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North American Decoys At Auction April 24 & 25, 2014


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Guyette & Deeter

North American Decoys At Auction Pheasant Run Resort 4051 East Main Street St. Charles, Illinois 630-584-6300 Held in conjunction with the Midwest Decoy Collectors Association Show

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Preview 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Join us for complimentary cocktails and hors d’oeuvres

Thursday, April 24, 2014 Preview 8:00 AM - 10:45 AM Auction 11:00 AM

Friday, April 25, 2014 Preview 8:00 AM - 9:45 AM Auction 10:00 AM

For questions during the auction call 410-745-0485

Catalog $45. Out of Country $54 Absentee, Phone & Online Bidding accepted call 410-745-0485 for arrangements For Free Decoy Appraisal Contact: Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416


Important Notices: ■ Unofficial prices realized information will be available 5 business days after the auction. Official prices realized list will be available online approximately 2 weeks after the auction. ■ If you would like to consign decoys to our next auction please contact; Gary Guyette 410.745.0485 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com or Jon Deeter 440.543.1416 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com. Free appraisals are available with no obligation to consign and all correspondences are strictly confidential. ■ For delicate carvings a written statement from the purchaser assuming responsibility for pursuing any claims in the event of any damage incurred during shipping, these items are marked *. Under no circumstances will we be responsible for damage to glass, frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of the cause. ■ Auctioneer James D. Julia, Fairfield, Maine. ■ Stands are not included with the decoys or weather vanes unless specified in catalog. Plexiglass cases are not included with shotgun shell boxes. ■ Sales Tax - There is a 7.5% sales tax on purchases over $200 unless you have a Sales and Use Tax License* (from any state) or have your purchases shipped outside of Illinois. If you are exempt, please have a copy of your certificate with you. You will be required to sign an Illinois sales and Use affidavit for us to keep on file. ■ Reserve a room at a discounted rate of $115 by calling the Pheasant Run Resort at 800-474-3272 and mention the decoy auction. ■ All duck calls have condition reports, but are sold “As Is” ■ Trade Up Program - A limited numer of decoy purchases may be paid for by consigning decoys to the next Guyette & Deeter. auction. Ask Gary or Jon for Details.

UPCOMING GUYETTE & DEETER DECOY AUCTIONS July 29 & 30, 2014

Sheraton Harborside Hotel Portsmouth, New Hampshire 50 Dealer buy, Sell, swap. *NO SALES TAX

November 12 & 13, 2014

Talbot County Community Center Easton, Maryland

In Conjunction with the Easton Waterfowel Festival 50 Dealer buy, Sell, swap. To consign Contact Gary Guyette | decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com | 410-745-0485 Jon Deeter | jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com | 440-543-1416


Guyette & Deeter

Dale & Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 Tel: 410-745-0485 Fax: 410-745-0487 decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com

Jon & Leigh Ann Deeter 7980 Darby’s Run Chagrin Falls, OH 44023 Tel: 440-543-1416 Cell: 440-610-1768 Fax: 440-543-1466 jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com

Zac Cote Assistant Auction Manager, Gallery Manager, & Photography Freeport, Maine Tel: 410.253.8616 Tel: 207.869.6004 zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

Mike Stevenson Graphic Designer & Website Developer St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410.745.0485 michael@guyetteanddeeter.com

Ed Kenney Merchandise Manager & Shipping St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410.745.0485 shipping@guyetteanddeeter.com

Lynda Brooks Office Manager St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410.745.0485 lynda@guyetteanddeeter.com

Jane O’Malley Monetti

Bookkeeper St. Michaels, Maryland Tel: 410.745.0485 billing@guyetteandschmidt.com


Featuring Decoys From The Collections Of: Harry Sietz John Moore William Grossman James and Lyda Madden Carl Pryor Steve Powell

Gary Lucas Phil Williamson Jim Rose Paul Kelly Peter Bartlett

Harry Seitz Harry Seitz, Jr. and Barney Crandell, both from Michigan, were enthusiastic waterfowl hunters, decoy collectors and historians who began collecting decoys in the 1960s. In the early 1970s, Harry and Barney acquired several hundred decoys by various makers from the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company (Canada Club). Of great importance was the introduction of “The Flats Decoys” including Warin, Ward, Wells, Chambers and Reeves over the next few years to collectors across North America.

Harry J. Seitz Jr.

Harry designated some of these decoys as collection decoys that would form the core of his great “Flats collection.” Seitz and Crandell held several exhibits in 1975 including Chicago, Michigan and finally in Easton, Maryland in November where Harry Seitz displayed these same important Flats decoys that are being offered in this sale.

Marjorie “Midge” Seitz


William Grossman When on vacation in the early 1960’s Will Grossman was driving down a road near Brewster on Cape Cod when he spotted a small flea market. He pulled in and while shopping met early decoy collector and dealer Bob Clifford. They became friends and Will stopped to visit him on his annual summer vacation trips from New York City. They talked a great deal about both carving and collecting decoys. One time when Will and his wife Soony were visiting, Bob told them about a decoy auction that was going to be held in Hyannis a few days later. They wound up going to Richard Bourne’s first decoy auction. Will was captivated by the beauty of the decoys. The Grossman’s continued to time their vacations in New England to line up with the Bourne auctions and were there for the summer Mackey collection sales.. When Bourne went out of business in the early 1990’s they began attending the Guyette and Schmidt decoy sales at the Cliff House in Ogunquit, Maine. I remember that they were always smiling and thinking that they were there as much to enjoy their travels, surroundings, and the other people, not just to buy decoys. When we opened the preview for our joint sale with Sotheby’s of Jim McCleery’s collection in Manhattan I had no Idea of what to expect. Will and Soony were among the very first people through the door when the preview began. It was very reassuring to see both of them walking toward me smiling. Will passed away in March 2012. - Gary Guyette

William Grossman


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Session One

Thursday, April 24, 2013 11:00 AM Lots 1 - 402 Pacific Coast 1-6 Mason Shorebirds 7-13 Illinois River 14-33 Mason Decoy Factory 34-52 Massachusetts 53-64 Miniatures 65-74 Ontario 75-92 Etchings 93-100 Ben Schmidt 101-108 Mark McNair 109-119 Memorabilia 120-132 New Jersey 133-146 Shorebirds 147-154 Mason Decoy Factory 155-169 Decoratives 170-182 Illinois River 183-213 Fish 214-229

Ken Anger 230-239 Paintings 240-249 Ontario 250-268 Related Items 269-292 Calls 293-303 Memorabilia 304-319 Shell Boxes 320-334 Midwestern 335-356 Factory Shorebirds 357-364A Calls 365-375 Memorabilia 376-389 Shell Boxes 390-399 Memorabilia 400-402

Session Two Friday, April 25, 2013 10:00 AM Lots 403 - 670

Decoratives 403-425 Mason Decoy Factory 426-439 New England 440-446 Illinois 447-464 Ontario 465-471 New York State 472-486 Wisconsin 487-502 Michigan 503-514 Ward Brothers 515-522 Maryland 523-532 Shorebirds 533-551 Delaware River 552-558 Virginia 559-568 New York State 569-583

Contemporary 584-602 Louisiana 603-613 Ontario 614-634 Factory 635-670

Please read conditions of sale in the back of catalog


SESSION ONE

Thursday, April 24, 2013 - 11:00 am

Pacific Coast

The Pacific Flyway

“Wildfowl Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Frederick Hanson

8


Harold “Hi” Crandall

Charles Bergman

1892 - 1969 San Francisco, California

1856 - 1946 Astoria, Oregon

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2 1.

Exceptional pintail drake, Horace “Hi” Crandall, San Francisco, California. Extra long neck style with slightly turned head and relief wing tip carving. Beveled bottom edge. Near mint original paint with good patina; structurally excellent.

Provenance: From a home in Oregon.

Literature: “Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson, p. 362. (6,000 - 8,000) 2.

Hollow carved canvasback drake, Charles Bergman, Astoria, Oregon. Fine form and patina. Original paint with slight wear on much of the decoy; very early touchup on around 30% of the white area and part of the breast; several tiny dents.

Provenance: From a home in Southern California.

1 Detail

(4,000 - 6,000) 9


3

4

3.

Rare Canada goose wine caddy, Horace “Hi” Crandall, San Francisco, California. Slightly turned head. Carved crossed wing tips and fluted tail. Fine paint detail. Signed by the carver. Excellent and original. (4,500 - 6,500)

4. Mallard drake, Charles Bergman, Astoria, Oregan. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; numerous small scrapes; a few small dents; tiny chip missing from top of tail.

10

Literature: “Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson, p. 75. (3,000 - 4,000)


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6

5.

Rare rigmate pair of greenwing teal, Amiel Garibaldi, San Francisco, California, circa 1930s. Both have slightly turned heads and relief feather carving. Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Paul Mazilli.

Literature: “Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson, p. 326. (3,500 - 4,500)

6.

Rigmate pair of mallards, Percy Bicknell, Lulu and Sea Islands, British Columbia, circa 1950s. Raised “V” wing tip carving and fine scratch loop feather paint. Exceptionally well preserved with good patina and very slight wear; no structural flaws.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Ron Sharp.

Literature: Decoys of the Pacific Coast,” Michael Miller and Fred Hanson, p. 22. (1,500 - 2,000)

11


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

The Mason Decoy Factory made these as a special order item for sportsman in one of the few remaining areas where the Passenger Pigeon population was large enough to be sport hunted. Less than ten of these decoys have surfaced. In all probability, the Passenger Pigeon was once the most abundant bird on the planet. Accounts of its numbers sound like something out of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds and strain our credulity today. Alexander Wilson, the father of scientific ornithology in America, estimated that one flock consisted of two billion birds. Wilson’s rival, John James Audubon, watched a flock pass overhead for three days and estimated that at times more than 300 million pigeons flew by him each hour. Elongated nesting colonies several miles wide could reach a length of forty miles. As railroads penetrated the upper Middle West after the Civil War, many millions of pigeons were shipped to cities along the Atlantic seaboard, since, by then, clearing of oak and beech forests and hunting had already exterminated the birds on the East Coast. Extinction of the Passenger Pigeon came with stunning rapidity. Michigan was its last stronghold; about three million birds were shipped east from there by a single broker in 1878. Eleven years later, 1889, the species was extinct in that state.

7.

Very rare passenger pigeon, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century. Glass eye model with iron bill. Rosey colored breast with detailed tail feathering. “Hunter collection 10” written on underside. Very strong original paint; several areas of small stains and areas on top of paint that appear to be wood filler. (15,000 - 20,000)

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8 Detail

8.

Very rare juvenile or female passenger pigeon, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Glass eye model. Original paint with very slight wear; structurally good.

Literature: “Mason Decoys A complete Pictorial Guide,� Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 119, exact decoy. (6,500 - 9,500)

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9 10

11 12

9.

Yellowlegs with tack eyes, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. “11” is stamped near the stick hole. Original paint with minor to moderate wear, mostly on one side; small dents.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

10.

Black bellied plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1905. Very round body style with tack eyes. Original paint with minor wear on the back, almost no wear on the rest of the decoy; a few tiny dents and one shot mark.

(2,000 - 3,000)

Provenance: Originally purchased from Adele Earnest at her Stoney Point, New York art gallery in 1960.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 100. (2,500 - 3,500) 14

11.

Black bellied plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Tack eye model. Original paint with minor wear; professional touchup by Russ Allen to the black area on the head; old overpaint taken off top of head; several tiny dents.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Joe French, Marathon, Florida. (3,500 - 5,500)

12. Running knot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Rare early split tail model with wooden bill and tack eyes. Original paint with minor wear; small chips missing from underside of tail; small crack near one eye. (3,500 - 4,500)


13.

Curlew, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century. Branded “W.P.” on underside. Original paint with area of touchup to front of breast and neck; tight crack in underside and small rub under left eye; knot in center of back has raised slightly; professional repair to a small chip at the base of the neck.

Provenance: Ex collection of Winward “Bud” Prescott, South Swansea, Massachusetts. Collection of Hal and Barbara Sorenson. (10,000 - 14,000)

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13 Detail

This exact Mason curlew pictured in the Sorenson’s home 15


Illinois River

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14. Pintail drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. “G.F.S.” painted in red on underside. Retains original Graves weight. Original paint by Catherine Elliston. Strong original paint protected by a very light coat of varnish that has worn away; stain below midline of body; several small shot scars and dents. (4,000 - 6,000)

15.

Pintail hen, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Graves weight on underside. Strong original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; white bar on wing patch has old working touch up; very light gunning wear and flaking to paint on underside near weight. (3,500 - 4,500)

16.

Oversize canvasback drake in eclipse plumage, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois. Retains Graves weight. Peacock brand in underside, also remains of Hamilton painted brand. Made for the Peacock Jewelry Company Lodge, Delta Marsh, Manitoba. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 88. (3,000 - 4,000)

17.

Pintail drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880s. Good feather paint detail. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; weight is missing; professional bill chip repair. (3,000 - 5,000)

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Stephan Lane 1875 - 1946 Lacon, Illinois

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18 Detail 18 Detail

18.

Exceptional and very rare pintail drake, Stephan Lane, Lacon, Illinois, last quarter 19th century. Particularly fine feather paint detail on back. Original paint with good patina and minor wear; very lightly hit by shot.

Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forrest Loomis, p. 280. (6,500 - 9,500) 17


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Rigmate pair of mallards, Chris Powers, Peru, Illinois, 1st half 20th century. Both have slightly turned heads. Drake has metal curled tail feathers. Both have highly detailed painting. Both have “C.P.” painted under bill. Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

20.

Rare and stylish Carriage House rig mallard drake, Lake Villa, Illinois, last quarter 19th century. Turned neck and head. “JHC” painted on underside. Neck swivels from a construction detail where two pieces of metal act as a hinge. Paint is a very old mix of working repaint with traces of what appear to be original, all protected by an old coat of varnish; numerous rubs to bare wood on head and body; a few small dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

21.

Very rare greenwing teal hen, Joseph Zender, Chicago, Illinois, circa 1930s. Used at the Peru Gun Club. Near mint original paint on most of the decoy; minor wear on the underside; couple of tiny dents.

18

Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forest Loomis. (2,000 - 3,000)

22.

Black duck, Ed Keller, Bartonville, Illinois. “E.K.” painted on underside. Near mint original paint; structurally good. (1,750 - 2,250)

23.

Canvasback drake, Charles Ruggles, Henry, Illinois, last quarter 19th century. Slightly turned head. Painted eyes. Branded “M.I.F.” in underside. Dry original paint that has crazed and flaked over the head and body; small repair to right side of tail; repair to bill where exposed wood has also been darkened. (1,500 - 2,000)

24.

Rare preening mallard drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois. Paint was restored a long time ago; small chips missing from back of neck seat; weight has been removed; small dents. (1,000 - 1,500)


Charles Perdew only made one rig of Canada geese. Goose populations in the Illinois River Valley were not substantial enough to demand decoys for them until the 1960’s, years after Perdew had passed. This decoy was originally in the Earl Poggemoeller collection and was featured on the cover of the Julia & Guyette, August 1985 catalog.

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25. Very rare Canada goose, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 1st half 20th century. High head with carved raised wings. Detailed feather painting by Charlie. Three piece body. Thin original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; small areas of flaking throughout head and body; small chip on left side of wing; tight age crack through lower neck. (12,000 - 15,000)

25 Detail

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Rare rigmate pair of mallards, Cline McAlpin, Chicago, Illinois. Unusual style copied after the Connecticut school. Only one rig of this style was made. Origianl and mint. (2,500 - 3,500)

27.

Flat back style bluebill drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880s. Retains Elliston weight. Original paint with minor wear; several small dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

28.

Rare bluebill drake, Charles Schoenheider, Sr., Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Mostly original paint with some strengthening to black; minor wear. (2,000 - 3,000)

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Mallard drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois. Graves weight on underside. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 87. (1,750 - 2,250) 30.

Mallard hen, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois. Retains Graves weight. His earlier style. From the Caswell rig branded “C.J.C.”. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; two small cracks in upper breast. (1,500 - 2,500)

31.

Very rare mallard drake, Fred Allen, Monmouth, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. This is an early 19th century experimental model. Only three known in the sleeping position. Hollow and filled with lead shot. Paint is a mix of original and old working repaint covered by a coat of varnish. (1,200 - 1,600)


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32 Detail 32.

Mallard drake, Doug Mosely, Princeton, Illinois, circa 1880s. “DM” painted on underside. Finely detailed Mosley feather paint on back and sides. Very good and original.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 88. (4,000 - 6,000)

33.

Pintail drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Raised wing tips and slightly turned head. Retains Perdew weight. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear, mostly on the lower breast; orange paint makers mark on weight; professional repair to a crack in the neck by Russ Allen. (4,000 - 6,000)

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Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

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34.

Rigmate pair of bluebills, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade with wide “spoon” bills. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; small dents.

37.

Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Strong feather paint. Visible challenge stamp on underside. Original paint; crack running length of underside with tail chip repair 1” diameter.

Provenance: Rose collection.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

35. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Very rare early hollow challenge grade with snakey head and “spoon” bill. Original paint with minor wear; structurally good.

38.

Rigmate pair of bluebills, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1900. Premier grade. Rare “lowhead” model. Good original paint with seam separation on both; both have had a grey wash removed.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

39.

Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. Original paint with minor wear; small dents; small cracks in underside. (1,500 - 2,500)

Provenance: Rose collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

(2,000 - 3,000)

36. Grey coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Branded “W.T.B.”. Original paint with minor wear; professional tail chip repair; a few small dents; lightly hit by shot. (1,250 - 1,750) 22

(2,000 - 3,000)

(1,800 - 2,500)


40.

Rigmate pair of redheads, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Premier grade. Both in strong original paint with minor wear; drake has several shot scars to body and head; hen has four shot scars and paint flaking around two knots in wood. (4,000 - 6,000)

40

41.

Rigmate pair of widgeon, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; small dents; some neck filler is missing.

Provenance: Rose collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys - A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 69. (3,000 - 5,000)

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42.

Pintail hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Early head style with detailed feather painting and sponge painting on breast and underside. Original paint with moderate wear; two areas of neck filler missing; small chip at tip of bill.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,500 - 3,000)

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43

43 Detail

43 Detail

43. Important mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade with early snakey head style. Exact decoy pictured on back cover of “Mason Decoys” by Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. Outstanding original paint with good patina and very slight wear; a few small dents and scrapes; never used.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, back cover, exact decoy. (12,000 - 15,000)

Lots 43 and 44 pictured on the back cover of “Mason Decoys” by Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid

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44

44 Detail

44 Detail

44.

Important black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade, with “premier” ink stamp on underside. Exact decoy pictured on back cover of “Mason Decoys” by Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. Near mint original paint with strong feathering; structurally excellent.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, back cover, exact decoy. (10,000 - 14,000)

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45

46

47

48

49

50

45. Bluebill hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Rare premier grade, “lowhead” model. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; professional touch up on edges of bill and speculums; protected by an old coat of varnish; small dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(1,500 - 2,500)

48. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade with early snakey head style. Solomon stencil on underside. Original paint with minor wear; small tail chip; small crack at neck base; lightly hit by shot. (1,200 - 1,600) 49.

Exceptionally well preserved mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. In factory filled crack in back has opened slightly; head is a little loose; original paint with good patina and very slight wear. (2,000 - 3,000)

50.

Rare early style black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Original paint with minor wear; small chips missing at neck filler; old tail chip repair.

Literature: “Detroit Decoy Dynasty,” William Dodge and Ron Sharp. (1,750 - 2,250)

46. Merganser hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Original paint on most of body; head has restoration at the crest and some part of the bill, with touchup in that area.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

47.

Canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade Chesapeake Bay model. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; small dents; knot has fallen out of one edge of tail; old touchup on black areas.

26

Provenance: Rose collection.

(1,500 - 1,800)

(1,200 - 1,600)


51

52

51.

Very rare rigmate pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade with early snakey head style, circa 1905. Original paint with minor discoloration and very slight wear; several tiny dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(6,000 - 9,000)

52. Exceptional brant, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade with “Barron” brand on the side and back. Near mint original paint with good patina; thin “in factory” filled cracks in back.

Literature: “Mason Decoys - A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 83. (6,000 - 8,000)

52 Detail 27


Slot Neck Canada Goose

53 Detail

Adele Earnest of Stony Point, New York was one of the early pioneers of folk art and decoy collecting in North America. She was one of six founding trustees of the American Folk Art Museum in Manhattan and donated or displayed many items from her collection, including some of the museums most important examples of folk sculpture. In her book “Folk Art in America: A Personal View” Earnest writes that “in 1954, in Columbia, Pennsylvania, we had found three extraordinary Canada geese decoys, which have been a cynosure for collectors ever since.” Earnest retained one of the three geese that were found (pictured on the bookplate of her book “Art of the Decoy” and sold in January 2007 by Christie’s and Guyette & Schmidt for $553,600), and sold the remaining two geese to renowned folk art collector Stuart Gregory. Gregory, from Wilton, Connecticut, was also a founding member of the American Folk Art Museum and was known to fly himself around the country in his twin-engine airplane to acquire the best examples from the country’s top dealers. After graduating from Princeton and Harvard Law School, he retired at age 50 from a successful pharmaceuticals position and collected American folk art and antiques as a full time avocation. When the Gregory collection was offered in 1979 at a Sotheby’s Parke Bernet auction, it was heralded as a landmark sale that “would raise price levels to such a degree that they continue to be used as reference points long after the sale is over”.

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The sale did not disappoint, establishing world records for weathervanes, folk sculpture, theorems and folk painters such as John Brewster, Ammi Phillips, Erastus Salisbury Field and William Mathew Prior. The highest price achieved for a waterfowl decoy was also established when this exact decoy sold to Dr. James McCleery for $12,500, which surpassed the $10,500 he paid for a Hudsonian Curlew by William Bowman at the Mackey sale. 21 years after the Gregory sale this exact decoy was again offered, this time in the landmark decoy auction of the late Dr. James McCleery. At the sale preview two geese were displayed on a central pedestal, a preening Canada goose by Elmer Crowell and this “slot-neck’ Canada goose decoy by an unknown maker. When the goose hit the auction block many long time collectors expected it to surpass the World Record $684,500 achieved by the preening Crowell goose in the same sale. When the hammer fell, however, the $233,500 price was one of the few “great buys” of the sale. Having been originally discovered in Buck’s County, Pennsylvania and showing similarities to decoys of Philadelphia, Adele Earnest always believed them to be from the state they were discovered in. However, a long-time collector and decoy historian from Connecticut, who purchased the other “slot-neck” goose from the Gregory sale, believed they were made in Massachusetts. Many shorebird decoys found in Massachusetts share the dovetailed neck and corresponding number construction detail, which is not found on decoys from any other region. The feature of a removable head, though not dovetailed, is also present on the iconic rig of geese by Capt. Charles Osgood of Salem, Massachusetts, displayed at the Shelbourne Museum. The collecting community may never know for certain exactly where this slot-neck goose was made, but one thing is certain, it is among the finest working decoys every created and rivals the folk sculpture of any museum in North America. The age, form, rarity, condition and provenance of this carving would make it the centerpiece of even the most important decoy or folk art collections, making this a truly rare opportunity.

Pictured on the front cover of “The McCleery Auction” by Ron Gard and Robert Shaw 29


53 Detail

53 Detail

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53 Detail


53

53.

Very rare and important hollow carved Canada goose, last quarter 19th century. One of three found by Adele Earnest in Columbia, Pennsylvania in 1954. A large hollow carved decoy, approximately 31” long with a removable head that is dovetailed into the body. The number “3” is painted on the bottom of the dovetail and in its corresponding slot in the body. There is a large brass crosspiece inserted into the underside of the decoy with a threaded hole in the center. The decoy can be used as either a floater or a stick up field decoy. There is subtle feather painting on the back and tail areas. Slight shoulder shaping at the beginning of the wings and gouge feather carving in the underside of the tail. Original paint with very minor wear; small chip missing from the back side of the neck base; several tiny dents.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Stuart Gregory, sold at Sotheby’s January 1979, lot 148. Formerly in the collection of Dr. James McCleery, sold at the Guyette & Schmidt/Sotheby’s auction January 2000. McCleery stamp on underside. Collection of James and Lyda Madden.

Literature: “Call to the Sky,” Robert Shaw, p. 11, exact decoy. “The Great Book of Wildfowl Decoys,” Joe Engers editor, p. 142, exact decoy. “North American Decoys,” Byron Cheever, Summer 1979, p. 4, exact decoy. “The Art of the Decoy,” Adele Earnest, p. 8, rigmate. “The McCleery Auction,”Ron Gard and Robert Shaw, front cover, exact decoy. (400,000 - 600,000)

31


54.

Black duck, Elmer , East Harwich, Massachus-etts. Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Slightly turned head. Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; several small dents in one side; hairline crack in underside; short hairline crack in back. (2,500 - 3,500)

54 55. Black duck, Charles Hart, Gloucester, Massachusetts. Relief wing carving with feather carving detail and fluted tail. Original paint with minor wear mostly on head; a few small dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

55

56. Oversize black duck, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Almost 20” long. Crowell’s oval brand is in the underside. Original paint that has darkened with age; minor wear; crack in underside; small cracks in body lightly hit by shot; professional repair to small crack at neck base. (1,500 - 2,000)

56

57.

57 32

Oversize goldeneye hen from the Hingham, Massachusetts area, 1st quarter 20th century. Similar to work of Joseph Lincoln. Original paint with minor wear on much of decoy; moderate wear on one side of back; small crack in back; age split in underside. (1,500 - 2,000)


58

59

60

61

62

63

58.

Old squaw drake from Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. Original paint with moderate wear and good patina; small dents; minor roughness to end of tail; crack in underside. (950 - 1,250)

61.

Hollow carved Canada goose from the North Shore of Massachusetts, circa 1900. Appealing old in use repaint; small chips missing from tail; small cracks. (400 - 600)

59. Self bailing scoter, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts. Original paint with minor wear; filler added with paint touchup at neck seam; a few small dents. (1,250 - 1,750)

62.

Brant from Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century. Worn original paint; one tack eye is missing; crack in underside; defect in wood in one lower side. (300 - 400)

60. Black duck, Joseph Lincoln, Accord, Massachusetts. Old in use repaint with some original showing; numerous cracks in body; lightly hit by shot.

63.

Goldeneye drake from South Shore of Massachusetts. Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; crack in back. (350 - 450)

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 98. (950 - 1,250) 33


Keyes Chadwick

1865 - 1958 Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts

H. Keyes Chadwick, circa 1950

Chadwick, a carpenter and poultry farmer, made his first decoys in 1881 for his own use. A few years later he began making decoys under the influence of his neighbor and decoy carver Benjamin Smith. His earliest carving style is nearly identical to Smith’s. Between 1900 and around 1930 Chadwick produced his most stylish work. After that he simplified his decoy style to make it easier to carve larger quantities and to make the decoys more durable.

64 Detail

34


64.

Exceptional redhead drake, Keyes Chadwick, Oak Bluffs, Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century. Chadwick’s earliest style with long graceful body and slightly turned head. Raised neck seat. Original paint with minor scuffing and very little wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 70. “Martha’s Vineyard decoys,” Stanley Murphy, pp. 27-57. “Decoys of the Atlantic Flyway,” George Ross Starr, p. 129 (17,500 - 22,500)

64 Detail

64

35


Miniatures

65

66

67

68

69

70 65.

66. 67.

68.

69.

36

71 Pair of miniature redheads, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. Original and very good. (2,000 - 2,400) Miniature redhead hen, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Unmarked. Very good and original. (800 - 1,000) Miniature bluebird, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Crowell’s paper label is on the underside. Small amount of roughness to tip of tail; bill has been slightly blunted. (600 - 900) Miniature ringneck pheasant, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is in the underside. Slight wear at tip of tail, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) Miniature flying pintail drake mounted on a piece of tree fungus, Francis Collins, Milan, Illinois. Collins carved and sold many miniatures through Abercrombie

and Fitch in Chicago. In dome case. Approximately 4” tall. Very good and original.

Literature: “Decoy Collectors Guide,” 1968 annual, p. 83, exact carving. (500 - 800)

70.

Pair of miniature flying mallards on burl base, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Each bird is approximately 5” long. Very slight paint shrinkage, mostly on drake’s tail, otherwise excellent and original.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

Literature: “Charles Perdew,” Ann Tandy Lacey, p. 224. (1,750 - 2,250) 71.

Miniature pair of mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1945. Each measures about 1 1/2”. On burl base. Very good and original.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. (800 - 1,200)


73

72

74

74

74 72. Seven miniatures, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Three flying mallards on burl bases and four swimming mallards. Mounted on birdseye maple and in Plexiglas case. Case size 12” x 5 1/2” x 6 1/2”. Included are two letters from George Miller to Perdew ordering the carvings and asking about their status at a later date. Very good and original. (3,000 - 4,000) 73.

Set of 16 miniature waterfowl carvings in shadowbox case, Francis Collins, Milan, Illinois. All are signed and ID’ed on the undersides. Case size approximately 9” x 12”. Very good and original.

Provenance:

Made for Robert Michelson, Edina,

Minnesota, in 1966. Literature: “Decoy Collectors Guide,” 1968 annual, p. 86. (1,500 - 2,000) 74.

Lot of 23 miniatures, Walter Ruppel, Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Three Canada geese, one pair of mallards, one canvasback, one redhead, one bluebill, pair of American mergansers, pair of red breasted mergansers, pair of hooded mergansers, pair of greenwing teal, bluewing teal drake, pair of shovelers, wood duck drake, pintail drake, and pair of speckled belly geese. All in near mint condition. (1,500 - 2,500) 37


St. Clair Flats

St. Clair Flats Shooting Company members “Ontario Decoys II,” Bernie Gats

The St. Clair Flats, including what was over 100,000 acres of waterfowl habitat spanning the Canada/USA border is located where the St. Clair River flowing from Lake Huron percolates into Lake St. Clair and includes Walpole Island’s Native Canadian territory. Large numbers of migrating waterfowl historically staged in the Flats each fall. Beginning around 1850, enthusiastic sportsmen and market hunters travelled by rail from eastern Canada and the USA to hunt each fall in The Flats; with them came decoys from Toronto, Hamilton, Long Point, Detroit and other places to augment the local decoy makers’ work. 38


The St. Clair Flats Shooting Co. established, as a hunting club in 1874 was also known as the “Canada Club” or the “Toronto Club”. George Warin and David Ward were founding members of the club as were six other Ontario residents. John Reeves worked there until his death in 1896. Tom Chambers then managed the club from 1900 until 1943. Tom Chambers was a skilled waterfowl hunter, market gunner and decoy maker from Toronto on the shores of Lake Ontario. His Toronto friends included J.R. Wells of Toronto, accomplished boat builder, decoy maker and legendary waterfowl shot, who worked for the Ackroyd Boat Co. on the Toronto waterfront; David Ward, amateur boxer, decoy maker, boat builder, accomplished oarsman, shooting sportsman and market hunter; and George Warin, decoy maker, boat builder, market hunter and sportsman. These four decoy makers along with the “Reeves of Long Point” are credited with creating the so called “Toronto School Flats Decoys”, the tag that Barney Crandell ( the Michigan collector and decoy historian who wrote the great, early, ground-breaking articles on these makers) hung on this style. Most importantly to collectors, the St. Clair Flats Shooting Co. assembled and preserved for almost 100 years, a treasure trove of great decoys of historical input. In the early 1970’s, the club decided to sell the old club decoys. Friends and decoy enthusiasts, Judge Harry M. Seitz Jr. of Monroe, Michigan and Bernard W. “Barney” Crandell of Birmingham, Michigan partnered and purchased several hundred decoys. Makers, among others included Chambers, Warin, Wards, J.R. Wells, John Reeves, Weir, Quillen, factory decoys and of course, the unknowns. Many of the decoys were in astounding original condition; 100 years old; provenance established; ownership branded; some with “maker’s brands” – rare and historically important. Judge Harry Seitz Jr. and his wife Midge Seitz included many of the finest decoy examples from “The Flats Purchase” in the family collection. These collection birds, some 40 years after Harry acquired them are now on the move again.

Tom Chambers, Howard Meredith, George Hendrie, William Pulling, and Stratherne Hendrie, 1905

Photo courtesy of Ken Cole

39


Tom Chambers 1860 - 1948 Toronto, Ontario

Tom Chambers geese out for the hunt

Photo courtesy of Ken Cole

Tom Chambers was a highly skilled waterfowl hunter, market gunner, decoy maker and marsh manager from Toronto Ontario on the shores of Lake Ontario. He hunted the Toronto waterfront and surrounding area centered on Ashbridges Bay. Tom Chambers moved to the “Flats” in the 1880’s. Tom was initially involved with the “St. Anne’s Club”, a Canadian waterfowl hunting club, in the 1880’s. He moved to the St. Clair Flats Shooting Co. around 1900. Chambers, nicknamed “King Tom” apparently for his dictatorial style when dealing with native Canadian guides, would for the next 43 years manage one of Canada’s finest and most prestigious hunting clubs. His goose decoys were completed early in his years at the club. Probably, less than 15 exist in original paint today. This decoy tapers from a higher back to an extremely low breast profile creating an exceptionally striking profile. It is light weight, hollow, with a ¼” bottom board. It has a graceful swept back neck, a simple understated elegance, is very lifelike in the water, and I’m sure was functional given the fact that Chambers was a market hunter. This Chambers’s goose is branded “J.T. McMillan”, a 1913 Flats member. It was originally collected by Harry Seitz and Barney Crandell. Some decoy collectors believe that the “Flats Geese”, of which this carving is a fine example, best exemplify the qualities that make the Flats decoys so sought after and the Chamber’s legacy so compelling.

40


75

75 Detail 75 Detail

75.

Canada goose, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Branded “Tom Chambers, Maker.” and “J.T. McMillan.” Slightly larger body style than some from this maker. Thin original paint with subtle feather painting. Original paint with light wear; chip missing form left side of body approximately 4” x 1/2”; paint has crazed slightly; small chip of paint missing from area near right eye; a few small rubs exposing bare wood on back and sides.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(20,000 - 25,000)

41


76.

76

Rare pintail drake, Phineas Reeves, Long Point, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Three generations of the Reeves Family, over a 120 year span, were fisherman, made decoys, duck boats, guided duck hunters and other club members. They trapped and fished commercially and managed duck clubs Phineas Reeves 1833-1896 had three sons who made decoys – John C. Reeves 1860-1896, Charles P. Reeves 1872-1941 and Frank Reeves 18701938. They often worked together on decoys. This pintail circa 1890’s is likely a collaborative effort – carved by John, then covered with canvas and painted by Charles. Hollow body, stylized swept back neck with extended tail. Second coat of paint; numerous shot marks to head and body; wear at top of head and cheeks; appears to be some wood filler added to both sides of bill; wood filler added to old break in bill.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,500 - 3,500)

77

77. Canvasback hen, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Hollow body with strong feather painting on wing patch. Branded “J.T.N.”. Original paint; crack running most of length of right side of body; crack through neck; a few rubs that have been darkened; four shot marks; wear to bare wood at end of bill.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,500 - 3,500)

78.

Black duck, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Fine detail feather painting on head. Dry original paint; very light gunning wear; repair to sliver running the length of underside of bill.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

79.

Black duck, Bud Tully, Peterborough, Ontario, circa 1930. Excellent and detailed wing carving on back, including Tully’s strong rasp carving. Two large drilled holes in underside used to hollow the decoy. Original paint with slight wear; structurally good.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

78

79 42


80

80 Detail

80 Detail

80.

Fine redhead drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Hollow carved “highback” style. Branded “S.H. Walker,” “AH Buhl,” “G & J Warin, Boat Builders, Toronto,” and “W.A. Allen”. Fine and strong feather painting with wet n wet blending. Exhibiting some of Warin’s best painting. Original paint with crazing at breast and some areas of back; shot scar on tail; minor flaking on a few areas to bill and head.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(9,000 - 12,000)

43


81

82

83

84

85

86

81.

“Lowhead” style black duck, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario. Hollow with bottom board. Branded “GNILLUP” in underside. Very thin paint, much of which appears to be original.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

82.

Redhead drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario. Hollow with bottom board. “W” carved in underside. Mix of original and old working touch up; minor wear; moderatly hit by shot. (800 - 1,200)

(800 - 1,200)

83.

Very early pintail hen, unknown maker, Toronto, Ontario. High head with small paddle tail. Bill carved away from face. Painted eyes. Branded “A.H. Buhl” on underside. Old working paint which is crazed; several shot scars and worn areas to bare wood.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

44

(800 - 1,200)

84.

Black duck, Ontario, circa 1900. Branded “H.D.” in underside. Heavy wear with traces of old and original paint; repair to break in neck. (600 - 800)

85.

Pair of bluebills, Will Smith, Bloomfield, Ontario, circa 1900. Marked “LW” on undersides. Well done repaint by Davey Nichol; lightly hit by shot. (800 - 1,200)

86.

Rigmate pair of ringnecks, D.W. Nichol. Drake has carved crest. Both are good and original.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)


87. Redhead drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Branded “C.H.G.” and “T”. Solid body style with strong feather painting. Original paint; numerous shot marks; wear to edge of bill and tail; screw has been added at the back of the neck to secure head to body.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,000 - 2,500)

87 88.

Hollow carved black duck, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Branded “JRW Maker”, also initials “J.M.” are painted on the underside. Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; touchup at shot marks; small crack under tail.

Literature: Gates.

“Ontario Decoys,” Bernie (3,000 - 5,000)

88 89. Rigmate pair of redheads, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Both branded “A.H. Buhl”. Combing on drake and fine feather painting on hen. Strong original paint; right side of drake shows an in the making rectangular wooden plug; hen has two shot marks in left side of bill; several rubs; structurally good; drake is original paint; very light shrinkage at the breast and areas of red on some areas of the face; hen has near mint original paint.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

90.

Pintail hen, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Early hollow body style. Excellent wet on wet feather painting. Low profile body with small paddle tail. Original paint with minor wear; numerous shot marks and areas of wear to bare wood around tail, top of head, and edges of bill; shot mark at tip of bill.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (4,000 - 6,000)

89

90 45


91

91 Detail

46

91 Detail

91.

Pair of redheads, John Wells, Toronto, Ontario, first quarter 20th century. Both decoys are branded “T.H. Newberry”. Club member, 1900 - 1914. Very hollow. Low profile body style. Both are in original paint with very minor wear; a few small rubs to bare wood; drake has a few shot marks; bottom board of hen has been repainted, including one chip or wood defect on the edge of the bottom board on right side.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(7,000 - 9,000)


92

92 Detail

92.

Very rare rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Hollow long body style. Strong feather painting on hen’s wing patches with comb painting over back. Drake has fine comb painting on back. Both are in original paint; a few small rubs and dents; one small shot mark on drake; structurally very good.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(10,000 - 15,000)

47


Etchings 94

93

96

95

93. “Yellowlegs at Dusk,” an etching by Frank Benson. Signed in the margin. Image size approximately 8 1/2” x 13”. Original and good.

95.

“Yellowlegs #3,” an etching by Frank Benson. Signed in the margin. Matted and framed. Image size approximately 6 1/2” x 9”. Original and good.

Provenance: Williamson collection.

Provenance: Williamson collection.

94.

“The Blind,” an etching by Roland Clark. Signed in the margin. Matted and framed. Image size approximately 9” x 12 1/2”. Original and good.

96. “Setting Out Decoys,” an etching by Roland Clark. Signed in the margin. Matted and framed. Image size approximately 8 1/2” x 11”. Original and good.

Provenance: Williamson collection.

48

(600 - 900)

(600 - 900)

Provenance: Williamson collection.

(600 - 900)

(600 - 900)


98

97

100

99

97.

“Gray Dawn” an Etching of duck hunters in marsh with boat and decoys by Roland Clark. Signed in the margin by the artist. Matted and framed. Image size approximately 9 1/2” x 15”. Original and good.

99.

“Windy Morning” an etching of duck hunters by Churchill Ettinger. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 7 1/2” x 10”. Original and good.

Provenance: Williamson collection.

Provenance: Williamson collection.

98.

Etching of waterfowl, Roland Clark. Signed in the margin by the artist. Image size approximately 10 1/2” x 12 1/2”. Matted and framed. Original and good.

Provenance: Williamson collection.

(500 - 800)

(400 - 600)

(350 - 550)

100. “Redheads, 2” a dry point by Frank Benson. Trial proof 1 out of 7. Professionally matted and framed. Signed in the margin by the artist. Image size approximately 10” x 8 1/2”. Minor wrinkles to print, but in general good condition. (300 - 400)

49


Ben Schmidt

1884 - 1968 Detroit, Michigan

As with most artist’s, appreciation for their talent often comes near the end of their career. Ben Schmidt was no exception. Photographed on the cover of Friends magazine in November of 1956 with a caption in the back that reads: “Getting duck decoys ready for hunters is a year round activity for Ben Schmidt of Centerline, Michigan. Ben has been making decoys for more than half of his 72 years and can turn out a finished bird (including painting) in only three hours.” Without a doubt, Ben Schmidt is celebrated as Michigan’s most prolific and popular decoy carver. His work progressed and evolved through many decades but it was his relationship with Michigan collector Dick Lancaster that set Schmidt on a new direction sometime in the mid 1940’s. Lancaster started to visit Schmidt and together they would flip through the pages of various bird books. Lancaster eventually ordered a pair of all duck species in North America. The project started around 1945 and continued for the next ten years. Some of the unusual species offered here were ordered by Lancaster and have never been offered for sale until now. The pair of American mergansers is quite possibly the only known pair that Ben made.

50


101

102

101. Very rare brant, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950. Head is turned slightly, raised wing tips and feather stamping. One of only a few known to exist. Excellent and original.

101 Detail

Provenance: Dick and Louise Lancaster collection. Ordered by Dick from Ben Schmidt. (6,000 - 9,000)

102. Pintail drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950. Excellent feather stamping. Silver Spoon insert at tail. Signed on underside. Good and original. Provenance: Ex Phyllis Ellison collection. Seitz collection. (4,000 - 6,000) 51


103. Pintail hen, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1940. Early desirable long body style. “K.D.” carved in underside. Original paint with very light wear; a few shot scars in body and one in head.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

103

104. Rigmate pair of mallards, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1945. Both branded “H.L.R.” on underside. Both have feather stamping and wing carving. Strong original paint with light wear.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

104 105. Rigmate pair of goldeneye, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1940. Both are stamped “F.B.” on underside, for Fred Buck. Hen has excellent feather stamping covering entire body and slightly turned head. Both are in original paint; some staining on the white areas of drake; hen is worn to bare wood on some areas of head and body.

105

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,500 - 3,500)

106. Very rare greenwing teal drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950. High head, slightly turned. Gunning decoy with keel removed. Excellent and original with small rub near right eye.

106 52

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 4,000)


107

108

107. Possibly one of a kind pair of American mergansers, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950. Strong feather stamping and carving on hen. Both have leather added to bottom along with information from Dick Lancaster. Mint.

Provenance: Lancaster.

108. Pair of buffleheads, Michigan. Mint.

Ben

Schmidt,

Detroit,

Provenance: Purchased from Ben Schmidt by Dick Lancaster in the 1950s. (4,000 - 5,000)

Purchased from Ben Schmidt by Dick (5,000 - 8,000)

53


Mark McNair

Craddockville, Virginia

109. Well carved preening pintail drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Raised “V” wing carving. Very good and original. (2,000 - 3,000)

109

110. Rigmate pair of pintails, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Signed “McNair” and dated 1980 on underside of drake. Both are branded “Walsh”. Hollow with bottom board. Fine comb painting on back. Both in strong original paint with light gunning wear; hen has stress crack in neck. (2,000 - 3,000)

110

111. Widgeon drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Signed “McNair” on underside and branded “Walsh”. Hollow with bottom board and slightly turned head. Strong original paint with light gunning wear. (1,250 - 1,750)

111

112. Rare lowhead style greenwing teal drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Raised, carved primaries and secondaries. Very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

112 54


113

114

115

116

117

118

119

113. Yellowlegs, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Relief wing carving and carrying hole through tail. Original paint that has been aged; minor wear on extremities; structurally very good. (800 - 1,200)

117.

114.

118. Pintail drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. “McNair” signature on underside. Pad weight stamped 1982 and branded “Walsh”. Original paint; a few small dents and minor separation at midline where two pieces of wood were attached for body. (1,000 - 1,200)

Yellowlegs or dowitcher, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Signed on underside. Very good and original; two small dents near tail. (500 - 700)

115. Dove, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Signed McNair on underside. Raised and separated wings. Excell ent. (500 - 800) 116. Working pintail drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Stamped 1982 in weight. Signed and branded “Walsh”. Original paint with minor wear and paint rubs; a few small dents. (900 - 1,200)

Working widgeon drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Slightly turned head. Signed and branded “Walsh”. Original paint with minor wear; small crack in back. (1,000 - 1,400)

119. Pintail drake, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Branded “Walsh” on underside. Nestled and slightly turned head. Fine comb painting on back. Strong original paint slight gunning wear and hairline crack on right side of body. (1,200 - 1,500)

55


Calendars and Posters

121

122

120

120. 1905 Peters calendar. January page attached. Approximately 27.5” x 14”. Image of two hunters feeding dogs. Retains top and bottom bands. Crease mark on of lower right side and again near top. (1,500 - 2,500) 121. Very rare Austin Powder Company poster, Cleveland, Ohio. Image of three dogs by Edmond Osthous. Approximately 22.5” x 17”. Small tears at top, bottom and two corners; a few small scratches and fold marks on image. (1,500 - 2,500)

56

122. Ithaca Guns poster. Image of passenger pigeons by Fuertes. Retains top and bottom bands. 16 1/2” x 28”. Small tear along an area of bottom band, lower left edge; small tear at top left, otherwise very good. (1,500 - 2,000)


124 125 123

123. Hercules Sporting Powders 1916 calendar. Image of black bellied plovers. Retains July calendar page. Near mint; a few small rubs on left side. (2,000 - 3,000) 124. Peters Cartridge Company calendar 1929. Retains both bands and full set of calendar pages. Image of setting mallards by Lynn Bogue Hunt. Near mint condition. (2,000 - 3,000)

125. Winchester calendar 1915. With Lynn Bogue Hunt image of golden eagle and mountain goat. Bands have been removed. Professionally framed. Several crease marks on top third of image and below calendar pages.

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

57


126. Rare Remington UMC 22 calibre repeating rifle hang tag. Advertising the new rifle for game and gallery. Great image of boy hunting rabbits. 14” x 10”. Professionally framed. Damage to top left corner, small area missing; imperfection at base of number 2 in center. (1,500 - 1,800)

126

127

128

127.

Peters Factory hang tag. Image of Hunters with birddogs. 11 1/2” x 8”. Professionally matted and framed. Excellent with small rough area near lower left.

Provenance: Lucas collection.

58

(3,000 - 4,000)

128. Peters Factory hang tag. Image of boy holding Canada geese. 11 1/2” x 8”. Professionally matted and framed. Areas of in painting along top, bottom and both sides.

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)


130

129

131

129. Maas & Steffen Inc 1942 calendar. Retains December calendar page. Retains top band. Measures 26” x 13 1/2”. Very good; slight edge wear on left side. (1,200 - 1,500) 130. 1908 Calendar, Herrington & Richardson Arms Company. Image of hunter and caribou by Philip Goodwin. All calendar pages are intact, with top and bottom bands. Approximately 14” x 26 3/4”. Bottom band is slightly bent; mild edge wear; areas of restoration and in painting at top left where man is carrying canoe; top right above tree line; and along lower right edge; some staining on calendar page.

132

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(1,000 - 1,500)

131. Maas & Steffan 1939 calendar. Image of fox and badger by Jack Murray. Retains September calendar page and top band. Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500) 132. Two Winchester advertising pieces. Professionally framed. A countertop felt for Winchester repeating shotgun and ammunition. And a dealer decal, along with instructions for applying to glass. (500 - 800)

132 59


New Jersey Harry V. Shourds

1861 - 1920 Tuckerton, New Jersey In the 1960s early decoy collectors John Hillman and Lloyd Johnson traveled to Morgantown, Maryland, a small town on the Patomac River, to meet with James E. Baines. Baines was a waterman, guide, and decoy maker who had a home on property that was bordered by the Piccowaxen Creek and the Patomac. They purchased seven barely used redhead drakes by Harry V. Shourds of Tuckerton, New Jersey. These iconic decoys would end up in prominent collections accross the US, including this one that made its way to Jim McCleery

John Hillman (right) with Isabelle (center) and the Krosses

Lloyd Johnson

James Baines

133

60


133 Detail

133. Important redhead drake, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century. Branded “J.E.B.”. Detailed feather paint on back. Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Dr. James McCleery. McCleery collection stamp is on the underside twice. Lot 395 in McCleery auction sale, Sotheby’s/Guyette, Schmidt & Deeter, Jan 2000.

Literature: “Call to the Sky,” Robert Shaw, p. 61, exact decoy. “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 37. “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 21. “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, p. 49. (40,000 - 60,000)

133 Detail

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134. Brant, Rhodes Truex, Absecon, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century. Original paint with good patina and minor wear; working touchup on white area under tail.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr, p. 102. (2,000 - 3,000)

134

135. Black duck, Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey 1st quarter 21th century. Appealing old repaint looks like it was done by Horner; touchup at body seam; a few small dents. (2,500 - 3,500)

135 136. Rare bluebill drake, Rhodes Truex, Absecon, New Jersey. Inset rectangular weight and carved eyes. Original paint with good patina and minor discoloration almost no wear; very slight separation at body seam.

136

137

137. Hollow Canada goose, attributed to Rowley Horner, West Creek, New Jersey. This bird is in a working second coat of paint likely by Chris Sprague. Refer to page 114, plate 231, “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty for the picture of a similar goose which he attributes to Sprague. This bird is somewhat deeper in the body than those known to have been made by Horner, but lacks glass eyes. The paint on this bird appears to be the same at that on the bird in plate 231. Working second coat of paint shows minor wear and nice patina; multiple shot marks on one side of the body; professional repair to the bill; thin tight crack in the neck.

62

Literature: New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr. “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty. (1,500 - 2,000)

Literature: “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, pp. 96-97, and 114. (2,000 - 4,000)


Mark English Northfield, New Jersey

138

138 Detail 138 Detail

138.

Important merganser drake, Mark English, Northfield, New Jersey, circa 1890. Hollow with carved eyes and raised neck seat. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; good patina.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Somers G. Headly, Newark, Delaware. Headly’s initials are stamped in the underside twice. Formerly in the collection of Roy Bull, Cape Charles, Virginia. Bull collection stamp in underside. Noyes museum exhibition stamp on underside.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 14. “Classic New Jersey Decoys,” James Doherty, p. 164. (14,000 - 18,000) 63


139

140

141

142

143

144

139. Pair of working pintails, William Cranmer, Beach Haven, New Jersey. Both have slightly turned heads. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; long thin chip missing from one side of drake’s bill; minor roughness to heads; small dents.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(400 - 600)

140. Bluebill hen, Chris Sprague, Beach Haven, New Jersey. Original paint with moderate wear; professional bill repair.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(650 - 950)

141. Canada goose, Eugene Hendrickson, Lower Bank, New Jersey. Stamped “PMO/CAW collection.” Slight discoloration on underside, otherwise very good and original. (300 - 400)

64

142. Canada goose, Jess Birdsall, Point Pleasant, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century. Old in use repaint; small chip missing from side of bill.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(500 - 700)

143. Black duck, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, last quarter 19th century. Old in use repaint on much of the decoy; sides of head original; crack in neck with small chip missing; small thin chips missing from underside of bill.

Provenance: From a home near Pemberton, New Jersey. (400 - 600)

144.

Two decoys. A bluebill drake, Willis Johnson, Lakewood, New Jersey and a redhead drake, Taylor Johnson, Point Pleasant, New Jersey. Bluebill has Hillman collection tag on underside. Old in use repaint; minor wear; small dents; minor roughness to end of redhead’s bill.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(400 - 600)


145

145. Very rare merganser hen, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa 1900. Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; working touch up on white areas of the underside; crack through neck; lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Jersey.

From a home near Pemberton, New (8,000 - 12,000)

145 Detail

146

146. Rare merganser hen, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; discoloration is mostly on one side; professional bill repair by Russ Allen; crest tines have been slightly blunted; old working overpaint on lowerhalf. (5,000 - 8,000)

146 Detail 65


Shorebirds Elijah Burr

Hingham, Massachusetts

147

147 Detail

147 Detail

147. Very rare running lesser yellowlegs in winter plumage, Elijah Burr, Hingham, Massachusetts, circa 1890. Extended carved wing tips and shoe button eyes. Near mint original paint; small paint flake missing from top of head.

66

Literature: “Shorebirds: The Birds, The Hunters, the Decoys,” John Levinson and Somers Headly, p. 56, exact decoy. (12,000 - 15,000)


Elmer Crowell

1862 - 1952 East Harwich, Massachusetts

148. Rare golden plover, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Tack eye model with early pointed bill style. Fine paint detail. Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Shorebirds: The Birds, The Hunters, the Decoys,” John Levinson and Somers Headly. “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (17,500 - 22,500)

Hunters with a day’s bag of plover, last quarter 19th century 67


149 150

151 152 153 149. Yellowlegs, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire, 1st quarter 20th century. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; bill has been blunted a little; old touchup on one side of head; written on pencil on underside is “Collected Baltimore, etc.” (3,000 - 5,000)

152. Golden plover from the Morton rig, Quincy, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. Raised wing tips and carved eyes. Morton brand under the tail. Near mint original paint, bill is a professional replacement by Russ Allen. (2,000 - 3,000)

150. Rare dowitcher from Nantucket, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. Carrying hole through tail and tack eyes. Original paint with minor flaking and wear; old bill restoration; a few small dents. (3,500 - 4,500)

153. Large greater yellowlegs, Charles Thomas, Assinippi, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. Approximately 14.5” long. Relief carved wing tips and tack eyes. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; old touchup on eyes and bill; lightly hit by shot.

151. Yellowlegs from Kingston, Massachusetts, last quarter 19th century. Relief wing carving. Similar in form of Lothrop Holmes. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; moderately hit by shot; chip missing from top of tail; bill is a well done replacement. (2,500 - 3,500) 68

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. (2,000 - 3,000)


154

154. Ruddy turnstone, Toronto Harbor, Ontario. Wooden bill with wire legs and original wooden base. Original paint with minor wear; three shot marks.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(8,000 - 12,000)

The fact that little is known about the men who carved the Toronto Harbor shorebird decoys should not detract from the importance and beauty of the forms that were created in this isolated shorebird hunting region. While Manhattan had Long Island and New Jersey to supply plumage for the millinery trade, the fashionable elite of Toronto were also hungry for their share of fancy hats and pins during the Victorian era. Shorebirds were abundant and the sportsman of the day created shorebird decoys to lure them.

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Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

Around 1958, two legendary New Jersey pickers, carvers and friends were out on a decoy buying run. As the story goes, they were in the town of Pleasantville, NJ. It was Lloyd Johnson’s turn to knock at the door. Johnny Hillman stayed behind waiting in the car for Johnson to complete his mission. When Johnson returned, he reached in a brown paper sack and pulled out a Mason Premier Wood Duck. Johnson must have kept the duck for a short time but before 1965, he traded it to Bill Mackey. William F. Mackey published his book, “American Bird Decoys” in 1965 and at that time, he was the owner of the Mason. Mackey was so impressed with the Premier Wood Duck that he pictured it in a color plate and wrote the following caption: Illustrated in Mason Catalog, 1905 Courtesy of Alan Haid.

“Mason’s Decoy Factory of Detroit, Michigan left us our

finest heritage of factory-made decoys. The greatest single item from their shop is their Premier grade Wood Duck. This example is in unusually fine condition” Why are Mason factory Wood Ducks so rare? The company did advertise the species and included an illustrated image of a decoy in a catalog produced in 1905. In reality, however, the wood duck population in the United States was so low that the decoys were just not needed. In fact, the population of the wood duck was in such depths that the species received complete protection from hunting with The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. The Missing Wood Duck Upon Bill Mackey’s death in 1972, the family began a series of auctions to sell his collection. Blatantly missing was the Mason Premier Wood Duck. The family had decided to withhold several of their favorite items and around 1990 one famous collector from the Midwest hired a detective to try and locate a few of the missing jewels. Once located, communication between Kitty Mackey and Dr. McCleery started. In Kitty’s words: “I remember meeting Dr. McCleery on July 17, 1973 in Hyannis, MA, at the sale of my fathers decoys right after he bought the Bowman Curlew for a world record price of $10,500. It was 23 years later before we had further contact. We started to have regular conversations, and then one day Jim mentioned how “he had always coveted the Mason ‘woodie’ (as he always called the Mason Premier Wood Duck), from the day he saw it pictured in Dad’s book and was glad to know of its whereabouts. I also learned later that he had been putting money aside in what he called “the woodie fund,” in case the bird ever came to market. As time went on, I’d talk to Jim on the phone occasionally about decoys or we’d correspond in notes. At some point along the way it dawned on me that if I were ever to sell the wood duck, Jim McCleery would be the only person I’d consider. I really had no interest in selling it, but I often thought it was a shame that the bird wasn’t being seen by more collectors and appreciated by people in the field. It wasn’t a decoy that should be hidden away collecting dust. I mentioned my feeling to Frank Schmidt but I was insistent that if it couldn’t go to Jim, it wouldn’t go anywhere. I knew how Dad felt about the bird, that it was one of a kind and it had to go to a one of a kind guy and there was only one as far as I was concerned – Jim McCleery.” And so it was. Frank Schmidt delivered the bird to Jim in March of 1998. Jim’s honeymoon with the “woodie” was short lived as he passed away less than a year later. At the sale of Dr. McCleery’s collection, one of the rarest of all decoys held its own, achieving a new world record of $354,500 and the fourth highest selling lot of the 70


eleven million dollar decoy sale. A photographic history It is not uncommon for iconic pieces of art to be photographed regularly over their lifetime. The exact can be said for the Mason Premier Wood Duck.

Jim McCleery and Frank Schmidt after Jim’s purchase of the Mason Premier wood duck from the Mackey family in 1998

First appearing in a color plate in “American Bird decoys” Bill Mackey, “American Decoys,” Quintina Colio, p. 6, exact decoy, then on the cover of the Ward Museum exhibit catalog titled, “Classic Hunting Decoys & Sporting Art” in 1994, the cover of “Decoy Magazine,” July/August 1994, Page 90 of “Decoys, North America’s One Hundred Greatest,” Loy Harrell, Jr., page 47 “Bird Decoys of North America,” Robert Shaw and finally as the single decoy photographed at the beginning of chapter one on “Mason Decoys,” page 9, Alan Haid and Russ Goldberger. On the cover of “The McCleery Auction,” Ronald Gard and Robert Shaw. “Bird Decoys of North America,” Robert Shaw, 2010, pp. 46-7, exact decoy.


155. Extremely rare and important wood duck drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910. Premier grade. Hollow carved with slightly turned head and fine swirl paint detail. The only known hollow example. Near mint original paint; a small drip of gray paint has been partially removed from one side; several tiny dents; knot on one side has separated slightly.

155

72

Provenance: Originally purchased out of a home on the Jersey Shore by John Hillman and Lloyd Johnson. Ex collection William Mackey, Jr., by descent to the Mackey family, New York, New York. Ex collection Dr. James McCleery, Pasadena, Texas. Lot 252 in the McCleery collection auction, Guyette & Schmidt, Inc./Sotheby’s, January 2000, from a property of a Southern collector.

Literature: “American Bird Decoys,” William J Mackey, Jr., p. 96, exact decoy. “American Decoys,” Quintina Colio, p. 6, exact decoy. “Decoys, North America’s 100 Greatest Decoys,” Loy Harrell, Jr., p. 90, exact decoy. “Top of the Line Sporting Collectibles,” Donna Tonelli, p. 115, exact decoy. Decoy Magazine, July/August 1994, cover, exact decoy. “The McCleery Auction,” Ronald Gard and Robert Shaw, front cover, exact decoy. “Bird Decoys of North America,” Robert Shaw, 2010, pp. 46-7, exact decoy. (500,000 - 800,000)


155 Detail

155 Detail

This singular decoy is universally considered to be what legendary collector William Mackey called it: “the greatest single item from their [Mason’s] shop.” It is clearly a labor of love, a one-of-a-kind piece that stands far above the many other excellent birds produced by the Mason firm. The decoy is a superb evocation of a drake wood duck, which the noted ornithologist E. H. Forbush, in his 1912 book on the game birds of Massachusetts, declared “the loveliest of all wild-fowl. Even the Mandarin Duck of China is not more strikingly beautiful.” The elegant flowing lines of this bird’s body and head are complemented by carefully rendered swirling paint patterns to capture the essence of this species as well as any artist—including John James Audubon—ever has. As former owners William Mackey and Jim McCleery both understood, no collector could ask for more. -Robert Shaw

155 Detail 73


156. Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade with double blues. Early snakey head style. Strong original paint; three small shot marks; small dent on left side; edge wear to tip of bill; varnish that has darkened slightly.

156 Detail

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Provenance: Seitz collection.

(6,500 - 9,500)


157 157 Detail

157. Very rare widgeon hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. Branded “J.B.Semple” on underside. Original paint; restoration to tail with touchup in that area; touchup at neck seam.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(7,000 - 10,000)

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158.

Rigmate pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; drake has small crack in one side and tiny rough area on the tip of the tail; hen has been hit by shot and has a small chip missing from the tail. (2,500 - 3,500)

158

159. Coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Challenge grade. Branded “L.P.J.” and “W.O.H.” on underside. Strong original paint with light gunning wear; small chip at tip of tail; 60% of neck filler missing; a few small rubs and shot scars.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

159

160. Rare and early special order pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century. A gray wash has been removed from both decoys to expose original paint; both show minor wear; bottoms have been shaved and keel added to both.

160

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

161. Rare wood duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1900. Old overpaint that has been taken down, but still retains original lines and coloring; rough areas on right side of wing patch and left side of breast. (2,000 - 3,000)

161

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162

163

162. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade, Seneca Lake model. Strong original paint with good patina and minor wear; a few small dents and shot marks; each has a crack in the underside extending a short way up the breast.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(5,000 - 8,000)

163. Rare pair of goldeneye, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Original paint that has darkened with age; minor wear; a few small dents; each has a circular, rectangular weight inset in the underside.

Provenance: Rose collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys - A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 65. (4,000 - 6,000)

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164. Very rare rigmate pair of mergansers, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Standard grade with tack eyes. Both are branded “R. Behan”. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; each has a crack in the underside; replaced neck filler and shot marks.

Provenance: Rose collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys - A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 74. (3,000 - 5,000)

164

165. Pintail drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade with early snakey head style. Original paint with minor wear; crack in back; small dents; old touch up on part of bill. (3,000 - 5,000)

165

166. Rare hollow carved bluebill hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Strong original paint with minor wear; small crack in one side.

Provenance: Rose collection. (2,500 - 3,500)

166

167. Bluebill hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; approximately 2” circular weight is set into the underside; small dents.

167

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Provenance: Rose collection. (1,500 - 2,500)


168

169

168. Bluewing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade with double blues. Strong original paint; edge wear to tail and some paint flaking to right side.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

169. Rigmate pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Premier grade. Strong original paint; very light wear; small tail chip on hen; small tail chip on drake that has been restored; a few tiny puppy chews at tip of drake’s bill. (5,000 - 7,000)

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Decoratives

170

171

170. Rare 7/8 size pair of decorative mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry Illinois, circa 1945. Both have carved raised wings, and slightly turned heads. Hen has desirable carved cheek. Drake has strong comb painting on sides. Excellent original paint; protected by an old coat of varnish; tight crack through drake’s neck.

171. Pair of 1/4 size wood ducks on wooden base, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Carving is just under 8” long. Wood ducks have raised, carved wing tips, slightly turned heads, and are resting on a large maple leaf. Minor paint shrinkage; thin crack through drake’s neck; slight roughness to drake’s wing tips.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. (4,500 - 6,500)

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Literature: “Charles Perdew, Ann Tandy Lacey p. 231, exact decoy. (5,000 - 7,000)


172. Dove, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, 2nd half 20th century. Raised wings with wire legs and glass eyes. Made for Otto Myer. “Hunter collection 5” written on underside of tail. Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; structurally very good. (3,000 - 4,000)

173. Half size female cardinal on burl base, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1940. Glass eyes and carved raised wing tips. Approximately 5 1/2” tall. Excellent; protected by an old coat of varnish.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. “Fish and Fowl Decoys of the Great Lakes,” Donna Tonelli, p. 153, exact decoy. (4,000 - 7,000)

173

174. Full size pair of decorative mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1945. Both have slightly turned heads and carved raised wings. Drake has carved curl feather and strong comb painting on sides. Excellent and original; protected by an old coat of varnish.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. (4,000 - 6,000)

174 81


175. Pair of 1/4 size flying mallards and pair of greenwing teal, George Reinbold. Signed. All measure approximately 9.5” from wing tip to wing tip. Fine and well painted feather paint detail. Minor discoloration on wings, otherwise very good and original.

Provenance: From a home in Blue Hill, Maine. (3,500 - 4,500)

175

176. Pair of size flying pheasant and grouse, George Reinbold. Hen is approximately 12” long. Fine and well blended paint detail. Both have minor bill damage; male has chip missing from one edge of tail and two wing tips are missing.

Provenance: From a home in Blue Hill, Maine. (1,000 - 1,500)

176

177. Dove, Harold Haertel, Dundee, Illinois. Hollow with working rubber bill and glass eyes. Slightly blunted at tail. (800 - 1,200)

177 178. Two size carvings, George Reinbold. A cock ringneck pheasant and a grouse. Pheasant is 11” long. Highly detailed and well blended feather paint. Minor discoloration at wing tips; otherwise very good and original.

178

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Provenance: From a home in Blue Hill, Maine. (1,750 - 2,250)


179. Pair of 2/3 size decorative mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1945. Both have slightly turned heads and carved raised wings. Drake has carved curl feather and strong comb painting on sides. Excellent and original; protected by an old coat of varnish.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. (3,500 - 5,500)

179

180. Pair of 1/3 size decorative pintails, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1945. Drake has slightly turned head. Both have carved wing tips. Very good and original; protected by an old coat of varnish; hen is missing a slight chip in underside of tail.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. (2,500 - 3,500)

180 181. Pair of half size decorative mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1945. Both have slightly turned heads and carved raised wings. Drake has carved curl feather and strong comb painting on sides. Excellent and original; protected by an old coat of varnish.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. (3,000 - 5,000)

181

182. Pair of 1/4 size decorative mallards, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1945. Both have slightly turned heads and carved raised wings. Drake has strong comb painting on sides. Excellent and original; protected by an old coat of varnish; drake has hairline crack in neck.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. (2,000 - 3,000)

182

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Illinois River 183. Mallard drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois. Retains Graves weight. Original paint with minor wear, mostly near eyes; two cracks in tail; a few tiny dents. (2,500 - 3,500)

183

184. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Branded “W.L. Cocroft”. Original paint with moderate wear on upper half of decoy; minor wear on lower half; a few small dents. (1,750 - 2,250)

184

185. Very rare mallard drake ice duck, Charles Schoeneider Sr., Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Hollow carved with metal foot. Paint has been completely restored in the style of Schoenheider by Bill Gibian. (3,000 - 5,000)

185

186 84

186. Canada goose, William Shaw, Lacon, Illinois, last quarter 19th century. Only two of these geese are known by Shaw. Tack eyes. Very thin paint, much of which appears to be original; protected by a very old coat of varnish; three piece body has some seam separation; crack in neck; crazed areas on neck have partially flaked to expose wood; a few small dents; professional repair to most of the bill. (3,000 - 4,000)


187. Round body style mallard drake, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois, 1st half 20th century. Carved wings with “25” painted on underside. Paint on head, areas of brown on breast, black underside of tail, and wing patches is old working repaint; the rest is original protected by an old coat of varnish; cracks in neck. (2,000 - 2,500)

187

188. Flat back style bluebill drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880s. Retains Elliston weight. Original paint with minor flaking and wear; old overpaint has been taken off of part of the underside with traces remaining; small dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

188

189. Mallard hen, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Retains original Graves weight on underside. Branded “J.P.” near weight. Strong original paint with light wear; professional tail chip repair to approximately 1/2 of tail. (3,000 - 4,000)

189

190. Mallard drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Gray sided model. Retains Graves weight on underside. Paint by Millie Graves. Very strong original paint protected by a light coat of varnish; small tail chip has been reglued; light wear; shot mark on left side of body. (3,500 - 4,500)

190

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191

192

193

194

195

196

198

197

191. Preening mallard drake, George Barto, Putnam, Illinois. “AAA” painted on underside. Weight is missing; original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents. (650 - 950)

195. Pintail drake carved in the style of Hector Whittington, Oglesby, Illinois, by Fred Engleman. Good comb paint detail. Near mint original paint; structurally very good. (300 - 400)

192. Rare three piece deep V body style pintail drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Original paint with moderate wear on back and the rest has old in use repaint; crack through neck with small chips missing in that area. (500 - 800)

196. Bluewing teal drake, Hector Whittington, Oglesby, Illinois. Stamped 1967. Original paint with minor to moderate flaking; structurally good. (400 - 600)

193. Pintail drake, Fred Weber and Charles Gissler, Peru, Illinois. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; thin chip missing from underside of bill; small dents.

Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forest Loomis, p. 231. (450 - 750)

194. Crow, Haddon Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1960s. Brass ID plate on base. Near mint original paint; shallow chip in the underside of bill. (400 - 600) 86

197. Pair of Canada geese, Otto Quesh, Chicago, Illinois, 2nd quarter 20th century. Hollow carved with movable heads. Original paint with moderate flaking and wear; a few small dents. Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forest Loomis. (600 - 900) 198. Hollow stick up Canada goose from the Illinois River, 1st quarter 20th century. Original paint with minor wear covered with old coat of varnish; small tail chip missing; crack at filler in neck base; two metal legs are missing. (400 - 600)


199

200

199. Very rare widgeon hen, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Slightly turned head. Retains Perdew weight. Near mint original paint by Charlie protected by an old coat of varnish; some irregularities in varnish on lower half. (4,500 - 6,500)

200. Rare rigmate pair of pintails, Roy Patterson, Peoria, Illinois. Drake has slightly turned head. Inscribed on bottom “Roy Patterson Peoria Ill”. Two-piece hollow pine bodies. Professional repair to a small hole in the back of each by Russ Allen.

Literature: Decoy Magazine: “Roy Patterson” by Donna Tonelli, March/April 2004, p. 32-34. (4,500 - 6,500)

87


201

203

205

201. Rare bluebill drake, Stephen Lane, Lacon, Illinois. Strong comb painting on white areas of back. Original paint protected by a old coat of varnish; chip is missing from underside of bill; crack on nostril area of bill; several very old shot marks have been filled with wood filler; moderate wear; rough areas to edge of tail. (800 - 1,000) 202. Bluewing teal drake, Cline McAlpin, Chicago, Illinois, circa 1960. Slightly turned head, McAlpin stamp on underside. Near mint original paint; tight crack to left side of neck. (800 - 1,200) 203. Rare bluebill drake, Stephen Lane, Lacon, Illinois. Strong comb painting on white areas of back. Moderate gunning wear with several shot scars and rubs to head and rough areas around edge of tail. (1,000 - 1,200)

88

202

204

206

204. Rigmate pair of mallards, Tube Dawson, Putnam, Illinois, 1st half 20th century. Excellent and original. (800 - 1,200) 205.

Early mallard drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois. From the Caswell rig, branded “C.J.C.” in underside. Most of the decoy has working repaint; crack through neck; a few small dents; weight is missing. (800 - 1,200)

206.

Pintail drake, Herbert Reitgraf, Peru, Illinois. Original paint with good detail and minor wear; a few small dents.

Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Forest Loomis and Paul Parmalee, Plate 178. (800 - 1,200)


207

208

209

211

210

212

207. Two decoys Hector Whittington, Oglesby, Illinois. circa 1930s. Old repaint appears to be by Whittington; a few small dents. (400 - 600) 208. Large pintail drake, Tony Chaido, Spring Valley, Illinois. Signed. Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents. (350 - 450) 209. Two decoys, Perry Wilcoxen, Liverpool, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Mallard has original paint with minor to moderate wear; pintail has a mixture of original and more modern touchup; a few small dents. (400 - 600) 210.

Miniature mallard drake on burl base, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Burl base has Perdew’s signature on side. These were known as “dollar ducks”.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. (500 - 800)

213

211. Hollow carved Canada goose, Tony Chaido, Spring Valley, Illinois. Relief carved wing tips and glass eyes. Original paint by Donna Tonelli, decoy was not finished. Very good and original. (350 - 550) 212. Bluebill drake, Charles Schoenheider Sr., Peoria, Illinois. 1924 is stamped in the weight. Included is a 1st place ribbon from the 2001 Chesapeake Wildlife Expo. Old in use repaint; a few small dents; hairline crack partway through neck.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 86. (350 - 450)

213. Working style hooded merganser drake, William Koelpin. Signed and dated 1969. Relief wing tip carving. Reglued crack in neck; keel has been removed. (400 - 600)

89


Fish

214

214. Fine trout fish decoy with jigging stick from Lake Chautauqua, New York, last quarter 19th century. Approximately 7” long with leather tail, metal fins, and tack eyes. Detailed gill carving. Slight curve to leather tail. Original paint with good detail and patina; minor wear; structurally very good. (9,000 - 12,000)

214 Detail

215

215.

Rare trout fish decoy from Lake Chautauqua, New York, last quarter 19th century. Approximately 7” long. Metal fins, tack eyes, and unusual metal tail. Gill carving. Particularly fine paint detail and patina. Original paint with a few small scrapes; small crack by weight in underside.

Literature: “Beneath the Ice,” Apfelbaum Gottlieb and Michaan, p. 51 and p. 57, fish by same maker. (9,000 - 12,000)

90

215 Detail


216

217

218

219

220

222

221

222

216. Trout fish decoy from Lake Chautauqua, New York. 6 1/2” long. Thick body with fine detailed speckle painting on sides. Carved mouth and gills with classic leather tail. Original paint with light in use wear; possible repair to cracked leather tail. (2,000 - 2,500) 217. Trout fish decoy from Lake Chautauqua, New York. Measures 7” long. Carved gills and mouth, painted eyes and leather tail. A blend of pink, yellow and white on sides. Very thin original paint; structurally good. (2,000 - 3,000) 218. Trout fish decoy from Lake Chautauqua, New York. Measures 8”. Unusual carved mouth, lips and gills with classic leather tail. Side fins are carved. Tack eyes. Paint appears to be a very old, possibly second coat. (1,800 - 2,200)

222

219. Trout fish decoy from Lake Chautauqua, New York. 7 3/4” long. Carved mouth and gills with classic leather fin and tack eyes. Very good and original. (1,800 - 2,200) 220.

Trout fish decoy from Lake Chautauqua, New York. 7” long. Carved mouth and gills with classic leather fin and tack eyes. Very good and original. (1,800 - 2,200)

221. Trout fish decoy from Lake Chautauqua, New York. Carved gills and mouth with tack eyes. Cross hatch painting against a silver side. Metal fins. 6 1/2”. (1,800 - 2,200) 222. Group of three fish decoys from Lake Chautauqua New York, circa 1900. Two fish have leather tail fins, one has metal fins. Two fish measure 7” one 6 1/2”. All three fish are a mix of original paint with strengthening to white areas on underside; one side fin missing; surfaces are dry and very old. (1,500 - 2,000)

91


223 223. Sturgeon sizing decoy from Wisconsin. 24” long, glass eyes, and detailed scale painting. Wonderfully painted red mouth with three furniture locks used to simulate top fin. Two areas of leaded weight on underside. One of the finest examples of a sturgeon decoy that we have ever seen. Strong original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; very dry surface. (6,000 - 8,000)

223 Detail Sturgeon, with weights over 200 pounds, is the largest freshwater fish that can be legally obtained by ice fish spearing. In 1948 a Game Warden said that “...it’s a curious fish that likes to examine objects in the water” so the sturgeon are virtually coaxed into spear range. Since sturgeon are bottom feeders, most fish decoy/ coaxers are used close to the lake bottom. Sturgeon fish decoys are carved as sturgeon, catfish, northern pike, and suckers, while others are made with no species in mind. An important adaptation was larger fish decoys, called a Winnebago coaxer, that have straight and heavy bodies. Sizing decoys are the largest fish decoys made in North America and were first used after 1932, when length rather than weight was used to define the legal limit.

224

226 224. Vintage sturgeon decoy from Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin. Approximately 15” long with metal fins. Original paint with moderate wear; small cracks. (650 - 950) 225. Crappie fish decoy from Minnesota. Metal fins, and carved eyes and gills. Approximately 5.5” long. Original paint with minor wear; structurally good. (400 - 600)

92

225

227 226. 13” long crappie in underwater scene with carved rocks and lily pads with carved dragon fly on lily pad, Smokey Joe Jackson, Saginaw Bay, Michigan, circa 1960s. Reglued crack in two dragonfly wings, otherwise very good and original. (1,500 - 2,500) 227. Lot of 11 fish decoys. Including examples by Bethel, Newman, Max, Stuart, Randall, and Leach. Vary from fair to very good. (1,000 - 1,500)


Oscar Peterson Cadillac, Michigan

Born November 14th, 1887 in Grayling Michigan, Oscar Peterson soon relocated to Cadillac Michigan, where he lived his entire life until his death in 1951. Over the years Peterson produced items including, fish decoys, trade signs, pincushions, vases, fishing lures and decorative plaques. Trade signs like this were given free to his better selling spearing decoy customers. Recently found in a home in Southern Indiana, this sign originally hung from hooks attached at the top of the fish later it was retired to the base it currently resides on.

228

228. Rare and desirable pike trade sign, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Carved and painted on both sides with applied metal fins and wooden tail. Relief carved eyes, mouth, gills and nostrils. Early Peterson paint pattern. 25” long. 6” tall. Mounted to a stand for easy display. Remnants of two holes on top of body where eye hooks once were and hole through center of the back. Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; putty that was applied over fins has flaked away; flaking at tail and high spots on head and front of face. (15,000 - 25,000)

228 Detail 229. Pike, Oscar Peterson, Cadillac, Michigan. Approximately 7” long. Period 3. A few paint flakes missing from metal fins, otherwise very good and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

229 93


Ken Anger

Dunnville, Ontario

230

231

232

233

234

235

230. Stylish redhead hen, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Slightly turned head. Very good and original.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,500 - 2,500)

231. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Grossman collection. Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey, Mackey collection stamp is on the undersides. (1,500 - 2,500)

232. Bluewing teal hen, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Rasping on head. Hour glass carved in back. Excellent and original.

94

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

233. Stylish black duck, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, 2nd quarter 20th century. Early feather carvings, slightly turned head, and very hollow. Original paint with light wear; two drips of stain near left front eye.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

234.

Pair of redheads, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Incised wing carving. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; thin old coat of varnish; a few tiny dents. (2,000 - 3,000)

(1,250 - 1,750)

235. Bluebill hen and drake, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Incised feather carving. Hen has slightly turned head. Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents. (1,250 - 1,750)


236. Rigmate pair of mallards, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, 1st half 20th century. Excellent carving and painting. Near mint. (3,000 - 4,000)

236 237. Greenwing teal drake, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Carved hourglass with comb painting on back. Rasp carving on head. Excellent and original.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 4,000)

237

238. Widgeon drake, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Carved hourglass with comb painting on back. Rasp carving on head. Excellent and original.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 4,000)

238

239. Rigmate pair of buffleheads, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, 1st half 20th century. Hen is slightly smaller than drake. Very good and original.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,500 - 4,500)

239 95


Paintings

240

242

244

241

243

245

240. Oil on canvas of hunter setting out decoys, Lou Schiffrel. Signed. Professionally framed. Image size approximately 23” x 29”. Very good and original. (1,750 - 2,250)

243. Painting on board of Long Island decoys, Lou Schiffrel. Professionally framed. Image size approximately 18” x 24”. Very good and original. (1,500 2,000)

241. Oil on canvas of hunter with shorebird decoys, Lou Schiffrel. Signed. Professionally framed. Image size approximately 23” x 29”. Very good and original. (1,750 - 2,250)

244. Painting on board of a Sam Soper goose and a shotgun, Lou Schiffrel. Signed. Professionally framed. Image size approximately 24” x 29”. Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

242. Watercolor of decoys in gunning boat by Lou Schiffrel. Signed. Professionally triple matted and framed. Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

245. Watercolor of hunter with decoys in gunning boat, Lou Schiffrel. Professionally triple matted and framed. Image size approximately 18” x 28”. Very good and original. (1,500 - 2,000)

96


248

246

247

249

249

249A

248. Oil on canvas of hanging mallards. Dated September 1899. Image size approximately 22 1/2” x 28 1/2”. Original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; structurally good. (650 - 850)

246. Watercolor of street scene entitled “Near Albufeira,” Ogden Pleissner. Signed. Professionally matted and framed. Image size 7” x 10”. Very good and original. (4,500 - 6,000) 247. “They’re Flying” oil on board by M.A. Klafke. Signed and dated 1993. Subject matter is a hunter with decoys and dog. Professionally framed. Approximately 10” x 15”. Very good and original. (700 - 900)

249. Pair of pen and ink drawings of hunters with their decoys, Lou Schiffrel. Signed and dated 1976. Professionally matted and framed. Image size approximately 10 1/2” x 17”. Very good and original. (500 - 700) 249A. Watercolor of dog with woodcock, Herman Gustav Simon, 1846-1893, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Signed. Professionally framed. Image size approximately 14” x 16-1/2” Very good and original.

Provenance: Simon exhibited at the Centennial International Exposition of 1876, at the Pennsylvania Academy between 1876-1887, and at the Society of Artists, 1879, 1881, 1884. (2,000 - 2,500)

97


Ontario

250

251

252

253

254

255

250. Redhead drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario. Solid body with “CEC” brand in underside. Lightly hit by shot, otherwise very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 251. Redhead hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario. Solid body with “CEC” brand in underside. Very good and original.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates. (1,200 - 1,500)

252. Canada goose, Long Point Company, unknown carver, Long Point, Ontario, circa 1900. Branded “SMP” in underside. Exaggerated “S” curved head. Hollow construction with bottom board. Older coat of working paint that is covering a very early crazed, probably original surface. (1,000 - 2,000)

253. Redhead drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Bottom board hollow. Branded “J.R.W.” on underside. Average gunning wear with several shot marks; red on head appears to be a very old second coat; crack through right side near neck seat.

(1,200 - 1,500)

254. Redhead hen, Bud Tully, Peterborough, Ontario, 2nd quarter 20th century. Strong carving over body and wings. Paint appears to be original, including white areas on lower side of body; small spots of discoloration on top of back and bill; light gunning wear.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,000 - 2,000)

255. Rare black duck, Peter Pringle, Dunnville, Ontario, circa 1930. Branded “PMP” on underside. Well executed carving on back and rasping on head. Paint is a mix of old and repaint.

98

Provenance: Seitz collection.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,000 - 1,200)


As one might expect, Tom Chambers made many changes in his decoys between 1880 in Toronto through the late 1930’s at the Canada Club. Using Redheads and Canvasbacks as examples: He made at least 5 distinct Redhead styles and five distinct Canvasback styles. The round head, long body Redheads were his earliest Flats Club style. Wonderful decoys, meticulously carved, sanded, painted usually without combing, skillfully blended thin oil paint, often branded George Hendrie, an 1889 member of the Flats Club. Also, early round head, short bodies-the same great heads with shorter, streamlined bodies with back-swept necks, usually nicely blended, not combed paint, with the same meticulous bill carving. Then came the stylized Redheads-head and bill stretched out a distinct wedge shape with slightly less attention to detail, a flatter body with great thick comb painting and thicker, shorter bills. Also found are “poodle heads” with a “horse neck” arch, a broad puffy head with great high head style. Also a rig of short-billed, slightly smaller decoys. A dizzying array of styles, not surprising given the time span, economic changes, material supplies and available time to complete the decoys, all the while managing a busy, isolated club. Chamber’s Canvasbacks also morph to several styles, each appealing and compelling to collect. Long bodied, round heads often branded Hendrie appear to be his earliest Canvasback club decoys; later, are spectacularly profiled, swept necked examples with racy heads and long bodies; short-bodied Cans with exaggerated wedge profiles; a smaller rig of round head, short bodies, hollow (branded JTN John T. Nichols, a 1901 club member) with great marbleized, blended paint; several solid, long-bodied Cans stamped Thoms. Chambers maker, with round heads, great comb painting and meticulously finished. As with Redheads, several styles, a common theme, function, form, paint at its St. Clair Flats best.

256

256 Detail

256 Detail 256.

Rigmate pair of hollow redheads, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900. Early round head style. Drake has an “H” carved in underside. Subtle feather painting on wing area of hen and unusual feather painting on wing patches of drake. Both are in original paint; drake has rubs and crazing on back and head; hen has rubs on body and head, small dent to the right side of the tip of the bill.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(8,000 - 12,000) 99


257

258

259

260

261

262

257. Rigmate pair of hollow carved black ducks, William Chrysler, Bellville, Ontario, circa 1920s. Original scratch feather paint with minor to moderate wear; one has a tail chip missing; both have neck cracks with some chips missing at the cracks one has a tail chip missing; lightly hit by shot. (1,750 - 2,250) 258. Redhead drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1870s. Solid body model with raised neck seat. Branded “CHCT” twice in underside, also signed “EH Goodrich”. Original paint that has darkened with age; minor wear; small cracks and dents. (1,200 - 1,500) 259. Old squaw hen by an unknown carver from Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Slightly turned head and raised neck seat. Original paint with moderate wear; hairline crack in back. (1,000 - 1,500)

100

260. Pair of hollow carved bluebills from the St. Clair Flats, last quarter 19th century. Glass eyes. Old in use repaint; lightly hit by shot. (1,000 - 1,500) 261. Lowhead black duck, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900. Branded on underside “G&J Warin, builders, Toronto” and “E.P.H.” twice. Original paint shows considerable wear and crazing; several rough spots exposed to bare wood on bill, head, and body.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

262. Lowhead bluebill hen, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, 2nd quarter 20th century. Comb painting on back. Classic wing carving. Very good and original.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)


263. Canvasback drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Hollow body with strong combing on back and wet on wet feather painting on sides. Original paint; crack midway through the neck; rough area near tail; a few small rubs.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 4,000)

263 264. Rare and possibly unique sleeping black duck, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Branded “Thos Chambers, Maker” in underside. Fine scratch painting on head. Original paint with moderate gunning wear; rubs on both sides of body and top of head exposing wood; hairline crack in back runs from tip of bill to tail. (2,000 - 3,000)

264 265. Canvasback, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Branded “J.T.N.” in underside. One of only four known canvasback drakes by Chambers in his rare short body, round head style with marbleized paint technique. See rigmate pair in “Decoying St. Clair to the St. Lawrence,” B.W. Crandell, color plate, p. 167. Original paint by Tom Chambers; sliver of bill missing running length of tip to underside of mandible.

265

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 5,000)

266. Hollow carved black duck, Jim Duncan, Smith Falls, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Relief wing carving with raised wing tips and some feather detail. Comb feather painting and glass eyes. Original paint with minor wear; paint has been damaged by a spill on back of body; five small nails secure break in the neck; a few other small dents.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 156. (2,500 - 3,500)

266 101


John Reeves

1860 - 1896 Long Point, Ontario

John Cope Reeves was the eldest son of Phineas Reeves (1833-1896) who was the patriarch of three generations of decoy carvers, boat builders, duck guides and club managers. John Reeves was the first bookkeeper of the Long Point Company which was established in 1866 as a prestigious hunting club on the North Shore of Lake Erie in Ontario, Canada.

Working at Long Point with his father Phineas, the father/son team guided and made decoys for club members. They used the same patterns, and their decoys were very similar. John made Teal, Black, Mallard, Pintail and Goose decoys. The two known early John Reeves geese from Long Point are similar to Phineas’ and are not as stylish as his later Canada Club geese. In the late 1880’s, John moved to the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company as the club manager. The club is often referred to as The Canada Club and/or the Toronto Club. In the early 1890’s, John Reeves made a small rig of “Flats Geese” for St. Clair Flats Shooting Club member Howard G. Meredith. John Reeves death in 1896 at the age of 36 obviously contributed to the rarity of his Flats decoys. Most knowledgeable “Flats” decoy collectors believe these “Meredith Geese” to be John Reeves finest work. Some believe these strikingly handsome goose decoys with their swept back necks, full stylish head position, long elegant thin tails, and wonderfully rich, blended paint detail are some of the finest Toronto School Flats Geese. This John Reeves “Meredith Goose” is branded H G M and was acquired in the early 1970’s directly from the St. Clair Flats Shooting Company by Judge Harry Seitz and Bernard Crandell of Michigan. Judge Seitz retained this goose for his collection and considered it one of the finest Meredith geese from the 7 original examples.

267

267 Detail 267 Detail 267. Canada goose, John Reeves, Long Point, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. High neck with turned head slightly looking down. Branded “Kennedy” “H.N.T.” “F.B.G.” and “Meredith” twice on underside. Worn original paint; wear at right side of tail; crack running the length of the body on the left side has lost its wood filler; paint missing from spot on left side; as well as flaking to exposed bare wood on head, bill and neck and other areas of body. Provenance: Seitz collection.

102

(10,000 - 15,000)


Charles Reeves

1877 - 1941 Long Point, Ontario This original paint Blue-Winged Teal decoy is one of only three known bluewing teal decoys by Charles P. Reeves, youngest son of Phineas Reeves of Long Point Ontario, Canada. Charles made the decoy around 1930 for Junius S. Morgan of New York and Wilton Lloyd Smith, both 1930 members of the prestigious Long Point Company where Charles worked making decoys, building boats and guiding sportsmen fishing and hunting. The decoy is branded “JSM” and “WLS”.

268

268 Detail

268 Detail

268. Bluewing teal hen, Charles Reeves, Long Point, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Solid body. Branded “J.S.M.”, “G.T.B.”, “W.L.S.”, “R.E.T.” Strong original paint with slight wear; structurally excellent; a few small rubs.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(12,000 - 15,000)

103


Related Items

269

270

269.

271

Bronze, William Koelpin, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. Titled “Damn the Wind”. Hunter in duck boat with water spaniel and decoys fighting the waves on a windy day. “Copyright 1976,” signed “William Koelpin, 12/24” inscribed in bronze. 24” x 10” x 9”. Excellent. (4,000 - 6,000)

270. ”Two Scotties listening” cast iron door stop, circa 1930. Made as advertising from the Texaco National Sewing Company. Approximately 9” long. Original and good. (200 - 300)

104

271. Classic flower basket cast iron door stop, Hubley Co. Approximately 11” tall. Heavy enough to work against any door. Well preserved original paint with minor wear. (300 - 400)


272

273

275

274

272. Sitting cat door stop, Bradley and Hubbard Co, Meriden, Connecticut. Approximately 7.5” tall. Very good. 273.

Literature: “The Door Stop Book,” John and Nancy Smith, p. 112. (950 - 1,250) Rare cast iron horned owl door stop, Bradley & Hubbard Co., Meriden, Connecticut, circa 1900. Marked “B&H 7797”. Original paint with very minor chipping and wear; 3 of the 4 original bumpers remain. (2,500 - 3,000)

274. Cast iron elephant door stop, Bradley and Hubbard Co., Meriden, Connecticut, circa 1905. Approximately 10” x 10”. Marked “B&H 7799”. Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400) 275. Vintage life size full body Scottie door stop, Hubley Co., Meriden, Connecticut. Approximately 16” x 12”. Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,400)

105


Canes

276

276 Detail

277

277 Detail

278

278 Detail

276. Hand and wrist with a wristwatch and band, 19301940s. Painted white. Found in Massacahusetts. (600 - 800) 277. Hand holding snake with frog, believed to be from Connecticut, circa 1900-1915. Faded black paint. (600 - 800) 278. Fist on the handle, 1st half 20th century, Battle Creek, Michigan. Painted silver, red, and black “sleeve” colorful sections, with hearts, clubs, diamonds, clubs added. (600 - 800) 106

279

280

279 Detail

280 Detail

279. Carved hand gripping baton, circa 18801910. Wonderfully painted with green, black, and red. American. Provenance: Ex Ted Trotta collection.

(700 - 900)

280. Gracefully carved hand holding a stick on handle, last quarter 19th century. With rope sailors knot at wrist, metal ferrule. American. Provenance: Ex William Guthman colleciton. (800 - 1,000)


281

281 Detail

283

282

282 Detail

285

284

283 Detail

281. Fist tightly holding snake, which wraps around wrist, circa 1880-1900. Probably from Oley Valley, Pennsylvania. Snake has ink drawn scales. (500 - 700) 282. Hand holding dog with collar on handle, 1890-1920, Michigan. (400 - 600)

284 Detail

286

285 Detail

286 Detail

284. Stained black fist carved on handle, early 20th century. Found in Illinois. (400 - 600) 285. Wonderfully carved folky hand holding a snake, circa 1900. American. (400 - 600)

286. Made in America walking stick. Excellent, detailed alli283. Hand holding cane, circa 1920-1930s. Brown paint, gators carved on handle and two on staff. 35” tall. cane with etched tree and bold snake wrapping around (400 - 600) cane. Carved “Once Walk, Talk, and Ly Cane.” American. (400 - 600) 107


287

288

290

289

292

287.

“De Shootinest Gent’man,” Nash Buckingham. Limited edition copy 367/950, Darrydale Press. Exterior is very good; some separation on inside cover at spline; minor age discoloration. (300 - 350)

288. Two volume hard cover set of books entitled, “The Birds of Minnesota,” by Thomas S. Roberts. Presented by the author to L.C. Stephens in 1932, inscription inside cover. Original and good. (75 - 125) 289. Dovetailed knife box with carved heart handle, last quarter 19th century. Approximately 16” long and 11” high. Hardwood construction. Probably Shaker. Original surface with a few small cracks and dents; small chip missing from corner of base. (500 - 800)

108

290. Splint birch fishing creel with side hole and wood lock. 17” wide 10” high and 8” deep. Both hinges appear to be replaced. (200 - 400) 291. Large group of wooden shorebird stands (Not Photographed). All types, around 100. A few are cork and metal. (200 - 300) 292. Six miscellaneous items. Early corkscrew marked Anheuser Busch, a ladies leg corkscrew with pink striping, a pant leg match holder patented 1880, a knife with a jawbone handle, pipe with a bowl in shape of curlew head, and a painted lead inkwell with tree trunk and hound. (400 - 600)


Calls There are numerous instances of Charles Perdew carving rigs for individuals who supplied him with good wood - “pattern” pine from foundries, white pine from demolished buildings and bridges, wood from nearby sash and door factories. Some very fine decoys were carved because Charlie wished to repay the thoughtfulness of a friend. One of the most well known rigs of decoys which are associated with a gift of wood belonged originally to Jerry Raffensperger of Henry. During the thirties, Raffensperger worked on the construction of metal bridges spanning the Illinois River at Henry and Hennepin, serving as resident engineer for the Illinois Department of Public Works. In December of 1933, when the wooden bridge at Henry was dynamited prior to construction of a new bridge, Jerry arranged for Charlie to receive white pine salvaged from the upper span of the old bridge. In exchange for this wood Raffensperger ordered a full rig of Perdew decoys, a dozen mallards that included a beautiful hen sleeper

“Perdew - An Illinois River Tradition, “Ann Tandy Lacey

293

294

293. Carved duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1930. Red mouth piece with very large initials carved “JGR” which stands for Jerry Raffensperger of Henry, Illinois. (5,000 - 6,000) 294. Mallard drake, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1935. Painted by Edna Perdew. “R” is stamped on under-

side of weight. Which signifies that it was made for Jerry Raffensperger. Original paint with minor wear; green on head has been repainted at the time repair was made to crack in neck a very long time ago; paint is protected by an old coat of varnish; in the making repair near tail area; several dents and a few small areas of flaking. (3,500 - 4,500) 109


294A

295

294B

296 294A. Three duck calls, Hadden Perdew, Henry, Illinois, last half 20th century. One is a miniature, that measures 2 3/4”. All three stamped Charles Perdew. Excellent. (800 - 1,200) 294B. Eight duck calls, by various makers. Jake Gardner, A.M. Bowles, Iverson (NY), Earl Dennison, Royal (in original box), Duc-em in original box, Wooden Commander cut down with original label, and one Duck Commander, reacher cut down. (1,200 - 1,500) 295. Three crow calls, Tom Turpin, Memphis, Tennessee. Small call is stamped “Field & Stream” on barrel and is missing reed. Medium size call has a few small dents near mouth piece. All appear to be original with light wear. (800 - 1,200)

110

297 296. Three crow calls. Two by Charles Perdew, both stamped “Charles H Perdew, Henry Illinois, pat. No. 2, 1900.” with “FC” scratched in barrel of one. Hadden Perdew call, also stamped with the same information. Both Charles calls show light wear; Hadden call is near mint. (500 - 800) 297. Three duck calls, probably from Illinois. Unknown makers. Two larger calls have replaced reeds; smaller cedar call appears to be all original; all three show light wear. (800 - 1,200)


298. Duck call, Tom Turpin, Memphis, Tennessee. Very rare model with hard rubber stopper. Some discoloration on stopper; all parts appear to be original. (1,500 - 2,500)

299. Carved duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois, circa 1930. Green mouth piece with initials “WF” carved on barrel with three flying mallards. All original parts; excellent. (4,000 - 6,000)

298

300

301

300. Duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. VL&A walnut call with four raised panels and “VL&A” carved into one of them. All parts appear to be original; slightly faded with wear at mouthpiece; a few small dents in stopper. (800 - 1,200) 301. Stylish duck call found in Louisiana. Four long leaves carved in walnut barrel with reelfoot style stopper and wedge block. Shows nice age; very good and original. (800 - 1,200)

299

302

303

302. Duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Walnut call with VL&A style. Four raised checkered panels with VL&A carved into one. Perdew, Henry, Illinois carved into top of barrel. Very good and original. (1,000 - 1,500) 303. Duck call, A.M. Bowles, Little Rock, Arkansas. Ebony wood with brass ring at top of barrel. Stamped “A.M. Bowles, Little Rock, Arkansas” at top of barrel. Some wear near mouthpiece; all parts appear to be original. (800 - 1,200) 111


Memorabilia

306

305

304

304. The Marlin Firearms Company poster. With Phillip Goodwin image of cowboy hunting elk. Professionally matted and framed. Retains top and bottom band. 24 1/2” x 13 3/8”. Crease marks throughout much of the image.

306. Winchester 1912 calendar with N.C. Whythe with hunters and grizzly bear. Calendar pages are missing. Professionally matted and framed. Image measures 29 1/2” x 14 1/2”. Bands appear to be missing.

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(3,000 - 4,000)

305. Marbles Company 1924 Calendar. Retains December page. Image of Campsite with man fishing by Philip Goodwin. Retains top and bottom bands. Very strong.

112

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(5,000 - 7,000)

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(3,000 - 4,000)


307. Rare and desirable Winchester poster, “Cock of the Woods.” Bright colors. Retains top and bottom bands. Approximately 25.5” x 15.5”. Tiny tear at top right of band; a few small areas of light edge wear on right side. Very good and original. (7,000 - 10,000)

307

308. Remington UMC trifold die cut, man with dog in cabin. 50.5” wide x 35” high. Professionally framed in high quality frame and matte. Image is in good condition, with several tears and damage to edges; as well as minor areas of in painting. (1,200 - 1,700)

308 113


309

310

311

309.

312

Dead Shot mallard poster with falling duck. Matted and framed. Image shown measures 19.5 x 14”. Professional repairs to torn areas of edge of right side and lower left. (800 - 1,200)

310. Winchester .22 counter top rifle display. Die cut counter top display that holds three rifles. Includes Merry Christmas note cards from Winchester and wrapping instructions. Measures 29.5” wide x 22” high x 16” deep. (1,200 - 1,500)

114

311.

Ajax Heavies poster. Image of geese flying through lightning storm. Good condition with creases and two pieces missing from top quarter of image.

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(1,000 - 2,000)

312. Remington UMC trifold die cut. Cartridge and shell advertising with central image of mallards at flight. 49” x 35.5”. Middle and left panel are in very good condition with light wear; the right panel has had some inpainting to the shotgun shell. Professionally matted and framed with high quality frame. (1,200 - 1,700)


313

314

315

316

313. Winchester poster. “They are Hitters”. Retains top and bottom bands. 26” x 15 1/2”. Good with crease mark through center and two small tears, one on left, one on right.

315. DuPont 1911 calendar. With Edmond Osthos image of hunters looking out window. Retains several calendar pages with September as top page. Has top band. Very good structurally.

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(1,500 - 1,800)

314. 1925 Peters Cartridge Company calendar. Image of mallards in flight over marsh, artist Jo Borges. Retains top band and November page. Approximately 30” x 15”. Some staining at top near band and top right side. (1,500 - 2,500)

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(1,000 - 1,500)

316. Winchester Factory 1912 calendar. With hunters and grizzly bear, image by N.C. Wyeth. Calendar pages missing. Bands are not visible. Image measures 29” x 14”. (1,000 - 2,000)

115


318

317

319

319

317. Large Remington UMC poster of hunters looking out window. Framed. Approximately 29” x 38”. Some wear at folds; a few small scrapes.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(1,250 - 1,750)

318. Very desirable UMC poster with image of bluewing teal in the timbers. By Lynn Bogue Hunt. Professionally framed and matted. Image measures 34” x 12”. (1,500 - 2,500)

116

319

319

319. Four advertising counter felts. Large UMC with two shells, Peters image with hunter, UMC with quail, and DuPont. Large UMC and Peters are professionally framed. Good to excellent. (800 - 1,200)


Shotgun Shell Boxes

320

321

323

324

320. Austin Cartridges Load No. 456, 2 pc. box, Austin Cartridge Co., Cleveland, Ohio, 12 ga., No. 6, 1 oz., 3 drs. Red printed label on buff box with image of three dogs on front. New Rival Shells is stamped on one side. Front label is 99% intact with some staining; a small tear that starts on front label and runs over side label; wrinkle on front bottom. (2,000 - 2,500) 321.

Bang Shells 2 pc. Box, Austin Cartridge Co., Cleveland, Ohio. Buff box with full wrap green, red, yellow, blue and black label. Label is 98% intact and box is good structurally; some staining and wear to label. (2,000 - 2,500)

322. Star load shotgun shell box, EL DuPont, Wilmington, Delaware. 12 guage. Image of red star and setters. Edge wear and rubs to label; structurally good. (5,000 - 7,000)

322

325

323. Robin Hood Eclipse, Eclipse Near Smokeless Powder 2 pc. box, Robin Hood Ammunition Co., Swanton, VT, 12 ga., No. 6, 1 1/8 oz., 3 1/4 drs. Buff box with red, green, yellow and black full label. Box and label show very little edge wear; label is 99% intact. (2,500 - 3,000) 324. Rare Robin Hood Eclipse shotgun shell box. 12 gauage number 4. Full wrap label with slight discoloration and light edge wear; seam split on side panel and one tear on opposite side panel with piece missing. (2,000 - 3,000) 325. Extremely rare Diana shotgun shell box, California Powder Works, San Francisco, California. Image of archer with setter standing on ledge of mountain. 10 guage. Number 6 shot. Label has had restoration and in painting to all three sides; bottom box appears to be original and structurally good. (2,000 - 3,000)

117


326

326

327

328

329

326. Three professionally built shadow boxes containing 12 gauge shotgun shell boxes. Boxes are attached with two pin holes through the bottom box so they have not been damaged. Boxes include; Remington, Peters, UMC, Monark, Western and Winchester. Each box measures 21.5” x 17.5”. Boxes are good to very good. (1,200 - 1,500) 327. Shotgun shell box, Robin Hood Powder Company, Swanton, Vermont. 12 gauge. A few rubs at edges; small crease on right side of front label and on side label where shell description is.

326

Provenance: Powell collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

328. 2 pc. Shotgun shell box, Hazard Cartridge Company, Chicago, Illinois. 10 gauge with very rare uncataloged 748 load. Not seen in the shell box book. Buff box with wrap label. Tear to flap at front panel and seam split on label above front panel; average wear.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(1,000 - 1,500)

329. Rare Robin Hood shotgun shell box. 12 guage number 5 shot. Full wrap label with piece missing from left side on top label; seam split top left. (1,000 - 2,000) 330. Very rare American ammunition jackrabbit shotgun shell box. 12 gauge number 1 shot with graphic of rabbit running on three sides and shell diagram on other. 1.5” tear on one side panel; small tear on another, otherwise original.

118

330

Provenance: Powell collection.

(1,000 - 1,500)


331

332

333 334

331. 100 count 2 pc. Shotgun shell box, Union Metallic Cartridge, “Club”. 16 gauge with image of hunter and spaniel. Seam splits and tears at all edges.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

332. Winchester Repeating Arms Company 100 count Rival shotgun shell box. 10 gauge 2 7/8”. Original and good; small amount of damage to lower right corner.

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(1,750 - 2,250)

333. Rare UMC Club 100 count shotgun shell box, The Union Metallic Cartridge Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 10 guage 2 7/8”. Image of hunter and setter pointing covey of quail. In painting on all grey edges, as well as both panels that have shell information; bottom box has strengthening and re conditioned on all edges. (2,000 - 3,000) 334. 2 pc. 100 count shotgun shell box, UMC Cartridge Company. Boxes full with correct empty and primed shells. Small area of stains and seam splits.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

119


Midwestern

335. Rigmate pair of hollow carved bluebills, Paul Lipke, Whiting, Indiana. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents; weights are missing. (2,500 - 3,500)

335

336. Very rare hollow carvedbluewing teal drake, Paul Lipke, Whiting, Indiana, circa 1940. Retains Lipke weight with “PL” stamped into it. Original paint with a number of small scrapes; slight separation at body seam.

Literature: “Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 181, exact decoy. (4,000 - 6,000)

336

337. Very rare hollow carved canvasback drake, Paul Lipke, Whiting, Indiana. “PL” stamped in weight. Slightly lifted head and raised neck seat. Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; hairline crack in underside. (2,000 - 3,000)

337 120


Moes posing with his famous rig of mallards

338

338. Rare mallard drakes, Alfred Moes, Lakeville, Minnesota. One is a feeder, the other is in a upright pose. Both have circular lead weights that fit into a cutout on the underside of the body and detailed feather carving. Thin crack in neck, otherwise very good and original. Literature: “Decoy Magazine,” Nov/Dec 2005. (8,000 - 12,000)

One of Minnesota’s most coveted carvers, standing among his piers of John Tax and Ole Gunderson. Moes made his rig of animated mallards around 1938

338 Detail

121


339

340

341

342

343

344

339. Early pintail drake from Minnesota with tack eyes. A little small, only 13 1/4” from bill to tail. Original paint with good patina and minor wear; small crack in back and at neck seam. (800 - 1,200) 340. Bluewing teal hen, Don Gearhart, Tulsa, Oklahoma. ID’ed on underside. Relief wing carving and glass eyes. Original paint with minor wear and a few small dents. (800 - 1,200) 341. Hollow carved mallard drake, Ben Yeargan, St. Louis, Missouri, circa 1930s. One of only 12 made by Yeargen. “B.Y.” painted on underside of bill. Original paint with minor wear protected by an old coat of varnish; small dents; small worn area on breast; slight separation at body seams. (800 - 1,200)

342. Hollow carved Canada goose, Ben Yeargan, St. Louis, Missouri, circa 1930s. One of only 12 made by Yeargen. “B.Y.” painted on underside of bill. Original paint with minor wear protected by an old coat of varnish; small dents; small worn area on breast; slight separation at body seams. (650 - 950) 343. Working snow goose decoy, Carl Satler, Burlington, Iowa, circa 1950. Wing, shoulder and tail carving. Balsa body with hardwood neck and head. Original paint on body and head; areas of black at neck and breast appear to have been strengthened. (800 - 1,200) 344. Reaching mallard hen, Ben Yeargan, St. Louis, Missouri. Signed under bill “B.Y.” with original cast iron “keel”. Very strong original paint; excellent structurally.

122

Literature: Decoy Magazine: “Ben Yeargan: Native American,” Gene Kangas, March/April 2013, p. 8-11, exact decoy. (1,200 - 1,600)


345

346

347

348

349

349A

345. Canada goose, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; old touchup on speculums and the white and black areas of the tail; small cracks and dents. (1,500 - 2,500) 346. Rare rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Ed “One Arm” Kellie, Monroe, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Drake is branded. “HY” Dahlka”. Both are in original paint; drake appears to have had a wash of grey removed and a light coat of varnish to white areas; both have light gunning wear.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

347. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Ed “One Arm” Kellie, Monroe, Michigan. Both are branded “Evans”. Paint has been restored in the Kellie style; small cracks and dents. (800 - 1,200) 348. Hollow carved bluewing teal hen with radically turned head from St. Clair Flats, circa 1950. Branded “J. Terrell”. Original paint with minor wear, mostly on extremities; a few tiny dents. (1,500 - 2,000)

350 349. Rigmate pair of redheads, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1950. Drake has slightly turned head. Both have wing carving. Both in original paint with light gunning wear with a few shot marks; drake has a crack through one side of the neck; underside has been repainted.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

349A. Small pair of hollow carved mallards from Wisconsin. Weights are stamp “F. Hass”. Decoys from this rig are pictured in a November 1984 article entitled “Decoys of Winnebago-Harakin Basin” by William Morrissey. And are also mentioned in an article about the Diana Hunting Club by Robert Personius. Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents. (600 - 900) 350. Black duck, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1945. Excellent feather stamping, slightly turned head. Very good and original.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

123


350A

350B

350C

351

352

353

354

356

355

350A. Canvasback drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan. Slightly turned head. Near mint original paint with good patina; keel has been removed. (600 - 900) 350B. Preening bufflehead drake. Branded “W.H. Finch”. Appealing old in use repaint; a few tiny dents. (800 - 1,200) 350C. Widgeon hen, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1940. Slightly turned head with carved wings and feather stamping. Age split on back; lightly chipped tail, and a bill replacement.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

351.

Bluebill drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan. Slightly turned head. Hollowed out from the underside and branded “GEB” in keel. Original paint with minor wear; small crack in tail; very small chip missing from center of tail. (650 - 950)

(700 - 1,000)

352. Pair of canvasbacks, Frank Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan. Original paint with moderate wear; small cracks and dents. (600 - 900) 124

353. Rare hollow widgeon drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1940. Feather stamping and wing carving. Original paint with minor wear; age crack that runs through most of the back; neck crack; bill replacement; old coat of varnish.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(700 - 1,000)

354. Redhead hen, Zeke McDonald, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Hollow construction with bottom board and raised neck seat. Old working repaint that reveals traces of what appears to be original paint underneath. (400 - 600) 355. Very unusual bluebill hen, Ralph Reghi, Mount Clemens, Michigan. Cedar body with turned and tucked head. Excellent original paint; small rub to right side of bill. (300 - 500) 356. Oversize black duck, Frank Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan. Slightly turned head. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; old touchup on speculums; lightly hit by shot. (300 - 500)


Factory Shorebirds

358

359

360

362

361

363

364

358. Excellent dowitcher, Dodge Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, last quarter 19th century. Strong sponge painting with tack eyes and iron bill. Near mint.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

359. Rare black bellied plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Tack eye model. White areas have old touchup, the rest is original paint with minor wear; area approximately 3/4” x 1 1/2” near stick hole shaved slightly; small dents.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(1,000 - 2,000)

360. Willet in fall plumage, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Glass eyes with iron bill. Original paint; appears as if a white wash was removed from lower side of breast and tail; two age cracks on left side of body; a few small dents.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

361. Golden plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Glass eye model with iron bill. Original paint; crack to right side of body was repaired a very long time ago.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

362. Golden plover, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Tack eye model with iron bill. Original paint with several shot marks in body; wear that has exposed bare wood; a few small dents.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

363. Dowitcher, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Glass eye model with iron bill. Original paint; numerous shot marks to body.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

364. Willet, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Tack eye model. Original paint with minor to moderate discoloration and wear; a few small dents and shot marks. (800 - 1,200) 125


Davis Island Club

The “Big House�

In 1890 Bernard Leckler purchased around 350 acres on Davis Island, North Carolina and the adjacent main land to build a home and hunting lodge. In 1904 George Deming purchased the club and it was used mostly for shorebird hunting

126


364A

364A Detail

364A Detail

364A. Very rare oversized curlew. Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1905. Approximately 17� long. Rigmate to Lot 527 in our April 2013 auction. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; pitting on bill; crack in underside; small dents; slight crack at knot.

Provenance: From the Davis Island Gun Club, North Carolina.

(17,500 - 22,500)

127


Calls

365

366

367

368

369

370

371

372

365. Large duck and crow call made in the style of Charles Perdew.

Literature: “Perdew: An Illinois River Tradition,” Ann Tandy Lacey. (300 - 400)

366. Turkey call, Tom Turpin, Memphis, Tennessee. Classic cat eye indent where screw attaches to box. Good and original. (800 - 1,200) 367. Carved wooden duck call with three flying ducks, John Coats, Long Wood, Florida. Reelfoot Tennessee style with tempered stainless steel reed. Very good and original.

128

Provenance: Proceeds from the sale of this call will be donated to the Easton Waterfowl Festival. (175 - 225)

368. Two duck calls. Trutone, Oak Park, Illinois, all original parts. Other call appears to be a special order Trutone with fancy burlwood barrel and cedar stopper with original parts. Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 369. Two duck calls. Valentine Leonard, Bureau, Illinois, with possible replaced reed, light wood inlay, and metal ring at end of barrel. Charles Perdew cedar call, stamped “Charles H Perdew, Henry, Illinois” on barrel, possible replaced wedge block, crack in stopper, small imperfection in wood. Good and original. (800 - 1,200) 370. Two duck calls, Memphis, Tennessee. A three duck call by Tom Turpin with three ducks on the barrel and possibly a replaced wedge block. Other call appears to be by Tom Turpin, but does not have any markings on the barrel, all parts look original. (800 - 1,200)


373

374

375 371. Two duck calls, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Both cedar calls. One is stamped “Chas H. Perdew, Henry Ill.” Tiny chip in stopper and imperfection in one side of stopper. Other call is stamped “Chas. H Perdew, Henry, Illinois.” Both appear to have original parts. (800 - 1,200) 372. Duck call, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Stamped “Charles H. Perdew. Henry. Ill.” Cedar call, parts appear to be original. Area on barrel where varnish has worn away. (400 - 600)

373. Lot of 17 assorted calls. Including examples by Olts, Faulks, and Mallardtone. Fair to good. (1,200 - 1,500) 374. Lot of 7 turkey calls. Fair to very good.

(500 - 800)

375. Six duck calls and one crow call. Olt, Boyd Martin, Fred Allen, Duc-em, Arkansas call, Crow call, and fisher style duck call. (200 - 400)

129


Memorabilia 376. Wooden shot dispenser. Approximately 9” x 12” x 25”. Two drawers, eight shot compartments. Original and good; piece on back side of top may be an old replacment.

Provenance: Powell collection. (350 - 450)

376

377

377. Five die cuts and window display advertising pieces. From various manufacturers, including Remington Kleanbore with target and game, Winchester firearms, payment plan counter top display, four model 70, 77, 50, 12. Remington .22 rifles, Savage firearm counter top display from 1964. and Monark federal cartridge corporation with images of waterfowl and upland game by Lynn Bogue Hunt. Near mint to very good. (800 - 1,200)

377A

377A

377A

130

377A. Three Western ammunition advertising pieces. A Lubloy hang tag die cut, 20” x 12”. A tin advertisement with graphic of hunter and setters. And a poster with North American game identification. Poster is missing top band and has tear near top left; die cut has edge wear and area of small stains; tin has small areas of rust and folds at edge. (500 - 800)


379 378

379

379

380

380

381

381

380

378. Original Winchester Lithograph, artwork used for 100 count, 21 gauge ammunition box. Approximately 15 3/4” x 14”. One dent and a couple of tears, but not on image. Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 379. Three vintage Peters counter felts. Framed. One of the Peters shotgun felts is fairly rough; the other two are in good condition.

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(350 - 450)

380. Three professionally matted and framed groups of ammunition envelopes. Including 7 ammunition envelopes. Including US Ammo, US Cartridge Company, the black shells, DuPont with quail, Hazard powder with calling mallard, DuPont with Osthus image, Dominion with moose. Dominion image is framed so that both side of envelope are visible. (500 - 800) 381.

Two advertising items. Remington Kleanbore with image of cowboy shooting rifle. Peters cartridge and shell image of flying geese, 29” x 25”. Staining at some fold marks on Peters image; Kleanbore is in excellent condition. (500 - 800)

131


382

381A

383

384

384

384 385

385 381A. Western and Winchester 3D window display with shell boxes and hunters shooting mallards. 22” x 18”. Strong condition with minor seam tears where panels join and part of gun barrel missing from hunter on left side. (300 - 500) 382. Trifold die cut, Remington UMC. Old man with pipe and shell. Measures 32” x 29”. Good with tear through man’s head; staining on center piece. (400 - 600) 132

383. Three professionally framed paper cartridge boards. A Peters hang tag with rifle cartridges, 20” x 13”. Winchester cartridges, 21” x 13”. Western cartridges, 29” x 19.5”. Winchester has several tears at lower right and across the top; Western is excellent; Peters shows slight edge wear. (500 - 800) 384. Large die cut store advertisement, Peters Ammunition. Image of hunter shooting mallards and Peters High Velocity bluewing teal box. Slight rough area at corners; two tears along inside lower edge. (800 - 1,200) 385. Two signs, Johnson Outboard Motors. One is 19.75” x 14” is red, black, and white and reads “Johnson Sea-horse” and the other is 24” x 11”. Both show some wear, tiny dents and the smaller sign has painted area over old address area.

Provenance: Powell collection. (200 - 400)


387

386 388

388

389

389

386. Hunting sign on old wide board. Approximately 24” x 48”. Original paint with moderate wear. (450 - 750) 387. Desirable Maas & Stessen Company fur advertisement calendar. 1946 with image of hunter and polar bear. October calendar page remains. Very strong missing bottom band. (400 - 600)

388.

Two advertising pieces. Professionally framed Remington UMC poster with top band; image of two men and pheasant. Average wear with pieces missing from side and rough edges. Hercules 1916 calendar, top band is missing, January calendar page is attached. (400 - 600)

389. Two vintage counter felts. One UMC, the other H & R Arms. Both are framed. UMC is good; the other is poor.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(400 - 600) 133


Shell Boxes

390

393

392

391

395

394

397

398

390. Two 2 pc. UMC shotgun shell boxes. Both are buff boxes with wrap labels. Trap box is 12 gauge, #8 shot, bright colors, tear to one side, panel appears as if box was wet at one time. Nitro club, 12 gauge, #7.5 shot with full wrap label, light staining and wear, but very good. Provenance: Powell collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

391. E.K. Tryon Hand Load 2 pc. box, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 16 ga., No. 6, 7/8 Drs., Nitro Club. Correct shells and unfired with three missing. Buff box with Maroon wrap label showing duck flying down. Ink stamp on box says “20 ga”. Box and label are very good; 1” tear at seam of outer box. (1,500 - 2,000) 392. Two 2 pc. Peters Shotgun shell boxes. New Victor, 12 gauge 6 shot, buff box with full wrap label. High Gun, with snipe on cover, buff box with full wrap label, 20 gauge, 8 shot. New Victor has edge wear and pieces missing from one side flaps, small dent and wear at front label; High Gun has seam split; edge wear on labels and staining 134

392A

396

399 on one side of label.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(500 - 800)

392A. Pointer shotgun shell box by Clinton Cartridge Company, Chicago, Illinois. 12 gauge 4 shot. Buff box with wrap label. Front and sides are very strong; back label has four small tears.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(500 - 800)

393. Rare one piece AJAX heavies US Cartridge Company shotgun shell box. 16 gauge, 6 shot. Image of geese flying through lightning storm. A few small rubs, otherwise very strong.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(800 - 1,200)

394. Rare quick shot shotgun shell box, Peters Cartridge Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 10 gauge # 8 shot. Considerable restoration and in painting to all of the box. (300 - 500)


400

400

400

400

401

402 395. Two 2 pc. Shotgun shell boxes, Remington UMC nitro club. Both buff boxes with full wrap labels. Box with image of squirrel is very strong, pieces missing from back label. Box with image of Canada goose has slight edge wear and two small seam breaks. Provenance: Powell collection.

(500 - 800)

402 Second box Winchester repeater, 16 gauge, 10 shot; with graphic of pheasant. Winchester has light rubs at corners, full of correct shells; other has top lid has torn away and has been reinforced with scotch tape. Edges are worn but not torn.

Provenance: Powell collection.

(800 - 1,200)

396. Two 12 ga. shotgun shell boxes, UMC Nitro club. Both have the full label with some staining and tears to side panels. One box has tear the length of side panel and one side is missing a piece of top box; second box is structurally good. (400 - 600)

400. Four professionally framed ammunition advertising pieces. Eleys cartridge lithograph, DuPont hang tag, Ithaca 3D plastic shotgun advertisement for feather light; US Cartridge Company, the black shells shot sample. (800 - 1,200)

397. 2 pc. Shotgun shell box, Peters Target. Buff box with wrap label. 12 gauge, 7 shot. Edge wear and tears to both top and bottom box.

401. Poster of Dead Shot mallard. Image reads “Deadshot Smokeless Black”. Matted and framed. Exposed image measures 20.5 “ x 12”. Very light staining throughout; no structural tears. (800 - 1,200)

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(500 - 800)

398. 2 pc. 100 count shotgun shell box, US Cartridge Company, Climax 10 gauge. Box is full of empty primed shells. Tears and seam splits to most edges.

Provenance: Lucas collection.

(800 - 1,200)

399. Two 1 pc. Shotgun shell boxes. Winchester leader, 12 gauge, #6 shot; hunter shooting quail on front and back.

402. Two calendars promoting Charles H. Perdew. Color calendar from 1944 with all pages intact. Measuring 14.5” x 8.5”. 1947 calendar with all pages intact and photo of hunters in sneak boat. Both in very good condition; color catalog shows some wear at edges. (800 - 1,200)

End of Session One 135


Session Two

Friday, April 25, 2013 – 10:00 AM

Decoratives

Elmer Crowell in front of his work shop

In the early 1900s Elmer Crowell began making decorative bird carvings. In 1912 he set up a shop and began making decoratives and hunting decoys full time. With the help of his son Cleon he continued to produce decoratives and miniatures, mostly for the tourist trade for over 30 years

403. Full size whimbrel mantle carving, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts. Crowell’s rectangular stamp is under the base. Fine paint detail and slightly turned head. Very minor paint flaking on jesso thighs and tiny rough area at underside of tip of bill, otherwise very good and original.

136

Literature: “The Songless Aviary,” Brian Cullity, p. 77.

(20,000 - 24,000)


403

403 Detail

403 Detail


404 Detail

404 Detail

404 Detail

404. One of a kind full size blue jay perched on tree branch attached to carved wooden base, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, circa 1920s. Approximately 11.5” tall. Signed under the tail. Particularly fine blended paint with good detail. Near mint original paint; structurally excellent. (16,000 - 20,000)

138

405. Redhead drake head on champhered wooden base, Elmer Crowell, East Harwich, Massachusetts, 1st quarter 20th century. Original and mint. (1,500 - 2,000)


404

405


406

407

406. Exceptional pair of greenwing teal, William Schultz. Signed. Inscription on underside reads, “Carved for my good friends, Bill and Ava Brauer” also third place Midwest Decoy Show, Detroit, Michigan, 1973; Exhibition sticker on underside. “Second bird I used texture, the first is drake of this pair”, on hen. Both have slightly turned heads, hen is in swimming pose. Both have finely carved raised wing tips, and exceptional paint detail. Very good and original. (5,500 - 8,500)

140

408

407. Pair of bluewing teal, John Garton, Smith Falls, Ontario. Signed, “Made November 1971 for Bill Brauer, by J.B. Garton.” Both have slightly turned heads, detailed wing tip feather carving and fluted tails. Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500) 408. Pair of decorative black ducks, Don Briddell, Mt. Airey, Maryland. Signed and dated 1985 on the undersides. Both have slightly turned heads and carved crossed wing tips. Near mint original paint; structurally very good. (1,500 - 2,000)


409

409 Detail

409. One of a kind pair of flying mallards, Philippe Sirois, Arrowsic, Maine, circa 1950s. Each is approximately 25” long. Fine paint detail. Feather carving on wings. Original paint with almost no wear; crack in one side of drake; feet are duck feet. (7,500 - 9,500)

141


Ward Brothers

Crisfield, Maryland

410

411

410. Redhead drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Slightly turned head. Relief wing carving with raised carved wing tips and fluted tail. Signed “For Leroy Wilbur’s collection, Lem Ward 1968.” Slight paint shrinkage on one lower side near tail and at knot in lower breast. (7,000 - 9,000) 142

411. Full size flying canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Signed and dated 1961. Finely detailed feather carving. Very good and original. (9,000 - 12,000)


411A

411A. Exceptional pair of 3/4 size flying pintails, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Very early examples for this type of Ward Brothers flying birds. Both are signed and dated 1957. Extra fine paint detail and form. Very good and original. (14,000 - 18,000)

143


412

413

414

415

416

417

412. Decorative ruddy duck hen, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia. Branded “Cigar” and signed, with the inscription “Carved especially for Curtis Fruit, Virginia Beach, Virginia.” Detailed feather carving and fluted tail. Excellent and original. (650 - 950)

415. Decorative widgeon drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania. Slightly turned head, detailed feather carving, and raised wing tips. Signed on underside by Schmiedlin. Very good and original. (1,000 - 2,000)

413.

416. Pintail, Al Glassford, Toronto, Ontario. Excellent feather carving and comb painting. Competition bird entered at Pointe Mouillee in the 1970s. Sticker on underside says “1970 US nation 1st place.” Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)

Full size mourning dove, Frank Finney, Virginia Beach, Virginia. On painted base with Frank’s “F” in underside. Glass eyes with carved wings and tail. Very good and original. (700 - 900)

414. Decorative wood duck drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania. Slightly turned head, detailed feather carving, and raised wing tips. Signed on underside by Schmiedlin and dated 1980. Very good and original. (1,000 - 2,000) 144

417. Pair of widgeon, Al Glassford, Toronto, Ontario. Excellent feather carving. Drake has strong comb painting. Competition birds entered at Pointe Mouillee in the 1970s. Very good and original. (1,200 - 1,500)


Cameron McIntyre New Church, Virginia

418 Detail

418 418 Detail

418. One of a kind hanging game carving, Cameron McIntyre, New Church, Virginia. Subject matter is a pair of canvasbacks and redhead drake on backboard. Approximately 25� x 41�. Signed on the back of the frame. Fine paint and feather detail. Carved entirely by hand using traditional woodworking tools. Exceptional composition, form, and surface quality. Carved from native white cedar and painted in oils. Excellent and original. Literature: Hunting & Fishing Collectibles, Jim Brodell, July/August 2011. (10,000 - 14,000)

145


419

420

422

421

423

424

425

419. Very rare feeding avocet on driftwood base; Walter Ruppel, Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Detailed feather carving and extended wing tips. Excellent and original. (1,250 - 1,750)

423. Flying 2/3 size black duck, Ken Massey, Stevensville, Maryland. Made to mount on wall. Highly detailed paint and feather carving. Tiny tail chip missing from under one wing tip, otherwise very good and original. (500 - 700)

420. Full size flying mallard drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine. Old in use repaint; small cracks. (950 - 1,250)

424. Two decoratives, Walter Ruppel. A woodcock and a dove. Both have detailed carving and feather paint. Very good and original. (400 - 600)

421. Preening hooded merganser drake, Joe Wooster, Ashley, Ohio. Signed and dated 1970. Relief wing tip carving. Several tiny dents, otherwise very good and original. (600 - 900)

425. Standing turkey hen, George Reinbold. Signed under the base. Approximately 8” tall. Fine paint detail. Three piece body construction with some separation at the seams, otherwise very good and original. (500 - 700)

422. Pair of hanging greenwing teal with detailed feather carving, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia. Mounted on old wide board. Very good and original. (500 - 700)

146


Mason Decoy Factory 1896 - 1924 Detroit, Michigan

426. Mallard hen with slightly lifted head, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. Original paint with minor wear; small amount of touchup at one side of neck filler.

Provenance: Rose collection. Formerly in the collections of William J. Mackey, Carter Smith, Barbara Johnson, and Dr. Loy Harrell. Mackey stamp on underside. (3,500 - 5,500)

426 427. Greenwing teal drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. It appears as if a gray wash has been taken off to reveal original paint; that has been strengthened on some areas including wing patches; several shot marks to body; including one inch scar on top of tail.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,000 - 3,000)

427 428. Brant, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Challenge grade. Original paint; very old repair to left side of neck; dowel raised slightly at top of head; minor gunning wear.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (2,500 - 3,500)

428 429. Pair of bluewing teal, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Both branded “B.P.C.” and “S & D” on underside. Both have had paint taken down and have been strengthened in some areas including wing patches; both are protected by an old coat of varnish; hen has been hit by shot; both have several small dents.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (3,000 - 4,000)

429 147


430

430 Detail

430. Extremely rare bufflehead hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; small crack in side and underside; bill has been very slightly blunted; several tiny dents.

148

Literature: “Mason Decoys” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 75.

(8,000 - 12,000)


431

431 Detail

431.

Canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Very rare premier grade Chesapeake Bay model. Good original paint with very minor wear on most of the decoy; a little more wear on top of head; in factory filled crack in underside that has separated somewhat with filler missing.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of John Delph, Pointe Vedre, Florida. Lot 562 in the Guyette & Schmidt April 2003 decoy auction. Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 52.

(8,000 - 12,000) 149


432

433

434

435

437

436 432. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1910. Challenge grade. Special round body style. Original paint with very minor wear; small crack in back.

Provenance: Rose collection.

Literature: “Mason Decoys - A Complete Pictorial Guide,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid, p. 40. (1,750 - 2,250) 433. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Early challenge grade. Original paint with minor wear; small amount of neck filler missing; professional tail chip repair; small cracks in underside; a few small dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(1,500 - 2,500)

434. Rare bufflehead drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Glass eye model. Original paint; most of neck 150

filler missing and area of inpainting behind left wing patch approximately 2” in diameter.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

435. Rare rigmate pair of widgeon, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Very early style, circa 1905. Old in use repaint on most of the decoy, a lot of original paint on heads; each has a tail chip repair and small dents. (1,500 - 2,500) 436. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade with original challenge stamp on underside. Original paint with minor wear; cracks in one side; small dents. (1,200 - 1,600) 437. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. Original paint with minor wear; small crack in each side; lightly hit by shot. (1,500 - 2,500)


438

439

438. Pintail drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. Original paint with minor wear; small dents; thin crack in back; hairline crack in breast.

439. Extra fine black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade with outstanding paint. Premier stamp in underside. Near mint original paint; several tiny chips missing from neck filler; professional tail chip repair.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(4,000 - 6,000)

Provenance: Rose collection.

(3,500 - 5,500)

151


New England Augustus Wilson

1864 - 1950 South Portland, Maine

“Wilson’s folk art career spanned over a half century along coastal southeastern Maine. It’s estimated that he sculpted thousands of decoys and multiple dozens of decorative bird carvings as well as tigers, snakes and perhaps other wild creatures. When comparing the overall efforts of all decoy makers, few rival Gus Wilson’s variations in form. Some turned a head now and then; others occasionally made sleepers. Yet no other carver consistently rendered as many different head and wing positions in his working decoys” This rocking head blackduck (lot 440) is one of the finest of its form and extremely rare with the mussel in bill carving. Although Wilson varied the head positions in many of his decoys, the 90-degree turn of the mergansers (lot 441) head is a rare form. “Decoy Magazine” Nov/Dec 1994, “Gus Wilson Folk Artist”, Gene Kangas, pp. 8 – 15.

Augustus Wilson

440 Detail 152

441 Detail


440

441

440. Black duck, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine. With exceedingly rare rocking head, mussel in mouth combination carving. Rocking head is attached with a small dowel. Relief wing carving. Original paint with minor wear; tiny chip missing from one edge of tail; roughness in one side below the wing carving from when the decoy was made.

Literature: “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph. “Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor, p. 36. (17,000 - 20,000)

441. Merganser drake, Gus Wilson, South Portland, Maine. In very rare turned head position. Inlet head that is turned approximately 90 degrees. Relief wing carving, carved eyes, and carved bill delineation. Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; neck crack with a small amount of touchup in that area; leather in bill is a replacement.

Literature: “Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor. “New England Decoys,” John and Shirley Delph, p. 34. (15,000 - 20,000)

153


442. Rigmate pair of oversize eiders, Amos Wallace, West Point, Maine, last quarter 19th century. Inlet heads and detailed bill carving. Hen eiders by Wallace are very rare. Hen has inset tack eyes and a horseshoe weight on underside. Drake has old working repaint with minor shrinkage and wear; a crack through the neck and back, small cracks in head; hen appears to have worn original paint with tight cracks in the body and an age split in the underside.

442

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of George Thompson. Collection of Gene and Linda Kangas, stamped “KANGAS E” on underside.

Literature: For drake only; “Decoys A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. “Decoys,” Gene and Linda Kangas. “National Directory of Decoy Collectors,” 1978-1979, Gene and Linda Kangas. “Folk Art from the collection of Gene and Linda Kangas, Art Academy of Cincinnati, Ohio 1979. “Ward Museum of waterfowl art decoy study gallery inaugural exhibit 1992. (2,500 - 3,500)

443

444

443. Hollow carved widgeon drake, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut. Good comb and feather paint detail. Original paint with moderate wear; small cracks in body.

Provenance: From a rig found at a plantation on the Cooper River in South Carolina.

Literature: “Shang,” Dixon Merkt. (5,000 - 7,000)

444. Canada goose, George Boyd, Seabrook, New Hampshire. Canvas over wood slat construction and slightly turned head. Paint appears to be mix of old overpaint taken down to original; one hole in canvas near tail; rubs at edge of tail. (3,000 - 4,000) 445. Rare highhead canvasback drake, Shang Wheeler, Stratford, Connecticut. Cork body with carved shoulders. Signed on underside “Charles Shang Wheeler”. Original paint with repair to tip of bill; light coat of gray wash has been added to strengthen most of bill. (2,000 - 3,000)

445

154


Albert Laing

1811 - 1886 Stratford, Connecticut An early, shallow bodied example by the father of the Stratford, Connecticut school, this decoy was likely carved and used years before Laing moved from New York City to Stratford at the age of 52. This canvasback drake is likely a rigmate to the swan, redhead, and canvasbeck hen that were known to be from Laings battery rig that was used on the Chesapeake Bay where canvasbacks were much more plentiful than his home of New York City.

446

446 Detail

446.

Extremely rare preening canvasback drake, Albert Laing, Stratford, Connecticut & New York, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century. Laing brand in underside. Hollow carved. Old paint with moderate wear; small chip missing from neck base; short cracks in neck.

Literature: “Connecticut Decoys,” Henry Chitwood, p. 26. “Shang,” Dickson Merkt, p. 139. (17,500 - 22,500)

446 Detail

155


Charles Schoenheider, Sr 1854 - 1954 Peoria, Illinois

Photograph taken in 1919 of the twelve geese that Schoenheider had completed for his “unsatisfied” customer.

Charles Schoenheider was a man of many talents and probably out of necessity. Raising fourteen children in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, in the central Illinois River valley, would not have been easy. Having gained a reputation as an excellent market hunter, his fertile hunting grounds included the areas around Peoria where the Illinois River formed an area known as Peoria Lake. These marshes are now owned and manage by some of the best duck hunting clubs in the country. Duck Island, Rice Pond Club and Old Goose Pond are just a few. Market hunting was considered an honorable profession and Schoenheider found it enjoyable. In the off-season he would build homes. He built many in Peoria, including an entire block on, then, Vine Avenue and several cabins along the riverbank. The floating decoys he made are all in the typical Illinois River style, two-piece bodies and hollow. He is best known for his “ice decoys” a style, unique to him. With hollow bodies, he placed the head a little further forward on the breast and then created a led foot that could be inserted into the underside of the body. This allowed the decoys to stand on the ice or in a field with greater visibility. Sometime around 1910 Schoenheider received an order for one dozen goose decoys from Daniel W. Voorhees. Voorhees was president of the Duck Island Preserve and he intended to use the geese for field shooting. After completing the order, Schoenheider contacted Voorhees. At this time, Schoenheider sold a dozen duck decoys for $24.00. With the geese requiring considerably more effort, he asked $125.00 for the dozen. Voorhees thought that was outrageous and walked away. Disgusted Schoenheider stored the geese in his attic where they remained until his death in 1944. Over the next few decades they slowly began to get dispursed. Adele Ernest bought four, two of which remained in her collection until we sold them at auction in 1993. The goose being offered today has never been outside of Peoria Illinois until now. The letter below from the family who has consigned it provides details of their acquisition; Here is a brief history of the Charles Schoenheider, Sr. Decoy in our family. “My father, Walter Swardenski, loved to hunt ducks. He grew up hunting ducks on the Illinois River with his dad and brother-in-law. My dad was one of the best wing shooters I have ever seen.

156


He later became acquainted through business with the Vorhees family from Quincy, Illinois, and spent time hunting at their Duck Island Club near Banner, Illinois. Both my brother and I shot our first ducks at the Duck Island Club with Dan Voorhees III. He was the son of Dan Vorhees Jr. who was the person who originally ordered the rig of geese decoys from Charles Schoenheider, Sr. In the mid 1960s my mother saw an ad for the decoys and took a taxi to buy one as a birthday present for my dad. The only thing I remember her saying was how nervous she was because she had spent so much for the present. For the next 40 plus years the goose decoy stood sentinel in the living room of their Frank Lloyd Wright home in Peoria. With the passing of my mother and father, my brother and sisters and I decided it was time for someone else to enjoy this wonderful decoy.�

447

157


447 Detail

447 Detail

158


447 Detail

447. Important standing Canada goose, Charles Schoenheider, Sr., Peoria, Illinois, circa 1910. Hollow carved with five piece body construction. Cast iron leg and web foot in underside for use on ice. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: 9 of the 10 standing geese from this rig are in decoy collections, this one has never been at auction and has never been out of Peoria, Illinois before being consigned to this auction.

offered

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 85. Also on p. 164 is a group shot of the 12 Canada geese made by Schoenheider taken in 1919, this is one of the decoys in the photo. (85,000 - 95,000)

159


448

448 Detail

448 Detail

448. Extremely rare bluewing teal hen, Charles Schoenheider, Sr., Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Hollow carved. Fine feather paint detail. Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents and shot marks.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Alan and Elaine Haid.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 86.

160

(17,500 - 22,500)


449. Canvasback drake, Jack Eppel, Peoria, Illinois. Good comb and feather paint detail. From the hunting rig of Andy Anderson, “A.L.A.” carved in weight. Original paint with minor discoloration and very slight wear; structurally very good.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Randy Root, Metamora, Illinois. (3,000 - 4,000)

449 450. Rigmate pair of mallards, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Both are branded “HC Gardner”. Drake is also branded “JHD”. Both retain original Elliston weights. Both are in original paint protected by an old coat of varnish; small dents and wear over body and heads; drake has a crack near base of neck. (3,500 - 4,500)

450

451. Pintail drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois. His later style. Fine feather paint detail. Retains Graves weight. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; cracks in eyes; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 151. (3,500 - 4,500)

451

452. Extremely rare Canada goose, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois. One of only four known. Three piece body construction. Very old paint that is crazed; professional bill repair that extends into the front of the face; tight crack at base of neck. (4,000 - 6,000)

452 161


Charles Walker 1876 - 1954 Princeton, Illinois

453

162


453 Detail

Painted on the underside of this decoy is the number “8”, which represents the gunning share number of Clifford Jolley. Jolley owned the lumber yard in Princeton, Illinois and he supplied Walker with the lumber to make decoys. Walker made Jolley two rigs of twelve mallards, one with flat bottoms and one with round bottoms.

453 Detail

453. Exceptional mallard drake, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois, circa 1930s. From the Princeton Fish and Game Club. Fine scratch paint detail and patina. “8” painted on the underside for Chifford Jolley. Original paint with a few small flakes missing, mostly on top of head; a few small dents.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Walter White.

(20,000 - 24,000)

Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois 163


454 Detail

454. Rare standing mallard ice duck with iron foot, Charles Schoenheider, Sr., Peoria, Illinois. “Peoria” and “C.S.” stencil on underside. Old overpaint has been taken off to mostly original paint with traces of old overpaint; small dents.

164

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 85. (12,000 - 15,000)

454


455

455 Detail

455 Detail

455. Rare rigmate pair of late canvasbacks, Charles Perdew, Henry, Illinois. Both retain Perdew weights and have wing carving. Near mint original paint; structurally excellent. (12,000 - 15,000)

165


456. Rigmate pair of mallards, Charles Walker, Princeton, Illinois. Number “6” is painted in the undersides for long time Princeton Fish and Game Club member Stan Brown. Decoys were purchased from his widow. Hen has slightly turned head. Old overpaint has been taken off to original in some areas; paint has been strengthened in some areas; traces of old overpaint remain. (4,000 - 6,000)

456 457. Canada goose, Otto Garren, Canton, Illinois. Near mint original paint with good patina; filled in the making crack in back with a few small pieces of filler missing, also in lower breast; slight separation at body seam.

Literature: “Decoys and Decoy Carvers of Illinois,” Paul Parmalee and Forest Loomis, p. 389. (2,500 - 3,500)

457

458. Rigmate pair of mallards, Bert Graves Peoria, Illinois. Both retain Graves weights. Good feather paint detail. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; hen’s bill has been broken off and reattached; a few tiny dents.

458 166

Literature: “Decoys of Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 151. (4,000 - 6,000)


459.

Rare early “round body” style mallard drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880. Body is almost 4” thick. Retains weight. Original paint with minor wear, mostly on head; professional repair to a thin crack in the neck; traces on old gray paint from a hunter’s rig mark.

Literature: “Decoys of Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 156. (3,000 - 5,000)

459

460.

Mallard hen, Charles Schoenheider Sr., Peoria, Illinois. Classic drill holes at base of bill. Worn original paint with some strengthening over wing patch; shot mark at top of bill and a few other areas to body and head; neck is loose at base; two chips with missing pieces at tail. (2,000 - 3,000)

460

461. Mallard drake, Hiram Hotze, Peoria, Illinois. Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; white and gray on sides is old repaint; moderate wear on head; a few tiny dents.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 172. (2,500 - 3,500)

461

462. Canvasback drake, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois. Graves weight on underside. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents. (2,500 - 3,500)

462 167


Robert Elliston 1849 - 1915 Bureau, Illinois

463

463 Detail

463 Detail

463. Very rare and important “round body” style bluebill drake, Robert Elliston, Bureau, Illinois, circa 1880. Retains Elliston weight. Exceptional form with fine feather paint detail and comb painting on back. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; slight wear to wood on edges of bill.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid.

168

(20,000 - 25,000)


464

464 Detail

464 Detail

464. Rare rigmate pair of oversize mallards, Bert Graves, Peoria, Illinois, 1st quarter 20th century. Both are branded “JBC”. Both have fine swirl feather paint on backs. Painted by Catherine Elliston. Hen has original paint with minor wear and has been lightly hit by shot; hairline crack in neck and minor roughness on the tip of the bill; drake has original paint with minor wear and working touch up on the head, neck, and speculums; it has also been lightly hit by shot.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Joe French. Purchased by Joe French on April 7, 1956 from Arthur Graff. Graff was the superintendent of the Carte Island Gun Club south of Bath, Illinois. They were made for John B. Crawford from Chicago who was a member of the club in the early 1900s. The numbers 400 and 401 were Joe’s inventory numbers. (22,500 - 27,500) 169


Ontario

One of two known to exist. Both were in the group of decoys purchased from the Canada Club. Both Crandell and Seitz kept a Chambers in their personal collection. We sold Crandell’s Chambers pintail in 2003.

465

465 Detail

465 Detail

465. Very rare pintail drake, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario. Subtle painting with feather vermiculation on sides. Branded “J.A. McDougall” and “Steers”. Hollow with bottom board. Original paint; a knot near the rear of the tail has pushed up slightly; and slight wood separation has been secured with a finish nail on the left side when the decoy was made; professional restoration to the bill Provenance: Seitz collection. 170

(15,000 - 20,000)


466 466 Detail

466 Detail

466. Rare hollow carved Canada goose, Phineas Reeves, Long Point, Ontario, circa 1870s. Tie strap is attached to square nails. Branded “GBH” in side for George B. Harris. Original paint with minor wear and numerous fly specks; professional bill chip repair. Provenance: This decoy resided at the Long Pointe Co. for over 100 years. It was presented to John L. Wamsley, the Marsh Manager/Head Keeper in the early 1990s as a retirement gift. (20,000 - 24,000) 171


William Hart

Belleville, Ontario The Hooded Merganser is one of North America’s handsomest, though least numerous, ducks. This secretive species prefers wooded ponds, lakes, and streams, where it often goes undetected. William Hart along with two of his hunting companions, Bill Crysler and Ralph Weese, from the Belleville, Ontario area made hooded mergansers as part of a complete diver rig.

467 172


William Hart, circa 1920.

The Hart Family, circa 1930

467 Detail

467 Detail

467.

Important and very rare hollow carved hooded merganser drake, William Hart, Belleville, Ontario. “WHH” is carved in the underside. Very slightly turned head with raised neck seat. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; old overpaint was professionally removed from speculums by Russ Allen; varnish was spilled on much of the top of the tail al long time ago.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Paul Kelly, Belleville, Ontario.

Literature: “The County Decoys,” James Stewart, p. 136. (27,500 - 32,500)

173


468

469

468 Detail

469 Detail

468. Canvasback drake, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Branded “J.R.W. Maker”. Hollow body with strong combing and feather painting. Original paint; several shot marks; small rubs to bare wood; restoration to bill. 174

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(6,000 - 8,000)

469. Very rare rigmate pair of bluebills, Tom Chambers, Toronto, Ontario, circa 1900. Hollow carved. Original paint with very minor wear; a few tiny dents; professional bill repair on drake by Russ Allen. (6,500 - 9,500)


470

471

471 Detail

470. Pintail drake, George Warin, Toronto, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Branded “G and J Warin Builders Toronto”. Very hollow with Warin’s finest feather painting and combing. Original paint with minor wear; shot marks on body, including two to the head; a crack in the back of the body has an old hunters repair where four nails were used to secure the crack; head and neck appear to have been broken and rescored with finish nails and glue.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(8,000 - 12,000)

471. Hollow carved Canada goose from the Bunbury rig. Branded “H.T. Bunbury” in underside. Bunbury was a St. Clair flats shooting club member 1877 - 1901. Square nail construction with removable head. Opening in underside so that head can be stored inside the body. Original paint; good patina and minor wear; small dents; crack in underside. (7,500 - 9,500) 175


New York State Julius Mittlesteadt 1888 - 1957 Buffalo, New York

472

472 Detail

472. Rare hooded merganser drake, Julius Middlesteadt, Buffalo, New York. One of three hooded merganser drakes known. Plump body with painted crest and tack eyes. Original paint with stress cracks in bill; hairline crack at neck; very minimal wear. 176

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(6,000 - 9,000)


473

474

474 Detail

473 Detail 473. Rare hooded merganser hen, Julius Middlesteadt, Buffalo, New York. Tack eyes, paddle tail. Stress crack in bill; original paint; never rigged; several small dents. (6,000 - 9,000)

474. Very rare American merganser drake, Julius Mittlesteadt, Buffalo, New York. Original paint with minor wear; very tiny chip missing from bill tack; slight separation at seam at one side with chip missing from underside.

Literature: “Great Book of Decoys,” Joe Engers, editor, p. 94, exact decoy. (5,000 - 8,000) 177


475

476

477

478

480

479 475. Rigmate pair of goldeneye, Julius Mittlesteadt, Buffalo, New York. Both have slightly turned heads and tack eyes. Both are unrigged. Very good and original.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,500 - 2,000)

476. Bluebill hen, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1930. “OLS” is painted on the underside. Original paint with minor wear and moderate discoloration; worn area at knot on lower side; thin chip missing from one edge of bill; several small dents.

Literature: “Decoys - A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas. (1,000 - 1,400)

477. Bluebill drake, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, circa 1880’s. Hump back style with good comb paint detail. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; minor roughness to end of bill and crack through top of bill. 178

Literature: “Stevens Brothers Decoys,” Peter and Peggy Mueller. (900 - 1,200)

478.

Redhead drake, Julius Mittlesteadt, Buffalo, New York, 1st half 20th century. Strong comb painting on back and tack eyes. Very light gunning wear; very good and original, with chip missing at tip of bill.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

479. Hollow carved black duck, Cyril Heath, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1920s. Appealing old in use repaint; small dents. (650 - 950) 480. Diminutive goldeneye hen, Upstate New York, 1st quarter 20th century. “Bufflehead, Frank Singer, Simpson, New York x” carved in underside by maker. Wet on wet blending on breast and lower body. Yellow painted eyes. Very good original paint; a few rough areas on top of back; stress cracks at base of neck and midway through bill. (800 - 1,200)


Ed Dingman

Alexandria Bay, New York

481

481 Detail

482 482 Detail

481. Rare American merganser drake, Ed Dingman, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1920. Original weight with “E.D.” embossed into it and George Thompson collection stamp. Carved crest. Worn original paint with neck crack, two shot marks, and two age cracks in body.

Provenance: George Thompson Collections and Gene and Linda Kangas. Stamped on underside “Kangas M1” and initials “G.W.T.inside a swan.

Literature: “Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations” by Gene and Linda Kangas, pictured on cover and p. 91.Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art 2012-13 Exhibition “Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations”.“Decoys: A North American Survey” by Gene and Linda Kangas, pictured p. 160 and color p. 213.Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Decoy Study Gallery Inaugural Exhibit 1992.New York Decoys Exhibit, North American Vintage Decoy & Sporting Collectibles Show, Chicago IL 2012. (8,000 - 12,000)

482.

Rare American merganser hen, Ed Dingman, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1920. Carved crest. Original paint with neck crack, shot scar at top of back, crack near tail, and wear exposing bare wood on several areas of body.

Provenance: Gene and Linda Kangas and John Mulak collections, Stamped on underside “Kangas M1”

Literature: “Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations” by Gene and Linda Kangas, pictured on cover and p. 91.Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art 2012-13 Exhibition “Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations”.“Decoys” by Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 209.Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Decoy Study Gallery Inaugural Exhibit 1992. (5,000 - 7,500)

179


483

484

483. Oversize canvasback drake, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York. Balsa body. Good comb paint detail. Original paint with good patina and minor wear; slight separation at body seam; small dents in balsa.

484. ”Long body” style bluebill hen, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York. Good feather paint detail. “JJP” is stamped several times in underside. Original paint with minor wear, mostly on head; a few small dents.

Literature: “Chance,” Harold W. Reiser III. (5,000 - 8,000)

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of George Ross Starr Duxbury, Massachusetts, Starr collection stamp and his label on underside.

Literature: “Chance,” Harold W. Reiser III. (4,000 - 6,000) 180


485

486

485. Rare stickup gull, James Stanley, Cape Vincent, New York. Good bill carving detail. Original paint with minor discoloration and very slight wear; several small thin cracks in body.

486. Very rare rigmate pair of greenwing teal, James Stanley, Cape Vincent, New York, 1st quarter 20th century. Original paint with moderate wear; small dents. (6,500 - 9,500)

Literature: “Decoys, A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 163. (5,000 - 7,000)

181


Wisconson Joseph Sieger

1871 - 1959 Tustin, Wisconsin

Joseph Sieger

Joseph Sieger was born on the family farm near the northwest shore of Lake Poygan in Wisconsin. This area was one of a few throughout North America crowned with the title “canvasback capital of the world”. For a period of nearly fifty years starting around 1870, canvasbacks killed, cleaned and packed on ice supplied restaurant and grocery store demand in Chicago, Milwaukee and beyond. It is thought that Sieger made between two and three dozen of these magnificent high neck canvasback drakes. Many of today’s collectors consider them to represent the finest canvasbacks that Wisconsin has to offer.

182


487

487 Detail

487 Detail

487. Important “high head” canvasback drake, Joseph Sieger, Tustin, Wisconsin, circa 1920s. Hollow carved with glass eyes. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; minor to moderate paint shrinkage on black areas; several tiny dents.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 40.

(25,000 - 30,000) 183


These perky bluebills have often been attributed to the hand of Joseph Sieger but when decoy collector David Spanler bought the decoys out of the Sieger barn there were a number of items included with the find that Sieger probably did not make. In all there were six bluebills that while wonderful in their own right they do not have the characteristics found in the iconic canvasbacks.

488

488 Detail

184

488. Rare rigmate pair of bluebills, attributed to Joseph Sieger, Tustin, Wisconsin, 1st quarter 20th century. Perky high heads with inlet weights on underside. Paddle tail that is slightly champhered on bottom. Hen is in original paint that has crazed and worn off at some spots on head and edges of bill; hen has had hole drilled under tail and through the top side, probably where a knot was removed; hen has several shot scars on one side of body, bill and head; drake was repainted, probably by Sieger.

Provenance: Seitz collection. (8,000 - 10,000)


490

489

491

492

494

493 489. Hollow carved canvasback drake, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin. “GH” painted on underside. A mixture of original paint and old in use repaint; hit by shot; filler added and touchup at neck seam. (1,200 - 1,500) 490. Hollow carved redhead hen, Fritz Geiger, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents; crack in each eye. (1,000 - 1,500) 491. Rigmate pair of bluebills, James Walton, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Carved detail on wing and tail feathers on both decoys. Drake has head tucked into chest. Paint appears to be a mix of original and old working paint; numerous shot scars in drake; hen has several shot scars as well as areas worn to bare wood. Literature: “Great Lakes Decoy Interpretations,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 195, exact drake. Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art 2012-13 Exhibition. (700 - 900)

492. Oversize canvasback drake, Frank Strey, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, 1930s. Relief wing carving. “Matt” is painted on the underside. Original paint with minor wear; small cracks in body.

Literature: “Decoys of the Winnebago Lakes,” Ron Koch. (650 - 950)

493. Large coot, John Roth, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, circa 1920s. “AW Stein” is painted twice on the underside. Original paint with minor wear; a few small scrapes; minor roughness to tip of tail. (650 - 950) 494. Hollow carved canvasback drake, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin. Paint has been restored on most of the decoy; paint on tail appears original; minor roughness on edge of tail; small dents. (950 - 1,250)

185


495. Canvasback drake, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin. Slightly turned head. “D” painted on underside. Hollow. Original paint worn to expose bare wood; rub at tip of bill; several small dents and cracks in body. (2,500 - 3,500)

495 496. Canvasback, Ferd Homme, Stoughton, Wisconsin. High head with carved and crossed wing tips and fluted tail. “Mike” is painted on underside. Slightly turned head. Original paint worn to bare wood on spots of tail, head and body; shot mark in head. (3,000 - 6,000)

496

497. Bluebill drake, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin, circa 1910. Slightly turned head. Original paint; two small dents and other small areas of wear, including a shot gun scar to base of neck. (2,500 - 3,500)

497

498. Hollow carved canvasback drake, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin, 1st quarter 20th century. Slightly turned head. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; professional repair to a chip in one side of neck. (2,000 - 3,000)

498 186


499

500

499. Large mallard drake, Walter Pelzer, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; area approximately 2” square at wing tips was whittled down slightly a long time ago and touched up; very lightly hit by shot; crack in underside.

Literature: “Decoys: A North American Survey,” Gene and Linda Kangas, p. 228. (5,000 - 8,000)

500. Rare coot, Augustus Moak, Tustin, Wisconsin, circa 1920s. Raised neck seat and turned head. Hollow carved. Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Ron Koch. (2,500 - 3,500)

499 Detail 187


Enoch Reindahl

Stoughton, Wisconsin The decoys offered in lots 501 and 502 are from Reindahl’s personal gunning rig made in the 1930s. The incredibly realistic details found in his carvings and paint came as a result of his meticulous wildlife studies through the extensive collection of photographs that he took in his privately owned marsh.

501. Rigmate pair of mallards, Enoch Reindahl, Stoughton, Wisconsin. Both have slightly turned heads, carved eyes, and raised wing tips. Original paint with minor wear; each has an age split in the underside and lightly hit by shot; drake has two small cracks in back; hen has small crack in tail.

501 Detail

501

188

Literature: “Top of the Line Sporting Collectibles,” Donna Tonelli. (9,000 - 12,000)


502 Detail Enoch Reindahl and Ferd Homme

502. Sleeping black duck, Enoch Reindahl. Raised and crossed wing tips with carved eyes and bill tucked gently underneath the right wing. Original paint with a working touchup likely by Reindahl to a knot in the lower breast and age split in underside. (12,000 - 15,000)

502

189


Michigan Nate Quillin

1839 - 1908 Rockwood, Michigan

503

503. Rigmate pair of pintails, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan. Hollow with bottom board. Each is branded “WTB” on underside for William T. Barber. Both have inlet necks. Drake has original paint with a light gray wash that has been removed, paint on head appears to have been strengthened, bill is a replacement; several shot scars; hen has traces of old paint covered by a later coat of brown; numerous shot scars on body and head; with a bill replacement.

504

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(5,000 - 7,000)

504. Redhead hen, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan, last quarter 19th century. Helmet head style with inlet neck. Hollow carved with bottom board. Branded “JAS” and “LSR” on underside. Worn original paint with tight crack that runs from the back to end of tail; small rough area at left side of head.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(2,000 - 3,000)

505. Redhead drake, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan. Branded “WTB” twice on underside for William T. Barbor. Original paint that has had a gray wash taken off with some strengthening on head and bill; shot scar above the bill; structurally good.

505 190

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(2,000 - 2,500)


In 1875 William Hall of Toledo and E. H. Gillman purchased 1200 acres of property and in doing so they founded a club known as the “Big Eight”. Four years later the name of the club was changed to Pointe Mouillee Shooting Club, making Gillman a founding member and eventually club president.

506

506 Detail

506 Detail

506.

Very rare pintail drake, Nate Quillin, Rockwood, Michigan. Boat bottom style. Branded “E.H. Gillman, Detroit” on right side. Inlet neck, strong comb painting on back. Peg construction to secure neck to body. Both pegs have raised slightly. Included is a drawing of this decoy by M.D. Van Housen. Original paint; tail chip; age splits at front of breast; wear at top of head, crack through neck and possibly varnish spills to white areas underneath both wings; most of bill is missing.

Provenance: Ex Kirk Whaley collection. Seitz collection.

(10,000 - 14,000)

191


507

508

509

510

511

512

507. Early pintail drake, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan. Desirable long body style. Original paint; crack on lower right hand side of neck has been reglued; shot mark left side of cheek; professional bill replacement.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(3,000 - 4,000)

509.

Canvasback drake, Ferdinand Bach, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1930. “F.B.” carved in underside. Fluted tail carving and wing carving. Old overcoat has been taken down to reveal original paint; hairline crack in neck.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

192

Hollow carved mallard drake, Walter Sibley, Whitehall, Michigan. Slightly turned head with inserted hardwood bill. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; minor roughness to the tail; old touchup to dark areas of underside. (1,750 - 2,250)

511.

Hollow carved redhead drake, Walter Sibley, Whitehall, Michigan, circa 1900. Head is turned approximately 45 degrees with inset hardwood bill. Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot.

Literature: “Fish and Fowl of the Great Lakes,” Donna Tonelli. (2,500 - 3,500)

(1,000 - 1,500)

508. Excellent rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Ed “One Arm” Kellie, Monroe, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Thick wet on wet paint blending. Near mint original paint; unrigged. Provenance: Seitz collection.

510.

(1,500 - 2,000)

512. Rare bufflehead hen, Ben Schmidt, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1940. Body is made from two pieces of wood, does not appear to be hollow. Slightly turned head. Original paint with minor wear.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,200 - 1,500)


Ferdinand Bach 1888 - 1967 Detroit, Michigan

513

514

513. Canvasback drake, Ferdinand Bach, Detroit, Michigan. “F. Bach” carved in underside. Detailed feather carving. Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; thin crack in one side; flat gray stippling on back appears to have been done at a later date.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 68. (12,000 - 15,000)

514. Large black duck, Ferdinand Bach, Detroit, Michigan. Relief wing carving with raised wing tips. Original paint with minor wear; minor roughness to wood at tip of tail and edge of one wing tip; small dents. Provenance: Formerly in the hunting rig of Gerald Buckhausen. Literature: “Waterfowl Decoys of Michigan and St. Clair Region,” p. 46, exact decoy. “The Bird Decoy - An American Art Form,” p. 94. (4,500 - 6,500)

513 Detail 193


The Ward Brothers Crisfield, Maryland

The White Mallard Club name has become synonymous with a rig of pintails and mallards used at this elite duck shooting club located in Northern California’s Butte Sink valley. Identified by the horseshoe shaped weights nailed to the rear of each decoy, or the nail pattern of a missing weight, it is thought that these decoys made their way to the club via either Abercrombie & Fitch or Roos-Akins sporting goods store in San Francisco, for one of the club’s founding members, William Burroughs. Most of the pintails and mallards are in the 1936 model but there were also a few pinch breast pintails from the 1920s. This pintail remained in the family of a White Mallard Club member until sold by our firm in 2007.

515

194


515 Detail

515 Detail

515 Detail

515. Rare pinch breast style pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Slightly turned head. Original paint on much of the decoy; old touchup on white areas and top of bill; the decoy was varnished a long time ago; hairline crack in underside; filled curing crack in back has had some of the filler fall out.

Provenance: From the White Mallard Club near Calusa, California. Rigmate to lot 24 in our August 2013 auction. (30,000 - 40,000)

195


516

516. Rare “knot head” canvasback with turned head, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1930. Very wide head style reminiscent of “fat jaw” decoys. Original paint with moderate discoloration and wear; some old touchup on breast and underside; thin chip missing from bill; thin crack through neck.

516 Detail

196

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath. (12,000 - 15,000)


517

517. Unused 1936 model mallard drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Slightly turned head. Near mint original paint on most of the decoy; small, approximately 3/8” hole filled in back and one side; professional touchup at small area above one speculum and at crack on underside.

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath, p. 83. (17,500 - 22,500)

517 Detail

197


518. 1936 model pintail hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. A long time ago a bottom board was added with filler at the seam and touchup on the sides, appears to have been done by the Ward Brothers; cracks in neck; filler added to a chip at neck base; touchup at a neck crack. (3,000 - 4,000)

518

519. Classic 1936 model canvasback hen, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Signed on the underside. Mixture of original paint with overpaint taken off and some touchup; small crack in back; hairline crack in bill; a few small dents and shot marks. (2,500 - 3,500)

519 520. 1936 model black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Painted on underside is “LT Ward’s best grade, black duck”. Appears to have a second coat of paint by the Ward Brothers; small chip missing from tail; filled cracks in back done before second coat; cracks in neck.

Provenance: John H. Moore collection, New York, New York. (2,500 - 3,500)

520 521. Canvasback drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Balsa body, slightly turned head, and inserted hardwood tail. Stamped “R. Richardson collection” and Signed, “Lem Ward, 1948, open water”. Strong paint stippling on back and sides. Excellent original paint; a few shot scars on left side of body; otherwise structurally excellent. (3,000 - 4,000)

521 198


522

522. Cedar widgeon drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland, circa 1940. Slightly turned head. Signed on the underside, also included there is the “L.T. Ward & Bro” ink stamp. Original paint with minor wear; thin chip missing from one side of bill; minor roughness to one edge of tail.

Literature: “Ward Brothers Decoys,” Ron Gard and Brian McGrath. (9,500 - 12,500)

522 Detail 199


523

524

525

526

527

528

Pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. 1938 model with slightly turned head. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; old paint restoration on white areas. (1,500 - 2,000)

526. Rigmate pair of mallards, Madison Mitchell, Havre de Grace, Maryland. Both have a large “RWS” brand in underside. Original paint with some patina and some wear; hen has hairline cracks in underside. (500 - 800)

524. Bluebill drake, Robert McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland. Strong original paint with very minor wear; small crack in one side from when the decoy was made; a couple of tiny dents.

527. Black duck, Charles Bryan, Middle River, Maryland. Signed and dated 1982. Good scratch paint detail. Very good and original. (250 - 350)

523.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mid Atlantic Region,” Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 91. (1,250 - 1,750)

525. Pair of bluewing teal, Madison Mitchell, Havre de Grace, Maryland. Signed with electropen. Hen has a crack in the underside, otherwise very good and original. (650 - 950)

200

528. Sleeping redhead drake from Madison Mitchell’s shop in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Original paint with very minor wear; small crack in breast; several small cracks in underside. (250 - 350)


529. Pintail drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. 1948 model with balsa body and inserted hardwood tail. Slightly turned head. Unrigged. Very strong original paint; crazing in brown areas of head; small dent on top of bill. (4,000 - 6,000)

529 530.

Goldeneye drake, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. Shooting stool model. Signed “Lem and Steve 1968”. Branded with Jimmy Hanniman’s brand “New Orleans Louisiana, a JH N.O.LA.” Original paint that has slightly crazed and darkened at breast area; structurally excellent; near mint. (2,500 - 3,500)

530 531. Canvasback drake, Robert McGaw, Havre de Grace, Maryland, 2nd quarter 20th century. Decoy was made to sit flat. Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; several small dents. (1,500 - 2,000)

531 532. Black duck, Ward Brothers, Crisfield, Maryland. 1936 model. Slightly turned head. Bill replacement and old gunning repaint, possibly by the Ward Brothers. (1,200 - 1,500)

532 201


Shorebirds

533

534

533. Running yellowlegs, Thomas Gelston, Quogue, New York, last quarter 19th century. Relief wing carving and shoe button eyes. Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot. (6,500 - 9,500) 534. Rare sandpiper, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York. Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; lightly hit by shot; bill is a professional replacement. (5,000 - 8,000)

534 Detail

202


535

535. Very rare plover in alert pose, Obediah Verity Seaford, Long Island, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century. Relief wing carving and carved eyes. Original paint with minor wear; thin crack in one side; white paint appears to be a early 2nd coat; bill is a later replacement. (10,000 - 14,000)

535 Detail

203


Obediah Verity 1813 - 1901 Seaford, New York

536

204


536 Detail

Obediah was born in Seaford, Long Island in 1813. He worked as a bayman all his life and he also carved a small amount of decoys for his own use as well as for friends and family. In the exhibition book for the Ward Museum, “The Decoys of Long Island”, they are described as. “His decoys are often pudgy with a well-fed appearance and are characterized by carefully detailed heads. These decoys are often said to be done in an impressionistic style. Ovediah Veirity is probably solely responsible for the establishment of the “Seaford School” of carving style.

536. Rare curlew, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, circa 1870s. Carved eyes and relief wing carving. Wide beetle head style. Quite large, over 15” long. Original paint with minor wear, mostly on back; shallow crack on one side; bill is a professional replacement.

Literature: “The Decoys of Long Island,” p. 63. (42,500 - 47,500)

536 Detail

205


537 538 539

537. Yellowlegs, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa 1900. Branded “J.H. James”. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear, mostly on the underside; moderate wear; a few small dents and shot marks.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey; Hillman collection stamp is on underside. Lot 57 in the April 1996 Guyette & Schmidt decoy auction. (3,500 - 5,500)

538. Large black bellied plover, Obediah Verity, Seaford, New York, circa 1870s. “HP” carved in the underside. Extra deep relief wing carving. “IHP” is carved in the

206

underside. Worn original paint on much of decoy; black on breast is old repaint; heavily hit by shot.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of John Hillman, Seagirt, New Jersey, Hillman collection stamp on underside. Lot 237 in the Guyette & Schmidt April 1996 Decoy Auction. (2,000 - 2,500)

539. Curlew, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey. Original paint with moderate discoloration and minor wear; small shot scar in bill; small crack in one side of head; small shot and defect in one side of head. (4,000 - 6,000)


540

540 Detail

540. Tern with split tail, Obediah Verity, Seaford, Long Island, New York, 3rd quarter 19th century. Appealing old in use repaint; hit by shot; minor roughness to tip of bill. (8,000 - 12,000)

207


541

541 Detail

541 Detail

541. Rare plover in winter plumagen Rogers Rig, Long Island, New York, 1880s. Branded “T. Rogers�. Original paint with minor wear; tiny shot marks on head.

208

Provenance: Formerly in the Eberle collection.

(7,500 - 9,500)


542 543

542.

Rare black bellied plover, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey, circa 1900. Original paint with good patina and minor wear; shrinkage on upper breast and part of back; crack in underside. (6,500 - 9,500)

543. Rare peep, Joel Barkelow, Forked River New Jersey, circa 1900. Bill is doweled through to back of head. Original paint with very minor shrinkage and discoloration; several small paint flakes missing from one side of tail.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of John R. Ribic.

Literature: “New Jersey Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 164. (5,000 - 7,000)

209


John Dilley

Quogue, New York

544

544 Detail

544 Detail

544. Rare and early black bellied plover, John Dilley, Quogue, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century. This large plump bird is more indicative of Dilley’s golden plover. This may be the only known example of this style black bellied plover by Dilley. Original paint that has had some old working varnish removed with some touchup to the black on the breast; a few light shot marks; overall structurally excellent.

210

Provenance: Ex collection of Joe French.

(17,500 - 22,500)


545

545 Detail

545 Detail

545. Extremely rare ruddy turnstone, John Dilley, Quogue, Long island, New York, last quarter 19th century. Fine feather paint detail. Original paint with minor gunning wear and good patina; a few tiny dents. (17,500 - 22,500)

211


546

548

546. Flat sided yellowlegs with tack eyes and iron bill. Original paint with good patina and minor wear; pitting on bill and eyes.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of William J. Mackey, Mackey collection stamp on underside. (400 - 600)

547. Unusual peep with lifted head, Long Island, New York, last quarter 19th century. Near mint original paint; tiny chip missing from edge of tail; most of bill is a professional replacement. (800 - 1,200) 548. Two flat sided yellowlegs from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Original paint with minor wear; one has had wing tip and bill replaced and has old overpaint on part of the head. (700 - 1,100)

212

549

551

550

547

549. Very rare folding tin sanderling, attributed to Strater and Sohier, Boston, Massachusetts. Original and near mint. (350 - 550) 550. Rare folding tin robin snipe, Strater & Sohier, Boston, Massachusetts. 1874 patent date is stamped in side. Original paint with minor flaking; a few small dents. (250 - 350) 551. Golden plover from Massachusetts. From the Morton rig, Quincy, Massachusetts. Branded “W. Morton” in underside. Old in use repaint; wire legs were removed a long time ago and holes were plugged with small square wooden pegs. (250 - 350)


New Jersey & Delaware River

553

552

556

554

557

552. Unusual sleeping black duck, John McLoughlin, Bordentown, New Jersey, 1st half 20th century. Very good and original. (800 - 1,200) 553. Oversize black duck, Jess Heisler, Burlington, New Jersey, 1st quarter 20th century. Slightly turned head, tack eyes. Original paint with some strengthening to top of back; structurally good. (1,000 - 1,500) 554. Two decoys. A goldeneye drake, Harry V. Shourds, Tuckerton, New Jersey and a swimming black duck, with very slightly turned head, Harry Mitchell Shourds. Goldeneye has had paint restoration and a few small dents; black duck has most of paint missing with

minor seam separation.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

(500 - 700)

556. Three decoys from the Delaware River. Black duck by Turk Leibensperger, canvasback drake by John McLoughlin, and a bluebill drake by Malcolm Skylar. Leibensperger decoy is good, others fair.

Provenance: Bartlett collection.

557.

Black duck, Jess Heisler, Burlington, New Jersey. Raised “V” wing carving and fluted tail. Original paint with minor flaking and wear; several small dents. (950 - 1,250)

(650 - 950)

213


John Blair, Jr.

1881 - 1953 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

John Blair, Jr. was known to have made very few decoys. Bluebills, teal, black ducks, and pintails have turned up over the years

He personally presented the decoy above, plate 50 of “Wildfowl Decoys”, to the book’s author, Joel Barber, around 1930.

214


558

558 Detail

558 Detail

558. Rare hollow carved pintail drake, John Blair, Jr., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, last quarter 19th century. Tack eyes and raised neck seat. Highly detailed feather paint. Original paint with good patina and minor discoloration and wear; a few tiny dents; tiny chip missing from tip of tail.

Literature: “Floating Sculpture,” Blair Huster and Doug Knight, p. 34.

(32,500 - 37,500)

215


Virginia Nathan Cobb, Jr

1825 - 1905 Cobb Island, Virginia

559

559. Desirable full body black duck, Nathan Cobb, Jr., Cobb Island, Virginia. Classic inlet head. Hollow with serifed “N” carved in underside. Raised “V” wing tip carving. Very old repaint with detailed feather scratching covering traces of original; break at neck has been secured a very long time ago with a nail driven through back side of head. (8,000 - 12,000)

559 Detail

216


560

560 Detail

560 Detail

560. Rare black duck, Alma Fitchett, Smith Island, Virginia. “AF” carved in underside. Button eyes with slightly turned head. Ice groove carved in back. Some feather painting detail visible on neck and breast area. Worn original paint with minor wear; crack through neck.

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 9.

(8,000 - 12,000)

217


Dave “Umbrella” Watson 1851 - 1938 Chincoteague, Virginia

561

561 Detail

561. Classic brant, Dave “Umbrella” Watson, Chincoteague, Virginia, circa 1900. Raised “V” wing carving and shoe button eyes. Slight shoulder carving. Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; moderate wear on breast and head; old in use touchup on white area under the tail; a few small dents.

218

Literature: “Southern Decoys,” Henry A. Fleckenstein, Jr., p. 78.

(9,000 - 12,000)


562

562 Detail

562. Canada goose, Dave “Umbrella” Watson, Chincoteague, Virginia, 1st quarter 20th century. Hollow carved with wing carving. Roy Bull brand in underside. As well as “AMOSD.” Very old paint, most of which is a second coat; age split on top of back; crack in neck with separation; gunning wear to edge of tail, bill and head.

Provenance: Ex collection of Roy Bull, Cape Charles, Virginia.

(10,000 - 15,000)

219


563

564

566

563. Root head pintail, Charles Clark, Chincoteague, Virginia. Long body with slightly reaching head. “S.G.H.” stamped twice in underside for Somers Headly collection. Two nails driven through underside to secure age split to right side of lower part of body. Most of the decoy has two coats of very old paint, some of which is probably original and some that has been strengthened; sliver in bill is secured by a small finish nail; age cracks in neck and putty missing from back of head where nail was driven to secure head to body. (2,000 - 3,000) 564. Black coot with metal head, J.L. Rowe, Virginia Beach, Virginia. “Rowe” brand on underside. Original paint with minor wear; filled age split in underside. (550 - 850) 220

565

567

565. Bluebill drake, Ira Hudson, Chincoteague, Virginia, 1st quarter 20th century. Football style with carved fluted tail and tack eyes. Original paint with minor wear; flaking to bare spots on body and head. (800 - 1,000) 566. Swimming Brant, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia. Branded, signed and dated 1972. Cork body, wooden bottom board and head. Keel has been removed, otherwise very good and original. (400 - 600) 567. Swimming brant, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia. Signed and dated 1959. Slightly turned head. Original and good. (400 - 600)


568

568 Detail

568. Sculptural brant, Walter Brady, Cobb Island, Virginia. Harold Haertel collection stamp on underside as well as Bill Mackey’s business card. Classic wing separation carving, carved eyes, and bill splined through back of head. Graceful form with tilted neck seat. Old paint is mostly missing to expose bare wood; bill is an old replacement; drilled hole at top of head; and imperfections in wood on back; as well as several line tie holes on underside and where pad weight was removed. (5,000 - 7,000)

221


New York State

569

570

571

572

573

574

575

576

577

569. Two decoys. Solid body black duck, Cyril Heath, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1920s. Oversize black duck, Charles Patterson, Wellesley Island, New York, circa 1920s. Heath decoy has original paint with minor wear; several small tail chips missing. Patterson decoy has worn old paint appears to be original on most of the decoy; numerous thin cracks; small chip missing from one edge of bill. (600 - 900) 570. Black duck, Sam Denny, Clayton, New York. Original paint with very minor wear; a few small dents. (600 - 900) 571. Pair of goldeneye, Frank Lewis, Ogdensburg, New York. Inlet heads. Original paint with minor wear; small cracks and dents; filler was added a long time ago to three carved areas on underside of head. (300 - 500) 572. Black duck, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York. Scratch and comb painting on breast and back. Good and original; a few shot marks. (500 - 800) 573. Bluebill drake, Frank Combs, Alexandria Bay, New York. Combing on back and sides appears to be original, the rest has old repaint; lightly hit by shot; small crack through neck. (500 - 800) 222

574. Two goldeneye hens, Frank Coombs, Alexandria Bay, New York, and George Blevam. Blevam has “AP” carved in the underside. Appealing old in use repaint with moderate wear; Coombs has small crack in bill and bill has been slightly blunted; Blevam has a few small dents. (350 - 450) 575. Goldeneye hen from Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1920s. Appealing old in use repaint; eyes were moved at one time; small dents. (350 - 550) 576. Goldeneye drake, known as imposters of Stevens decoys. Stamped “H.A. Stevens” on underside with square pad weight and tack eyes. Original paint with mild wear; edge is worn to bare wood on side and ends of bill.

Literature: “The Stevens Brothers,” Dr. Peter and Peggy Muller, p. 180, rigmate. (600 - 900)

577. Rigmate pair of mallards, Ken Harris, Woodville, New York. Harris stamp in underside. Both are hollowed out from underside and have slightly turned heads. Good feather paint detail. A few shallow paint scrapes, otherwise very good and original. (350 - 550)


578

579

578. Bluebill drake, George Stevens, Weedsport, New York, circa 1880s. Original paint on most of the decoy; some touch up on the underside; small dents, mostly in underside.

579. Black duck, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, circa 1880. Tack eye model. Original paint with minor wear; small dents; small chip missing from one edge of tail.

Literature: “Stevens Brothers Decoys” Dr. Peter and Peggy Muller. “Stevens Decoys,” Shane Newell. (4,500 - 6,500)

Literature: “The Stevens Brothers,” Dr. Peter and Peggy Muller. (3,500 - 4,500)

223


580. Canvasback drake, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, circa 1880s. Original paint with minor wear on most of the decoy; professional touchup on underside; a few small dents. (3,000 - 4,000)

580

581

581. Rare rigmate pair of redheads, Chauncey Wheeler, Alexandria Bay, New York, circa 1925. Balsa bodies with heavy combing on drake. Balsa construction with two body halves joined by dovetails. Drake has original paint with areas of touchup to neck seam and tail and also where head joins bill; hen has original paint with minor flaking and wear; body seams have separated slightly on both decoys; small dents to balsa. (3,500 - 4,500) 582. Canvasback, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, last quarter 19th century. “HH Stevens” stamp visible on underside. Mostly original paint; some strengthening to black areas on breast and tail. (2,000 - 3,000)

582 583. Bluebill drake, Stevens Brothers, Weedsport, New York, circa 1880s. Branded “WSO”. Working repaint wiht some original; minor discoloration and wear; professional repair to the tip of the bill; moderately hit by shot.

583 224

Provenance: Grossman collection. (1,500 - 2,000)


Contemporary

584

585

586

587

588

589

590

591

584. Two decoys, Carl Danos, Larose, Louisiana. Both signed and dated on underside. Black duck and goldeneye drake. With a carved remark burned into the underside of goldeneye. Unused near mint. (500 - 800) 585. Baikal teal, Torrey Ward maker, original paint by Marty Hanson. Signed by both. Very good and original. (400 - 600) 586. Pair of wood ducks, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia. Both have a large “C” carved in the underside. Drake is in swimming pose with slight turned and cocked head. Very good and original. (400 - 600) 587. Hollow carved full size great horned owl, Jerry Siloski, circa 1970s. Original paint that has been aged; structurally good. (400 - 600) 588. Pair of buffleheads, Pete Peterson, Cape Charles, Virginia. Branded and signed 1999. Drake has slightly

592 turned head. Very good and original.

(350 - 550)

589. Pair of mergansers, Pete Peterson, Cape Charles, Virginia. Branded and signed 1992. Both have slightly turned heads. A few tiny paint scrapes, otherwise very good and original. (350 - 550) 590. American merganser drake, Reggie Birch, Chincoteague, Virginia. Relief wing carving, paddle tail, and raised neck seat. Original paint that has been artificially aged; a few small dents; crack in underside. (400 - 600) 591. Black Coot, Coot Garton. Branded. Original and good. (250 - 350) 592. Mourning dove, Mark McNair, Craddockville, Virginia. Silhouette with two piece bill. Signed “M.F. McNair” on the underside. (300 - 400) 225


593. Stylish pair of wood ducks, in the style of Hucks Caines, Frank Finney, Virginia Beach, Virginia. Hollow. Both branded “J. Morris” on underside. Both have peg between breast and bill. Both have aged varnish and shot scars. (3,000 - 4,000)

593 594. Bufflehead drake, Jim Schmiedlin, Bradfordwoods, Pennsylvania. Signed and dated 1994. Branded “J.A.S.”. Slightly turned head. Relief wing carving with slightly carved crossed wing tips. Original paint with very minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents. (3,500 - 4,500)

594 595. Two doves, William Gibian, Onancock, Virginia. Both have glass eyes, carved separated wing tips and signed “Gibian” on underside. (800 - 1,200)

595 596. Bluebill, Tan Brunet, Galliano, Louisiana, 1991. Signed and dated on underside. “The first northern nationals, July 12 1991. Do’Gris by Tan Brunet, competition grade.” Turned head and fine comb painting. Mint. (900 - 1,200)

596 226


597

598

599

600

602

601

597. Red breasted merganser drake, William Gibian, Onancock, Virginia. Hollow with carved crest, wing, and tail. Signed “Gibian” on underside. Excellent. (650 - 950) 598. Rigmate pair of mallards, Vince Giannetto. Carved in the Delaware River tradition. Both have slightly turned heads. Original and very good. (500 - 700) 599. Pair of buffleheads, Grayson Chesser, Jenkins Bridge, Virginia. Both have a large “C” carved in the underside. Very good and original. (500 - 800)

601.

Ruddy duck hen and drake, Cigar Daisey, Chincoteague, Virginia. Branded and signed. Both have detailed feather carving. Slight discoloration on hen’s breast, otherwise very good and original. (700 - 1,000)

602. Well carved mallard hen, Marty Hanson, Prior Lake, Minnesota. Hanson ink stamp on underside. Good feather paint detail and slightly turned head. Original keel. Very good and original. (700 - 1,000)

600. Well made reproduction of a Ben Schmidt Canada goose. Near mint original paint that has been aged; structurally very good. (650 - 950)

227


Louisiana

604

603

606

605

607

608

603. Black duck, Tan Brunet, Galliano, Louisiana. Competition grade. Signed and dated on underside. “Canadian redleg by Tan Brunet 4/24. 1992”. Crossed wing tips and tucked head position. Mint. (1,500 - 2,000) 604. Rigmate pair of pintails, Mitchell LaFrance, St. Sophie, Louisiana, last half 20th century. Made in LaFrance’s later years, this pair was made as a gift for Charles Frank, and these exact decoys are pictured in his book on Louisiana decoys. Each decoy has five different museum stickers on underside detailing where they were exhibited. Both have turned, reaching heads. Original paint; drake has a small area of missing neck filler base of neck; hen has a tiny chip missing near left eye. (1,500 - 2,500) 605. Mallard drake, Gaston Isadore, Phoenix, Louisiana. Original paint with minor wear; small amount of touchup on body; several small cracks and dents. (1,250 - 1,750)

228

609

606. Ringbill drake, Nicole Vidacovich, Sunrise, Louisiana. Relief wing carving. Original paint with minor wear; professional repair to bill and tip of tail as well as small area of wing with paint strengthening in that area.

Literature: “Decoys of the Mississippi Flyway,” Alan Haid, p. 225. (950 - 1,250)

607. Gadwall drake, Domingo Campo, Shell Beach, Louisiana. Relief wing carving. Paint has been restored by Billy Hannamen; a few small dents. (650 - 950) 608. Bufflehead drake, Jude Brunet, Galliano, Louisiana. Signed and dated “8.30.1990” on underside. Slightly turned head and crossed wing tips. Mint. (400 - 600) 609. Mallard drake, possibly by George Regas. Relief wing carving. Old in use repaint with some original showing; neck crack repair. (350 - 450)


610. Rare gadwall drake, George Fredrick, New Orleans, Louisiana. Slightly turned head. A later example of Fredrick’s work. Relief wing carving and fine paint detail. Original paint with very minor wear; several tiny dents. (2,500 - 3,500)

610 611. Pair of mallards, Reme Rousell, Jr., Raceland, Louisiana. Original paint with minor wear; mostly on the drake; small amount of touchup and small dents on drake; hen’s head is a little loose.

Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie, p. 51. (1,500 - 2,000)

611 612. Rare mallard drake, Cooney Lietel, Venice, Louisiana. Relief wing carving. Original paint with minor wear; neck crack repair.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Charles Frank, New Orleans, Louisiana. Numerous decoy exhibition stickers on underside.

Literature: “Louisiana Lures and Legends,” Brian Cheramie, p. 204 (1,500 - 2,000)

613. Rigmate pair of pintails, Alfred Hebert, Little Caillou, Louisiana. Made for the consignor’s father in 1962. Both have slightly turned heads. Original paint with feather detail on both; hen has a small amount of touchup by Hebert on the head; drake has touchup by Hebert on approximately 20% of body; structurally very good. (1,500 - 2,000)

612

613 229


Ontario

614

615

617

616

619

618 614. Rigmate pair of goldeneye, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, 1st half 20th century. Very good and original.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(2,000 - 2,500)

615. Rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Good form. Original paint with good patina and minor wear; drake has some old touchup on part of the top of the tail area; small dents; slight wear to edge of drake bill.

Provenance: Formerly in the collection of George Thompson, Thompson collection stamp on underside. (2,000 - 3,000)

616. Hollow Canada goose, Phineas Reeves, Long Point, Ontario, last quarter 19th century. Made for Edward W. Harris, Long Point Company member 1877 - 1906. “Cliff Loach” is written on underside. Paint has been restored; small shot marks; neck crack repair. (2,000 - 2,500) 230

617. Black duck, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario, 2nd quarter 20th century. Slightly turned head, typical wing carving on back, and rasping on head. Original paint with light wear; appears to be unrigged.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(800 - 1,200)

618. Canvasback drake, Duncan Ducharme, St. Ambroise, Manitoba. Ducharme stamp on underside. Original paint with good patina and very minor wear; a few small dents. (1,200 - 1,500) 619. Black duck, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Slightly turned head. Original paint with minor wear; small crack and small chip from breast is missing. (650 - 950)


621

620

623

622

624

625

625A

620. Goldeneye hen and drake, William Hart, Bellville, Ontario. Original paint with minor shrinkage and wear; drake’s head is loose; a few small dents. (800 - 1,200) 621. Black duck, Ken Anger, Dunnville, Ontario. Original paint with minor wear; hairline crack partway through bill.

Provenance: Grossman collection.

(400 - 600)

622. Hollow carved pair of bluebills, Clarence Shaw, Hamilton, Ontario. Relief wing carving and comb painting on back. Slightly turned heads. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 55. (400 - 600) 623. Mallard drake, Cliff McCutcheon, Toronto, Ontario, 1st half 20th century. Original paint; two stress cracks on back of decoy; restoration to an area of right side of

tail; a few shot scars.

(500 - 800)

624.

Bluebill drake, Harve Davern, Brighton, Ontario. Good scratch paint detail. Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents; inset weight has been removed.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 114. (500 - 700)

625. Two decoys from Eastern Ontario, 2nd quarter 20th century. Redhead drake and bluebill drake by same maker. Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents and shot marks. (400 - 600) 625A. Bluebill hen, John R. Wells, Toronto, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Branded “JRW” on underside. A very old coat of working repaint with areas of exposed original paint underneath; a few rubs and scratches. Provenance: Ex Harry Seitz collection.

(600 - 800)

231


626

629

632

627

633

627.

Bluebill drake, Harve Davern, Brighton, Ontario. Good comb paint detail. Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot; head is lose and one eye is missing.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 114. (350 - 450)

628. Black duck, Art Chilton, Toronto, Ontario. Branded “A.C.” as well as maker stamp in underside. Good scratch feather paint detail. Relief wing carving and slightly turned head. Hairline crack in bill, otherwise excellent and original. Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 59. (350 - 450)

629. Black duck, Melvin Hall, Hamilton, Ontario. Relief wing carving. Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents.

232

631

630

626. Two decoys, Jack Reeves, Long Point, Ontario. Black duck and mallard drake. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents. (350 - 550)

628

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 62, exact decoy. (350 - 450)

634 630. Two decoys, Jack Reeves, Long Point, Ontario. A pintail drake stamped “JR” and a mallard drake. Original paint with minor wear; slight separation at body seam in mallard. (350 - 550) 631. Rigmate pair of hollow carved bluebills from Ontario, 2nd quarter 20th century. Original and good. (300 - 400) 632. Redhead drake, John R Wells, Toronto, Ontario. Solid body with “CEC” brand in underside. Old in use repaint on bill, back, and sides; black on tail and breast and red on head appear to be original; lightly hit by shot; hairline cracks in back. (300 - 400) 633. Hollow carved bluebill hen, Dan Bartlett, Prince Edward county, Ontario, 1st quarter 20th century. Old in use repaint; minor roughness to one edge of bill. (300 - 400) 634. Black duck, Zan Ruest, Cornwall, Ontario, circa 1960. Relief wing carving with feather detail and on the tail. Original paint with minor wear; a few small dents and shot marks.

Literature: “Ontario Decoys,” Bernie Gates, p. 201. (200 - 300)


Factory

635

636

638

637

639 635. Black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Strong original paint with minor wear; filled crack in back; some touch up at neck seat.

Literature: “Mason Decoys,” Russ Goldberger and Alan Haid. (1,500 - 2,500)

640 638. Pair of bluewing teal, Hays Factory, Jefferson City, Missouri, 1st quarter 20th century. Both have original paint; drake has several shot scars; light wear and varnish stains; hen has age split on underside, neck filler missing; rough area at tip of bill, and minor wear.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,200 - 1,800)

636. Canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. Seneca Lake model. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; a few small dents; several small cracks in body. (1,000 - 1,400)

639. Dove, Herter’s Factory, Waseca, Minnesota, circa 1940. Perfecta model. Never rigged for hunting. Excellent original paint; small rub on right side of wing patch. (1,200 - 1,500)

637. Early bluewing teal drake, Dodge or Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, circa 1890. Branded “LPJ” and “WGH” on underside. Mostly original paint with moderate wear and touchup to area of brown around neck area and neck filler. (1,500 - 2,000)

640. Dove, Herter’s Factory, Waseca, Minnesota, circa 1940. Perfecta model. Original paint; moderate wear with rubs to bare wood at tail, head, and right wing patch . (1,000 - 1,200)

233


641

642

643

644

646

645

641. Rare hollow carved bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade with wide “spoon” bill. Original paint with minor wear; numerous tiny dents; some touchup at neck filler. (1,000 - 1,500) 642. Redhead hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Strong original paint; structurally good; paint is missing from a knot at the left hand side and two other small areas on right side of body; light gunning wear. (1,000 - 2,000) 643. Merganser drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20h century. Taken down to original paint; some areas of exposed bare wood; several shot marks.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(1,000 - 1,500)

644. Rare special order bluebill hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade with flat bottom. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; small dents and shot marks.

(1,000 - 1,400)

645. Bluebill drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. Much of the decoy has working repaint, in the Mason style; some original showing, small dents. (1,000 - 1,500) 646. Very rare pintail drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. circa 1900. Standard grade with painted eyes. Mackey collection stamp on underside. Neck filler is missing; original paint with neck filler missing; three old repairs to the head with touchup.

234

Provenance: Rose collection.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(500 - 800)


647

648

649

650

652

651

647. Pair of bluebills, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Standard grade with glass eyes. Strong original paint with minor wear; hen has been hit by shot and has around half of neck filler missing; drake has small crack in neck filler and a crack in the underside. (950 - 1,250) 648. Bluebill hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade with wide “spoon” bill. Original paint with minor wear; a few tiny dents; filled “in factory” hairline crack in back. (800 - 1,200) 649. Hollow carved Canada goose from a Midwestern decoy factory, circa 1930s. Original paint with minor wear on much of the decoy; moderate discoloration and some touchup on other parts; small cracks and dents; small chip missing from neck base. (900 - 1,200)

650. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade. Original paint with minor wear; professional tail chip repair; small dents; tight crack in neck. (1,000 - 1,400) 651. Rare pair of goldeneye, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Standard grade with glass eyes. Original paint with minor wear; neck filler is missing from drake; surface crack in one side of hen; hairline crack in underside of each; several tiny dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(950 - 1,250)

652. Exceptional black duck, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Standard grade with tack eyes. Near mint original paint; chip missing from neck filler and crack in neck filler; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(900 - 1,200)

235


653

654

655

656

657

658

659

660

653. Rare rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Standard grade with painted eyes. Original paint with minor discoloration and wear; some chips missing from neck filler on drake; more missing on hen; drake has a crack in the underside; small dents. (650 - 950) 654. Mallard hen, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Rare hollow challenge grade. Original paint with minor to moderate wear; two cracks in one side; small dents; head is loose; minor wear to edges of bill. (800 - 1,200) 655. Pair of mallards, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Hen is unrigged. Both are in strong original paint; drake is protected by an old coat of varnish, a few small chips and cracks at neck filler, few tiny rubs on body and head; hen is excellent condition with a few small areas of flaking and one near back of tail where the wood was darkened. (700 - 900) 656. Mallard drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade. Original paint with minor wear; old touchup at neck and at a filled split in one side; small cracks; hit by shot. (700 - 1,000) 657. Pair of bluebills, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Standard grade with glass eyes. Original paint 236

661 with minor wear; a few small dents; most of the neck filler has been professionally replaced on drake, chips missing on hen.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(600 - 900)

658. Rig of five black ducks, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Standard grade with tack eyes. Original paint with moderate wear; much of the neck filler is missing; some old touchup on feathering. (500 - 700) 659. Canvasback drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Premier grade, Seneca Lake model. Branded “AJB”. A rig that was found in Wisconsin. Original paint; crack that runs from middle of breast through underside of decoy; right eye appears to be an old replacement; tight crack that runs through the neck; minor wear; a few small dents; some paint strengthening to end of bill. (800 - 1,200) 660. Grey coot, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Challenge grade with “FGS” painted on underside. Worn original paint; age split on underside; small dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(800 - 1,200)

661. Bluewing teal hen, Pratt Factory, Joliet, Illinois. Original paint with minor wear; lightly hit by shot. (750 - 1,000)


662

663

664

665

666

667

668

669

670

662. Atlantic model Canada goose, Wildfowler Decoy Factory, Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Unstamped. Near mint original paint; protected by its original coat of varnish, structurally very good. (450 - 650) 663. Very early mallard drake, Peterson Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 2nd half 19th century. “L.Ward” brand in underside. Painted eyes with neck seat carved towards back of body. Paint on top of bill, white and wing patch appear to be a second coat; several dents and shot marks. (600 - 800) 664.

Rare pair of “fat head” mallards, Evans Decoy Factory, Ladysmith, Wisconsin. Original paint with moderate wear; a few small dents and shot marks; one neck seam has been reglued. Literature: Trayer.

“North American Factory Decoys,” Ken (700 - 1,000)

665. Pair of mallards, Evans Factory, Ladysmith, Wisconsin. Standard grade. Hen has comb scratch painting. Both stamped “Evans Decoy” in underside. Original paint; drake has moderate wear; hen has light wear; stress crack on lower edge of drake’s bill. (400 - 600) 666. Very rare bufflehead drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan, 1st quarter 20th century. Premier grade. Mostly original paint that has darkened and worn away on many spots; age cracks and numerous shot marks to body; shot scar on left cheek; front of head replaced.

Provenance: Seitz collection.

(400 - 600)

667. Black duck, Hays Decoy Factory, Jefferson City, Missouri. Near mint original paint; crack in underside; a few tiny dents.

Provenance: Rose collection.

668.

Rare rigmate pair of canvasbacks, Pratt Manufacturing Company, Joliet, Illinois, circa 1930s. Original paint with minor wear; crack in one side of hen and underside of drake; a few small dents.

Literature: “North American Factory Decoys,” Ken Trayer, p. 304. (350 - 450)

(400 - 600)

669. Redhead drake, Mason Decoy Factory, Detroit, Michigan. Standard grade with painted eyes. Original paint with minor wear; hit by shot; approximately 1/3 of neck filler is missing; slight wear on one edge of bill; two in factory filled cracks in back.

Provenance: Rose collection.

(350 - 450)

670. Mallard drake, Evans Factory, Ladysmith, Wisconsin. Mommouth grade. Retains Evans decoy stamp in underside. Strong original paint; two hairline cracks on lower right side of body; light even wear over head and body. (300 - 400)

End of Session Two 237


Index of Carvers A.M. Bowles ................................................................................ 303 Ajax, Ajax...................................................................................... 311 Allen, Fred....................................................................................... 31 American Ammunition ................................................................. 330 Anger, Ken....................................230-239,262,614,615,617,619,621 Austin Cartridge ............................................................. 121,320,321 Bach, Ferdinand............................................................... 509,513,514 Barkelow, Joel................................................................................ 543 Bartlett, Dan................................................................................... 633 Barto, George................................................................................. 191 Benson, Frank...................................................................... 93,95,100 Bergman, Charles............................................................................ 2,4 Bicknell, Percy................................................................................... 6 Birch, Reggie................................................................................. 590 Birdsall, Jess.................................................................................. 142 Blair, Jr., John................................................................................ 558 Boyd, George.......................................................................... 149,444 Bradley and Hubbard ............................................................272-274 Brady, Walter................................................................................. 568 Briddell, Don.................................................................................. 408 Brunet, Jude................................................................................... 608 Brunet, Tan.............................................................................. 596,603 Bryan, Charles................................................................................ 527 Buckingham, Nash......................................................................... 287 Burr, Elijah..................................................................................... 147 California Powder ........................................................................ 325 Campo, Domingo........................................................................... 607 Carriage House Rig ........................................................................ 20 Chadwick, Keyes............................................................................. 64 Chaido, Tony........................................................................... 208,211 Chambers, Tom....................75,77,78,81,89,92,256,263-265,465,469 Chesser, Grayson............................................................. 422,586,599 Chilton, Art.................................................................................... 628 Chrysler, William........................................................................... 257 Clark, Charles................................................................................ 563 Clark, Roland.........................................................................94,96-98 Clinton Cartridge ...................................................................... 392A Coats, John..................................................................................... 367 Cobb, Nathan................................................................................. 559 Collins, Francis........................................................................... 69,73 Combs, Frank................................................................................. 573 Combs, Frank................................................................................. 574 Crandall, Horace “Hi”..................................................................... 1,3 Cranmer, William........................................................................... 139 Crowell, Elmer............................................ 54,56,65-68,148,403-405 Daisey, Cigar............................................................. 412,566,567,601 Danos, Carl.................................................................................... 584 Davern, Harve......................................................................... 624,627 Dawson, Tube................................................................................ 204 Denny, Sam.................................................................................... 570 Dettman, Warren............................................................................ 491 Dilley, John............................................................................. 544,545 Dingman, Ed........................................................................... 481,482 Dodge Decoy Factory, .......................................................... 358,661 Ducharme, Duncan........................................................................ 618 Duncan, Jim................................................................................... 266 DuPont.................................................................................... 315,322 Elliston, Robert................................... 17,24,27,188,450,452,459,463 English, Mark................................................................................. 138 Eppel, Jack.............................................................................. 195,449 Ettinger, Churchill............................................................................ 99

Evans Decoy Factory, .................................................... 664,665,670 Finney, Frank.......................................................................... 413,593 Fitchett, Alma................................................................................. 560 Fredrick, George............................................................................ 610 Garibaldi, Amiel................................................................................. 5 Garren, Otto................................................................................... 457 Garton, Coot................................................................................... 591 Garton, John................................................................................... 407 Gearhart, Don................................................................................. 340 Geiger, Fritz................................................................................... 490 Gelston, Thomas............................................................................ 533 Giannetto, Vince............................................................................ 598 Gibian, William....................................................................... 595,597 Glassford, Al........................................................................... 416,417 Graves, Bert..............14-16,29,30,183,189,190,205,451,458,462,464 Haertel, Harold............................................................................... 177 Hall, Melvin................................................................................... 629 Hanson, Marty................................................................................ 602 Harris, Ken.............................................................................. 572,577 Hart, Charles.................................................................................... 55 Hart, William........................................................................... 467,620 Hays Factory........................................................................... 638,667 Hazard Cartrdige............................................................................ 328 Heath, Cyril.................................................................................... 479 Hebert, Alfred................................................................................ 613 Heisler, Jess............................................................................. 553,557 Hendrickson, Eugene..................................................................... 141 Hercules Powder .......................................................................... 123 Herrington & Richardson ............................................................. 130 Herter’s Factory .................................................................... 639,640 Homme, Ferd................................................................................. 496 Horner, Rowley....................................................................... 135,137 Hotze, Hiram.................................................................................. 461 Hubley Co ............................................................................. 271,275 Hudson, Ira..................................................................................... 565 Isadore, Gaston.............................................................................. 605 Ithaca Guns .................................................................................. 122 Jackson, Joe.................................................................................... 226 Johnson Outboard Motors ............................................................ 385 Keller, Ed......................................................................................... 22 Kellie, Ed “One Arm”...................................................... 346,347,508 Klafke, M.A................................................................................... 247 Koelpin, William............................................................................ 213 Koelpin, William............................................................................ 269 LaFrance, Mitchell......................................................................... 604 Laing, Albert.................................................................................. 446 Lane, Steven....................................................................... 18,201,203 Lewis, Frank.................................................................................. 571 Lietel, Cooney................................................................................ 612 Lincoln, Joseph........................................................................... 59,60 Lipke, Paul..............................................................................335-337 Maas & Steffen .............................................................. 129,131,387 Marbles ........................................................................................ 305 Marlin Firearms............................................................................. 304 Mason Decoy Factory................ 7-13,34-52,155-169,359-364A,426439,635,636,641-648,650-660,666,669 Massey, Ken................................................................................... 423 McAlpin, Cline......................................................................... 26,202 McCutcheon, Cliff......................................................................... 623 McDonald, Zeke............................................................................ 354 McGaw, Robert....................................................................... 524,531


McIntyre, Cameron........................................................................ 418 McLoughlin, John.......................................................................... 552 McNair, Mark...................................................................109-119,592 Middlesteadt, Julius.........................................................472-475,478 Mitchell, Madison................................................................... 525,526 Moak, Augustus.......................................... 489,494,495,497,498,500 Moes, Alfred.................................................................................. 338 Mosely, Doug................................................................................... 32 Nichols, D.W.................................................................................... 86 Patterson, Roy................................................................................ 200 Pelzer, Walter................................................................................. 499 Perdew, Charles..................... 25,33,70-72,170-174,179-182,184,192, 199,210,293,294,299,300,302,371,372,455 Perdew, Haddon................................................................... 194,294A Peters ............................. 120,124,127,128,314,379,384,392,394,397 Peterson, Oscar....................................................................... 228,229 Peterson, Pete.......................................................................... 588,589 Peterson Decoy Factory ............................................................... 663 Pleissner, Ogden............................................................................. 246 Powers, Chris................................................................................... 19 Pratt Factory............................................................................ 357,668 Pringle, Peter.................................................................................. 255 Quesh, Otto.................................................................................... 197 Quillin, Nate............................................................................503-506 Reeves, Charles.............................................................................. 268 Reeves, Jack............................................................................ 626,630 Reeves, John.................................................................................. 267 Reeves, Phineas.................................................................. 76,466,616 Reghi, Ralph.................................................................................. 355 Reinbold, George...................................................... 175,176,178,425 Reindahl, Enoch...................................................................... 501,502 Reitgraf, Herbert............................................................................ 206 Remington .......................................... 126,308,312,317,318,382,395 Roberts, Thomas............................................................................ 288 Robinhood ............................................................... 323,324,327,329 Roth, John...................................................................................... 493 Rousell, Jr., Reme.......................................................................... 611 Rowe, J.L....................................................................................... 564 Ruest, Zan...................................................................................... 634 Ruggles, Charles.............................................................................. 23 Ruppel, Walter................................................................... 74,419,424 Satler, Carl..................................................................................... 343 Schiffrel, Lou...................................................................240-245,249 Schmidt, Ben.............101-108,345,349-350A,350C,351,353,507,512 Schmidt, Frank........................................................................ 352,356 Schmiedlin, Jim............................................................... 414,415,594 Schoenheider, Sr., Charles..................... 28,185,212,447,448,454,460 Schultz, William............................................................................. 406 Shaw, Charles................................................................................. 186 Shaw, Clarence............................................................................... 622 Shourds, Harry V.................................. 133,143,145,146,537,539,542 Sibley, Walter.......................................................................... 510,511 Sieger, Joseph.......................................................................... 487,488 Siloski, Jerry.................................................................................. 587 Simon, Herman Gustav............................................................... 249A Sirois, Philippe............................................................................... 409 Smith, Will....................................................................................... 85 Sprague, Chris................................................................................ 140 Stanley, James......................................................................... 485,486 Stevens, George............................................................................. 578 Stevens Brothers .............................................. 477,579,580,582,583

Strater & Sohier ........................................................................... 550 Strey, Frank.................................................................................... 492 Thomas, Charles............................................................................ 153 Truex, Rhodes......................................................................... 134,136 Tully, Bud.................................................................................. 79,254 Turpin, Tom...................................................................... 295,298,366 UMC .............................................................................. 334,390,396 Union Metallic ...................................................................... 331,333 US Cartridge ......................................................................... 393,398 Verity, Obediah.........................................................534-536,538,540 Vidacovich, Nicole......................................................................... 606 Walker, Charles................................................................ 187,453,456 Wallace, Amos............................................................................... 442 Ward, Torrey.................................................................................. 585 Ward Brothers, ................................410-411A,515-523,529,530,532 Warin, George................................................... 80,87,90,258,261,470 Watson, Dave.......................................................................... 561,562 Wells, John................................ 82,88,91,250,251,253,468,625A,632 Wheeler, Chauncey................................................... 476,483,484,581 Wheeler, Shang....................................................................... 443,445 Whittington, Hector................................................................ 196,207 Wilcoxen, Perry............................................................................. 209 Wildfowler Decoy Factory ........................................................... 662 Wilson, Gus...................................................................... 420,440,441 Wincehster, .................... 125,132,306,307,310,313,316,318,332,378 Wooster, Joe................................................................................... 421 Yeargan, Ben.................................................................... 341,342,344 Zender, Joseph................................................................................. 21


w w w. D e c o y s f o r S a l e . c o m Gu ye t t e & Deeter weekly o n lin e a uc tio n s De coys , Du ck calls , Shot Shell Boxes, S po r tin g Adver tisin g a n d Co llec tibles Gu ar ant e e d d e s cr i ptio n s, multiple ph o to s, q uick sh ippin g

Visit our website or contact Zac Cote at 410-253-8616 for questions or to discuss consigning.

Ward_GuyetteAd_2014_Layout 1 1/3/14 12:15 PM 1 For Questions Contact: 410-253-8616 | Page zcote@guyetteanddeeter.com

| PO Box 1170, St. Michaels, MD 21663 | www.decoysforsale.com

Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art

Glimpse the beauty of wildfowl from around the world

Gallery Hours: Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday: Noon-5 p.m. Members enjoy free admission 909 S. Schumaker Drive, Salisbury, MD 21804 410-742-4988

WARDMUSEUM.ORG

Ira Hudson Duck Family

The Museum features the world’s largest and finest public collection of decorative and antique decoys Join as a member, make a donation or plan a legacy gift today! Contact Executive Director Lora Bottinelli at 410-742-4988, Ext. 111


Collection Planning Program

Enjoy Collecting Now and Plan Ahead With a forty year history, you can rely on the Guyette & Deeter decoy auction house as the most trusted decoy auction firm to handle your estate planning and collection management needs. Whether it’s for tax purposes, estate planning, gifting, charitable giving or insurance purposes, let us manage and periodically update a comprehensive written appraisal of your collection. Gary and Jon are available to work with banks, attorneys, trust and estate officers, probate court, private clients and family members who may be responsible for the dispersal of estates and collections. Let professionals document your collection with accurate values and descriptions. We will work closely with you to ensure that your wishes are established at agreed upon terms and conditions now, to make it easier to administer your estate later.

Please contact Gary or Jon to discuss our Collection Planning Program today.

With several options, we make it easy for you to reach us: Gary Guyette PO Box 1170 • St. Michaels MD 21663 (410) 745-0485 • (410) 745-0487 fax decoys@guyetteanddeeter.com Jon Deeter 7980 Darbys Run • Chagrin Falls OH 44023 (440) 610-1768 • (440) 543-1466 fax jdeeter@guyetteanddeeter.com For more information, visit our website: www.guyetteanddeeter.com


4 9

Pheasant Run Resort, St. Charles, IL

T H

N O R T H

A M E R I C A N

Vintage Decoy & Sporting Collectibles Show

April 22–26, 2014

Don’t miss the largest decoy and sporting collectibles show in North America. More than 30,000 items for sale. More than 300 dealers. More than 1,400 collectors. The must attend show of the year for anyone who has any interest in America’s hunting and fishing past and the great folk art that grew from it.

Room -toTradi Room ng

300

rooms

Guyette Schmidt , & Deeter

Conf e Cen rence Deal ter 325er Event

Auction

table s

• Educational seminars for the beginning and experienced collector alike

• Display of seldom seen New Jersey decoys out of the best collections in the country

• Demonstrations by the country’s most talented contemporary carvers – including Cameron McIntyre who will display his personal hunting rig at the Show

• Display of some of the finest spearing fish decoys known • Duck call auction and display • Free decoy appraisals

For more details on daily Show activities and information on reserving selling tables go to

midwestdecoy.org or call 586-530-6586

Join Midwest Decoy Collectors Association for $25 – Includes free admission to show, newsletters, and annual member directory

The Midwest Decoy Collectors Association is a non-profit organization whose purpose is to collect and preserve the history of the decoy as original American folk art.


CONDITIONS OF SALE ‑- PLEASE READ 1.

GUARANTEE ‑ We have made a consistent effort in correctly cataloging and describing all items to be sold. The decoy catalog descriptions are guaranteed for authenticity and condition. All other items sold “AS IS” Should the need arise, the auctioneer reserves the right to make verbal corrections and provide additional information from the block, at the time of the sale. Absentee bids will not be executed on items that are found to be other than described in the catalog. Since opinions can differ, particularly in the matter of condition, the auctioneer will be sole judge in the matter of refunds. 2. DURATION OF GUARANTEE ‑ Request for refund for items purchased IN PERSON at the auction must be made within 3 days of the sale. If you are an absentee or phone bidder it is your responsibility to examine the lot immediately upon receipt. On items purchased in absentee, the guarantee will end 3 days from the time of delivery. Therefore, all guarantees on items purchased will become null and void 7 calendar days from the date of shipment. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT IF YOU PAY LATE, YOU WILL NOT BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE GUARANTEE. Payment must be postmarked no later than 30 days after the auction. 3. PROTESTED BIDS‑ In case of a disputed bid, the auctioneer is the sole determinant as to whom the successful bidder is, and at his discretion, may reoffer and resell the article in dispute. If a dispute arises after the sale, the auctioneer as sales records shall be conclusive as to whom the purchaser was, and the purchase price. 4. BIDDING- Bidding usually starts below the low estimate and advances in increments of approximately 10% of the opening bid subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. The auctioneer reserves the right, at his sole discretion, to refuse any bids that he deems unreasonable. The minimum bid increment guideline is as follows: $500 to $1000 - $25 $10,000 to $20,000 - $500 $100,000 and above - $2000 $1000 to $10,000 - $100 $20,000 to $100,000 - $1000 5. ABSENTEE BIDS‑ Phone or mail bids, at the discretion of the Auctioneer, will be accepted with a 20% deposit. In such case the bookkeeper will execute such bids competitively. Absentee bids are executed by the bookkeeper on behalf of the bidder in accordance with the bid increment policy shown above. Please review the rules governing both absentee and phone bids in the back of the catalog. 6. TERMS‑ All items are to be paid for in U.S. funds at the day of the auction. No items will be released until they are paid for. Those who have not established an account with us and wish to pay by check, must do so prior to the beginning of the auction, by presenting a current letter of reference from their bank, or by providing references, that are suitable to the Auctioneer. The Auctioneer reserves the right to hold merchandise purchased by personal check, until the check has cleared the bank. Phone and absentee bidders ‑ You will be notified one week after the auction of your bids/results. PAYMENT IS DUE UPON RECEIPT. A late charge will be accessed on all balances not paid, at the rate of 12% A.P.R. commencing 30 days after the auction. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. Guyette & Deeter will not carry insurance on items that are not paid for within 30 days of the auction. Also, the auctioneer may retain and/or recover the deposit specified as liquidated damages. In addition, the property can be resold at public or private sale without further notice. Any deficiency resulting from such resale shall be paid to the auctioneer by the defaulting buyer, together with all charges, fees, and expenses incurred by such resale, or the enforcement of the obligation hereunder. Buyer agrees to pay all charges and expenses incurred by reason of any breach of the Terms and Conditions of sale, including without limitation, reasonable attorney fees. 7. RESERVES ‑ A very small percentage of the decoys in this auction carry reserves. A reserve is a confidential minimum price established between the auctioneer and the consignor. The reserve will not exceed the low estimate printed in the catalog, and is usually much less. Reserves are executed by the bookkeeper on behalf of the consignor. 8. PAYMENT FOR PURCHASES MAY BE MADE WITH VISA , MASTERCARD, CASH OR CHECK. 9. BUYERS PREMIUM- The buyer’s premium, assessed on each selling lot, is 15% of the hammer price up to and including $1,000,000, plus 10% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. For payments made using Visa or MasterCard, the buyer’s premium is 18% up to and including $1,000,000, plus 13% on any amount in excess of $1,000,000. 10. TAX ‑ THERE IS A 7.5% SALES TAX IN ILLINOIS. 11. ACCEPTANCE OF CONDITIONS ‑ Bidding on any articles in this catalog indicates your acceptance of all the above items. 12. BIDDING AGENT RESPONSIBILITY ‑ If you are registering for someone or if you execute a bid for someone else under your number, you are responsible for the settlement of that account. You are also responsible for examining the decoy(s) for your client regarding the guarantee. 13. WITHDRAWAL ‑ We reserve the right to withdraw any property before the sale and shall have no liability whatsoever for such withdrawal. 14. TITLE ‑ Title passes upon the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer. It will then be the responsibility of the buyer to make full payment prior to removing the goods from the premises. Removal is at both the buyer’s risk and expense, and must be made at the conclusion of the sale, unless other arrangements are made with the Guyette & Schmidt staff. Any lots we might make arrangements for moving or storing are solely at the risk of the owner, and any damage or loss occurring after the fall of the hammer becomes that of the buyer. 15. LEGAL DISPUTE ‑ Any legal disputes arising from this auction shall be settled in the court system of the State of Maine. UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE - The Maine Uniform Commercial Code, Title II, Section 2328 applies to this auction. 16. All calls are sold “As Is”. THE OFFICE WILL NOT BE OPEN UNTIL WEDNESDAY AFTER THE AUCTION.


ABSENTEE AND PHONE BIDS 1. Absentee bids are a service provided to our customers free of charge. Every effort is made to execute all absentee bids, however, in the event of an error of omission, or failure to properly execute absentee bids, the Auctioneer shall not be held liable. 2. All absentee bids must be accompanied by a 20% deposit, which will be refunded immediately after the auction if your bid is unsuccessful. If your bid is successful, the deposit will be applied to the purchase price and the balance due upon presentation of your bill. All absentee bidders are notified by mail, whether succesful or unsuccesful. 3. Visa and Mastercard numbers can be given in place of a check deposit, if your bid is submitted by phone. Your card number will not be used to make payments for purchases, it is only used as collateral. Your card number will only be used to make payment for purchases if you default on payment. 4. To execute an absentee bid, fill out the enclosed form, listing catalog number, description and your top bid price (not including the 15% buyer’s premium). Send this together with your deposit as soon as possible. If your bids are sent seven days or less prior to the auction, you should call our office three days prior to the auction, to confirm that we have received your bids. If they have not been received at that point in time, we will take your bid over the phone. We cannot guarantee that bids received after the auction has started will be executed. 5. If two or more bids are received on the same item from different people, the bidding will open at the next logical raise above the second highest bid. If two absentee bids are received with the exact same amount, the first one received will take precedence. 6. All bids must be in even dollar amounts. Bids in fractions of dollars will be considered the next lower even dollar amount. 7. Bid increments: The bid increment policy, which also applies to both absentee and phone bidders is listed under “CONDITIONS OF SALE” (item #4), in the front of the catalog. 8. Open bids, bids with no set top amount, or orders to just simply buy the lot, cannot be accepted. You must have a definite top limit before we can execute your bid. Alternatives to this are as follows: a. To bid over the telephone. This can be done by simply sending a 20% deposit for what you wish to bid on the object. This will bind whatever bid amount you wish to bid over the telephone. (NOTE: There are only 7 phone lines into the auction room and phone bids will be handled on a first come, first served basis.) b. Some bidders concerned that a lot might just go for one bid above their top limit, leave a top bid plus one bid. This works as follows: the top bid submitted might be $1000, but not wishing to lose the lot for simply $25 more, the party might bid $1000 + 1 bid if they definitely don’t want to go over a certain price, they would indicate $1000 +1 ($1,025) (NOTE: One possible problem that occasionally arises with absentee bids is when someone in the audience bids exactly the amount, which you specify is your limit. In such a case, we would not go one extra bid unless your bid sheet indicates plus one bid.). 9. If you are a successful bidder, a bill will be sent one week after the auction. Purchasers should indicate their desired method of shipment, if such is necessary. There is a charge for shipping, labor, materials, and insurance. Shipping is done on a first come, first served basis, and can take up to 4 weeks. Please note that a certified check, Visa, Mastercard, or any other form of guaranteed funds will expedite shipping. 10. All purchases are shipped COD to the address on your invoice, or as otherwise instructed, approximately 10 days after payment has cleared. In place of COD, you can call the office with your credit card number to pay shipping & handling charges, or to make other arrangements. According to UPS regulations, we must now crate all paintings. In addition, for expensive oil paintings and delicate carvings, we need a written statement from the purchaser, assuming the responsibility of pursuing any claims, in the event of damage incurred during shipping. Valuable lots need to be sent 2nd day air UPS due to values. Under no circumstances will we be liable for damage to glass or frames, or fragile decoratives, regardless of cause. 11. TERMS — Phone and absentee bidders — You will be notified one week after the auction of your results. Payment is due upon receipt. Interest will be charged on all balances not paid within 30 days after the bill is sent at the rate of 12% APR. If any accounts become more than 60 days overdue, the consignor will be given the name of the buyer who is responsible for holding up their funds. If an account is 75 days overdue, the items may be returned to the consignor and overdue buyer will pay the buyers premium and commission from the sale, if they wish to participate in future Guyette, Schmidt & Deeter auctions. 12. Bidding on any article(s) indicates your acceptance of these terms above. If you have any questions concerning absentee bids, please call us.


OFFICE:

ABSENTEE AND PHONE BID FORM

PO Box 1170 St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 Fax 410-745-0487 decoys@guyetteandschmidt.com

OFFICE USE ONLY TIME DATE OF BID AUCTION DATE MANAGER ABSENTEE OR PHONE BID

NAME ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

TELEPHONE DEPOSIT $

(Check Amount or Visa or MasterCard # & Exp.)

IIdesire following items in the sale.sale. The The bids bids are toare be to executed by Guyette & Deeter, up to but desiretotobid bidononthe the following items in the executed by Guyette & Schmidt, Inc.,not upexceeding to but notthe amount(s) on the below bids.on Allthe bidsbelow will be executed and will accepted subject to theaccepted Terms ofsubject Sale andtoAbsentee Bids exceedingspecified the amount(s) specified bids. All bids be executed and the Terms of Procedure outlined inBids the catalog. (Please be sure you understand before using thisour Absentee and Phone Sale and Absentee Procedure outlined in that the catalog. (Pleaseour be procedures sure that you understand procedures before Bid Form.) will not open Bid untilForm.) Wednesday using this Office Absentee andbe Phone Officeafter willthe notauction. be open until Wednesday after the auction.

Signature A PREMIUM OF 15% WILL BE APPLIED TO ALL ITEMS SOLD, TO BE PAID BY THE BUYER OFFICE USE

IN CATALOG # ORDER

DESCRIPTION

A SECOND PAGE IS PROVIDED ON BACK SHOULD YOU REQUIRE ADDITIONAL SPACE TOTAL BIDS $

x 20%

EQUALS DEPOSIT ENCLOSED $

BID AMOUNT


Page 2

NAME OFFICE USE

PHONE IN CATALOG # ORDER

AUCTION DATE DESCRIPTION

BID AMOUNT


148

481

404

228


Guyette & Deeter

PO Box 1170, St. Michaels, MD 21663 410-745-0485 | www.guyetteanddeeter.com