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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Contents Welcome Director’s Welcome…….................................................3 Letter from Our Chief……………………………….........4 2012 Orientation Team…….........................................5

The Transfer Advising Process Center for Advising & Student Transitions…..7-­‐8 Academic Advising………………………………………..9 Meeting with Your Advisor.………..........................10 Student Responsibility Summary..........................11 How and Why to Graduate in Four Years....12-­‐13 Transfer Student Policies & Procedures…..14-­‐15 FAQ’s..................................................................................16

Advising Resources WESS……………………………….…..................................18 Analysis of Academic Progress……………………..19 Blackboard………………………………………………….20 General Education Requirements...................21-­‐24 Sample Course Schedule & Key..............................25 Schedule Planning Worksheet…………………26-­‐27 Index of Departments and Programs............28-­‐29 Restricted Majors…………………………………...30-­‐32 Teacher Education Program……………………33-­‐36 School of Business……………………………….…37-­‐38

Important Dates University Calendar of Dates............................40-­‐41 Recommended Calendar of Activities………42-­‐43 Red Hawk Day................................................................44 Billing Dates.............................................................45-­‐46

Student Support Services Business and Auxiliary Services Student Accounts……………………………………49-­‐50 Financial Aid……………………………………………….51 Admissions………………………………………………….52 Registrar……………………………………………………..53

Student Support Services Continued Parking Services…………………………..…………54-­‐55 Shuttle Bus & Public Transportation……….56-­‐57 Dining Services……………………………………..……..58 I.D. Card Office……………………………………….……59 Red Hawk Dollars………………………………….…….60 University Bookstore…………………………….……..61

Meeting New People Center for Student Involvement…………..……….63 Commuter Association Resources & Services..64 Residential Education and Services………………65 Campus Recreation…………………………………...…66 Women’s Center………………………………………….67 Office of Equity and Diversity………………………68

Health and Wellness Counseling and Psychological Services……...….70 Disability Resource Center……………………...71-­‐72 University Health Center……………………………...73 Health Promotion………………………………………..74 Campus Ministry…………………………………………75 Athletics………………………………………………..……76

Campus Safety Sexual Assault Response Team…………………….78 Bias Response Taskforce………………………….…..79 Campus Safety Procedures…………………………..80 E-­‐lerts and Buzz……………………………….………….81 University Police…………………………………………82 Be a Hawk Eye…………………………………………….83

Academic Support Services Center for Academic Development and Assessment…………………………………………………85 Career Services and Cooperative Education.…86 Office of Dean of Students……………………….87-­‐88 Center for Writing Excellence……………………....89 Sprague Library…………………………………………..90 Office of Information Technology……………91-­‐92 Summer and Winter Sessions………………………93 Post-­‐Orientation Checklist………………………...…94 Field Guide 2012

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WELCOME

Welcome to Montclair State University! Welcome to Red Hawk Country! Dear Student, Although attending college is familiar to you, Montclair State University appears to be unfamiliar

territory

right

now.

Transfer

Orientation will show you that you have many resources available to you to help you find your way and to succeed. The campus will become your home-­‐away-­‐from-­‐home in no time at all. Here are a few suggestions to help move this process along: Keep this Transfer Field Guide handy. It includes a great deal of information about campus departments, University policies, and tips that will be helpful to you in finding your way around Red Hawk Country. Visit your Academic Advisors often and discuss with him/her your hopes, plans, frustrations, and dreams. Map out what you want to achieve while you are here, make a plan of how you will you do it, and review it regularly with your Academic Advisor. Focus on the whole “you” – your academic, personal, and social aspirations – to grow holistically. Your first year at Montclair State can set the pace for your entire college career. Immerse yourself in all that that University has to offer. Enjoy Transfer Student Orientation and Red Hawk Frenzy! Warmest regards, Dr. Michele Campagna Executive Director Center for Advising & Student Transitions

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WELCOME

Welcome, New Students! On behalf of the proud women and men who serve the Montclair State University Police Department, I want to let you know that MSU is a community that takes your safety seriously. We will help guide you to resources available here. The University Police Department is continuously updating and evaluating emergency response plans. All community members and their families are strongly urged to familiarize themselves with campus emergency response plans by visiting www.montclair.edu/emergency. Traditional methods of communication and modern technology, such as instant text messaging, will provide the most up-­‐to-­‐date information on emergent situations affecting the community as needed. Take an active role in your safety during your time here, and report suspicious activity as you see it to the University Police Department. Programs offered by our Department, like Street Smart Self Defense and Operation I.D., are great ways to protect both you and your valuable items. These programs are offered throughout the semester. Remember to lock all doors and windows in your car and on-­‐campus housing, and don’t leave items unattended for any period of time. Crime statistics are released each October on our website at www.montclair.edu/police from the previous year. There are emergency phones across campus denoted by a blue light that will put callers in immediate contact with police communications. E-­‐lerts and BUZZ are great ways to utilize modern technology to provide a “smart” escort cross campus. Simply use your issued cell phone to voluntarily have University Police monitor your travels across campus via GPS technology and ensure a safe journey to your destination on campus. It is our hope that you have a safe and enjoyable experience in your college life. We encourage you to take an active role in helping us serve you by acting in a responsible and civil manner towards all community members. Again, welcome to the MSU community, and if I or any of the dedicated police officers that serve this community can be of help, do not hesitate to call us at 973-­‐655-­‐5222 or visit us on the web at www.montclair.edu/police. Chief Paul M. Cell Montclair State University Police Department

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2012 Orientation Team Aaron Freland Matthew Delos Reyes Elizabeth Ramirez

WELCOME

Graduate Interns from the National Orientation Director’s Association Iowa State University The University of North Texas Illinois State University

Montclair State University Peer Leaders Peer Leader

Major

Class

Club/ Organization

Natasha Alvarado

Email @mail.montclair.edu Alvaradon2

Political Science

Senior

Katherine Begley

Begleyk1

Communication Studies

Senior

Jackeline Cano

Canoj2

Sociology

Junior

Latin American Student Organization 90.3 WMSC – MSU’s Underground Radio Peer Leadership Program

Casey Coleman

Colemanc9

Broadcasting

Junior

Admissions Ambassador

Sandy Dawoud

Dawouds1

Undeclared

Sophomore

Peer Leadership Program

Deanna Dominguez

Dominguezd3

Business

Senior

Peer Leadership Program

Bryan Espinal

Espinalb1

Undeclared

Sophomore

Melih Gazko

Gazkom1

Political Science

Junior

Latin American Student Organization Bonner AmeriCorps

Melaney Leal

Lealm1

Psychology

Junior

Peer Leadership Program

Diane Mangru

Mangrud2

English Education

Junior

Peer Advisor

Michael Poole

Poolem3

Broadcasting

Junior

Players Club

Brittany Popiolek

Popiolekb1

Animation/Illustration

Sophomore

Peer Leadership Program

Ebony Potts

Pottse2

English

Junior

Admissions Ambassador

Ashley Pryce

Prycea1

History Education

Sophomore

Alpha Lambda Delta

Gadiel Respes

Respesg1

Communication Studies

Senior

Pi Kappa Alpha

Jeannabel Reyes

Reyesj16

Mathematics

Junior

Anny Rodriguez

Rodrigeuza59

Spanish

Sophomore

Jeniffer Soto

Sotoj8

Psychology

Junior

Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Program Latin America Student Organization Student Government Association

Deanna Stirk

Stirkd1

Justice Studies

Junior

Intramural Sports

Giovanna Tello

Tellog1

English

Senior

Peer Advisor

Nicholas Vessichelli

Vessichelln1

Nutrition

Sophomore

Wrestling Club

Sherika Wallace

Wallaces5

Communication Studies

Junior

Peer Leadership Program

Alysha Zakrzewski

Zakrzewskia1

History Education

Sophomore

History Club

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TRANSFER ADVISING

Center for Advising & Student Transitions http://www.montclair.edu/advising Morehead Hall, Room 120 cast@mail.montclair.edu 973-­‐655-­‐7114 The Center for Advising and Student Transitions (CAST) serves as the primary advising resource for all freshmen, undeclared sophomores, transfer students, students changing majors, and military and veteran students. CAST supports your transitional needs by working collaboratively with all University partners in taking a proactive role in the education process of students. We help you make informed decisions about courses required for your major, how to choose an academic major, how to think critically about your future goals, and assistance with planning for that journey. Academic Advising The mission of the Center for Advising and Student Transitions’ academic advising program is to assist students with their academic transition as they expand their knowledge and skills, clarify their goals, and develop ownership of their educational experiences. As an undeclared or first-­‐year student, you are assigned a CAST Academic Advisor who will guide you in reaching your academic goals. If you are a transfer student transitioning into Montclair State University or a student changing a major and/or minor, a CAST Advisor can help you with this process by providing you with information about the University and its various resources. CAST Programs and Services CAST programs have been specially designed to promote your academic, personal, and social development at Montclair State University. Our initiatives enhance your learning experiences both in and out of the classroom. Academic Advising Programs First-­‐Year Advising Through a combination of one-­‐to-­‐one advising session, the New Student Seminar course (GNED199), workshops, and self-­‐directed activities, the First-­‐Year Advising Program is designed to guide you through your transition to University-­‐level learning at Montclair State University. The First-­‐Year Advising Program is designed to help you identify your goals as a learner and to use the University’s resources to help you accomplish them. CAST encourages you to meet with your advisor regularly throughout your first year of study. Sophomore Advising Developing relationships, choosing a major, deciding whether to study abroad, and finding internships are just some of the decisions you make during your sophomore year. The Sophomore Year Program offered by the Center for Advising and Student Transitions focuses on getting you connected to such resources and to help you have a meaningful and successful sophomore year! Major Exploration The selection of your college major is not a decision to be made lightly. By encouraging you to understand your interests, abilities, and how these elements reflect themselves within Montclair State University’s majors, your CAST advisor will assist you in identifying your ideal college major. The work doesn’t stop with your decision, however, as your advisor will also help you create a path to that major and then connect you to the academic department that will help you follow that path through to your graduation.

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TRANSFER ADVISING

Peer Advisor Program The Peer Advisor Program is an extension of the existing Peer Leadership Program. Peer Advisors work in close collaboration with the CAST Academic Advisors and have been trained to work with students on basic advising issues. The Peer Advisors are available to answer your questions, direct you to resources, and provide you with support at Montclair State University. The Step-­‐Up Program Step-­‐Up offers academic support for freshmen and sophomore students who have an overall GPA that falls into the 2.0-­‐2.29 range and/or have not completed approximately two-­‐thirds of course credits attempted at the University. Students in the program receive individual support designed to help them complete their coursework and raise their GPA. Student Academic Progress Program (SAPP) SAPP provides advising and support services for students needing to improve their academic standing at the University by helping them become motivated, self-­‐directed, and successful learners. Programs Supporting Your Transitions Peer Leadership Program Peer Leaders consist of undergraduate Montclair State University students who possess leadership qualities and have a desire to be first-­‐year student advocates. Peer Leaders provide support during New Student Orientation and Red Hawk Day. Students interested in being a Peer Leader must meet the positions qualifications, apply, and complete a training program once hired. National Society of Collegiate Scholars The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS) is a national honor society that recognizes freshmen and sophomores who have a GPA of 3.4 and are in the top 20 percent of their class. NSCS places an emphasis on service and has chapters in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Sophomore Success Programming Our Sophomore Success Programming is geared specifically toward your academic, social, personal, and professional development as a sophomore student. CAST will support your transition from your freshman to sophomore year and then guide you further until you become a successful junior at Montclair State University. Veteran and Military Resources The Coordinator of Veteran and Military Resources provides advising, on and off campus referrals, and support services to Montclair State University’s veterans and military students. Orientation Programs Transfer Student Orientation Transfer Student Orientation includes essential information on how to select appropriate courses to continue your degree program, including a presentation on how to read the Analysis of Academic Progress, as well as on-­‐site advisement and registration.

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TRANSFER ADVISING

Academic Advising What is Academic Advising? Academic Advising is an educational process that, by intention and design, facilitates students’ understanding of the meaning and purpose of higher education and fosters their intellectual and personal development toward academic success and lifelong learning (NACADA, 2004). Academic Advising should be ongoing throughout your college career. It helps you to clarify your personal, educational, and career goals, and helps you to understand how your courses fit into your goals for the future. If you are an undeclared transfer student, an Academic Advisor from our department will be your primary academic advisor. If you have declared a major, you will be advised by a Faculty Advisor in your major department. Faculty Advisor Assists with course selection, scheduling, planning for degree completion Assists with developing, clarifying, and evaluating educational plans and goals Helps students learn if they are on track, ahead, or behind in major course sequence Has extensive knowledge in their field and can provide insight on the trends in the job market Is a student’s best network contact

Professional Advisor Helps students identify and explore major and minor selections and/or alternatives Helps clarify University policies and solve academic problems Helps students identify campus resources Works with you to identify your strengths and interests to help you develop realistic educational goals Is a student’s referral source for campus resources

Check WESS to identify your advisor. If none is posted, contact your major department to inquire. Statement on Disabilities: Any student with a documented physical, sensory, psychological or learning disability requiring academic accommodations should make arrangements through the Disability Resource Center. (Morehead Hall, Room 305, 973-­‐655-­‐5431)

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TRANSFER ADVISING

Meeting with Your Advisor All undeclared first-­‐year and sophomore students are assigned an Academic Advisor based upon their last name. Academic Advisors work with students throughout their time as first-­‐year students and undeclared sophomores to develop and implement a plan for academic and personal success. Your Academic Advisor is knowledgeable about the majors and minors offered at the University as well as the many available campus resources. If you have declared a major, you will be assigned a faculty advisor, who is specifically trained to work with you regarding your major courses.

How to Find Your Advisor 1. Log onto WESS (wfs.montclair.edu) 2. Under “Student Records,” click on “Advisor” 3. Your advisor will be listed there. To find contact information for your advisor, click on “MSU PeopleSearch” and type in your advisor’s full name. Q: I don’t have an Advisor listed on my WESS account. What do I do? A: If you are an undeclared student, contact the Center for Advising & Student Transitions at 973-­‐ 655-­‐7114 and you will be assigned an Academic Advisor. If you are a declared student, contact your major department and ask them to assign you to a Faculty Advisor.

Contacting Your Advisor To schedule an appointment with your Academic Advisor, you will need to call 973-­‐655-­‐7114 and remember to clearly state your first and last name, CWID, AND the academic advisor with whom you would like to schedule an appointment. When emailing your Advisor, or any faculty/staff member, be sure to always use your MSU email account. Also, include your first name, last name, CWID, and identify why you are writing. See sample email: Hello Dr. Smith, My name is Emily Clare and I am in your ENWR 105 course that meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8:00am. I am writing to ask a question about our current issues paper due in three weeks. I am unclear about the requirements of the assignment and was wondering if you could further explain them for me. Specifically, I would like to know your expectations for the paper and what the grading criteria will be. I look forward to hearing back from you. Thank You, Emily Clare CWID: 12358858 We strongly encourage all students to visit http://www.montclair.edu/advising or the University Catalog at www.montclair.edu/catalog for the latest information on programs, deadlines, and procedures.

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Student Responsibility Summary STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY TO SELF AS A LEARNER Check your MSU e-­‐mail DAILY: Information regarding grades, housing, inclement weather, and other University updates will be sent to this account. When contacting faculty and staff members, be sure to write to them from your University email account, not personal email accounts. Contact your Advisor: It is your responsibility to know about academic requirements, new programs, or other campus updates. Be in contact with your Advisor at least three times per semester. You have three different ways to reach them: phone, e-­‐mail, or visit their office. Adhere to Important Dates & Deadlines: It is your responsibility to be knowledgeable and adhere to academic policies and procedures. Important dates such as adding/dropping courses and tuition/bill payments are listed every semester online in the Schedule of Courses www.montclair.edu/Registrar/. It is imperative to be aware of deadlines for housing assignments, restricted major applications, and purchasing parking permits. Review the Undergraduate Catalog: Majors and minors offered at the University as well as course descriptions can be found in this online publication. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the academic policies and procedures, which can also be found here. Simply visit “Quick Links” off of MSU’s website and choose Undergraduate Catalog. Review your WESS Account Regularly: Web Enrollment Student Services (WESS) is the central location for your personal information. You can log into WESS to review your grades, financial awards, class schedule, and much more. You should review any financial or academic obligations, parking violations, etc. by logging into WESS. It is your responsibility to be aware of and remedy any holds. Avoid Academic Probation: All students must maintain a minimum cumulative 2.0 grade point average (GPA) to be considered in “Good Academic Standing.” Any student who falls below a 2.0 GPA will be placed on academic probation. The student will be granted the following semester to retake failed courses and raise his/her cumulative GPA to 2.0 or higher. If a 2.0 GPA or greater is not obtained, the student will be placed on Academic Suspension (See the Undergraduate Catalog for details).

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TRANSFER ADVISING

How and Why to Graduate in Four Years If you think four years of college is expensive, try five…or six. You may hear jokes about “super seniors,” but the extra time and money you’ll spend on an additional year in college is not so “super”. Not only will you pay another year’s worth of tuition, textbook costs, campus fees, and other education expenses, but you won’t be earning money at your first job or getting started in graduate school. It seems that graduating college in four years has become less of a priority for many college students. In fact, at most New Jersey colleges and universities, freshmen have a less than 50-­‐percent chance of earning a bachelor’s degree within four years, according to a Star-­‐ Ledger analysis of graduation data from more than two dozen campuses across the state. If you're just starting your college career, be sure to keep your eyes on the prize and remember the real reason you're in college: to get your degree. The benefits of graduating in four years can outweigh the sacrifice. Perhaps the most practical reason for graduating college "on time" is the money you and your family will save by not paying for an extra year of school. The in-­‐state tuition cost for the 2011-­‐12 academic year at Montclair State University is approximately $10,700, plus room and board (if you live on campus), textbooks, and other costs of living. If you're using student loans to finance your education, you'll only go deeper into debt. It is simply more cost effective to graduate in four years. By the time you're starting your career and making a steady salary, many of your peers will still be in school. This quick start will enable you to get a better footing in the work force, thus allowing you to advance quicker. In order to graduate on time, you must have a plan. Here are some tips to help you stay on the right track to a 4 year graduation: • • • • • •

Complete a course load of 15 to 18 credits each semester. Enroll in summer and/or winter sessions to catch up or get ahead. Coordinate your general education requirements with your major requirements. Make full use of the academic advising available to you. Meet with your advisor at least once a semester. Decide on a major early and stick with it. If you don’t know what you want to major in, complete your general education requirements first. Put your effort and hours into school. Schedule your time to fit your academic plan and plan your job and co-­‐curricular activities around that schedule. Your education is job #1. Seek help if you are having problems. Keeping your mental, physical and emotional health in check will help you to perform at an optimal level.

Your academic career is your responsibility; be actively involved in it!

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TRANSFER ADVISING

Transfer Student Policies and Procedures Transfer Waivers The General Education Transfer Waivers are placed on your Analysis of Academic Progress (academic audit) if you have completed your Associate of Arts (AA), Associate in Fine Arts (AFA), or Associate of Science (AS) degree from a NJ community college. This waiver removes all of your General Education requirements except for the World Language and World Culture requirement. Your Analysis of Academic Progress will list your general education courses under “free electives.” If you earned an Associate Degree in Applied Science (AAS) from a NJ community college or have transferred more than 15 academic credits from your transfer institution, a New Student Seminar Waiver will be placed on your Analysis of Academic Progress. This waiver will remove the New Student Seminar requirement from your degree program. If you are transferring less than 15 credits from your transfer institution, you are required to complete the New Student Seminar requirement. Make sure to send your final transcripts with “Degree Received” notation to the Undergraduate Admissions Office. All AA/AS/AFA pending degree waivers will be deleted if no final transcript is received.

World Language/World Culture Requirement The World Language/Cultures requirement is separate from the GenEd2002 requirement and must be completed by all transfer students. This requirement can be fulfilled through transfer credits if you have completed world language courses at your transfer institution. You must complete two sequential semesters of a world language at the introductory level (i.e. German 1 & German 2) in the same language in order to satisfy this requirement.

Transferring Credits to MSU You can transfer in a maximum of 60 credits from any County College. Transfer credits in excess of 60 credits hours will not appear on your Montclair State academic record.

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Transfer Student Policies and Procedures continued from previous page Residence Requirements A minimum of 32 credit hours of the total required for the baccalaureate degree must be completed at Montclair State. The final 24 credit hours required for graduation must be taken at Montclair State and cannot be acquired through transfer. This policy is strictly adhered to. Any student who transfers from another institution with advanced standing in a major field of study is required to complete a minimum of twelve credit hours of upper level course work in the major at Montclair State. Some curricula may require more than this minimum.

Transfer Credits marked as “DPT” Credit Transfer Credits that do not have an exact equivalent to Montclair State University courses are listed in the Free Electives section of your Analysis of Academic Progress as a “DPT” course. You can have these courses reviewed for possible University equivalency by providing a description of the course from your transfer institution to the department where the course is located at Montclair State. For example, if you see HIST DPT on your Analysis of Academic Progress, this course would be evaluated by the history department.

Completing your “IN Progress” Course Work at your Transfer Institution If you are currently completing your final coursework at your transfer institution, the course(s) you have “in progress” are posted as “zero” credits on your Analysis of Academic Progress (credit evaluation). If you are currently enrolled in course(s) that are not reflected on your Analysis of Academic Progress, it means that Undergraduate Admissions was not notified of your plans to take it. Please contact Undergraduate Admissions at 973-­‐655-­‐4444 so they can update their records with which course(s) you are taking.

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FAQ’s How do I view my class schedule? Class schedules are available online through WESS (wfs.montclair.edu.). On WESS, click on “Registration” and select either “Detailed Schedule” or “Student Schedule” to view a copy of your schedule. You may also contact the Registrar's Office at 973-­‐655-­‐4376. What GPA do I have to maintain to avoid being on Academic Probation? All students must maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average. If a student’s cumulative GPA drops below 2.0, regardless of the number of attempted credit hours, you will be placed on academic probation. You will only have one semester to bring your cumulative GPA to a 2.0 or better. For more information, see the MSU Undergraduate Catalog at www.montclair.edu/catalog . How do I withdraw from classes? Students will be permitted to drop courses through WESS with a WD through the ninth week of the semester. Even if you have a hold on your account, you may still WD from a course by going to the Office of the Registrar in College Hall, Room 204. What happens if I need to withdraw from the University? Non attendance does not constitute withdrawal. If you do not officially withdraw, you will be financially and academically liable for all charges on your bill. Keep in mind, there is a withdrawal process that includes a form to complete, surrender of your campus photo ID, and dropping your courses. Contact the Center for Advising and Student Transitions at 973-­‐655-­‐7114 for more information. Where can I find IMPORTANT deadlines for students? The important deadlines for students are located in the Schedule of Courses Book which is published online at www.montclair.edu/Registrar/schedulebook. How do I get an "IN" (incomplete) for my course/s? In order to receive an "IN" for a course, you need to discuss your situation and reasoning with your professor. Your professor makes the final decision. If approved, you both must complete an Incomplete contract. In most cases, incomplete coursework must be completed within six weeks after grades have been posted. Who do I contact if I need information about the World Language Requirement or to schedule a foreign language placement test? You can speak with your Academic Advisor, register online at http://flp.montclair.edu , or contact Jessica Brandt at 973-­‐655-­‐6955. What is the math readiness test? This test is required for all students who wish to take pre-­‐calculus or a higher-­‐level math course who did not earn at least a C-­‐ or better in the prerequisite course. Contact the Center for Academic Development and Assessment at 973-­‐ 655-­‐4476 to schedule this test.

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ADVISING RESOURCES

WESS (Web Enrollment Services for Students) WESS is the University’s suite of online services which affords students a convenient method of registering, accessing schedules, grades, and financial accounts. Students access WESS with their Student ID Number (CWID) and their six digit Personal ID Number (PIN). WESS is generally available Monday-­‐Friday 7am-­‐11pm and Saturday/Sunday noon to 6pm (check the current semester schedule of courses for system availability). How to Access WESS: -­‐ http://wfs.montclair.edu/ and click on WESS OR -­‐ Go to www.montclair.edu and click on “Quick Links” on the top toolbar. Under the “Technology” section, click on WESS. What you can find on WESS: Student Records -­‐ Grades -­‐ Account Summary and Pay Online -­‐ Analysis of Academic Progress -­‐ Holds -­‐ Official Transcript Request -­‐ Unofficial Transcript -­‐ Advisor Registration -­‐ Drop and Add Classes -­‐ Student Schedule -­‐ Detailed Schedule -­‐ Registration Status

Financial Aid -­‐ Financial Aid Summary -­‐ Change/Decline Awards -­‐ Award Information by Year -­‐ Student Requirements -­‐ Cost of Attendance -­‐ Academic Progress Courses -­‐ -­‐ -­‐ -­‐ -­‐

Course Section Search Course Selections Online & Hybrid Courses List Schedule of Course Book Course Catalog

Q: What do I do if I try to login and it says “The ‘Login ID’ or ‘PIN’ entered is invalid?” A: For security reasons, you must contact the Office of the Registrar at 973-­‐655-­‐4376 and request your PIN reset. The Registrar will confirm your identity and advise you of your newly assigned PIN. For Technical Issues or comments contact WESS-­‐Admin at: WESS-­‐Admin@mail.montclair.edu

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ADVISING RESOURCES

Access Your Analysis of Academic Progress (Degree Audit) •

• •

Your analysis of Academic Progress is a program tailored to you. It tells you which specific courses you need to complete for your major. You should look at your analysis each semester prior to registering for courses to see which courses you still need. After you register, you should run it again to make sure the courses you registered for are fulfilling the requirements you intended them to fulfill. To access your Analysis of Academic Progress (degree audit), which includes your transfer credit equivalencies, simply log on to www.montclair.edu then go to Quick Links (located on the top of the homepage) drop down menu and select the WESS option. Select Enter Student Services link to login to your student account. Refer to the Undergraduate Admissions Checklist for information on setting up your campus wide identification number (CWID) at http://www.montclair.edu/admissions/accepted/transfer_checklist.html Once you have entered the Web Enrollment Services for Students (WESS) site, click on the Student Records drop down menu and then select The Analysis of Academic Progress link. Once you have reached the Analysis of Academic Progress page: Ø Click “select” if the Primary program information indicates the major you intend to study. Ø If the Primary Program is not the major you intend to study, then click on the “Modeling” option Ø Next, select your intended major (choose from the drop down menu options) Ø Next, select the catalog requirement – GenEd 2002 option Ø The new screen that loads will be your Analysis of Academic Progress For assistance in interpreting your analysis, you may make an appointment during the school year with your academic advisor.

Attention: Undeclared students, students interested in obtaining teacher certification, and/or students interested in “exploring” other majors (e.g. restricted programs) must choose the “Modeling” option. (Note: Modeling will not change your major, it is simply a “what-­‐if” scenario for you to review)

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ADVISING RESOURCES

Blackboard Blackboard (Bb) is course management system (CMS), which is designed to enhance the teaching and learning environment. This robust CMS affords instructors and facilitators a simple-­‐to-­‐use interface that fosters interactive and engaging learning environments for students. Montclair State University faculty, staff, and students can login to Bb (http://blackboard.montclair.edu) with a valid NetID from any location. Some of the tools available within Blackboard include: Ø Course content easily made available such as assignments, lecture notes, PowerPoint and multimedia files, just to name a few Ø Asynchronous and synchronous collaboration tools such as discussion boards and real-­‐time knowledge sharing Ø Electronic mail control whereby e-­‐mail can be sent to the entire class or specific individuals without maintaining an address book of names Ø Online quizzes and surveys using a variety of assessment tools Ø Online grade book, whereby students can track learning outcomes throughout the semester Ø Adaptive release, which allows instructors to develop custom learning paths for individuals Ø e-­‐Portfolio tool, which provides an environment student reflection, evaluation, and presentation Ø The Bb Content System where individuals can access a virtual hard drive where learning artifacts can be stored For more information, visit the OIT website at http://oit.montclair.edu/resources/studentbb.html Blackboard Mobile Learn Students may now take interactive learning to the mobile devices, giving students instant access to their courses, communities, and contents. To begin using Blackboard Mobile Learn, download instructions at: http://oit.montclair.edu/bb9/docs_instructors/mobile_learn/MobileLearn12-­‐10.pdf Additional Services and links available via the WESS main page at: https://wfs.montclair.edu/

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ADVISING RESOURCES

Gen Ed 2002 COURSES OFFERED FOR THE FALL 2012 SEMESTER The following courses fulfill Gen Ed 2002 for full-­‐time freshmen and part-­‐time students who entered Montclair State University in Fall 2002 or thereafter, and transfer students who entered the University in Fall 2006 or thereafter. Departments in which courses are located are in italics. A. NEW STUDENT SEMINAR Biology and Molecular Biology Department

BIOL 199 Freshman Seminar in Biology

Chemistry and Biochemistry Department

CHEM 190 Freshman Seminar in Chemistry Exercise Science and Physical Education Department

ATTR 199 Orientation Athletic Training HPEM 199 Freshman Seminar in Health and Phys. Ed. Interdisciplinary Gen Ed 2002 Department

GNED 100 Adult Academic Success Seminar GNED 199 New Student Seminar

John J. Cali School of Music Department

MUGN 199 Freshman Seminar Music Major Mathematical Sciences Department

MATH 102 New Student Experience for Math Political Science and Law Department

POLS 199 Freshman Seminar/Pol Sci & Law C1. COMMUNICATION: Writing English Department

ENWR 105 College Writing I: Intellect Prose

Honors Program Department

HONP 100 Honors Sem: Great Books/Ideas I C2. COMMUNICATION: Literature English Department

ENWR 106 College Writing II: Writ. & Lit St C3. COMMUNICATION: Communication School of Communication and Media Arts Department

CMST 101 Fund Speech: Comm Requirement D. FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS Art and Design Department

ARAN ARCE ARDW ARDW ARPA ARPH

190 200 200 201 200 200

ARPH ARPM ARSC ARSC

201 200 200 210

Introduction to the Visual Arts Ceramics: Pottery and Sculp Beg I Drawing, Beginning I Life Drawing, Beginning I Painting, Beginning I Photography Beginning I: Contemporary Art Form Digital Photo and Imaging I Printmaking, Beginning I Sculpture, Beginning I Sculpture, Beginning II

English Department

ENFL

208 Introduction to the Film

Honors Program Department

HONP 201 Honors Sem in the Creative Process

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Field Guide 2012

John J. Cali School of Music Department

MUGN MUGN MUGN MUGN MUGN MUGN

100 152 160 209 236 250

Introduction to Music Music in Film Intro Music World Cultures Introduction to Jazz * The History of Broadway Rap and Rock as Cultural Phenomena *

Theatre and Dance Department

DNCE 105 Dance Appreciation DNCE 141 Dance Technique: Modern I DNCE 155 Dance Technique: Ballet I THTR 105 Acting I E. World Languages Classics and General Humanities Department

GREK LATN LATN LATN LATN

101 101 102 205 206

Beginning Greek I Beginning Latin I Beginning Latin II Intermediate Latin I Intermediate Latin II

Linguistics Department

AMSL 101 Beg American Sign Language I AMSL 102 Beg American Sign Language II ESOL 173 Academic Writing Modern Languages and Literatures Department

ARAB ARAB ARAB ARAB ARAB ARAB CHIN CHIN FREN FREN FREN FREN GERM GERM GERM GERM GERM GERM HEBR HEBR HEBR HEBR JAPN JAPN

101 112 121 132 151 204 101 121 101 112 121 132 101 112 121 132 201 202 101 112 121 151 101 112

Beginning Arabic I Beginning Arabic II Intermediate Arabic I Intermediate Arabic II Advanced Arabic I Advanced Arabic II Beginning Chinese I Intermediate Chinese I Beginning French I Beginning French II Intermediate French I Intermediate French II Beginning German I Beginning German II Intermediate German I Intermediate German II Advanced German I Advanced German II Beginning Hebrew I Beginning Hebrew II Intermediate Hebrew I Advanced Hebrew I Beginning Japanese I Beginning Japanese II


121 101 112 121

Intermediate Japanese I Beginning Russian I Beginning Russian II Intermediate Russian I

Spanish and Italian Department

ITAL ITAL ITAL ITAL PORT PORT PORT SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN

101 102 103 104 101 102 103 101 102 103 104 135

Italian I Italian II Italian III Italian IV Elementary Portuguese I Elementary Portuguese II Portuguese III Spanish I Spanish II Spanish III Spanish IV Basic Spanish Heritage Learners

F1. HUMANITIES: World Literature or General Humanities Art and Design Department

ARHT 105 Art West Civ: Ancient-­‐Medieval ARHT 106 Art Wes Civ:Renaissance-­‐Modern

Classics and General Humanities Department

GNHU GNHU GNHU GNHU GNHU

115 201 202 285 294

Troy and The Trojan War General Humanities I-­‐to 1400 General Humanities II-­‐from 1400 Mythology Russian Prose and Drama

English Department

ENLT 206 World Lit: Coming of Age Theme ENLT 207 World Lit: Voices of Trad/Challng Modern Languages and Literatures Department

RUIN 294 Russian Prose and Drama F2. HUMANITIES: Philosophy or Religion Educational Foundations Department

EDFD 220 Philosophical Orientation to Edu Philosophy and Religion Department

PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 102 Ethics PHIL 106 Logic RELG 100 Religions of the World RELG 101 Introduction to Religion RELG 221 Religion and Culture G. COMPUTER SCIENCE Computer Science Department

CMPT 109 Intro Cmpt App:Fluent W/Info Tec CMPT 112 Honors Seminar in Computing Honors Program Department

HONP 112 Honors Seminar in Computing H. MATHEMATICS Honors Program Department

HONP 104 Fractals and Infinity

Mathematical Sciences Department

MATH 103 The Development of Math MATH 106 Contemp Appld Math for Everyone MATH 109 Statistics

ADVISING RESOURCES

JAPN RUSS RUSS RUSS

I. NATURAL/PHYSICAL SCIENCE LAB Anthropology Department

ANTH 101 Physical Anthropology Biology and Molecular Biology Department

BIOL BIOL

100 Biological Sciences 110 Biology of Human Life

Chemistry and Biochemistry Department

CHEM 100 Introductory Chemistry

Earth and Environmental Studies Department

EAES EAES EAES EAES EAES EAES

101 105 107 201 240 250

Planet Earth Physical Geology Earth and the Environment Understand Weather & Climate Historical Geology Introduction to Marine Sciences

Honors Program Department

HONP 210 Honors Seminar in Science

J. PHYSICAL EDUCATION Exercise Science and Physical Education Department

PEGN PEGN PEGN PEGN PEGN PEGN PEGN PEGN PEGN PEGN PEGN

200 242 251 257 258 262 265 271 272 275 278

Beginning Swimming Racquetball Fitness for Life Weight Training/Conditioning Beginning Tennis Volleyball Figure Skating Social Dance Bowling Beginning Karate Yoga

K.1. SOCIAL SCIENCE: American or European History Classics and General Humanities Department

GNHU 281 Greek Civilization GNHU 282 Roman Civilization Educational Foundations Department

EDFD 221 Hist Foundations American Ed

History Department

HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST

103 Found of Western Civilization 105 Emergence of European Civilization, 1500-­‐1914 106 Contemporary Europe, 1914-­‐ Present 110 Intro to American Civilization 117 History of the U.S. to 1876 118 History of the U.S. Since 1876 281 Greek Civilization

Honors Program Department

HONP 102 Honors Seminar: 20th Century Civilization K.2. SOCIAL SCIENCE: Non-­‐Western Cultural Perspectives Anthropology Department

ANTH ANTH ANTH ANTH

100 103 115 120

Cultural Anthropology * Prehistoric Archaeology Cultures of the Middle East * Native North Americans *

Field Guide 2012

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ADVISING RESOURCES

ANTH 125 Anthro of Globalization ANTH 130 Cultures of South Asia * ANTH 140 Nonwest Contributions West World* ANTH 150 Cultures of Latin America * ANTH 180 Health & Healing/Cross Cult Pers Art and Design Department

ARHT 101 Art in Non-­‐Western Societies *

Classics and General Humanities Department

GNHU 217 Reading Asian Cultures * GNHU 293 Russian Culture and Civilization History Department

HIST HIST HIST HIST

108 112 114 116

Intro of African Civilization * Intro to Modern Middle East Early Latin America * Modern Latin America

LALS LALS

201 Perspectives on Latin America * 205 Image/Identity: Latin Women in Film and Fiction *

Latin American and Latino Studies Department

Modern Languages and Literatures Department

ARAB ARIN FREN FRIN RUIN

193 193 289 289 293

Introduction to Arab Culture * Introduction to Arab Culture * Francophone Film * Francophone Film * Russian Culture and Civilization

Philosophy & Religion Department

PHIL RELG RELG RELG

137 106 116 212

Asian Philosophy * African Religious Traditions * Islamic Religious Traditions Asian Religions *

SOCI

220 Sociology: Rich and Poor Nations

Sociology Department

Theatre and Dance Department

DNCE 245 World Dance * Women’s and Gender Studies Department

WMGS 200 Global Feminism * K.3 SOCIAL SCIENCE: Social Science Anthropology Department

ANTH 110 Anthropology of Multicult Amer ANTH 155 Urban Anthropology * Art and Design Department

ARTX 122 Clothing and Culture * Child Advocacy Department

CHAD 210 Child Abuse and Neglect Earth and Environmental Studies Department

EAES EAES EAES EAES

160 161 170 281

The Human Environment Human Geography World Geography Intro American Urban Studies *

Economics and Finance Department

ECON 100 Introduction to Economics ECON 101 Principles of Economics: Macro ECON 102 Principles of Economics: Micro Educational Foundations Department

EDFD 200 Psych Foundations of Edu EDFD 264 Gender Issues in Education *

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Field Guide 2012

Exercise Science and Physical Education Department

PEMJ

227 Social Problems in Sport

Health and Nutrition Sciences Department

HLTH 290 Human Sexuality NUFD 153 Dynamics of Food & Society * Justice Studies Department

JUST

101 Criminology

Linguistics Department

LNGN 210 Intro to General Linguistics LNGN 230 Language in Society LNGN 250 Language of Propaganda Political Science and Law Department

JURI LAWS LAWS POLS POLS POLS

210 200 220 100 101 201

United States Legal Systems Introduction to Law Conflict and Its Resolution * Introduction to Politics American Gov and Politics Comparative Politics

Psychology Department

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology PSYC 120 Psychology of Leadership Sociology Department

SOCI SOCI SOCI SOCI

102 113 204 230

Racial and Ethnic Relations Social Problems Sociology of the Family Sociology: Conflict/Violence

Women’s and Gender Studies Department

GLQS 200 Intro Gay Lesbian Bi Trans Queer WMGS 102 Intro Women & Gender Studies * L. GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVE 1. Gen Ed 2002 approved courses (other than Physical Education). 2. General introductory courses at 100–level/200–level in any department in the university. * Meets World Cultures (Multicult Awareness) Requirements


ADVISING RESOURCES

Index of Departments and Programs Undergraduate students needing to locate an advisor can contact their major department. DEPARTMENT/PROGRAM

CHAIRPERSON/DIRECTOR

LOCATION

PHONE (973) 655-­‐

Accounting, Law & Taxation

F. Aquilino

PA-­‐316

4174

Administration and Supervision

E. Grippaldi

UN-­‐3194

7718

African-­‐American Studies

S. Lewis

DI-­‐217

7378

Anthropology

F. Rothstein

DI-­‐101

4133

Aquatic and Coastal Sciences

P. Bologna

SH-­‐112

4112

Art and Design

S. Gordley

CA-­‐110

7295

Biology and Molecular Biology

Q. Vega

SH-­‐107A

7178

Broadcasting

D. Sanders

BR

7974

Center of Pedagogy (Teacher Education) C. Dacey

UN-­‐1160

7250

Chemistry and Biochemistry

M. Kasner

RI-­‐354

6864

Child Advocacy

R. McCormick

860 Valley Rd.

4188

Classics & General Humanities

J. Alvares

DI-­‐103

5292

Communication Sciences & Disorders

J. Koehnke

1515 Broad St.

3305

Communication Studies

H. Haines

LI-­‐050

4200

Computer Science

M. Oudshoorn

RI-­‐304

4166

L. Burlew

UN-­‐3169

7611

D. Schwarzer

UN-­‐2127

5187

T. Jacobowitz

UN-­‐3163

5407

Earth and Environmental Studies

M. Gorring

ML-­‐355

5409

Economics and Finance

S. Meziani

PA-­‐416

5255

Educational Foundations

J. Price

UN-­‐2129

5170

English

D. Bronson

DI-­‐468

4274

Exercise Science and Physical Education R. Horn

UN-­‐4111

5253

Family and Child Studies

K. Goldfarb

UN-­‐4145

4171

Fashion Studies

L. Reilly

SP-­‐006A

7485

Geography

G. Pope

ML-­‐254

7569

Geoscience

S. Passchier

ML-­‐252A

3158

Health & Nutrition Sciences

E. Goldfarb

UN-­‐4161

4154

Counseling, Human Development and Educational Leadership Curriculum & Teaching Early Childhood, Elementary and Literacy Education

2

Field Guide 2012


ADVISING RESOURCES

Index of Departments and Programs continued from previous page DEPARTMENT/PROGRAM

CHAIRPERSON/DIRECTOR

LOCATION

PHONE (973) 655-­‐

History

M.Whelan

DI-­‐428

7848

Honors Program

G. Waters

CO-­‐121

7374

PA-­‐351

7847

J. Oyler

UN-­‐2151

4278

International Studies

B. Hadis

DI-­‐306

7276

John J. Cali, School of Music

R. Cart

CH-­‐148

7028

Jurisprudence

M. Tayler

DI-­‐258

4196

Justice Studies

N. Connolly

DI-­‐348

5347

Latin American and Latino Studies

T. Spanakos

DI-­‐209

7575

Linguistics

E. Fitzpatrick

CS-­‐222C

4286

Management

L. Lin

PA-­‐344

4269

Marketing

A. Mukherjee

PA-­‐448

5126

Mathematical Sciences

H. Roberts

RI-­‐268

5132

Modern Languages and Literatures

L. Oppenheim

CS-­‐222B

4283

N.J. School of Conservation

W. Thomas

Branchville, NJ

7614

Philosophy & Religion

D. Rogers

DI-­‐445

7417

Political Science and Law

W. Berlin

DI-­‐203

7576

Psychology

P. Vietze

DI-­‐219

5397

Sociology

J. Livingston

DI-­‐303

4131

Spanish-­‐Italian

L. Levine

CS-­‐222E

7506

Theatre and Dance

R. Mugleston

LI-­‐126H

7343

Women’s Studies

F. Afzal-­‐Khan

DI-­‐121

7309

Information and Operations Management R. Misra Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children

Field Guide 2012

2


ADVISING RESOURCES

Entrance Requirements for Restricted Programs and Majors Reminder: A Department Chairperson and/or Designee signature is required to declare or add a major/minor.

COLLEGE OF THE ARTS (CART) • • • • • •

• • •

Art & Design Bachelor of Fine Arts -­‐ Studio Obtain Faculty recommendation from full-­‐time professor in your specialization. Complete portfolio interview with BFA committee Transfer Students -­‐ apply to the program after completing one full course in your specialization Contact: Julie Heffernan, 973-­‐655-­‐7295 Bachelor of Arts -­‐ Studio Portfolio review (OR) Complete three studio courses in the dept. with a “B” or better and have each professor of those courses complete a recommendation form (available in department) Contact: Dr. William McCreath, Calcia Hall 120, 973-­‐655-­‐7540

Bachelor of Fine Arts -­‐ Animation/Illustration, Film, Graphic Design, or Industrial Design • Students must complete a portfolio interview with the director of the individual programs. • Animation/Illustration: Professor Scott Gordley, 973-­‐655-­‐4140 • Film: Anthony Pemberton, 973-­‐655-­‐7200 • Graphic Design: Professor John Luttropp, 973-­‐655-­‐4163 • Industrial Design: Professor Denis Feigler, 973-­‐655-­‐2091

• • • •

• •

Communication Studies 3.00 cumulative GPA Students must provide: intended concentration, campus activities or organization involvement, job experience (if applicable), as well as a brief essay. Visit: http://www.montclair.edu/arts/dept/comm/comm06a.html Request appointment: Janet Wilson, Dept. Coordinator; Life Hall 050, 973-­‐655-­‐7471

• • •

Dance Audition and Departmental interview Visit: www.montclair.edu/pages/theatredance/index.htm Contact: Lori Katterhenry; Life Hall 126J, 973-­‐655-­‐7080

Fashion Studies Contact Program Advisor: Linda Riley, 973-­‐655-­‐7485

• •

3

Broadcasting 3.00 cumulative GPA Departmental interview Visit: http://www.montclair.edu/arts/dept/broadcasting/bdcs09.html Contact: Stephanie Wood; Broadcasting Building, 1D, 973-­‐655-­‐7870

Field Guide 2012


ADVISING RESOURCES

Entrance Requirements for Restricted Programs and Majors continued from previous page

• • • •

Music Audition on primary and secondary instruments Placement tests in music theory and aural skills Visit: http://www.montclair.edu/music/pages/audition/audition.html Contact: Ting Ho; Chapin Hall, Room 229, 973-­‐655-­‐7221

Theatre BA (Bachelor of Arts) • 2.70 cumulative GPA • Departmental interview • Letter of intent, recommendation, resume • Contact: Deborah Saivetz; Life Hall 126, 973-­‐655-­‐4217,saivetzd@mail.montclair.edu BFA (Bachelor of Fine Arts) • Audition and interview • Letter of intent, recommendation, resume • Visit: http://www.montclair.edu/pages/theatredance/index.htm • Acting BFA: Suzanne Trauth; trauths@mail.montclair.edu • Musical Theatre BFA: Clay James, 973-­‐655-­‐7341 jamesbr@mail.montclair.edu

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES (CHSS) • • • •

• • • • •

Jurisprudence Top twenty percent of high school graduating class. 3.00 cumulative GPA at the completion of a minimum of 24 credits at Montclair State University or at transfer institution. 3.00 GPA in the student’s first three courses in the major. Contact: Dr. Marilyn Tayler, Department of Political Science and Law, Dickson Hall 315, 973-­‐ 655-­‐4196 Justice Studies Cumulative GPA 2.00—Justice Systems Concentration 2.75—Paralegal Studies Concentration 3.00—International Justice Concentration Review of GPA in major courses Statement of interest Two references Visit: http://chss.montclair.edu/justice/resources/justicestudiesfaq.html Contact: Gale Morganti; Dickson Hall 331, 973-­‐655-­‐7897

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS (CSAM) • • • •

Computer Science 3.00 cumulative GPA 3.00 average GPA in the following two (2) courses: -­‐ CMPT 183 -­‐ Foundations of Computer Science I -­‐ CMPT 184 -­‐ Foundations of Computer Science II Visit: http://cs.montclair.edu/undergraduate.html Contact: Jenn Schiffer, Department Administrator, Richardson Hall 303, 973-­‐655-­‐7796

Field Guide 2012

3


ADVISING RESOURCES

Entrance Requirements for Restricted Programs and Majors continued from previous page

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES (CEHS) • • • • • • • • • •

Athletic Training Cumulative grade point average of 2.75 at the conclusion of the first semester No more than 2 grades of “C” or lower in major coursework Demonstrated interest in athletic training as a profession Athletic Training written application & statement Letter of reference from BOC certified athletic trainer 2 Letters of reference from professor or other allied health professional Interview with ATEP Admissions Committee Compliance with ATEP technical standards Visit: http://www.montclair.edu/ATE/admission_requirements.htm Contact: Dr. D. Middlemas; University Hall 4135, 973-­‐655-­‐7040

Family & Child Studies Family & Child Studies-­‐Early Childhood (P-­‐3) & Family & Child Studies-­‐Early & Middle Childhood (K-­‐5) • 3.0 cumulative GPA • Family Services: 3.0 cumulative GPA • Gerontology: 3.0 cumulative GPA • Family Children and School Settings (K-­‐5 and P-­‐3 certification): 3.0 GPA overall and in major classes -­‐Application required, only 30 internal transfers accepted per year -­‐Must have completed FCST 200 with a grade of B or higher -­‐Students who have earned 60 or more credits will not be permitted to apply to the FCSS (K-­‐5 and P-­‐3 Cert.) concentration • Students interested in any of the concentrations offered within Family and Child Studies must meet with Chris Cottle, University Hall 4151, 973-­‐655-­‐3387 Health & Nutrition Sciences Dietetics • 2.50 cumulative GPA • Contact: Dr. K. Bauer; University Hall 4020, 973-­‐655-­‐7155

3

Field Guide 2012


Teacher Education Program Continued from previous page * Holders of Chemistry certification can teach chemistry, environmental science, & general science. ** Holders of Physics certification can teach physics, environmental science, and general science. ***Holders of Physical Science certification can teach physics, chemistry, physical, environmental, general earth, & space science.

2. Successfully Completing Prerequisite Courses If you plan to apply for a subject area program (everything except Early Childhood and Elementary), first you must successfully complete (B-­‐ or better) the following courses: EDFD 200 EDFD 220

Psychological Foundations of Education (satisfies Gen Ed K3 Social Science) Philosophical Orientation to Education (satisfies Gen Ed F2

EDFD 221

Historical Foundations of American Education (satisfies Gen Ed K1 Amer/Eur

Philosophy/Religion) Hist)

CURR 210

Public Purposes of Education: Democracy and Schooling (satisfies L Gen Ed elective; must have sophomore status or higher)

In addition, you must also successfully complete 9 credits of major courses from your department. Math majors must have completed 11 credits including Calculus I and II and an additional course that requires Calculus II as a prerequisite. If you plan to apply for the Early Childhood (P-­‐3) or Elementary (K-­‐5) Program, you must first successfully complete (B-­‐ or better) the following courses: PSYC 101 CMST 101 ECEL 200 FCST 214

General Psychology (satisfies Gen Ed K3 Social Science) Fundamentals of Speech (satisfies Gen Ed C2 Communication) Perspectives in Early Childhood & Elementary Education in a Democracy (satisfies L Gen Ed elective; must be sophomore status or higher) Child Development I (prerequisite PSYC101)

In addition, you must also successfully complete 9 credits of major courses from your department. Family & Child Studies majors must successfully complete 6 credits of major courses as well as FCST 214. K-­‐5 and P-­‐3 Applicants: It is expected that you will have at least two courses in each of the four content areas taught in a pre-­‐school or elementary setting: Math, Science, Social Studies, and English. Therefore, all K-­‐5/P-­‐3 applicants must complete at least two courses with a grade of B or higher in each content area. If you do not have two courses in an area, or the required grade, register for appropriate courses to meet this requirement prior to applying to the Teacher Education Program. If you plan to apply to the Dual Degree Dual Certification Program (DDDC), first you must complete the following courses with a grade of B or better: • If Subject Certification: EDFD 200, EDFD 220, EDFD 221, CURR 210 • If P-­‐3 or K-­‐5 certification: PSYC 101, CMST 101, ECEL 200, FCST 214 In addition, you must complete 9 credits in your major with 3.25 GPA (Math majors must have completed 11 credits including Calculus I and II and an additional course that requires Calculus II as a prerequisite). Applications for the Dual Degree Dual Certification program are only accepted in the spring semester. The deadline to apply is the fourth Monday in January.


Teacher Education Program Continued from previous page ****Transfer Exception****

Students who transfer to MSU with 60 or more credits who are seeking a subject certification may apply to the Teacher Education Program immediately if they have completed 9 credits of major courses from their previous college or MSU and if they have completed or are enrolled in CURR 210 Public Purposes of Education: Democracy and Schooling at MSU. Math majors must have completed the 11 credits listed above. Students who transfer to MSU with 60 or more credits who are seeking Early Childhood (P-­‐3) or Elementary (K-­‐5) certification may apply to the program immediately if they have completed 9 credits of major courses, including Child Development I, from their previous college or MSU, and if they have completed or are enrolled in ECEL 200 Perspectives in Early Childhood & Elementary Education in a Democracy at MSU.

3. Applying for Admission Undergraduate students must apply for admission to the Teacher Education Program. This admissions process is separate from admission to the University or to a major. Applications are online at http://cehs.montclair.edu/academic/cop/application_for_admission_2011-­‐2012.pdf and are generally due at the start of the fall and spring semesters for admission for the following term. Completed applications must be submitted to University Hall, Suite 1160 on, or preferably before, the second Monday in September or on, or preferable before, the fourth Monday in January by 4:30 p.m. Please note that a variety of factors are considered when determining admission to the Teacher Education program and candidates who are selected demonstrate the best potential in all areas. Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee acceptance into the Teacher Education Program. After you are accepted, you are permitted to enroll in the Professional Sequence, which along with your major and general education requirements culminates in student teaching and completion of the Program. Students must pass all required Praxis II exam(s) in order to student teach. Undergraduates are advised to take the Praxis II when they have completed 90 semester hours. Students must maintain a minimum overall G.P.A. of 2.75 as well as the minimum G.P.A. required specifically for the major(s) as shown on the previous page in order to complete the Program successfully. PLEASE NOTE: Applicants for the DDDC program fill out the same application as listed at the link above. There is one additional essay required for the DDDC program which can be obtained by attending one of the DDDC information sessions hosted each fall semester. More information can be obtained in the Center of Pedagogy, UN 1160. 4. Staying Informed Teacher education adds a layer of complexity to students’ schedules and graduation requirements, which means a high level of initiative and follow-­‐through are expected of students. There are many deadlines, policies, and procedures that all future and current teacher education students need to be aware of as they progress through the Program. For detailed and up-­‐to-­‐date information, use the following resources: • • •

Your major advisor and your teacher education advisor (visit them every semester) Our Web site, at: http://cehs.montclair.edu/academic/cop/teacher/ The Teacher Education Program Handbook (available at our Web site and Bb community)


ADVISING RESOURCES

School of Business http://business.montclair.edu The School of Business offers a range of outstanding undergraduate and graduate programs that prepare students for successful careers in business, non-­‐profit organizations, and public service. The School of Business is an accredited member of the AACSB International. Eligibility Criteria Students are admitted into the School of Business either as a freshman or as an internal applicant. As an internal applicant, the following criteria are required: • An minimum overall GPA of 2.75 • Minimum 2.75 average GPA in the following four courses or their authorized equivalents: -­‐MATH114 Mathematics for Business II – Calculus -­‐ENWR105 College Writing I: Intellectual Prose -­‐ENWR106 College Writing II: Writing & Literacy Study -­‐ECON101 Principles of Economics: Macro or ECON102: Micro Departments & Concentrations 1. Accounting, Law & Taxation -­‐*Accounting** 2. Economics & Finance -­‐*Economics -­‐Finance -­‐Real Estate 3. Information & Operations Management -­‐Management Information Systems -­‐Operations Management

4. Management -­‐Management -­‐Hospitality Management 5. Marketing -­‐Marketing -­‐International Business -­‐Retail Merchandising and Management -­‐Sports, Events & Tourism Management (anticipated state date Fall 2012)

*Most programs are The Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration with a Concentration in a chosen area. The two Business Majors that are different are: The B.S. in Accounting (new for Fall 2012 and The B.A. in Economics. (Economics is also offered as a concentration.) **The Accounting Major also has a minimum retention policy. Minors (18 credits) 1. General Business Minor (open to any non-­‐Business majors – 2.75 overall GPA required) 2. Economics minor

Field Guide 2012

3


IMPORTANT DATES

University Calendar of Dates

4

April 9 – Sept. 4

Registration for Fall and Summer 2012 (see WESS System Availability and Registration Chart for additional information)

May 15

Grades for Spring 2012 semester will be available through WESS.

June 1

Deadline for filing an Application for Final Audit for January 2013 degrees and/or certificates – Oct. 1 for May 2013 (For details, log on to www.montclair.edu/Registrar)

July 2

Deadline for submission of grade changes for Incompletes received during the Spring 2012 semester.

July 30

Bills/Statements for the Fall 2012 semester tuition and fees will be posted to WESS Account Summary. Invoices will not be mailed; students should obtain billing and payment information via WESS or at www.montclair.edu/bursar/payment/

Aug. 20

Payment for Fall 2012 semester tuition and fees are due. (Payment options can be viewed via WESS or at www.montclair.edu/bursar/payment/) If you do not pay in full or do not have an approved deferment (Financial Aid, Payment Plan with TMS or Waivers) by the payment deadline as viewed on WESS, you will be subject to de-­‐registration.

Sept. 3

Labor Day (No Classes)

Sept. 4

Opening Day – Red Hawk Day (No Classes)

Sept. 5

First Day of Classes

Sept. 5-­‐ 11

Final Add /Drop Period for Fall 2012 semester courses. (see WESS System Availability and Registration Chart for additional information)

Sept. 11

Drop deadline for 100% refund/adjustment. Final day for students to drop a Fall 2012 semester course(s) resulting in 100% refund of tuition. Courses dropped at 100% refund may be processed either through WESS or by submitting written notice to the Office of the Registrar. (see Schedule of courses book for withdrawal information including withdrawal dates (select: Withdrawal Procedures, Deadlines & Refund Policy). 50% refund will be issued between September 12 -­‐ October 9, 2012.

Sept. 26

Pass/Fail and Audit Application deadline (to audit courses) for full term Fall 2012 semester courses.

Field Guide 2012


IMPORTANT DATES

University Calendar of Dates continued from previous page Oct. 1

Deadline for filing an Application for Final Audit for May 2013 degrees and/or certificates – March 1 for August 2013 (For details, log on to www.montclair.edu/Registrar)

Oct. 9

Withdrawal deadline 50% refund. Final day for students to withdraw from a Fall 2012 semester course(s) resulting in a grade of WD and 50% refund/adjustment of tuition. Withdrawals may be processed either through WESS or by submitting written notice to the Office of the Registrar. No refund/adjustment issued after this date.

Oct. 15

Deadline for submission of grade changes for Incompletes during Summer Session 2012.

Nov. 5

Registration for Spring 2013 and Winter 2013 semester begins (tentative date).

Nov. 7

Pass/Fail Application rescind deadline for full term Fall 2012 semester courses.

Nov. 7

Withdrawal deadline no refund/adjustment. Final day for students to withdraw from a Fall 2012 semester course(s) resulting in a grade of WD and no refund/adjustment of tuition. No course withdrawal permitted after this date.

Nov. 22 -­‐ 25

Thanksgiving Holiday (No Classes).

Dec. 12

Wednesday designated as a Friday (for Friday day classes only; Wednesday day and evening classes do not meet)

Dec. 13

Last Day of Classes. (Sunday, December 19, 2012 for Friday evening and weekend classes).

Dec. 14 – Dec. 20

Final Examinations for Fall 2012 semester. (see Final Exam Schedule ).

Dec. 20

End of semester.

Dec. 27

Instructor deadline for submission of Fall 2012 final grades.

Jan. 3

Grades for the Fall 2012 semester will be available through WESS. THE UNIVERSITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY THIS CALENDAR

Field Guide 2012

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IMPORTANT DATES

Recommended Calendar of Activities Fall Semester September (First week of classes): List the purposes for each course you are taking. If you don’t know the purpose of the class, contact your Advisor. Perhaps a change to your schedule is warranted. The add/drop deadline is September 11, 2012. Mid-­‐September: Think about an academic goal you would like to accomplish this semester. What steps do you need to take now to achieve it? What obstacles may be preventing you from reaching that goal? What resources can help you reach your goal? Mid-­‐October: Which classes are you enjoying now? What commonalities do you see in these subjects? What are some of the majors and/or careers you are thinking about? Early November: You should register for about 5 classes this spring. List 6-­‐8 classes you are considering, and explain why. Schedule an appointment now with your Advisor and bring this list with you to your advising appointment. Early December: Use the GPA calculator available at https://www.montclair.edu/advising-­‐transitions/student-­‐ resources/gpa-­‐calculator.php to predict your GPA for the fall semester. How does this GPA compare with what you were hoping to earn? What can you do now to improve it? Form a study group! Students who study in groups often do better than those who study alone. Early January: Talk with someone you respect, admire, and trust about their career decision-­‐making process. What can you learn from them? What might you do differently?

Spring Semester First week of classes (mid-­‐January): Most students start each semester with plans for how “this semester will be different.” How do you hope to improve upon last semester? List some techniques you might use to help you become an (even) better student. What resources might you make use of? How might you spend your time differently? Keep the list in a prominent place. February Peruse the website of the Center for Career Services and Cooperative Education. Take Focus II Assessment (http://www.montclair.edu/CareerServices/studentservices/focusintro.html). Explore a career of interest in the Occupational Outlook Handbook (www.bls.gov/oco).Think about what is important to you in a job. Stability? Travel? The chance to help others? Good pay? Your values in these areas are just as important as your strengths and interests in the career choice process.

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Recommended Calendar of Activities continued from previous page Early March: Look back to the list you made last month. How are you doing? What resources can you use to help you get back on track, if necessary? Late March: Generate your Analysis of Academic Progress on WESS. What are some courses that would be appropriate for next year? Do all the classes you’ve taken so far have a purpose in your degree? April: Who will your advisor be next year? If you are declared, you have a faculty major in your department. This is the person you will be meeting with for your advising questions. Gather your materials together from this year so you have a starting point for a conversation with this person. May and beyond: This summer, spend some time researching some majors or careers of interest. Look at the “What can I do with a major in” worksheets on the Center for Career Services and Cooperative Education website available here: http://www.montclair.edu/CareerServices/studentservices/major.html. Read about different careers in the Occupational Outlook Handbook (http://www.bls.gov/oco/). Think about joining an organization next year that focuses on a career or major of interest. Statement on Disabilities: Any student with a documented physical, sensory, psychological or learning disability requiring academic accommodations should make arrangements through the Disability Resource Center. (Morehead Hall 305, 973-­‐655-­‐5431)

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RED HAWK DAY

SAVE THE DATE Tuesday, September 4, 2012 Montclair State will officially welcome all first-­‐year and transfer students to the University community on Red Hawk Day. This event is a continuation of New Student and Transfer Orientation and is a requirement for all new students. Meet new students! Take your first step in becoming a part of the Montclair State Community! Participate in the College Olympics! Free Food, Free T-­‐Shirt, and prizes!

Go to www.montclair.edu/redhawkfrenzy for more information and to register.

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Billing Dates/Payment Options • • • •

For students who register for courses between April 9th and July 27th, bills will be available on WESS the week of July 30th. The payment due date will be August 20th. For students who register after July 27th; bills will be updated and posted to WESS daily. The payment due date will be within the next 48 hours. For students who register after August 20th, payment is due within the next 48 hours. Fall 2012 classes begin September 5th. Your Montclair State E-­‐mail is the MAIN form of communication. Failure to check you Montclair State e-­‐mail, errors in forwarding e-­‐mail, and returned e-­‐mail (from an “over quota” mail box or “unknown user” or other error message) will not excuse a student from missing announcements or deadlines.

Payment Options: Cash: You may pay with cash at the cashier’s window, in person at College Hall, Room 216. You must have the students CWID number. E-­‐Check Payment: We will also accept payments via an e-­‐check; this service is convenient and complimentary. Please use the link entitled e-­‐check on the “Account Summary" page of WESS. You will need to enter your CWID, routing and checking account number (entire the entire number; each bank is different). Computer terminals are provided in our Student Accounts office in College Hall, Room 218 for e-­‐check payments. Payments returned for any reason will be assessed an additional fee*. If MSU receives any returned payments your account will be flagged and e-­‐check will not be accepted as payment again. If paying with an e-­‐check Montclair State University waits approximately 3 business days before removing any type of transcript or registration holds. Please note that the e-­‐check only gives you the option to pay from your personal checking/savings accounts. Checks that are received as an advance payment using a credit card number/line of credit or mutual fund accounts are not recognized as valid account numbers. *Please note: There will be a $60 fee assessed for all returned/rejected e-­‐check payments due to incorrect information i.e.; invalid account number, cannot locate account, non-­‐sufficient funds, stop payments, etc. Your payment may be posted to your MSU account initially, but if a transaction is submitted, and your bank cannot process for any of the above reasons, that payment is returned to us as "unpaid" your payment will be removed from your account as a result and a $60 fee will be assessed. Please double check your entries including your CWID to ensure they are entered correctly before submitting your payment. SallieMae Installment Payment Plan: MSU offers payment plans through SallieMae. Students can enroll for 1 semester at a time. This plan is interest free and available for a modest fee. Enrollment is available for a limited time. You may enroll through: the link via your WESS Account Summary; online at Sallie Mae; speaking to a TuitionPay consultant by calling (800) 635-­‐0120. If you choose to enroll in a payment plan, it is the student’s responsibility to check his/her MSU WESS student account online at wfs.montclair.edu to keep the plan up-­‐to-­‐date. If your payment plan account is under-­‐budgeted, a hold will be placed onto your account which may prevent registration and/or release of your transcript.

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BUSINESS & AUXILIARY

Student Accounts Cashier's Office: College Hall, Room 216 Student Accounts: College Hall, Room 218 Collections: College Hall, Room 220 Billing/Payment Deadlines: www.montclair.edu/studentaccounts Statements are posted to WESS Account Summary mid-­‐July for the Fall semesters, mid-­‐ November for the Spring semesters and beginning of April for the Summer sessions. It is the responsibility of the student to check his/her account online on Web Enrollment Services for Students (WESS) at wfs.montclair.edu. Balances not paid or have an approved deferment (Financial Aid, Payment Plan or Waivers) by the payment deadline, as viewed on WESS, may be subject to deregistration. If you are dropped from your classes, you will need to re-­‐enroll on a space available basis. There may also be an additional fee assessed to students dropped and subsequently re-­‐enrolled. Balances not paid by the due date risk a late fee assessment. To review all payment options review the web page at www.montclair.edu/bursar/payment/ or the Payment Options link via your WESS Account Summary. Grades, transcripts and/or diplomas will not be released unless the account is paid in full. Please refer to the Student Schedule of Courses Booklet at www.montclair.edu/pages/registrar/schedulebook , the Student Accounts web page or contact our office (973-­‐655-­‐4177 or studentaccou@mail.montclair.edu) for further billing information and/or procedures. Once you have registered for classes, you are responsible for all charges associated with that semester. If you decide not to attend any or all of your courses, you must officially withdraw through WESS at wfs.montclair.edu or submit a written notice to the Registrar's office located in College Hall, Room 204. Do not assume your class or classes will be voided. Students who do not withdraw or take a leave of absence according to policy, forfeits all rights to a refund or to a reduction in his/her account. It is the student's obligation to drop/withdraw from their classes. All tuition and fee appeals must be submitted in writing to the Student Accounts Office, College Hall, Room 218. If you withdraw because of medical reasons, please contact the Dean of Students at 973-­‐655-­‐4118. Students that withdraw and have received financial aid must contact that office (973-­‐655-­‐4461) or www.montclair.edu/financialaid. Some of your aid may need to be returned. Any balance that results from a reduction in aid is the responsibility of the student. Health Insurance: Health insurance is mandatory for all full-­‐time undergraduate and graduate students as defined by the University (12 or more credits for Undergraduate, 9 or more credits for Graduate); however, if you already have health insurance coverage either through your parents, spouse or self employment, you can opt to waive the Health Insurance Fee by completing the Health Insurance Waiver form online. If you are a part-­‐ time student interested in purchasing health insurance, contact United Healthcare directly at 1-­‐800-­‐505-­‐4160 or www.firststudent.com.

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BUSINESS & AUXILIARY

Student Accounts Continued from previous page Enrollment/Waiver Provisions: All full time students are required to provide proof of coverage or to accept the provided health plan. You must waive the school-­‐sponsored insurance plan if you have coverage each academic year. You may waive coverage under this plan if you have health insurance that meets all of the University plan requirements and is approved by the University. You will need to provide information about your coverage in the waiver section. Important: If you do not enroll for or waive coverage by the designated deadline, you will be automatically enrolled in the school-­‐ sponsored plan and charged the applicable premium. * All enrollment or waiver selections must be completed by the end of the add/drop period in the fall semester (by the end of the second week of classes). Waivers can be completed using this link www.firststudent.com . Follow the directions provided and PLEASE PRINT the document before you submit. This copy will be used as one of your receipts. You will also need to print the message after submission of the document. All full time students that go through the waiver process are required to have both documents as proof of coverage. If you want to enroll in the insurance plan but need coverage prior to the start of classes, please go to www.firststudent.com, select Montclair State University from the drop down menu; then choose “Enroll Now” under “Student Tools.” All waivers will be credited by the end of add/drop. For further information, please access the University Health Center at www.montclair.edu/health/hc/. Student Accounts: For assistance concerning billing information, refunds, financial aid disbursements or payment plans please call 973-­‐655-­‐4177, Fax: 973-­‐655-­‐4421. Cashier’s Office: For assistance concerning received payments, admissions deposits, room deposits and orientation fees, please call 973-­‐655-­‐4317, Fax: 973-­‐655-­‐5486.

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Financial Aid www.montclair.edu/financialaid College Hall, Room 208 Phone: 973-­‐655-­‐4461 Fax: 973-­‐655-­‐7712 The Office of Student Financial Aid assists eligible students in meeting their educational expenses while attending Montclair State University. Need based assistance is provided in the form of loans, grants, and student employment. Many of the questions you have concerning financial aid can be answered by visiting our website. Beginning in January, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is available for completion. Students are encouraged to complete the FAFSA once their tax information is available. However, the FAFSA can be completed with estimated information. Once the actual tax information becomes available, students should update the FAFSA with the actual information by using the IRS Data Retrieval Tool on the FAFSA. Montclair State’s priority deadline for the FAFSA is March 1. The Institution Code for Montclair State University is 002617. The website to complete the FAFSA is www.fafsa.ed.gov . We encourage you to use the Financial Planner found on our website at www.montclair.edu/FinancialAid/financing . This planner will help you determine your cost of attendance at Montclair State. Once you calculate the estimated costs, you can then review the additional financing options such as the Parent PLUS Loan, a private loan or a payment plan. For more information regarding the PLUS loan or private loan, please go to www.montclair.edu/financialaid/loans. For more information regarding payment plans, please visit the Student Accounts website at www.montclair.edu/StudentAccounts . Follow these guidelines throughout the year: • • •

Be aware of your rights and responsibilities as a student, a financial aid recipient, and/or a student loan borrower. Monitor your WESS account and email (even over the summer) to ensure you are submitting requirements in a timely fashion. The longer you wait to submit information to our office, the longer it will take to determine aid eligibility. Financial Aid is disbursed beginning the first week of the semester. If your enrollment changes, your aid will be adjusted.

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BUSINESS & AUXILIARY

Admissions www.montclair.edu/admissions College Hall, Room 101 973-­‐655-­‐4444 Congratulations once again on your acceptance to Montclair State University! Now that you’ve decided to become a Red Hawk, be sure to follow all of the steps on your Accepted Student Checklist. You can find the checklist at: http://www.montclair.edu/admissions/accepted/ Don’t forget to send in your final high school transcript. Have your high school mail your final transcript, showing your date of graduation, to the address below: Montclair State University Office of Undergraduate Admissions 1 Normal Avenue Montclair, NJ 07043 Become a Student Ambassador! Do you like talking about what it’s like being a Red Hawk? Are you outgoing and interested in meeting new people? Montclair State needs Student Ambassadors to engage prospective students, conduct campus tours, and participate in events like Open Houses. Visit www.montclair.edu/admissions/ambassador for more information and to apply to the Ambassador Program for the upcoming semester. Help us grow the Montclair State family! Do you have friends or relatives who might be interested in becoming a Red Hawk? Tell them about Montclair State and encourage them to visit campus. For more information about our visit programs, including… -­‐ -­‐ -­‐

Open Houses For Freshmen, Transfer, and Adult Students Campus Tours Arts Days

…check out www.montclair.edu/admissions/visit.html

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Registrar www.montclair.edu/registrar College Hall, Room 204 973-­‐655-­‐4376 The Office of the Registrar provides information on: Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø

Registering for classes Schedule of courses How to obtain your transcript Graduation information Forms (course withdrawal, course overload, work at another institution)

WESS (online registration system) is designed to provide students with a convenient method of registering, accessing their schedules, grades and financial accounts. Students will continue to use their current social security number and birthday (six digit pin) to gain access to the system and then be assigned a campus wide identification (MSU ID) number. The following student services are now available: Student Records:

Analysis of Academic Progress, Unofficial Transcript, Holds, Identify Your Advisor

Personal Information:

Change Your PIN, Change Your Address Registration & Schedule:

Add/Drop Courses, Submit Withdrawals, Access & Print Your Schedule Course Catalog:

Undergraduate and Graduate University Catalogs Available Course Sections:

Lists sections of courses offered for a specified semester Financial Aid:

Personal Financial Aid Information

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BUSINESS & AUXILIARY

Parking Services www.montclair.edu/parking parking@mail.montclair.edu Garage Entrance, Red Hawk Parking Deck 973-­‐655-­‐7581 The department is dedicated to emphasizing the “Service” in Parking Services. This is accomplished by providing responsive customer services by effectively managing all parking activities on campus to support the academic, research and service goals of the University. All eligible students and employees of the University are required to have a parking permit for any vehicle that they park on campus, unless the vehicle will be parked only in the Red Hawk Deck or in metered spaces. Since permits or a parking fee is required at all times, permits convey authorization to park in lots designated by the type of permit issued. Please note, however, a permit does not provide assurance of a parking space. Visitor parking is only available in metered spaces and in the Red Hawk Parking Deck. At this time, Freshman Resident students are not allowed to bring their vehicles to campus. Please continue to monitor our website for changes in policy, as the Parking Regulations for 2012-­‐2013 will be displayed soon. Beginning in August, eligible students will be allowed to purchase parking permits on our website. A NetID is required to purchase a parking permit. To register in person at the Parking Services office, please visit us on the first level of the Red Hawk Deck. Office hours can also be found on our website. All members of the Montclair State University community, as well as visitors to the campus, can pay for outstanding citations online by using the Flex parking application (http://www.montclair.edu/facilities/fs/taps/flex.html). Online payment may be made via Mastercard, Discover, American Express or by e-­‐check. A copy of the parking regulations and a parking map can also be found on our website. We ask all students to become familiar with them.

Parking FAQs Where can I park? The University parking regulations are in effect 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year. Vehicles may be parked only in areas designated by the type of permit displayed by that vehicle. Please view the parking map here: http://www.montclair.edu/map/parking.php .

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Parking Services Continued from previous page I do not have a credit card, so I cannot buy my permit online. What should I do? You may pay with an e-­‐check via Flex or you may visit the Parking Services office on the first level of the Red Hawk Deck where you will be able to purchase your permit and pay with cash, check or money order.

What should I do if my permit is lost, stolen, or damaged? Members of the campus community are urged to lock their vehicles at all times to protect against parking permit theft. Stolen permits should be reported to University Police immediately. All costs associated with a lost, stolen or damaged permit are the responsibility of the permit holder. Montclair State University will not issue any permit free of cost. Lost or stolen permits for the NJ Transit Garage can be replaced for a $15.00 fee; transponders for the Red Hawk Deck for $40.00.

What should I do if my car breaks down on campus? Disabled vehicles must be reported to the University Police (973-­‐655-­‐5222). The vehicle should be removed as soon as possible and should not obstruct the flow of traffic or endanger safety.

What are the specific violations and the fines they carry? The complete list of violations and fines are available in the Parking Procedures and Policies at http://www.montclair.edu/facilities/fs/taps/regulations.html#Violations .

How do I appeal a parking citation? If you believe you did not commit the violation specified on a parking citation issued to you, you may contest the citation online via Flex within ten days of the date the citation was issued by going to https://montclairstate.t2hosted.com/app/index.aspx .

What happens if I don’t pay my citation? All unpaid citations will result in a hold on a student account. This is similar to outstanding balances on tuition, residence fees, course fees, etc. The hold will prevent students from registering for classes, obtaining transcripts, or completing other important tasks on campus.

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BUSINESS & AUXILIARY

Shuttle Bus and Public Transportation Shuttle Bus The Montclair State University Shuttle Bus System serves employees, students, and visitors traveling around campus. We are here to help you get around campus quickly and safely. We welcome your comments regarding the campus bus system. Please contact us at 973-­‐ 655-­‐3326 or fitzpatrickw@mail.montclair.edu All shuttle services are open to the public and free of charge. Routes: Student Center The Village at Little Falls Sinatra Hall Hawk Crossings Student Recreation Center Montclair Heights Train Station Red Hawk Deck

855 Valley Road 1515 Broad Street Car Parc Diem Lot 60 NJ Transit Garage Clifton Commons (Saturday Only)

To view the complete and most up-­‐to-­‐date schedules, please visit http://www.montclair.edu/facilities/fs/taps/trans_info.html . With the appropriate documentation from a physician, the University’s Disability Resource Center and the Human Resources & Employee Benefits Office authorize students and faculty/staff members of MSU to ride the Persons with Disabilities (PWD) Shuttle. The PWD Shuttle transports passengers between campus locations and will pick-­‐up/drop-­‐off passengers as close to one's building as possible; however, please note that vehicles are not permitted to access the main campus core. This service operates Monday to Friday, 7:30 a.m. until 11:00 p.m. To schedule a one-­‐time only ride, please contact the Facilities Service Desk at 973-­‐655-­‐5444 or servicedesk@mail.montclair.edu. If you would like to arrange for regularly scheduled recurring rides, please contact Transportation Services at 973-­‐655-­‐ 3326 or fitzpatrickw@mail.montclair.edu. Transportation Services is committed to providing the campus community with safe, efficient shuttle service. Unfortunately, weather and traffic conditions may sometimes cause delays. We apologize for these instances and will endeavor to maintain our posted schedules whenever possible.

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Shuttle Bus and Public Transportation Continued from previous page Public Transportation Students who wish to travel from campus into town for shopping or recreation can access several areas of Montclair Township via the train Monday-­‐Friday. There is no train service at the Montclair State University, Montclair Heights, Mountain Avenue, Upper Montclair, Watchung Avenue or Walnut Street stations on Saturday or Sunday. For other stops along the Montclair-­‐Boonton Line, transfer or fare information, please check the schedule at http://www.njtransit.com/pdf/rail/R0030.pdf or www.njtransit.com . In addition to the train, you can take several buses from the stop at the Red Hawk Deck. NJ Transit Bus 11/28 serves the University, Wayne, the Willowbrook Mall Park and Ride, Little Falls, Cedar Grove, Verona, Montclair, Glen Ridge, Newark, and Bloomfield. NJ Transit Bus 705 originates at Main Street and Passaic Avenue in Passaic and travels through Clifton to Montclair State University. From the west, NJ Transit Bus No. 705 originates at Willowbrook Mall and travels to Montclair State University. NJ Transit Bus 191 serves the University bus stop at the Red Hawk Deck and the Montclair Heights train station, on weekdays, making stops between New York's Port Authority Bus Terminal and Willowbrook. For additional information, visit http://www.njtransit.com and click "Bus Schedules" . DeCamp Bus 66 leaves from New York's Port Authority Bus Terminal and selected runs stop on campus at the Red Hawk Deck on weekdays. For the runs that do not include the stop at Montclair State University, you can catch the bus just off campus at the corner of Valley Rd. & Mt. Hebron Rd./Nassau Rd. For a schedule, visit http://www.decamp.com/schedules_routes.asp and choose Route 66 from the drop down menu. This will also provide you with a map on which you can zoom in to see the actual route that the bus follows. For more detailed information, please visit http://www.montclair.edu/facilities/fs/taps/gettingoffcampus.html

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BUSINESS & AUXILIARY

Dining Services www.montclair.edu/diningservices Click on Dining Services under Quick Links

Montclair State University Dining Services presents a variety of services and locations, offering a diverse selection of quality food products, excellent customer service, and a wide range of dining options to satisfy your palate and meet your budget. Locations • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Bistro 62 (next door to Sam’s Place) Café Diem @ Sprague Library (24 hour service, internet café lounge setting) Catering (located 7th floor of University Hall) Convenience Store ( located on the 1st floor of the Student Center) Einstein Bros. Bagel (located on the lower level of College Hall) Goccia (located in the Rathskeller at the Student Center) (Sushi) Rathskeller (located on the 1st floor of the Student Center) Red Hawk Diner (24 hour service, located behind the Student Center) Red Hawk Express Trucks (two mobile food trucks, serving locations across campus) Residential Dining Halls: Sam’s Place, Freeman Dining Hall, Blanton Hall Student Center Cafeteria (2nd floor of Student Center) Student Center Dining Room (2nd floor of Student Center, near Ballrooms A-­‐C) University Hall Coffee Bar (1st floor of University Hall)

Meal plans are available to all Montclair State University students; and linked to your Montclair State University ID card. Enrollment forms can be found by visiting montclair.edu and selecting Dining Services under Quick Links. Automated enrollment can also be selected using the following link: www.montclair.edu/DiningServices/plans.html . The Meal Plan Office is located on the 1st floor of the Student Center, next to the computer lab. Meal Plan Options We offer our student body a varied set of meal plans to meet their needs. Most plans consist of two elements: Meals and Flex Dollars. One block (or swipe under the Constant Meal Plan) is equal to one sitting at any of the resident dining halls on campus. Flex dollars are used just like cash to purchase food. One Flex dollar is equal to one cash dollar. Meals and Flex dollars are encoded onto your Montclair State University ID card. Flex Dollars are accepted at all of our Dining Service Facilities, C-­‐Stores and vending machines across campus. If you run out of Flex dollars before the end of the semester, you can purchase additional Flex dollars, simply by visiting the Meal Plan or the Student Accounts Office. Students, living in “on-­‐campus housing” are required to enroll in a meal plan. Check the Dining Services Website for more specific information on meal plan requirements, enrollment and pricing Payment Options The university bills the cost of a meal plan directly to a student’s account via WESS. The cost of a meal plan can be paid through financial aid, student loans, cash, check or credit cards. The cost of a meal plan is on a per semester basis.

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I.D. Card Office All members of the University community are required to carry the University ID Card at all times while on campus. Besides your University identification, the ID card is also used to access residence hall exterior and interior doors, University meal plans, Flex and Red Hawk Dollars, computer labs, Student Recreation Center, athletic events, check out library items, and more. In order to get the University ID Card: • Must be registered for classes 48 hours prior to processing your ID card. (orientation attendees must have paid an admissions deposit 48 hours prior to orientation and have your ID card processed on orientation day). • Present two valid forms of identification (mandatory one form of photo ID required). o Photo driver’s license o Passport or I-­‐20, J1 Visa for International Students o Credit/debit card o Birth certificate o Military I.D. o Health insurance card Where is the ID Card Office and what are the office hours? Student Center – lower level across from the Auxiliary Services Office Monday-­‐Friday: 8:30am-­‐4:30pm, Mondays and Thursdays until 6:00pm during Fall and Spring semesters. Check the web page for holiday and out-­‐of-­‐semester hours. Is there a charge for my first ID card? There is no charge for the first University I.D. Card issued. If the I.D. Card is lost, stolen, or damaged, a replacement fee is charged. Visit the ID Card web page for the latest ID card replacement fee rates. What if my ID card is lost or stolen? Freeze your lost or stolen ID card immediately 24hrs/7days at the Online Card Office or the Red Hawk Dollars free app for iPhone and Andriod phones. If you are unable to access any of these means, please call the ID Card Office (973-­‐655-­‐4147) or the Auxiliary Services Office (973-­‐655-­‐ 3375) during normal business hours. Where can I get the latest information about the University ID Card? Visit the ID Card web page at www.montclair.edu . In the MSU A-­‐Z Directory, select “I” and ID Cards.

Online Card Office What is the Montclair State University Online Card Office? An application accessed via the web and/or cellular apps providing services 24hrs/7 days a week to: • Purchase Red Hawk Dollars with a Visa, MasterCard, Discover credit cards • Immediately freeze your University ID card if it is lost or stolen • View usage of your Red Hawk Dollars, Flex Dollars, meal plan, and recent deposits • Grant additional access to your accounts • Send an email requesting money • Set up low balance warnings and automatics deposits How can I access the Online Card Office? www.montclair.edu In the Montclair State University A-­‐Z Directory, select “O” and Online Card Office Download the free Red Hawk Dollars app for iPhone and Android phones!

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BUSINESS & AUXILIARY

University Bookstore www.montclair.bkstr.com Lower Level -­‐ Student Center Phone: 973-­‐655-­‐4310 Fax: 973-­‐783-­‐1291

Purchasing Books In store or On-­‐line: You have the option of buying your books either in person or online at www.montclair.bkstr.com. The University Bookstore has the largest selection of Used Textbooks specifically requested by the Montclair State University faculty for their classes. Textbooks are available both New and Used, whenever possible. Purchasing used books will save you 25% off the new book price. Cash for books: Unwanted textbooks, not being held for your reference library can be sold back to the bookstore. Based on current market value, you could get back up to 50% of the original purchase price. We buy back books every day. Computer Products: The Bookstore carries a selection of basic computer products including network cables needed to hook up your computer to the campus network. A full range of blank CD’s, iPod accessories, computer bags and cases are also available. Up to 85% off selected software with academic pricing. Visit our web site for details. School Supplies: We offer a complete selection of basic school, art, and dorm supplies to meet your every day needs. Apparel and gifts: Don't hide your pride. The Bookstore is your headquarters for all kinds of MSU emblematic clothing and gifts for the whole family. Graduation gear is also available. Regular Bookstore Hours: Monday – Thursday 8:30am – 8:00pm Friday -­‐8:30am -­‐ 4:00pm Saturday-­‐ 10:00am -­‐ 2:00pm Sunday-­‐ closed Other Services: include balloons, stationary, snacks, gift cards, Sprint calling cards, special order books you’re looking for! Look for coupons and new student discount offers throughout the year.

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MEETING NEW PEOPLE

Center for Student Involvement Commuter Lounge, Room 104, Student Center Annex 973-­‐655-­‐7818 The Center for Student Involvement (CSI) compliments the academic program and enhances the overall educational experience of the students by engaging them in civic, cultural, recreational and social initiatives. Student involvement provides an environment in which students can promote and develop a greater sense of community, sense of self, university and civic pride. The department also publishes a semester calendar, a monthly activity calendar and distributes a weekly email of upcoming events, thereby keeping students abreast of the wide variety of activities and events occurring on campus. The CSI also serves as a resource and advisor to the Student Government Association and the over 100 student organizations and clubs. Campus Connections and Leadership Programs: Students are provided with different opportunities to expand their understanding of leadership and involvement through programs and experiences. The Leadership Institute Certificate Program is open to all current students where advanced leadership sessions are designed in a full day conference structure. The Student Leadership Team promotes peer to peer education through involvement tables, leadership programs, and offers outreach to uninvolved students. Monthly programs include personal leadership skills discovery, organizational development, team building, understanding who you really are, tools to “carpe future”, and much more. Commuter Students: CSI provides services, programs, advocacy and outreach for commuter students. The Red Hawk Nest Commuter Lounge located in Student Center 126. Our spotlight programs include movie days, commuter breakfast and lunch, themed day celebrations, and giveaways on the shuttle buses. Student Activities: There is always something happening at Montclair State University! Activities are designed to develop and refresh the body and mind in the form of entertainment, educational enrichment, cultural diversity and fine art activities. Events provided include NYC theater trips, Red Hawk Nights, Stress Relief Week, Fall Frenzy, Homecoming and much more! Greek Life: There are over 36 fraternities and sororities on campus. Each organization represents areas of academic, service, and/or social commitment. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Center: LGBT Center seeks to create an open, accepting, and affirming atmosphere for LGBT students, faculty, staff, and their allies at Montclair State. Through education, programming, and discussion groups, the LGBT Center allows for unique and important conversations to occur regarding LGBT issues. We are a LGBT Safe Space and welcome all members of the campus community. Drop in any time!

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Residential Education & Services www.montclair.edu/resed Located in Bohn Hall 973-­‐655-­‐5188 The Office of Residential Education & Services at Montclair State University is committed to making on-­‐campus living one of the most lasting influences on a student’s life. From structured activities sponsored by a residence hall staff and hall councils, to spur-­‐of-­‐the-­‐moment informal gatherings, Residential Education and Service’s emphasis is on developing an individual’s sense of responsibility, while at the same time encouraging personal growth. Available Residential Facilities: First-­‐Year Students: • Bohn Hall • Blanton Hall • Freeman Hall • The Heights • Stone Hall • Webster Hall

Returning/Transfer Students: • Sinatra Hall • Russ Hall • Hawk Crossings • The Village at Little Falls • The Heights • Blanton Hall • Stone Hall

The Office of Residential Education and Services employs approximately 25 full-­‐time professional staff, and over 300 student employees on an annual basis to fill the varying needs of our residential population. We are very proud of our diverse staff and the various skills that they bring to enhance your students' experience at MSU. Montclair State University residents will have the most contact with the following staff members, who we encourage you to get to know through your time living on campus: Community Assistants (CAs) are undergraduate student staff who live in the halls and are responsible for a floor of students. These students are carefully selected for their leadership ability, interpersonal skills, and passion for helping others and undergo extensive training each academic year. They are the first level of support for your students and are ready to help in many ways, ranging from answering simple questions about university life to facilitating programming and educational initiatives to ensure our students are off to a good start here at MSU. Community Directors (CDs) are responsible for the overall functions and operations of each of our residential facilities. CDs are full-­‐time employees who have advanced degrees (a minimum of a Master's Degree) in college student development, higher education administration, and other related fields. CDs received advanced training each year to be prepared to respond to emergencies; advise students on personal, social, and academic needs; monitor student conduct; and promote a positive living and learning environment. Each CD lives on-­‐campus to provide 24-­‐hour emergency response and assistance to our students. The Office of Residential Education and Services, in conjunction with various academic and campus services, hosts hundreds of social and educational events each year. As you know, residence hall living provides an incredible opportunity to get to know students who come from a variety of backgrounds, religions, and cultures. These experiences often result in lifelong friendships and have a profound impact on students' values and views of the world. Living in the residence halls is a fun and enriching way to experience the University. Whether it's your first semester or your final, there are a variety of ways that can help make your time in the residence halls safe and memorable. We look forward to seeing you at our opening welcome event on move in day as well as our annual Hypnotist performance and a variety of on-­‐going programs and events that are planned throughout the year!

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Campus Recreation www.montclair.edu/campusrec/ Student Recreation Center 973-­‐655-­‐3340 The mission of the Department of Campus Recreation and Intramural Services is to provide programs, services and facilities that encourage personal development and learning experiences through enjoyable sport and recreational opportunities. We strive to · Be an integral part of the collegiate experience; · Exceed accepted national standards of quality for programs and services; · Be responsive to the needs and desires of an ever-changing campus population We offer fun and safe recreational opportunities to Undergraduate and Graduate Students (Commuters and Residents), Faculty, and Staff of Montclair State University. We have a variety of collaborative recreational offerings, including Fitness and Group Exercise, Intramural Sports, Special Events, Off-Campus Trips, Sport Clubs, Community service and outreach, and Co-Sponsorships. We have a variety of collaborative recreational offerings (see below), and a student organization, MSU RecBoard, that meets on Fridays at 2:30pm. We are all about MIND, BODY and SPIRIT… plus FUN! Intramural Sports -Flag Football, Innertube Water Polo, Badminton, Volleyball, Bowling, Basketball, Dodge ball, Basketball, Indoor Soccer, Softball, Tennis, Golf Open, IM Swimming, Outdoor Soccer, Floor Hockey, Racquetball, Walley ball, and many more! Aquatics – Swim lessons, CPR and First Aid Classes Aqua Fitness and much more. Special Events –Yankees/Mets Trips, Spelling Challenge, Staff vs. Students Volleyball, Red Hawk Run for Charity, Medieval Times Trip, Let’s Make a Deal, Ski trips, MSU Trivia Bowl, The Price Is Right, monthly community service events and much more! “Group Xercise” Classes (FREE, taught in the Student Recreation Center): Pilates, Yoga, Kickboxing, Step, Sports Conditioning, Body Sculpt, Brazilian Jujitsu, Mixed Martial Arts, Karate, Amp’d Abs, Punk Rope, Move ‘N Groove, Hip Hop, Boot Camp, Zumba and many more! We now offer Personal Training opportunities, nutrition counseling stress management. Sport Clubs: Ice Hockey, Ultimate Disc, Cheerleading, Men’s Volleyball, Women’s Volleyball, Swimming, and Men’s Baseball

• • • • • •

STUDENT RECREATION CENTER TWO BASKETBALL COURTS • 25 YARD / 6 - LANE SWIMMIING POOL 10,000 SQ, FT. OF DEDICATED FITNESS • ELEVATED RUNNING TRACK SPACE • FOOD SERVICE, LOUNGE AREAS, BRAND NEW EXERCISE EQUIPMENT WIRELESS INTERNET ACCESS RACQUETBALL COURTS • NEW MSU BUS STOP MULTI-PURPOSE EXERCISE STUDIOS • AND MUCH MORE! CAMPUS RECREATION OFFICES GENERAL HOURS OF OPERATION (SPRING & FALL) MON-FRI - 6:00a m. - 12 MIDNIGHT; SAT & SUN - 8:00a.m. -12 MIDNIGHT Times may change for Holiday, Spring and winter breaks. Please check our Website for details www montclair.edu/campusrec/

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Women’s Center www.montclair.edu/womenscenter Student Center, 4th floor, Room 421-­‐422 973-­‐655-­‐5114 Founded in 1972, the Women’s Center is a tangible expression of Montclair State University’s commitment to women’s issues and concerns. The Women’s Center offers all members of the campus community an opportunity to engage in dialogue on women’s issues. We promote the exploration of topics of individual and collective importance to women in an open and comfortable atmosphere. Through workshops, programs, weekly events, individual mentoring, and discussion groups, we provide women and men with support in their search for personal development and the achievement of individual and social empowerment. Our programs take the theories created in Women’s and Gender Studies and bring them soundly into the realm of practice. Women’s issues are everyone’s issues! Referral Services The Women’s Center is a safe space and guarantees confidential support of all members of the campus community. While not a counseling center, we are here to listen and to help you identify your options in moments of crisis. The Women’s Center maintains an extensive collection of information on local agencies and campus offices that address the unique concerns of women, including but not limited to intimate partner violence, sexual assault, bias incidents, reproductive rights, health information, support groups, financial literacy, and more. Weekly Events Cycle Breakers – A weekly discussion group about domestic Violence Woman to Woman – A weekly discussion and safe space group for women VOX –Voices for Planned Parenthood – students for reproductive rights Earth Spirituality Union – A Student Group focusing on the feminine divine and Eco-­‐ feminists Take Back The Craft – Feminist Knitting, Crochet, and DIY group for all members of the campus community Connecting Across Cultures – A weekly discussion group about our diverse identities in collaboration with CAPS. Programs Past programs in the Women’s Center have included Women’s History Month, Sexual Assault and Violence Ended (SAVE) week, Take Back the Night marches, performances of the Vagina Monologues, an annual display of the Clothesline Project, Women in Business Summit, and the Women in Science Conference. Volunteers Women’s Center Volunteers are highly trained students who create, plan and host a wide variety of events and activities in the Women’s Center as well as providing a referrals and advocacy on a walk in basis. If you are interested in volunteering, contact us!

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The Office of Equity and Diversity www.montclair.edu/equitydiversity Student Center, 4th Floor, Room 420 973-­‐655-­‐7130 The Office of Equity and Diversity serves students, cultural organizations and the Montclair Community by promoting an environment that fosters and values human understanding. It is a reflection of the University’s commitment to living in a global community. Our aim is to internationalize our curriculum, improve intercultural communications and collaboration as we enhance students’ experience via exploration of the many cultures found on our campus. Housed within the Office of Equity and Diversity are: • The Women’s Center • Campus Coalition Against Trafficking (CCAT) • Center for Faith and Spirituality • Diversity and Inclusion Programs • Bias Response Taskforce In addition, the Office of Equity and Diversity collaborates with many of the student cultural organizations on campus. The Office of Equity and Diversity works under the Dean of Students to assist students in need of assistance by providing referrals to local resources such as housing, legal, support groups, and more. One-­‐on-­‐one coaching and mentoring is also available. The Office of Equity and Diversity provides services and events that will instill a university-­‐ wide appreciation and respect for diverse perspectives, equitable participation and inclusion for all of the campus community. You are encouraged to, as Mahatma Gandhi once said, “Be the change you wish to see in the world” and embrace global citizenship. Programs Past programs in the Office of Equity and Diversity have included, Diversity Week, Anti-­‐ Bullying Week, Geek Week, Peace Week, a Human Trafficking Conference and more. In addition the Office of Equity and Diversity has supported Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month, Latin Pride Month, World Aids Day, Sexual Assault and Violence Ended Week, Auschwitz Remembrance Day, Women’s History Month, International Women’s Day and National Coming Out Week. Peer Educators Diversity Peer Educators are highly trained student advocates who create, plan, and host a wide variety of events and activities on campus as well as providing referrals and advocacy on a walk in basis. If you are interested in volunteering, contact us!

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Counseling and Psychological Services www.montclair.edu/caps Russ Hall, First Floor 973-­‐655-­‐5211 Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) offers individual and group counseling to students, as well as a variety of educational and consultative services designed to promote wellness in the campus community. All counseling services are funded by a University Health fee and are voluntary and confidential. Call for an appointment Monday – Thursday from 9 A.M. -­‐ 5 P. M. and Friday 8:30 A. M. -­‐ 4:30 P. M. While a brief wait for services may occur at busier times of the year, urgency of need is always taken into consideration when scheduling an appointment. Depending on the student's needs, he or she may choose to attend counseling sessions a couple of times or throughout the semester. In some cases, a referral will be made to an off-­‐ campus agency or private practitioner. This would most likely be the case if the student’s needs can be better met off-­‐campus, or if longer-­‐term services are deemed more appropriate. CAPS goals include: • • • • • •

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allowing students to make the most of their academic education helping prevent future problems helping students develop to their fullest potential by learning new skills and resolving issues that may limit their performance assisting and supporting faculty and staff through consultation promoting wellness through workshops, presentations and major campus events providing a positive training environment and close supervision for graduate students in counseling and psychology

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Disability Resource Center www.montclair.edu/drc Morehead Hall, Room 305 973-­‐655-­‐5431 The Disability Resource Center (DRC) will assist you in receiving the accommodations and services necessary to equalize your access to education. The DRC provides assistance to students with physical, sensory, learning, psychological and chronic medical disabilities. 1. Self Disclosure: You must come to us! In college, it is your responsibility to disclose your disability to the DRC and request accommodations and services. 2. Documentation: You must provide documentation of your disability from a qualified professional. Documentation must include your functional limitations and need for specific accommodations. 3. Meet your Counselor: Make an appointment with your DRC counselor. We’ll discuss your needs and carefully plan your accommodations. 4. Notify Faculty: Your DRC counselor will provide you with letters for your professors informing them of your affiliation with our office and your accommodation needs. These letters will inform your faculty of the presence of a disability, never the nature of the disability. All documentation presented to the DRC is private and confidential. 5. Follow Through: Keep in touch with your counselor. Share your successes and brainstorm ways to improve your academic performance. Accommodations are always determined on a case-­‐by-­‐case basis as supported by documentation. Some examples of possible accommodations include: •

• •

Academic Accommodations o Extended testing time o Readers o Scribes o Textbooks on CD Equipment Loans Academic Advising

• • •

Counseling Housing Accommodations Adaptive Technology o Reading Software o Screen enlarging software o Graphic organizing software

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

Disability Resource Center Continued from previous page As a student with a disability, you have the right to: • • •

Equal access to courses, programs, services, jobs, activities, and facilities available within the University. Reasonable and appropriate accommodations, academic adjustments, and/or auxiliary aids as determined on a case-­‐by-­‐case basis. Appropriate confidentiality for all information pertaining to disability. Details of your disability will not be released nor discussed with anyone without your written consent. Disability information is never part of your academic record, nor noted on your transcript. Information reasonably available in accessible formats.

As a student with a disability, you have the responsibility to: • •

• •

Be qualified. Meet all academic and technical standards. Self-­‐identify. Initiate all requests and fully participate in the accommodation process. You must be involved in the planning, negotiation, and implementation of all accommodations. Make requests for accommodations in a timely and reasonable manner. Provide proper documentation that meets the guidelines established by the University to justify all requests. Documentation that verifies the nature of the disability must be provided by an appropriate professional source.

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University Health Center www.montclair.edu/healthcenter Blanton Hall (first floor) 973-­‐655-­‐4361 UHC is a comprehensive outpatient health care facility serving all registered Montclair State University students. Our mission is to keep you well during your academic career and to assist you in making healthy lifestyle decisions. Care is provided by nurse practitioners, registered nurses and collaborating physicians from our community. HOW DO I MAKE AN APPOINTMENT? During the semester, the University Health Center is open Monday through Thursday from 8:30 am to 6:00 pm, Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm and most Saturdays from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm. Non-­‐semester and summer hours vary. Call us at 973-­‐655-­‐4361 to schedule an appointment. Except for serious medical emergencies, an appointment is always needed. CONFIDENTIALITY: All medical records at UHC are strictly confidential. When you visit us, information about your care is not recorded on a permanent university record, so it cannot appear on a transcript or any other official document. No one from any University office or ANY other person, including your family, will be given information about you without your specific written permission, except in the event of an extreme emergency. IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENTS: New Jersey State law requires that all college students provide documentation of certain immunizations. Failure to comply with these requirements will prohibit you from class registration and housing eligibility. See our website for details. SERVICES AVAILABLE AT THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER • • • • • • • • • • • •

Diagnosis and treatment of illnesses and injuries Referral to specialists Employment and sports physicals Preventive health screening STI and HIV screening Gynecology care Contraception Emergency Contraception (morning after pill) Pregnancy testing Mammogram referral Men’s health screening and consultation Flu shots/Immunizations

• • • • • • • •

LGBT health screening and consultation – UHC is a safe space on campus! On-­‐site, discounted prescription medication Laboratory testing ECG testing Nebulizer treatments Assistance with management of chronic illness Disabilities referrals Mental health referrals Sexual Assault forensic exams and medical treatment

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Health Promotion www.montclair.edu/hp Bohn Hall-­‐ Main office (street level) 973-­‐655-­‐7397 M-­‐F, 8:30 am -­‐4:30 pm Drop In Center – Peer Advocacy Program (cottage between Student Center and Science Hall) Drop In Center: 973-­‐655-­‐5271 M-­‐Th, 9:00 am -­‐ 6:00 pm, Friday 9:00 am – 4:00pm during the academic year

Health Promotion understands the impact of student health on academic performance and strives to enhance the social, physical and emotional well being of the diverse student body. Health Promotion is committed to providing services that are designed to develop healthy behaviors and prevent health concerns that may interfere with academic and personal success. Health Promotion provides Montclair State University a variety of services to create a healthy campus community. Among these services include: -­‐Programs and outreach -­‐Public advocacy and policy change -­‐Peer Advocacy -­‐Weekly Groups -­‐GLBTQ Safe Space Program -­‐Research (data collection and analysis) -­‐Academic learning experiences -­‐Health information resource center -­‐Student employment (graduate and undergraduate) Some examples of student health issues: -­‐Stress management -­‐Body image -­‐Sleep -­‐Sexual Health -­‐Cold/Flu -­‐Alcohol -­‐Media literacy -­‐Tobacco Peer Advocacy at the Drop In Center is a major component of Health Promotion. Peer Advocates are student volunteers who have been trained to provide peer education, referral and health advocacy services to other students. Our volunteers bring a first-­‐hand perspective to current health and social issues. Peer Advocates help develop and implement new initiatives in order to execute programs they recognize as critical to the campus and to help others foster healthy lifestyle choices. They promote social change on campus by providing workshops, discussion groups, information and materials, and someone to talk to about health and social concerns. Their actions are all in an effort to create an actively healthy change for the campus community. Peer Advocates are an energetic and diverse group of students who are committed to making a difference for the campus community.

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Campus Ministry Council for Faith and Spirituality www.montclair.edu/equitydiversity/faith/ministry.html Student Center, First Floor, Room 112 973-­‐655-­‐7130 The Council for Faith and Spirituality, formally known as Campus Ministry, is an umbrella organization that includes all spiritual and religious student organizations and campus ministries. The Council meets monthly during the academic year. Campus ministers, Religious Leaders, and students support each other by learning from and listening to each other. The Council discourages proselytizing but rather affirms and encourages activities and events that support all religious traditions. The Council is chaired by Esmilda Abreu-­‐ Hornbostel, Director of Equity and Diversity. The Center for Faith and Spirituality was opened in April 2011 and is located in the Student Center Suite 112. Services and programs available through the Center are: -­‐A Prayer Room is open daily from 7am to Midnight. -­‐Midweek Mass, meditation, and other contemplative instruction is available. -­‐Bereavement services and pastoral counseling is available by appointment -­‐Weekly schedule of programs in meditation, praise singing, community service, interfaith dialogues and prayer can be found and enjoyed daily. Council Chair: Esmilda Abreu-­‐Hornbostel

973-­‐655-­‐7130

Campus Ministers: • • • •

Fr. Jim Chern, Catholic University Chaplain Rev. Diana Wilcox, Protestant University Chaplin Judith-­‐Faith Williams, Chi Alpha Director Rabbi Bill Kraus, University Chaplin

973-­‐655-­‐7240 973-­‐975-­‐7589 973-­‐ 655-­‐3282 908-­‐963-­‐6645

Cultural, Service and Religious Student Organizations: • Baha’i Student Group • Hillel-­‐Jewish Student Union • Buddhist Student Organization • InterVarsity Christian Fellowship • Campus Crusade for Christ • Indian Culture Club • Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship • Muslim Student Association • Change Collegian Network • Newman Catholic Campus Ministry • Christians on Campus • Protestant Chaplaincy–Web of Life • Coptic Christians • Secular Student Alliance • Earth Spirituality Union 75

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CAMPUS SAFETY

Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) www.montclair.edu/healthcenter/sexualassault.html It is our hope that no one within our campus community will become a victim of sexual assault. However, if it occurs, Montclair State has a specially trained Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) to meet all victim needs. Compassionate, comprehensive services can be obtained directly on campus 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to all students whether the assault occurs on or off campus. Contacting SART does not mean someone has to be charged with a crime. It does mean that a victim will be able to receive appropriate care. Services that are available include: • • • • • • •

Medical care including STI prevention and emergency contraception Forensic examination for evidence collection Rape Care Advocate services Confidential reporting as a Jane/John Doe Law enforcement support/assistance Options to file criminal/civil/Title IX complaints or campus disciplinary charges Assistance to seek services off campus Victims have the right to accept or decline any or all of the above services.

All services are confidential and NO action will be taken by the University or SART members without a victim’s consent. If you or someone you know has been sexually assaulted contact any of the following numbers as soon as possible to get help: • • • • • • • • •

MSU University Police University Health Center MSU Women’s Center Counseling & Psychological Services Dean of Students Office Residence Life Drop-­‐In Center Essex County Rape Care Center Passaic County Rape Crisis Service

973-­‐655-­‐5222 973-­‐655-­‐4361 973-­‐655-­‐5114 973-­‐655-­‐5211 973-­‐655-­‐4118 973-­‐655-­‐4155 973-­‐655-­‐5271 800-­‐733-­‐2273 973-­‐881-­‐1450

Additional information can be obtained at www.montclair.edu/healthcenter/.

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Bias Response Taskforce The Bias Response Taskforce (BRT) works within the division of Student Development and Campus Life (SDCL) to provide a well coordinated and comprehensive response to incidents of intolerance and bias with respect to race, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, religion, and national origin. It is committed to consistent and timely response. The Bias Response Taskforce of Montclair State University serves to prevent and respond to bias incidents on campus while coordinating outreach in the event of a bias incident and hate crime. If you or someone you know experiences biased intimidation or violence, the BRT strongly encourages you report the incident. To report a bias incident contact: • •

University Police Dean of Students Office

973-­‐655-­‐5222 973-­‐655-­‐4118

Faculty and staff, to report sexual harassment, contact: •

Barbara Milton 973-­‐655-­‐4349 Director of Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Diversity Division of Human Resources

Questions about the Taskforce can be directed to the BRT Chair: •

Esmilda Abreu-­‐Hornbostel 973-­‐655-­‐7130 Director of Equity and Diversity Division of Student Development and Campus Life

Additional information can be obtained at www.montclair.edu/biasresponse/

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CAMPUS SAFETY

Familiarize Yourself with Campus Safety Procedures Campus Safety Tips 1. Be alert. Crime happens on campuses. 2. Be cautious. Do not treat every new person you meet as an old friend. 3. Lock doors and windows whenever you leave your residence hall or car. 4. Keep your purse, backpack, laptop, etc. tightly closed and with you at all times. 5. Walk with others, especially at night. Use shuttle bus services. 6. Do not bring valuables like irreplaceable jewelry to campus. 7. Take an exact inventory of all your possessions. Join Operation ID. 8. Report any and all suspicious activity to the University Police. Even small details can help build crime patterns. 9. Lock your car, activate the alarm system and consider purchasing a device to secure the steering wheel. 10. If you believe you are being followed, go to a well lit area and call the University Police immediately, you can use a blue light phone for this. Tips taken from the University Police website www.montclair.edu/police Fire Safety To learn more about Montclair State’s fire safety programs, visit http://www.montclair.edu/facilities/fire/ Campus-­‐Wide Emergency Plan Review the Campus-­‐Wide Emergency plan and other safety resources at: https://www.montclair.edu/EMS/emergencyplan/emergencyplan.pdf In the News “Montclair, N.J: – Montclair State University. . . was awarded the nation’s most prestigious campus safety award for being the first University in the U.S. to offer students a GPS-­‐based mobile phone that allows students to alert campus safety with their location anytime they are feeling unsafe. . .”

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CAMPUS SAFETY

University Police www.montclair.edu/police Phone/Emergency: 973-­‐655-­‐5222 The website provides information on crime statistics Headquarters is located on Red Hawk Way, next to the Red Hawk Parking Deck and is staffed 24 hours a day. The Police substation is located in the Abbott and Costello Center at The Village at Little Falls. The mission and purpose of the Montclair State University Police Department is to protect life and property, provide rapid response to calls of service and support the educational mission of the university. EDUCATION: We support the educational mission of the university by maintaining a safe and orderly environment that is conducive to cultivating positive learning experiences. SERVICE: We answer all calls for service in a professional and efficient manner. PROTECTION: We provide effective police services to deter crime and apprehend violators of the law. The University Police Department is an autonomous, fully certified and operational law enforcement agency. The MSU PD is charged with the enforcement of all state and local laws, as well as university rules and regulations. The department is currently staffed by 34 full-­‐time police officers. MSU Police Officers are responsible for providing all law enforcement and emergency services to the campus community. All Police Officers are trained and certified by the New Jersey State Police Training Commission and must attend and complete a rigorous basic training course for police officers at certified police academies throughout the state. All officers are trained in first aid, CPR, and Automatic External Defibrillator (AED). Several officers are fully certified Emergency Medical Technicians. Emergency Call Boxes: There are 124 emergency call boxes on campus. The call boxes are easily identified by large red and white colored emergency phone signs and a blue light and when picked up will place callers in contact with police headquarters. RAVE Wireless Guardian: A voluntary GPS-­‐based campus safety application available on cell phones at every student's side when they need it. Students have the option to activate a Rave Guardian timer on their mobile phone whenever they feel unsafe (e.g., about to cross campus late at night) and be monitored by University Police. Students deactivate the timer when they reach their destination safely. Police will be dispatched to on campus locations when alarms are received at headquarters to areas last identified by subscriber. Self Defense: Each semester University Police offers a free self defense program geared to prepare community members for real life situations. The program runs throughout the semester and all students are welcome.

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ACADEMIC SUPPORT

Center for Academic Development & Assessment (CADA) www.montclair.edu/cada Morehead Hall, Room 139-­‐145 973-­‐655-­‐4476/5425 The Center for Academic Development and Assessment (CADA) conducts the assessment of freshmen and some transfer students for course placement. The Center also offers tutoring services, learning competencies workshops, supplemental instruction and academic support programs to Montclair State University students in collaboration with academic and administrative departments. Assessment & Testing The Center assesses and evaluates procedures associated with Placement Testing and places students into appropriate courses in English and mathematics after a review of their academic records. The Center administers the ACCUPLACER for a placement test in reading and mathematics. It also administers the Math Readiness Tests and provides proctoring services to external, State and national testing services as well as to individual students enrolled in distance learning courses. Academic Development CADA offers learning support programs to assure high quality services to Montclair State University students. The quality learning is centered on the student as an individual. The Center, certified by The College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA), provides tutoring, supplemental instruction and academic development programs. The Center is dedicated to providing an environment that promotes learning and professional growth where students and tutors work together in reaching their academic goals. The individual and group tutoring sessions are offered in most academic areas by master and peer tutors who have excelled in their particular subject areas and have been recommended by the faculty. CADA Academic Development Offerings: • • • • • • • •

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Individual tutoring Group tutoring sessions Tutoring appointments for students with special needs Course Review Sessions Supplemental Instruction (SI) Learning Competencies Workshops Italian and Spanish Conversation Groups And much more!

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ACADEMIC SUPPORT

Center for Career Services and Cooperative Education www.montclair.edu/careerservices Morehead Hall, Room 337 973-­‐655-­‐5194 The Center for Career Services and Cooperative Education provides students with the opportunity to advance their career development through a variety of services, including the following: Career Counseling Interest Testing

Online Tools Internships

Job Fairs Workshops

Full & Part-­‐Time Job Listing Cooperative Education Courses

We can help you focus your interests, explore majors and, apply classroom learning to the workplace, all while you continue your professional development. Career Counseling: • This service helps undeclared students identify their likes and dislikes in relation to majors and careers. (If you have declared your major, you will receive career advisement through your school or college.) • Interest testing is available to help you learn more about how your interests relate to majors and careers. You’ll meet with a career counselor to discuss the results and next steps. • Call 973-­‐655-­‐5194 to make an appointment. On-­‐campus Jobs: • We list all on-­‐campus jobs for students. • Register with us through CareerDirections, our online job posting system, to view available positions. • See www.montclair.edu/careerservices for registration information. Workshops: • We offer both online and in person instruction on many topics, including resume writing, job interviewing, how to obtain an internship, getting into graduate school, using Linkedin, Twitter and more! Cooperative Education: • A co-­‐op is a credit bearing, work-­‐based learning program created to assist you in exploring how classroom learning applies to work-­‐place practices. • Both full and part-­‐time internships are available for a minimum of one semester. • Co-­‐op students are supervised by a faculty member in their department, as well as by the employer, and receive a grade and course credit for the experience. Two very unique Cooperative Education programs are The Washington Center Internship and The Walt Disney World College Program, both one-­‐of-­‐a-­‐kind, living, learning experiences. • The Washington Center internship gives you the opportunity to work in DC and is open to all majors. • The Disney program brings you to Orlando to work at Disney Theme Parks and Resorts as part of a team of Cast Members from 100s of job disciplines. • For more information, visit our website at www.montclair.edu/careerservices Semester Office Hours: • Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. -­‐ 4:30 p.m. • Monday and Thursday evenings until 7 p.m. Semester Drop-­‐in hours: • Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 2:00pm-­‐4:00pm Summer Office Hours: • Monday through Thursday, 8:00am -­‐ 5:15pm Summer Drop-­‐in hours: • Tuesday, Thursday, 2:00pm – 4:00pm

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Office of Dean of Students www.montclair.edu/deanstudents Student Center, 4th Floor, Suite 400 973-­‐655-­‐4118 The commitment of the Dean of Students is to provide a growth enhancing University campus environment in which all students learn and develop to their fullest potential. The Dean and the Associate Deans of Students work together with other University offices and centers to promote the psychological, social, physical, intellectual, occupational, spiritual and ethical wellness of all students. We invite you to contact the Office of the Dean of Students or any of the University centers listed on the Dean of Students website for more information or assistance. The Montclair State University Human Dignity and Civility Code Montclair State University recognizes its responsibility to foster an atmosphere of respect, understanding and good will among individuals and groups, with special sensitivity to those most likely to be subjected to disrespect, abuse, and misunderstanding because of age, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity or expression, national origin, race, religion, and sexual orientation. The goal is to create an unbiased community where all individuals feel free to express themselves in ways that are appropriate in a multi-­‐ethnic and multi-­‐cultural society and to pursue their work and study in an atmosphere which values individuality and diversity. The University Code of Conduct www.montclair.edu/deanstudents/studentconduct/ Every student is responsible for knowing the University Code of Conduct. University regulations, disciplinary procedures and the Code of Conduct are coordinated by the Conduct Officer, Mr. Jerry Collins, through the Office of the Dean of Students. If a student is having a dispute with another student, a complaint can be filed by sending an email to Mr. Collins at collinsje@mail.montclair.edu .

We wish you a very successful year as a RED HAWK!

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Office of Dean of Students Continued from previous page Academic Dishonesty: The Dean of Students is responsible for assisting the faculty in maintaining a high level of academic integrity on the campus. The Dean works with the faculty to educate students about academic dishonesty and to adjudicate disciplinary cases in which there are suspected violations of the University Code of Conduct. Please refer to the following for more information about academic dishonesty: http://www.montclair.edu/deanstudents/studentconduct/codeofconduct.html. Regulations and Procedures: The University Regulations, Disciplinary Procedures and the Code of Conduct are coordinated through the Dean of Students Office. Any student can file a complaint about student behavior in the Dean of Students Office, Student Center Room 400, or by sending an e-­‐mail to collinsje@mail.montclair.edu. Students are encouraged to visit the Student Conduct webpage located at www.montclair.edu/deanstudents/studentconduct/ Course Withdrawal Prior to the University Deadline: To withdraw from courses go onto your WESS Account. Seek Academic Advising prior to withdrawing. Also, refer to the Registrar’s Semester Calendar for the Withdrawal Deadlines on the following website: www.montclair.edu.registrar. Refer to the Student Accounts website for the Refund Schedule and Policies. www.montclair.edu/bursar/policies/refunds.html Course Withdrawal After the University Deadline: If you have extenuating circumstances that prevent you from completing the semester after the withdrawal deadline, contact the Center for Advising & Student Transitions at 973-­‐655-­‐7114, Webster Hall. Also, download the Request for Course Withdrawal Exception form found on the Dean of Students website, read it carefully before completing the form. Submit the form to Dean Coleman-­‐Carter in the Dean of Students Office, Student Center, Room 400. Problem Solving: See the University Ombudsman. The Ombudsman provides a confidential and neutral place where issues and problems can be discussed. Your concerns and/or problems will be investigated through personal interview, consultation, record review and other information. You will be assisted in resolving your problem(s). You may call 973-­‐655-­‐ 4118, e-­‐mail Fischerp@mail.montclair.edu, or stop by the Dean of Students Office to schedule an appointment. A link for the student handbook is available through: www.montclair.edu/pages/deanstudents/

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Center for Writing Excellence The Center for Writing Excellence is available to all university students, faculty, staff, and alumni who are committed to developing and improving as writers. Sessions with experienced writing consultants are designed to provide help on every aspect of the writing process, with the goal of enabling students to achieve long-­‐term improvement, confidence, and independence. We are located in Sprague Library (in the far right corner of the Reference section, on the main floor). Hours for each semester, and the summer, are posted on our website: www.montclair.edu/cwe Conferences are generally a maximum of 25 minutes, and are available on a first-­‐come, first-­‐served basis. We can also schedule appointments in advance, and we are now offering online consultations. There is no charge for these services. Specifically, we can help you with— • • • •

Getting started: Understanding the writing task and generating ideas Drafting: Developing a focus and an argument, selecting appropriate evidence, and organizing your ideas Revising: Choosing strategies to improve drafts Polishing: Learning to edit your own writing

To prepare for your session, come with— • • • • • •

Assignment or task Text for course (if you are taking one) All work you have done to get started (any freewriting and notes) A draft of your paper (if you have one) Your goal for the conference Most important, specific question or writing problem for which you would like help

What we don’t do— • • •

Proofread or edit your papers for you, but we will help you learn how to do so. Interpret (if you are a student) comments your instructor made on your paper or discuss grades, but we will look at your efforts to revise. Review more than 4-­‐5 pages at a time, though you are welcome to return.

Schedule your appointment online at www.montclair.edu/cwe Questions? Please call 973-­‐655-­‐7442 or email us at CWE@mail.montclair.edu. There is no great writing, only great rewriting. -­‐-­‐Justice Brandeis Writing is 1 percent inspiration, and 99 percent elimination. -­‐-­‐Louise Brooks

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Sprague Library http://library.montclair.edu Circulation/Reserves: 973-­‐655-­‐4288 Reference Desk: 973-­‐655-­‐4298 The Library contains resources for and offers services to the students, faculty, and staff of the University and is open to the public. The Library collections includes books, indexes and abstracts, periodicals, magazines, newspapers, DVDs, videotapes, music CDs, other media, and government documents. The collections are in many formats: print, electronic books, online index/abstract databases and periodicals, and microforms. In order to check out books, you will need a valid, current MSU ID. Undergraduates may check out books for one month with a one month renewal. An MSU ID is also needed to check out materials faculty have placed on Reserve as supplemental reading for class assignments. Many Reserve materials are also available electronically through Blackboard. We are available to answer your questions at our Reference Desk. Don't hesitate to ask about how to use the online catalog, how to search an online index/abstract database, where materials are located, or how to begin researching an assignment. We welcome your questions! Ask us online at “Ask a Librarian.” Library instruction is offered in the New Student Seminar classes, English Composition classes, and in other subject areas, as requested by faculty. It is a good opportunity to learn more about the Library and how to do research in your subject area. We have many online index/abstract databases; for example: ABI/INFORM (business subjects), Art Abstracts (art, art history), Computer Science Index, EBSCO Academic Search Premier (general academic topics), Lexis-­‐Nexis (news, current topics), and The New York Times. A Reference Librarian will assist you to select the relevant database for your research. The index/abstract databases can be accessed from computers in the Library, from computer labs and residence halls on campus, and from off campus. You will need an MSU e-­‐mail account in order to access many of the resources and services from the Library's website. Most of the online index/abstract databases have the full text of the articles. You can e-­‐mail the articles to your e-­‐mail account or print them. And stop by Café Diem! The Library is now open 24/7 during the Fall and Spring Semesters. You must show your MSU ID to remain or enter the Library after regular service hours. Service hours during the Fall and Spring Semesters: Monday-­‐Thursday 8:00 a.m. -­‐ 12 Midnight Friday 8:00 a.m. -­‐ 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. -­‐ 5:00 p.m. Sunday 12 Noon -­‐ 9:00 p.m.

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Office of Information Technology http://oit.montclair.edu Technology Solutions Center, University Hall, 5th floor helpdesk@mail.montclair.edu. University Help Desk 973-­‐655-­‐7971, option 1 University Help Desk The University Help Desk is proud to provide the students at Montclair State University with the technical resources, services and support they need to communicate and collaborate with faculty and staff. Among the support services most frequently utilized by MSU students are the University Help Desk, public and teaching laboratories, media services and rentals, software consulting services and complimentary training sessions. In particular, the University Help Desk provides assistance to resident and commuter students who are connecting to the MSU network from an internet enabled device. We also assist with the eradication of potential computer viruses or malware that might stop you from connecting to the network. If you need assistance, please contact the Help Desk to schedule appointments. appointments are available Monday through Friday 8am – 6pm; Saturday from 8am-­‐2pm. For security reasons, you must remain in the Technology Solutions Center (TSC) while the staff attempts to diagnose and inoculate your computer. There are several ways to reach the University Help Desk between the hours of 7am-­‐9pm Monday through Friday and Saturday from 8am-­‐5pm, closed on Sundays during the fall/spring semester: Call Us: 973-­‐655-­‐7971 Email Us: helpdesk@mail.montclair.edu Friend Us: http://www.facebook.com/montclairstateuniversityhelpdesk Chat with Us: http://oit.montclair.edu Visit Us: 5th Floor of University Hall E-­‐mail for Students: The MSU email system is the official communications channel to the University Community. All MSU students are provided with, and are expected to utilize, a MSU email account as this is the primary point of contact. Email can be accessed through any computer with an internet connection at: http://webmail.montclair.edu, To activate your email, you must create your NetID first. Please visit the NetID management form at https://netid.montclair.edu for further instruction. Public Computing Laboratories: MSU currently has six (6) public computer labs that all enrolled MSU students can access with a valid MSU ID. These labs contain over 400 state of the art computers (including 2 laptop lending areas), replete with a variety of software applications that are available to students to use in the labs. For a list of all computing labs on campus or to view the current schedule, please visit: http://oit.montclair.edu/tsc/labs/labschedule.html. Mobile Computing Labs Laptop Lending Policy – Information Technology has over 120 laptops available for loan to enrolled Students with a valid MSU ID. These lendable laptops can be found in the Lower Level of Sprague Library and the 5th floor of University Hall. As these labs operate on different schedule, the laptops must be returned to the originating lab. Please visit the lab website to review these policies.

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Office of Information Technology Continued from previous page Laptop Lending Cart #1 (open 24/5) Lower level of Sprague Library 72 PC Laptops 8 Mac Laptops 3 B&W Printers Laptop Lending Cart #2 Inside University Hall, Room 5008, 5th Floor 30 PC Laptops 3 B&W Printers Stationary Computer Labs Sprague Library Student Interactive Multimedia (SIM) Lab, LB219 4 PC Desktops 2 Mac Desktops 4 Surf and Print Stations 2 Scanners (1 PC Scanner, 1 Mac Scanner) 2 B&W Printers, 1 Color Printer

Student Center Surf-­‐n-­‐Print Depot-­‐Lower Level, Room 004 24 PC Desktops 15 Surf and Print Stations 4 B&W Printers University Hall (UN5007/5008) Information Commons Lab – 5th Floor 66 PC Desktops 12 Mac Desktops 30 PC Laptops 8 Surf and Printer Stations 6 B&W Printers 2 WebPrint Printers (exclusively for printing from a personal internet-­‐ enabled device)

Want to know when a computer is available? Check out the Computer Lab Availability tool located at https://oit-­‐app2.montclair.edu/labusage/ from any internet enabled device. Printing On Campus Using PaperCut PaperCut is a print management software that allows the Division of Information Technology at Montclair State University to help our students better manage their printing and monitor the financial and environmental costs of printing. It also provides the University with the ability to monitor printing of the entire student body, generate reports and do analysis that will enable us to implement policies and practices that will help control costs for this important service. Each Fall/Spring term, all currently enrolled students are given 800 single-­‐sided or 1,142 double sided pages to print. This allocation translates into a $40 printing cost equivalent. The amount allotted for summer decreases to $10.00. For full documentation on how to check your balance, printing from a personal device or to watch the how to video, please visit the lab website at http://oit.montclair.edu/tsc/labs . In addition, PaperCut enables you to submit print jobs from anywhere on campus using your own computer or other network ready device using an Internet-­‐based application. You can release these print jobs to printers that are placed strategically across campus. To view the list of printers, please visit: http://oit.montclair.edu/tsc/labs/printerlist.html . Please consult “A Student’s Guide to Information Technology” for a more detailed listing of our services for students. This guide can be found at: http://oit.montclair.edu/documentationpdf/student2012issue.pdf

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NOTES

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Guide for Transfer Students