1”; two other small areas of imperfection. (800 - 1,200)

216

468E. Oil on canvas of duck hunter, Frank Butler.  Signed. Image size 28” x 20”. Painting was used for the cover of the October 1935 “National Sportsman” magazine, magazine included.  A few small scuffs near the edges; otherwise good. (800 - 1,200) 468F. Etching, A. Lassell Ripley.  Image of hunters in blind with dog retrieving a mallard drake and decoys in the water. Signed “A Lassell Ripley” in lower right. Image size 14” x 9”. Professionally matted and framed.   Very good and original. (800 - 1,200)


469

469. Oil on board of bass chasing frog, Peter A. Strzelewicz.  Image size 23 1/2” x 17 1/2”. Used for the cover of Bass Master Magazine, May/June 1977 issue. Cover included.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

470 470. “The Secret Pool,” an oil on board by Paco Young.  Signed. Image size approximately 14” x 20”.  Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

471. “Snowshoe Hare,” an acrylic on board by Mario Fernandez.  Signed and dated 1982. Image size 14” x 18”.  Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500)

471

217


North Carolina and Virginia

472

473

472. Well carved brant, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Slightly turned head. “V” wing carving and fluted tail and raised neck seat. Good feather paint detail. Balsa construction. “WAK” is stamped in the weight.  Original paint; minor wear; small dents in balsa, mostly on lower sides; slight roughness to one edge of tail and one side of the tip of the bill. Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr.

(5,500 - 7,500)

473. Unusual “boat body” model Canada goose, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Good feather paint detail and tack eyes as well as ice dip behind neck.  Original paint; minor wear, mostly on one side; age split in underside that is partially covered by the weight; small cracks; lightly hit by shot.

472 Detail

218

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr.

(5,000 - 7,500)


474

475

476

477

478

479

474. Canada goose, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; the black areas and cheek patches are a second coat; small tail chip; small knot hole in back; age split and cracks in underside of body. Provenance: Formerly in the collection of George Thompson, Casanovia, New York. Thompson collection stamp on underside. (1,750 - 2,250) 475. Hooded merganser hen, Doug Jester, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Original paint with moderate wear; lightly hit by shot; thin crack in one part of crest.

Provenance: Formerly in collection of William J. Mackey, Jr. Mackey collection stamp on underside. (1,500 - 2,500)

476. Pair of black ducks, Tom Boozer.  “TB” carved in to the undersides. One is in swimming pose with very slightly turned head, the other is in preening pose.  Very good and

original.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(1,000 - 1,500)

477. Hooded merganser drake, Doug Jester, Chincoteague, Virginia.    Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear on much of the decoy; white paint on underside and on head appears to be a second coat; structurally good. (1,000 - 1,500) 478. Two very early canvasbacks, carved in the Upper Bay style.  Supposed to have been used at the Swan Lake Club. Both have multiple brands, “L.S. Ludi”, “HI”, and “L.S. Ludington”.  Very old working paint, with traces of original showing through; both have neck cracks; and wear at tails; small dents and rough areas. (800 - 1,200) 479. Cast iron sink box brant from North Carolina, circa 1900.  Small traces of original paint; in use wear.   (700 - 900) 219


480. Redhead drake, by a member of the Waterfield Family, Knotts Island, North Carolina.  Attributed to Malachi, last quarter 19th century. Harold Haertel collection stamp on underside.  Old working paint; crack in underside; slightly raised neck shelf; several cracks in head and bill; as well as shot scars in head. (1,800 - 2,200) 481. Black duck, Ira Hudson Chincoteague, Virginia.   Fine scratch detailed feather painting. Tack eyes and bold wing patches.  Light edge wear at tail, top of head, and bill; tight crack on underside; otherwise very good and original. (4,000 - 6,000)

480

482. Rigmate pair of redheads, Alvin Harris, Atlantic, North Carolina.  Balsa body and heads with pine boards attached with wooden pegs. Drake has slightly turned head with high crown.  Strong original paint with wear at tips of bills and tails and small area on bodies. (3,000 - 4,000) 483. Large bluebill drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia.  Branded “TBW”.  Paint has been restored; several cracks; filler has been added to neck base. (350 - 550)

481

484. Rare bluebill drake, by a member of the Tillett Family, Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, 1st quarter 20th century.  Info on underside says “The only known decoy left of the many made Alphomso Tillett of Kitty Hawk, NC made in the 1920s and saved by his son Allen after his death, From V. Burg, 1968.”  Worn paint is a mix of both original and old working repaint; crack in neck has early repair; otherwise good and original. (800 - 1,200)

482

483 220

484


“One fall afternoon in 1981, Steve Barnes, a local waterman and decoy collector, was poking around near a deserted, cobweb infested barn on a farm near Knotts Island. Reaching into an old wooden flour barrel, he pulled out not one but three tiny ruddy duck decoys. Since the carver remains a mystery, they are knows as the Mary James Farm Ruddies. Mary James’ husband, Milton, guided for the Piney Point Club and was killed by lightening in 1942. Shortly after Steve’s discovery, another local collector found rig mates on the same site. So far eight have surfaced. History has already recorded them as North Carolina classics. These superb little fellows speak to the collector.” “The Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers editor, D.C. North, p. 176.

485

485 Detail 485. Rare and desirable ruddy duck, from the “Mary James Farm” rig, last quarter 19th century.  Body measures only 7” in length.  Very old paint appears to be a mix of original and old working repaint; much of the tail has worn away; slight separation between neck and body; bill is a professional replacement; a few shot marks in head. (12,000 - 15,000)

221


John Cannon Waterfield

Photo from The Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys, p 176 At the time this swan was identified as the work of John Williams, now identified as the work of John Waterfield.

485A Detail 222


485A

485A. Rare swan, John Cannon Waterfield, Knotts Island, Virginia, circa 1900. Large hand chopped body. Wide at the hips with upswept tail. Flat spot on underside. Head sits on flattened area that has been roughly chopped out. Bill is attached separately to head. Wood imperfection at top of back; a few cracks in length of body; head has been off and reattached with painted filler added to seam area; inserted bill is a replacement; original paint.

Provenance: Deaccessioned from the Shelburne Museum collection at a Richard Bourne decoy auction. (12,000 - 15,000)

223


Illinois River 486. Rigmate pair of mallards, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois, 2nd quarter 20th century.  Both have number “25” painted on underside. Drake has the additional stencil marking. Joe Zearing. This rigmate pair was purchased by Hank Thomas directly from the Zearing family. Walker mallard hens in this style are very rare.  As with most decoys in this rig the drakes have had the heads repainted as well as wing patches; green paint has also been added to the tail area; hen has had wing patch strengthened as well as a brown area above the wing patch; both are flat bottom with carved wings and protected by a very old coat of varnish that has darkened; strong comb painting on bodies of both decoys; original paint; both decoys have wear on head and bodies; neck putty has separated slightly from neck of drake.

Provenance: Thomas collection.

486

486 Detail

224

(7,500 - 10,000)


487. Rare rigmate pair of bluebills, Vern Cheeseman, Macomb, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint by Edna Perdew; minor wear; white ring on end of hen’s bill may have a second coat on it; slight separation at body seams. (9,000 - 12,000)

487

487 Detail 225


488

489

488. Mallard hen, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Head is turned approximately 45 degrees.  Near mint original paint by Charlie; weight is missing.

226

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

489. Rigmate pair of mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.  Retains Perdew weights. Drake has slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; structurally excellent.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection.

(5,000 - 8,000)


490

490 Detail

490 Detail

490. Rare bluewing teal hen, Charles Schoenheider, Sr., Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century.    Original paint with minor wear mostly on back; structurally good. Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of the Illinois River, Paul Parmalee and Forest Loomis. (17,500 - 22,500) 227


491

491. Preening mallard hen, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois.    Appealing second coat of paint by Catherine Elliston; retains Perdew weight; minor wear; structrually good; nine embossed dots on back end of weight.

491 Detail

228

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid. (13,000 - 16,000)


492

492. Two bluebill drakes, Jack Schwartz, Lacon, Illinois.  Original paint by Edna Perdew.  Minor to moderate wear; weights are missing; otherwise structurally good.

Provenance: Berry/Kalinsky collection. Julia & Guyette, April 1990 decoy auction. (4,000 - 6,000)

493. Great horned owl on wooden base, John Hyatt, Pekin, Illinois, made by Hyatt for the P.S. Olt Company.  Owl is carved from balsa wood, glass eyes.  Original paint with very minor wear; small dents and minor wear to paint on inside of tail, a result of being hit against the metal rod when being used.

Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forrest Loomis. (2,500 - 3,500)

493 Detail 229


494

495

494. Bluebill drake, Fred Allen, Monmouth, Illinois, last quarter 19th century.  Hollow carved with good comb paint on back.  Original paint with very minor wear; structurally good. (3,500 - 4,500)

230

495. Pair of wood ducks, Al Reis, Chicago, Illinois.  Balsa construction and relief wing carving.   Provenance: Recently found on a farm in Kentucky. (4,000 - 6,000)


Ontario

496

497

498

499

500

501

502

503

496. Black duck with slightly turned head, Art Chilton, Toronto, Ontario.  Relief wing carving, “AC” branded in underside.  Very good and original. (400 - 600) 497.

Black duck, Harve Davern, Brighton, Ontario.    Original paint with minor wear; old touchup to small rough area in center of back. (500 - 800)

498. Solid body black duck, J.R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900.    Old repaint; hit by shot; small rough area on one bottom edge. (500 - 800) 499. Hollow carved redhead drake from Ontario.  Branded “A. Cochrane,” Long Point Company member, 1902.  Original paint with minor wear on body and bill; red on head appears to be a second coat; lightly hit by shot; slight roughness to one edge of tail. (600 - 900) 500. Black duck, Billy Ellis, Whitby, Ontario.    Near mint original paint; structurally very good.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates.

(600 - 900)

501. Swimming black duck with lifted and slightly turned head, Arthur Dafoe, Aultsville, Ontario.  “AND” is carved in the underside.  Original paint with minor wear; crack through neck.

504

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Formerly in the collection of Bernie Gates.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 191. (600 - 900) 502.

Rare Canada goose, Billy Ellis, Whitby, Ontario.  Relief wing carving with extended wingtips.  Original paint; minor wear; small amount of neck filler missing from neck seam.

Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Purchased from Sam Stuart.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 67. (600 - 900) 503.

Hollow carved black duck, William Chrysler, Belleville, Ontario.  Scratch feather paint detail.  Original paint with minor to moderate wear; reglued crack in neck; small tail chip missing. (600 - 900)

504. Black duck, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario.  “JM” branded in underside twice.  Very good and original. Provenance: Peter Brown collection. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 25. (600 - 900) 231


New England

505

507

506

508

509

505. Swimming merganser hen from Massachusetts.  Balsa body with inset rectangular weight with the initials “HA: branded in it. Cedar head.  Original paint with slight wear at edges of tail; structurally good. (2,500 - 3,500) 506.

Preening greenwing teal hen, Swan Brewster, Stratford, Connecticut, circa 1920s.  Hollow carved with carved primaries.   Original paint with minor to moderate wear; structurally good. (1,000 - 1,400)

507. Stylish eider drake, Pete Mitchell, Baileys Island, Maine.  Inletted neck with wide body.  Old paint remains on body with traces of original patterns; professional bill repair; numerous shot scars. (1,500 - 1,800) 508. Pair of goldeneye, Archie Bodette, West Addison, 232

510 Vermont.    Old in use repaint on the white areas of the drake, otherwise original and good.

Literature: “Decoys of Lake Champlain,” Loy Harrell. (650 - 950)

509. Bluebill drake, Roswell Bliss, Stratford, Connecticut.    Original paint on much of the decoy with minor wear; bill has old in use repaint

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Henry Chitwood. Chitwood collection stamp on weight. (600 - 900)

510. Hollow carved goldeneye hen, Cassius Smith, Milford, Connecticut, last quarter 19th century.  Branded “C Smith” in underside.  Appealing old in use repaint; approximately 1/2 of bill is a professional replacement. (400 - 600)


Maryland

511. Working swan, Madison Mitchell, Havre de Grace, Maryland.  Large keel attached to underside.  Original paint with rubs that has discolored white areas throughout body and head; crack in neck has been reset with some in painting in that area; light wear to one side of bill; strong original paint. (2,000 - 2,500)

511

512

514

513

515

512. Redhead hen, John Holly, Havre de Grace, Maryland, 3rd quarter 19th century.  Branded “FS”.  Original paint with moderate wear; crack through neck; traces of old overpaint on underside. (1,000 - 1,400)

514. Wooden sink box decoy, Will Heverin, Chestertown, Maryland.    Multiple coats of old paint have been scraped down and paint has probably been added; structurally the decoy is good, but shows dents and wear at tail. (400 - 600)

513. Wooden sink box decoy from the upper Chesapeake Bay.  Possibly by Ben Dye. Branded “G.B. Post” on underside.   Original paint with shot marks to head and body; dowel has pushed through at top of head; neck filler is missing some areas around neck; lower portion of bill has been cracked and reglued. (800 - 1,200)

515. Rare brant, Charlie Joiner.  Signed and dated 1987 on underside. Flat bottom style with well executed paint.  Ex cellent. (600 - 800)

233


Factory

517

516

519

518

521

520

522

516. Robin snipe in fall plumage, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model.  Original paint with minor wear; crack in breast; a few tiny dents. Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

517. Dove, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Glass eye model.  Original paint with very slight wear; a few tiny dents and shot marks. Provenance: O’Connor collection.

(1,500 - 2,500)

518. Grey coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Challenge grade. Branded “HHB” for Harvey H. Brown, a member of Winous Point Shooting Club.   Original paint with minor wear; large tail chip repair; filler has been added to chip missing from end of bill. (650 - 950) 519. Mallard hen and drake, Hays Decoy Factory, Jefferson City, Missouri.    Original paint with minor wear; hen has filled age split in underside; drake has crack in underside; small chips of neck filler missing; small dent.

234

Provenance: Olson collection. Literature: “Factory Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. (600 - 900)

523 520.

Bluebill drake, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1880.  Branded, “DW Rustin.”  Original paint; moderate wear; screw in back is exposed that is holding the body halves together. (400 - 600)

521. Mammoth mallard drake, Evans Decoy Factory, Ladysmith, Wisconsin.  Retains Evans stamp on underside.  Strong original paint; Very good and original. (400 - 600) 522. Canvasback hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Branded “OS” and “DWH” on underside.  Old overpaint has been taken off of part of the head and lower sides; part of the head has been taken down to the primer; wear on back; several cracks in back; some of neck filler missing. (600 - 900) 523. Bluebill drake, Peterson Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century.    Original paint with moderate discoloration and wear; hit by shot; small chips missing from neck filler; two holes in one side of neck where nails were at one time to help secure the neck. (600 - 900)


524

525

527

528

526

524. Rare lowhead model bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Premier Grade. Branded “DWH and Hy Dahlka”.  Original paint with minor to moderate discoloration and wear; crack in back under the tail and in lower side; body seams have opened slightly; head has raised a little from body. (650 - 950) 525. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes. Very slightly turned head.  Near mint original paint; protected by an old coat of varnish; a small amount of neck filler is missing and that area has been touched up; thin crack in underside. (350 - 450) 526. Great horned owl, Herter’s Factory, Waseca, Minnesota.  Glass eyes. Claw beak.  A few very small

529

scrapes; one dent near eye; slight filler separation and crack near beak; otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 527. Scoter, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with glass eyes.  Mixture of original paint and old in use repaint; several small cracks. (300 - 500) 528. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan.  Standard grade with tack eyes.  Original paint with minor wear; slight wear to wood on one edge of bill; crack in underside and in neck filler. (250 - 350) 529. Small pintail drake, Hudson Decoy Factory.  Slightly turned head.  Original paint; minor wear; separation at body seam; a few small dents in head. (600 - 900) 235


New York State

530

531

532

533

535

534 530. Wood duck drake, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  Slightly turned head.  Very good and original. (350 - 450) 531.

Two bluebills, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  Harris ink stamp on undersides of both. Both have balsa bodies and pine keels.  Original and good; a few smalls scrapes and dents. (300 - 400)

532. Goldeneye drake, Gus Rogers, Alexandria Bay, New York.  “H. Roy” stamped in underside.  Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; crack and filled defect in one side with some of the filler missing; one small shot mark. (600 - 900) 533. Root head loon, probably from Long Island, New York.    Old overpaint has been taken off; lightly hit by shot. (600 - 900) 236

534. Large pair of canvasbacks, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York.  Harris ink stamp on the underside. Both have balsa bodies and cedar heads.  Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Olson collection.

(350 - 450)

535. Canvasback drake, Julius Mittlestaedt, Buffalo, New York.  Slightly lifted head.  Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Olson collection.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. (400 - 600)


536

537 (Nine of 75)

538

539

541

540 536. Limited edition deluxe copy of “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid.  Number 65 of 350. In hard slip cover.  Very good and original. (125 - 175) 537. Lot of roughly 75 books and auction catalogs.  Including “Decoy Collectors Guide,” Great Book of Decoys,” “Wildfowl Decoys,” “Gunning the Chesapeake,” etc.   Good. (400 - 600) 538. Wooden sign for Captain Norman Hudson, guide service.  Approximately 30” x 32”.  Weathered and worn; top border piece is rough. (250 - 350) 539.

Sign.  Two sided. Each side reads “Pistols, Rifles, Shotguns,

Ammunition.” Painted on metal, framed in wood. Appears to have been made about 1930.   (250 - 350) 540. Decoy sign, painted on old panel.  Made to look old. Measures 41” x 11”. Says “Decoys For Sale,” with image of swan head.  Paint is intentionally flaking to simulate age. (200 - 300) 541. Wooden sign for Champion Barnham, Chesapeake Bay dog.  Approximately 27” x 36”.  Original and good. (350 - 450)

End of Session Two 237


Index of Carvers Allen, Charles...........................................................................379 Allen, Fred................................................................................494 Andress, Ray...............................................................................53 Andreuccetti, Luigi...................................................................155 Anger, Ken...............................323,446,448,449,451,454,455,504 Antis, Harry............................................................................461D Austin Powder...........................................................................274 Bach, Ferdinand.....................................................................77,78 Baker, Jess...................................................................................42 Barr, James................................................................................127 Beck, William....................................................................197,198 Benson, Frank........................................................................468B Birch, Reggie............................................................................285 Bishop, Richard......................................................................468A Blair, Sr., John.............................................................369,374,377 Blinks, Thomas.........................................................................168 Bliss, Roswell...........................................................................509 Bodette, Archie.........................................................................508 Boozer, Tom..............................................................................476 Boyd, George.................................................................... 384-386 Brewster, Swan.........................................................................506 Brunet, Jett................................................................................159 Burns, Richard.......................................................................239D Butler, Frank.......................................................................... 468E California Powder Works .................................................264,275 Chamberlain Cartridge Company ....................................265,268 Chambers, Tom....................................................................55,344 Cheeseman, Vern.......................................................................179 Chilton, Art........................................................................456,496 Christie, Robert.........................................................................166 Chrysler, William............................................51,122,334,338,503 Clark, Charles...........................................................................395 Clifford, Bill..............................................................................245 Coheleach, Guy...................................................................... 461E Conical, Squires........................................................................280 Conklin, Hurley.........................................................................255 Coombs, Frank............................................................415,421,423 Cope, George.........................................................................168D Crandall, Horace.......................................................................154 Crawford, Buck....................................................................48,332 Crawford, Buck.........................................................................332 Crowell, Elmer.........................................................72,73,310,434 Dafoe, Arthur............................................................................501 Daisey, Cigar......................................................................254,258 Davern, Harve...........................................................................497 de la Torre, Romel.....................................................................463 Dilley, John...............................................................................396 Ditto, C.H.............................................................................. 239M Dodge Decoy Factory ....................................... 223-225,227,520 Dolson, Frank............................................................................343 Doren, Leonard.........................................................................307 Downey, Sr., A.J........................................................................152 Ducharme, Duncan...................................................................202 Ellis, Billy.....................................................................44,500,502 Ellis, Billy.................................................................................500 Ellis, Billy.................................................................................502

Elliston, Robert.................................................11,13,192,404,405 Eppel, Jack................................................................................188 Evans Decoy Factory ..............................................................521 Fernandez, Mario......................................................................471 Fernlund, Ivar.......................................................118,123,130,458 Finch, William.............................................................................84 Finkle, William...........................................................................90 Finney, Frank.........................................................................263A Fitzpatrick, Thomas..................................................................367 Foote, Jim.......................................................................... 133-141 Fredrick, Sr., Jules.....................................................................157 Garren, Otto..............................................................................487 Garton, John..............................................................................326 Gary, Charles.............................................................................156 Gibian, William..................................................................105,262 Godin, Pat.................................................................................341 Goulette, Isaac....................................................................153,289 Grant, Stanley...........................................................................376 Graves, Bert......................................................189,406-409,412B Grubbs, Charles W.................................................................239C Grubbs Manufacturing .........................................................239B Guhl, August.............................................................................305 Haertel, Harold..........................................................................325 Hagerbaumer, David.......................................................465,468C Hall, BK....................................................................................462 Hanson, Marty....................................................................... 17-21 Harris, Alvin..............................................................................482 Harris, Bill.................................................................................402 Harris, Ken....................................................315,425,530,531,534 Hayden, Larry...........................................................................319 Hays Decoy Factory ................................................................519 Heisler, Jess........................................................................372,381 Herter’s Factory ......................................................................526 Heverin, Will.............................................................................514 Hitchins, Harry..........................................................................126 Holly, John................................................................................512 Homme, Ferd..................................................................216,216A Homme, Mandt.........................................................................217 Hotze, Hiram..........................................................................412D Hudson, Ira.......................................................... 472-474,481,483 Hudson Decoy Factory ...........................................................529 Hunt, Lynn Bogue.................................... 163,168E,168F,459,460 Hutchins, Sam...........................................................................335 Hyatt, John................................................................................493 Indian Black Powder ...............................................................266 Jester, Doug........................................................................475.477 Joiner, Charlie....................................................................364,515 Keller, Ed....................................................................................15 Kellogg, W.H.........................................................................142A Koelpin, William J.......................................................461A-461C Laing, Albert.............................................................................430 Lake, Angus................................................................443,452,453 Lanham, Russel...................................................................... 239L Lashbrook, Virgil...............................................................190,191 Lawson, Oliver..........................................................................365 Leader, Moran........................................................................ 239E


Leboeuf, Orel.................................................................... 193-196 Levy, Lindsey......................................................................... 196E Lincoln, Joseph....................................................................76,431 Lipke, Paul..................................................................................63 Logel, Eddie..............................................................................158 Lowrey, William.......................................................................218 Marter, Reg........................................................................368,371 Mason Decoy Factory ............. 22-40,206-215,226,228-235,435442,516-518,522,524,525,527,528 Mayol, Jorge...................................................................168B,170 McCarthy Family ....................................................................403 McDonald, Norm......................................................................333 McIntosh, Leo...........................................................................324 McIntyre, Cameron.......................................................98,103,253 McNair, Mark................................75,97,99-102,107-109,256,259 Meyer, Marv.......................................................................327,328 Mitchell, Madison.....................................................................511 Mitchell, Pete............................................................................507 Mittlestaedt, Julius......................................................416,417,535 Moak, Gus..........................................................................220,221 Morgan, Joe...............................................................................370 Mueller, Keith............................................................. 430A-430D Nichol, Addie.......................................................................50,331 Nichol, DK.............................................................................45,49 Nichol, DW..........................................................113,129,340,450 Nitro Club ...............................................................................281 Osthaus, Edmund......................................................................169 Parker, Jay..........................................................................380,382 Parker, Lloyd.............................................................................373 Parnassos, Thomas....................................................................150 Perdew, Charles.14,16,67,69,70,180,181,184-186,236,237,239G, 239I-239K,243,244,251,252,306,318,410-412A,488,489,491 Perdew, Haddon..........................................................................10 Peters ................................................... 267,270-272,276,278,282 Peterson, Oscar....................................................131,147,290,292 Peterson Decoy Factory ..........................................................523 Pirnie, Miles................................................................................86 Plasschaert, Richard...........................................................162,464 Quillin, Nate............................................... 81,85,87-89,92,93,296 Randall, William.......................................................................401 Redi, Don....................................................................................43 Reece, Maynard........................................................................161 Reed, J.G................................................................................239H Reeves, John C..........................................................................447 Reeves, Charles.........................................................................329 Reeves, Frank............................................................................342 Reindahl, Enoch........................................................................222 Reis, Al......................................................................................495 Remington ............................................................................468D Reneson, Chet....................................................................164,461 Rennardson, Robert...................................................................339 Rider, Jack.........................................................................56,57,65 Rienbold, George......................................................................467 Ripley, A. Lassell.................................................. 165,168A,468F Rogers, Gus...............................................................................532 Roseberry, Sr., Tiff....................................................................239 Rule, Newt........................................................................ 246-250 Sanpere, Dave...........................................................................299

Schifferl, Lou..............................................................146,260,287 Schmidt, Ben............... 1-8,68,79,82,83,293,295,297,298,300,301 Schmiedlin, Jim................................................................ 347-349 Schoenheider, Sr., Charles........................................................490 Schoverling,Daly, and Gales ...................................................269 Schroeder, Tom.......................................................75A,91,96,303 Schultz, William.....................................314,316,317,320,321,322 Schwartz, Jack...........................................................................492 Scram, Butch.............................................................................142 Seerey-Lester, John............................................................167,468 Seymour, Harry......................................................................142B Shaw, Sharpie............................................................................238 Shourds, Harry V..................................................375,383,387,394 Siloski, Jerry......................................................................308,309 Skerry, George.......................................................................196D Smith, Cassius...........................................................................510 Smith, Chris..............................................................................304 Smith, Seymour........................................................................426 Sport Loads...............................................................................273 Stevens Brothers ................................................419,420,422,424 Stevens, Dan.............................................................................201 Stevens, Harvey........................................................................418 Stone, Claude............................................................................242 Strey, Frank...............................................................................302 Strunk, George...................................................................257,263 Strzelewicz, Peter A..................................................................469 Tax, John.....................................................................................59 Taylor, Vern............................................................................242A Thibert, Hormidas..................................................................196B Tillett Family ...........................................................................484 Trutone .................................................................................245A Tully, Bud.................................................................41,46,112,345 Turpin, Tom............................................................................ 239F Uhl, Jake................................................................................412C Vandenbosche, Ted........................................................80,143,144 Verity, Smith Clinton................................................................427 Verity, Obediah.......................................................... 176-178,389 Viau, A......................................................................................199 Vidacovich, Ernest....................................................................160 Vizier, Jimmie...........................................................................104 Walker, Charles...................................................9,12,182,183,486 Ward Brothers, .................................................... 74,354-363,366 Ward, David..............................................................................117 Warin, George.....................................47,52,110,119,120,444,457 Waterfield, John Cannon........................................................485A Waterfield Family ....................................................................480 Weiler, Milton........................................................................168C Weinhart, Otto...........................................................................219 Wells, John R.................... 111,116,124,330,336,337,346,345,498 Wheeler, Chauncey............................................................413,414 Wheeler, Shang..................................................................429,466 White, Bob................................................................................106 Wilkinson, Art and George.......................................................114 Wilson, Gus........................................................................432,433 Yeargen, Ben...............................................................................58 Young, Paco..............................................................................470 Zachman, John............................................................294,312,313


5 2

N D

N O R T H

A M E R I C A N

Vintage Decoy & Sporting Collectibles Show April 25-29, 2017

Don't miss the largest gathering of Sporting Collectibles enthusiasts in North America.

Pheasant Run Resort St. Charles, IL Open to the public

The must attend show for anyone interested in America’s hunting and fishing past and the great folk art that grew from it.

Tuesday, April 25 All Day – Room-to-room trading

Wednesday, April 26

Room-to-Room Trading. Guyette and Deeter Auction.

All Day – Room-to-room trading 6pm – Auction Preview Reception

Collector Seminars and Displays. Tabled Dealer Show. Free Appraisals. Vintage Midwest Miniature Display

P R E S E RV I N G T H I S O R I G I N A L A M E R I C A N F O L K A RT H I STO RY S I N C E 1 9 6 6

Thursday, April 27 All Day – Room-to-room trading 9:30am-1pm – Show Registration in Library 11am – Guyette & Deeter Auction Day 1 4pm – Evans Collectors Meeting 6pm – Call Makers Auction & Party

Friday, April 28

9am – Call Makers Meeting & Contest Judging 10am-2pm – “Members Only” Mega Center “Early Bird” Show 11am – Guyette & Deeter Auction Day 2 2pm-7pm – Public Mega Center Sales Event

Vintage Midwest Miniature Decoy Display Vintage LaCrosse, WI Fish Decoy Display Vintage Fish Trap Display Wisconsin Shooting Box Display Shell Box Display Featured Carver Exhibit – Mark, Ian, Colin McNair Contemporary Carver Demonstrations / Displays Continuous Silent Auctions Free Identification and Appraisals

7pm – Member Fish Fry

Over 30,000 items for sale

Saturday, April 29 9am-2pm – Public Mega Center Sales Event Displays / Demonstrations /Appraisals/Auctions

To book rooms at Pheasant Run, call

Theresa Stafford, 630-524-5038 For information on daily events, and reserving selling tables go to

midwestdecoy.org

or call

586-530-6586


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EVANS FACTORY DECOYS

A Collectors Comprehensive Pictorial Reference Guide NEW RELEASE Ready at the Midwest Decoy Collectors Assn. show.

Save shipping with pick-up at the show! Advance orders will not process until the book is shipped in April. Order Your Copy Today!

TThe first comprehensive pictorial

✠ Over 200 hard-bound pages

reference guide by Evans Society ✠ Over 350 full color photos Members Andy Schoneich and Terry ✠ Factory history Smart detailing the Evans Duck Decoy Factory. Filled with never-before ✠ Grade identification published information, this book is a ✠ Head & speculum identification must for any Evans enthusiast or dealer ✠ Toys, doorstops & paperweights of wildfowl decoys and collectibles. ✠ Miniature replicas & more... Published by L&M Design. A Limited First Edition of 1,000 books $75.00 + $6.00 S&H for first book / $2.00 each add. book (Cont. US)

www.decoyrelics.com

Please find the Evans Decoy Book tab. Print and complete the order form and mail or email (depending on method of payment) to: Andy Schoneich, 9345 West 119th Street, Palos Park, IL 60464

If no Internet access to print the order form:

708-448-3061 for help ordering

2017 Clayton Decoy/Wildlife Art & Sporting Collectibles Show July 14th & 15th (Friday and Saturday) | 9am - 6 pm Friday & 9 am - 4pm Saturday Gordon Cerow Recreation Park | 615 E Line Rd, Clayton, New York TIDCA Display: Decoys from the collection of Preston Lowe Canvasbacks by Chet Schutte, Rochester, NY

TIDCA Vintage Decoy Contest - Friday July 14th Decoy and Antique Auction - Friday, July 14th: ( www.chappysplace.com or www.auctionzip.com )

Merganser pre 1960; any merganser species, any maker or style

Goldeneye pre 1960; any maker or style

Redhead pre 1960; any maker or style

For more information visit www.timuseum.org or call 315-686-5794


CONDITIONS OF SALE ‑- PLEASE READ 1.

GUARANTEE ‑ We have made a consistent effort in correctly cataloging and describing the property to be sold. The decoys and paintings have guaranteed condition reports. Should the need arise, the auctioneer reserves the right to make verbal corrections and provide additional information from the block, at the time of the sale. Absentee bids will not be executed on items that are found to be other than described in the catalog. Since opinions can differ, particularly in the matter of condition, the auctioneer will be sole judge in the matter of refunds. 2. DURATION OF GUARANTEE ‑ Request for refund for items purchased IN PERSON at the auction must be made within 3 days of the sale. If you are an absentee or phone bidder it is your responsibility to examine the lot immediately upon receipt. On items purchased absentee, the guarantee will end 3 days from the date of delivery. Therefore, all guarantees on items purchased will become null and void 7 calendar days from the date of shipment. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT IF YOU PAY LATE, YOU WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE GUARANTEE. Payment must be postmarked no later than 30 days after the auction. 3. PROTESTED BIDS‑ In the case of a disputed bid, the auctioneer is the sole determinant as to whom the successful bidder is, and at his discretion, may reoffer and resell the article in dispute. If a dispute arises after the sale, the auctioneer’s sales records shall be conclusive as to who the purchaser was, and the purchase price. 4. BIDDING- Bidding usually starts below the low estimate and advances in increments of approximately 10% of the opening bid subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right, at his sole discretion, to refuse any bids that he deems unreasonable. The minimum bid increment guideline is as follows: $500 to $1000 - $25 $10,000 to $20,000 - $500 $100,000 and above - $2,000 $1000 to $10,000 - $100 $20,000 to $100,000 - $1,000 5. ABSENTEE BIDS‑ Phone or mail bids, at the discretion of the Auctioneer, will be accepted with a 20% deposit. In such case, the bookkeeper will execute such bids competitively. Absentee bids are executed by the bookkeeper on behalf of the bidder in accordance with the bid increment policy shown above. Please review the rules governing both absentee and phone bids in the back of the catalog. 6. TERMS‑ All items are to be paid for in U.S. funds at the day of the auction. No items will be released until they are paid for. Those who have not established an account with us and wish to pay by check, must do so prior to the beginning of the auction, by presenting a current letter of reference from their bank, or by providing references, that are suitable to the Auctioneer. The Auctioneer reserves the right to hold merchandise purchased by personal check, until the check has cleared the bank. Phone and absentee bidders ‑ You will be notified one week after the auction of your bids/results. PAYMENT IS DUE UPON RECEIPT. A late charge will be accessed on all balances not paid, at the rate of 12% A.P.R. commencing 30 days after the auction. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. Guyette & Deeter will not carry insurance on items that are not paid for within 35 days of the auction. Also, the auctioneer may retain and/or recover the deposit specified as liquidated damages. In addition, the property can be resold at public or private sale without further notice. Any deficiency resulting from such resale shall be paid to the auctioneer by the defaulting buyer, together with all charges, fees, and expenses incurred by such resale, or the enforcement of the obligation hereunder. Buyer agrees to pay all charges and expenses incurred by reason of any breach of the Terms and Conditions of sale, including without limitation, reasonable attorney fees. 7. PAYMENT FOR PURCHASES MAY BE MADE WITH VISA , MASTERCARD, CASH, CHECK, OR WIRE TRANSFER. 8. BUYERS PREMIUM- The buyer’s premium, assessed on each selling lot, is 15% of the hammer price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 10% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. For payments made using Visa or MasterCard, the buyer’s premium is 18% up to and including $1,000,000, plus 13% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. 9. TAX ‑ THERE IS A 8% SALES TAX IN ILLINOIS. Tax is waived if buyer presents a valid resale certificate from any state or has purchases shipped outSIDE of SOUTH CAROLINA. 10. ACCEPTANCE OF CONDITIONS ‑ Bidding on any articles in this catalog indicates your acceptance of all the above items. 11. BIDDING AGENT RESPONSIBILITY ‑ If you are registering for someone or if you execute a bid for someone else under your number, you are responsible for the settlement of that account. You are also responsible for examining the decoy(s) for your client regarding the guarantee. 12. WITHDRAWAL ‑ We reserve the right to withdraw any property before the sale and shall have no liability whatsoever for such withdrawal. 13. TITLE ‑ Title passes upon the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer. It will then be the responsibility of the buyer to make full payment prior to removing the goods from the premises. Removal is at both the buyer’s risk and expense, and must be made at the conclusion of the sale, unless other arrangements are made with the Guyette & Deeter staff. Any lots we might make arrangements for moving or storing are solely at the risk of the owner, and any damage or loss occurring after the fall of the hammer becomes that of the buyer. 14. LEGAL DISPUTE ‑ Any legal disputes arising from this auction shall be settled in the court system of the State of Maine. UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE - The Maine Uniform Commercial Code, Title II, Section 2328 applies to this auction. 15. All calls are sold “As Is”. THE OFFICE WILL NOT BE OPEN UNTIL WEDNESDAY AFTER THE AUCTION.


ABSENTEE AND PHONE BIDS 1. Absentee bids are a service provided to our customers free of charge. Every effort is made to execute all absentee bids, however, in the event of an error of omission, or failure to properly execute absentee bids, the Auctioneer shall not be held liable. 2. All absentee bids must be accompanied by a 20% deposit, which will be refunded immediately after the auction if your bid is unsuccessful. If your bid is successful, the deposit will be applied to the purchase price and the balance due upon presentation of your bill. All absentee bidders are notified by mail, whether successful or unsuccessful. 3. Visa and Mastercard numbers can be given in place of a check deposit, if your bid is submitted by phone. Your card number will not be used to make payments for purchases, it is only used as collateral. Your card number will only be used to make payment for purchases if you default on payment. 4. To execute an absentee bid, fill out the enclosed form, listing catalog number, description and your top bid price (not including the 15% buyer’s premium). Send this together with your deposit as soon as possible. If your bids are sent seven days or less prior to the auction, you should call our office three days prior to the auction, to confirm that we have received your bids. If they have not been received at that point in time, we will take your bid over the phone. We cannot guarantee that bids received after the auction has started will be executed. 5. If two or more bids are received on the same item from different people, the bidding will open at the next logical raise above the second highest bid. If two absentee bids are received with the exact same amount, the first one received will take precedence. 6. All bids must be in even dollar amounts. Bids in fractions of dollars will be considered the next lower even dollar amount. 7. Bid increments: The bid increment policy, which also applies to both absentee and phone bidders, is listed under “CONDITIONS OF SALE” (item #4), in the front of the catalog. 8. Open bids, bids with no set top amount, or orders to just simply buy the lot, cannot be accepted. You must have a definite top limit before we can execute your bid. Alternatives to this are as follows: a. To bid over the telephone. This can be done by simply sending a 20% deposit for what you wish to bid on the object. This will bind whatever bid amount you wish to bid over the telephone. (NOTE: There are only 4 phone lines into the auction room and phone bids will be handled on a first come, first serve basis.) b. Some bidders concerned that a lot might just go for one bid above their top limit, leave a top bid plus one bid. This works as follows: the top bid submitted might be $1,000, but not wishing to lose the lot for simply $25 more, the party might bid $1,000 + 1 bid if they definitely don’t want to go over a certain price, they would indicate $1,000 +1 ($1,025) (NOTE: One possible problem that occasionally arises with absentee bids is when someone in the audience bids exactly the amount, which you specify is your limit. In such a case, we would not go one extra bid unless your bid sheet indicates “plus one” bid.). 9. If you are a successful bidder, a bill will be sent one week after the auction. Purchasers should indicate their desired method of shipment, if such is necessary. There is a charge for shipping, labor, materials, and insurance. Shipping is done on a first come, first serve basis, and can take up to 4 weeks. Please note that a certified check, Visa, Mastercard, or any other form of guaranteed funds will expedite shipping. 10. According to UPS regulations, we must now crate all paintings. In addition, for expensive oil paintings and delicate carvings, we need a written statement from the purchaser, assuming the responsibility of pursuing any claims, in the event of damage incurred during shipping. Valuable lots need to be sent 2 day air UPS due to values. Under no circumstances will we be liable for damage to glass or frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of cause. 11. TERMS — Phone and absentee bidders — You will be notified one week after the auction of your results. Payment is due upon receipt. Interest will be charged on all balances not paid within 30 days after the bill is sent at the rate of 12% APR. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. If an account is 75 days overdue, the items may be returned to the consignor and overdue buyer will pay the buyers premium and commission from the sale, if they wish to participate in future Guyette and Deeter auctions. 12. Bidding on any article(s) indicates your acceptance of these terms above. 13. If you would like any additional information on any of the lots, please contact: Gary Guyette at (410) 745-0485 or Jon Deeter at (440) 610-1768. nd

If you have any questions concerning absentee bids, please call us.


OFFICE: OFFICE:

ABSENTEE AND PHONE BID FORM

POBox Box1170 1170 PO St. Michaels, MD 21663 St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 410-745-0485 Fax410-745-0487 410-745-0487 Fax decoys@guyetteandschmidt.com decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

OFFICE USE ONLY TIME DATE OF BID AUCTION DATE MANAGER ABSENTEE OR PHONE BID

NAME ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

TELEPHONE DEPOSIT $

(Check Amount or Visa or MasterCard # & Exp.)

IIdesire following items in the sale.sale. The The bids bids are toare be to executed by Guyette & Deeter, up to but desiretotobid bidononthe the following items in the executed by Guyette & Schmidt, Inc.,not upexceeding to but notthe amount(s) on the below bids.on Allthe bidsbelow will be executed and will accepted subject to theaccepted Terms ofsubject Sale andtoAbsentee Bids exceedingspecified the amount(s) specified bids. All bids be executed and the Terms of Procedure outlined inBids the catalog. (Please be sure you understand before using thisour Absentee and Phone Sale and Absentee Procedure outlined in that the catalog. (Pleaseour be procedures sure that you understand procedures before Bid Form.) will not open until Wednesday after using this Office Absentee andbe Phone Bid Form.) Office willthe notauction. be open until Wednesday after the auction.

Signature A PREMIUM OF 15% WILL BE APPLIED TO ALL ITEMS SOLD, TO BE PAID BY THE BUYER OFFICE USE

IN CATALOG # ORDER

DESCRIPTION

A SECOND PAGE IS PROVIDED ON BACK SHOULD YOU REQUIRE ADDITIONAL SPACE TOTAL BIDS $

x 20%

EQUALS DEPOSIT ENCLOSED $

BID AMOUNT


Page 2

NAME OFFICE USE

PHONE IN CATALOG # ORDER

AUCTION DATE DESCRIPTION

BID AMOUNT


168D

163

165

22

443


G u yet t e & Deeter, Inc . P O Box 1170, St. M icha el s, MD 2 1 6 6 3 410-745-0485 | g uyet t ea ndde e te r .com

North American Decoys at Auction April 27 & 28, 2017  

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