Page 1

SPANE:

1 Screening of Performance the Natural Environment Screening of Performance Art inArt theinNatural Environment


Working, performing and being in nature is inspiring, sparking the imagination and nurturing creative impulses leading to action. Capturing the ephemeral through performance art for the camera opens the opportunity for moments to be revisited and shared.

Cover Image: SPANE: ThresholdPrivate Perimeter (still), 2013 Rebecca Belmore 22:50


I initiated Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment (S.P.A.N.E.) out of an interest to showcase and learn from performance-based artists working with elements found in less cultivated natural or rural surroundings and how the resulting actions, processes and events could be represented in video. The first three screenings were culled from submissions. Response was overwhelmingly positive, allowing for the selection and presentation of diverse and provocative works. In this way, S.P.A.N.E. was also a forum for celebrating the limits of performance-based art. The first two programs were curated by myself (2011 & 2012) and the third in 2013, was curated by Lindsey Allgood from Norman, Oklahoma. These screenings were all presented in the idyllic forested setting of Artscape Gibraltar Point, located on the shores of Lake Ontario on an island just outside of Toronto’s city centre.

Travailler, performer et être dans la nature est source d’inspiration, suscitant l’imagination et entretenant l’impulsion créatrice menant à l’action. Capturer l’éphémère par la performance au travers de la caméra ouvre la possibilité à des moments d’être revus et partagés. J’ai initié Screening of Performance Art in Natural Environment (S.P.A.N.E.) d’un intérêt de mettre en valeur et d’apprendre des artistes de la performance travaillant avec des éléments trouvés dans des environnements davantage naturels ou ruraux, et de la manière dont ces actions, procédés et évènements peuvent être présentés en vidéo. Les trois premières présentations de projections ont suivi un appel de propositions. La réponse a été extrêmement positive, permettant la sélection et la présentation d’oeuvres diverses et provocatrices. En ce sens, S.P.A.N.E. a été un forum célébrant les limites de l’art basé sur la performance. J’ai commissarié les deux premiers programmes (2011 et 2012) et le troisième, en 2013, a été commissarié par Lindsey Allgood (Norman, Oklahoma). Ces projections ont toutes été présentées dans l’idyllique décor boisé du Artscape Gibraltar Point, situé sur les rives du Lac Ontario sur une île près du centre-ville de Toronto.

Johannes Zits

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

3


On his beaches, his clearings, by the surf of undergrowth breaking at his feet, he foresaw disintegration and in the end through eyes made ragged by his effort, the tension between subject and object, the green vision, the unnamed whale invaded 1

Margaret Atwood’s poem Progressive Insanities of a Pioneer offers an account of a struggle of the titular pioneer against the environment he seeks to subjugate. Despite his best efforts to establish himself at the centre of this environment, his various impositions are refused; the names he provides animals, the posts staking out property, even the defense of his self. Although unsuccessful himself, successive waves of like-minded ‘pioneers’ have over time entrenched a divide through constant labour, what Arendt identifies as the “unending fight against the processes of growth and decay through which nature forever invades the human artifice, threatening the durability of the world and its fitness for human use.”2

1

Atwood, Margaret. “Progressive Insanities of a Pioneer.” Selected Poems. Margaret Atwood. Simon And Schuster, 1976. 60

2

Arendt, Hannah. The Human Condition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958. 100

SPANE: Threshold


In a departure from Marx, Arendt recognizes a distinction between work and labour, the latter being the day-to-day requirements of biological sustenance, from birth to death. Engaged in ‘heroic’ struggle against forces that constantly threaten to overgrow or decay, a linear world is born from labour, distinct from the cyclical patterns of nature, and one’s own biological movement. The result is “an epistemological disruption between humans and the world they inhabit.”3 “World alienation” Arendt notes, “and not self-alienation as Marx thought, has been the hallmark of the modern age.”4 The implication of this divide confronts us in countless ways; the interruption of wilderness; fetishistic and material consumption of the land and its inhabitants, even anxieties over life and death. Countering this, the artists represented here are engaged in a different project. The artists explore and trouble the tension between subject and object via performative acts that push and destabilize the borders of this estrangement. Straying far from any notion of a centre, they seek fissures, placing themselves and their actions in the interstitial spaces in an effort to redress this estrangement. These acts, while not quite collapsing the distinction, draw closer in affinity rather than opposition to natural forces. Stefan St-Laurent is at first barely visible in his video Please feed the animals, a collected series performances undertaken during his residency in Bali. His body is obscured by a vibrant mass of flowers, while large insects are carefully placed on him. In another scene, he lies motionless with a coating of food is licked off him by dogs. Later, he is seen floating underwater, wearing scuba gear, as well as bundles of food are picked at by fish. Offering his body (or an anthropomorphic surrogate in cases where it would no longer be a symbolic offering) as a platter for animals to feed from, he reverses conventional consumption habits that typify our relationship with the natural world. As part of the 2011 edition of the Live Biennial in Vancouver, Brass engaged in a durational performance, exploring the archive of her late father’s research; a memorized knowledge existing now in mediated fragments – video, audio tape, photography and reams of paper. The research concerns the File Hills Colony, a disastrous colonial project that sought to instill farming practices to

3

Townsend-Gault, Charlotte, Rebecca Belmore, James Luna, and Scott Watson.Rebecca Belmore: The Named and the

Unnamed. Vancouver: Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, 2003. 9 4

Arendt, Hannah. The Human Condition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958. 254

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

5


indigenous peoples of the Peepeekisis, Okanese, Star Blanket and Little Black Bear First Nations. Over a faint soundtrack of an elder’s oral recollection, Brass engages with each media, unravelling spools of tape, throwing them to the wind. Sitting on stacks of paper, while holding a framed photograph, recoiling and falling from the paper stool as if shot by the image. These acts are an acknowledgement, and an attempt at embodying, a history burdened and obscured by documentation. In Float, Klein-Waller engages in a collaborative performance with a river. His stance is contemplative, ankle deep in the water, his face obscured by a wide-brimmed hat, while behind him a slow but steady train of branches float by. His monochromatic uniform and the black and white video are suggestive of a figure from an earlier era, or out of time. This anachronism is troubled by the consistent low rumble of traffic that can be heard, but not seen. Before arriving in Sudbury, Rebecca Belmore wrote a text: “Somewhere between a town, a mine, and a reserve, is a line.” For Belmore, this line is a thread, one she followed through in her exploration of the region. The video she created here, ‘Private Perimeter’, consists of a series of performative actions. Many of these moments appear as tableaux. An outstretched arm holding a tape that blows frenetically in the wind; A figure in contemplative stillness while standing in a tailing pond up to the knee. The figure in the video wears a ubiquitous construction uniform but re-imbued with a different form of work. Tracing a line through the complex borders at the outskirts of the town, she walks along the various borders that define it. She articulates the material language of the site, in all of its complexity. Located 20 minutes from the manicured landscape of the Banff townsite, Lower Bankhead is a former coal mining town. A skeletal infrastructure now barely visible, its atrophied structures relax and co-mingle with the surrounding environment. This ‘ghost town’ became fertile ground for the exploration by participants in the MUTOPIA residency, held at the Banff Centre in the summer of 2013. Drawing from oulipian writing exercises, scripts and actions were performed on the site. One such exercise engaged one of the massive mounds of coal that remain. The

SPANE: Threshold


participants follow each other successively up, and collectively down, the mound. The practical logistics of placing of the camera in the grass to record the action has the resulting effect of reducing the coal mound, and the actors, to the scale of an anthill. In a parody of a newtonian epiphany, a falling rock that Didier Morelli threw into the air, only to have it land on his head set him on a trajectory to study the forces of gravity. Through a residency in in Skagaströnd, Iceland, a geographical region with a high gravitational pull, to begin his weekly explorations, documented and embellished through video. He employs his body as an instrument in a series of experiments to measure and test the limits of this natural force. Moving between the taxidermy specimens that fill the Banff Park Museum National Historic Site, D’Arcy Wilson adopts the role of custodian, her job to lull the animals under her care to sleep. It is a touching gesture, offering a peaceful send-off that was likely not akin to their last living encounter with a human. At the same time, there is a perversity to the action, the mute response articulating an irrevocable distance, one she nevertheless endeavours to cross. Counterpoint to Wilson’s tender lullaby, in the following video the chords of Hendrix’s Voodoo Child open to a slow pan of a graveyard, where we witness Jaan Toomik enthusiastically writhing on the grave of his namesake. Toomik’s act of dancing on his father’s grave at first sets up the uncomfortable association with the political insult. Although still a provocative act, he turns this taboo on its head, inverting to a gesture of both celebration and longing. Through each of these videos, we are offered a view of the engagements the artists have with their environment, but we are still not the intended audiences. We are at a remove, witnesses to a sublime engagement. The performances take place at another, inner level. A connection is formed through their presence. Each artist seeks an understanding of reality of existence in harmony with the environment by turning inward toward a different, incorporeal knowledge. Through their bodies, a space is opened, not an invasion, but an invitation.

Tomas Jonsson

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

7


Le poème Progressive Insanities of a Pioneer de Margaret Atwood présente les difficultés rencontrées par un pionner qui tente d’asservir l’environnement qui l’entoure. Dans un désir de s’établir au centre de cet environnement, il voit ses différentes impositions rebutées : du nom qu’il donne aux animaux, à sa tentative d’établir une propriété, jusqu’à sa propre défense. Bien que nous constations son échec, plusieurs « pionniers » ayant une attitude similaire ont, par un travail constant, créé une rupture, ce que Arendt identifie comme étant « le combat incessant contre les processus de croissance et de détérioration à travers lesquels la nature envahit les artifices humains, menaçant ainsi la longévité du monde et la capacité de l’Homme à l’utiliser. » S’opposant à Marx, Arendt reconnaît la différence entre l’action et le travail, ce dernier étant la série d’actes essentiels à la subsistance biologique, de la naissance à la mort. De cette lutte « héroïque » contre les forces qui cherchent à envahir ou détruire, le travail crée un monde linéaire, s’opposant au modèle cyclique de la nature et celui du mouvement biologique de l’humain. Le tout résulte en « un bouleversement épistémologique entre les humains et le monde qu’ils habitent. » « L’aliénation du monde », note Arendt « et non pas l’aliénation de soi, tel que Marx le suggère, a caractérisé les temps modernes. » Ce bouleversement nous confronte de plusieurs façons : l’interruption de tout ce qui est considéré comme étant sauvage, la consommation matérielle et fétichiste de la terre et des ses habitants, allant même jusqu’à l’anxiété entourant la vie et la mort. Contrant cela, les artistes présentés ici participent à un projet différent. Ces artistes explorent et dérangent la tension entre le sujet et l’objet à travers des actes performatifs qui visent à déstabiliser et repousser les limites de cette aliénation. Cherchant à s’éloigner de la notion de centre, ils trouvent les fissures et positionnent leurs actions dans les interstices afin de réduire l’écart. Ces actions, bien qu’elles n’arrivent pas totalement à pallier à ce clivage, ont beaucoup plus d’affinités que d’opposition avec les forces de la nature. Au tout début de la vidéo S.V.P. Nourrir les animaux (Please feed the animals), compilant une série de performances créées lors d’une résidence à Bali, Stefan St-Laurent est à peine visible, alors que

SPANE: Threshold


son corps est masqué par une masse vibrante de fleurs et que de gros insectes sont soigneusement disposés sur lui. Dans une autre scène, il est couché, immobile, pendant que des chiens lèchent la nourriture étendue sur son corps. Plus tard, nous le voyons, flottant sous l’eau, en habit de plongée couvert de nourriture que les poissons viennent manger. Offrant son corps (ou un substitut anthropomorphique dans les cas où ce ne serait plus une offrande symbolique) tel un plat duquel les animaux se nourrissent, il inverse les habitudes de consommation conventionnelles qui caractérisent habituellement notre relation avec la nature. Dans le cadre de l’édition 2011 du Live Biennial à Vancouver, Brass a offert une performance de longue durée explorant les archives des recherches de son père décédé, c’est-à-dire un savoir mémorisé qui existe maintenant en fragments altérés – des vidéos, des bandes sonores, des photos et des piles de papier. Ces recherches portent sur la colonie de File Hills, un projet de colonisation désastreux qui visait à inculquer des pratiques d’agriculture aux populations autochtones des Premières Nations de Peepeekisis, Okanese, Star Blanket et Little Black Bear. Alors que la voix d’un aîné racontant ses souvenirs est entendue faiblement sur une bande sonore en arrière-plan, Brass s’approprie chacun des médias : Elle défait des bobines de film, les jetant au vent. Assise sur une pile de papier, tenant une photo encadrée, elle recule et tombe, comme si l’image l’avait abattue. Ces actions visent à reconnaître et incarner un pan de l’Histoire qui est enfoui et dissimulé sous la documentation. Avec Float, Klein-Waller offre une performance collaborative avec une rivière. Il adopte une pose contemplative, les pieds dans l’eau jusqu’aux chevilles et son visage caché par un chapeau à large rebord. Derrière lui, une parade de branches flotte lentement et continuellement. Son uniforme monochromatique et l’utilisation du noir et blanc dans la vidéo suggèrent une figure d’une autre époque, dépassée. Cet anachronisme est perturbé par le grondement sourd du trafic qui est constamment entendu, mais jamais montré. Avant d’arriver à Sudbury, Rebecca Belmore a écrit un texte : « Entre ville, mine et réserve, on retrouve quelque part une ligne. » Pour Belmore, cette ligne est un fil conducteur qu’elle a suivi au cours de l’exploration de sa région.

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

9


La vidéo qu’elle présente ici, « Private Perimeter », est une série d’actes performatifs, qui ressemble à des tableaux : un bras allongé qui tient un ruban qui flotte frénétiquement au rythme du vent; une figure d’une immobilité contemplative, debout, dans un bassin à résidus miniers. Le personnage dans la vidéo porte un uniforme de construction standard, mais qui semble avoir été réapproprié pour un autre type de travail. Traçant une ligne à travers les frontières confuses en périphérie de la ville, elle longe les régions frontalières qui la définissent. Elle articule le langage matériel du lieu, soulignant sa complexité. Située à 20 minutes du paysage pittoresque de la municipalité de Banff, Lower Bankhead est une ancienne ville minière. Ses infrastructures squelettiques sont à peine visibles et ses structures atrophiées s’étendent et s’enlacent à l’environnement qui les entoure. Cette « ville fantôme » est devenue le lieu d’exploration des participants de la résidence MUTOPIA, qui a eue lieu au Banff Centre à l’été 2013. S’inspirant d’exercices d’écriture oulipiens, le groupe a performé des scripts et des actes performatifs sur les lieux. Par exemple, l’un de ces exercices mettait en scène un énorme amas de charbon qui a été laissé là. Les participants se suivent donc à la file, en montant collectivement, puis redescendant le monticule. D’un point de vue technique, la caméra avait été placée dans le gazon lors de l’enregistrement de l’action, réduisant ainsi l’amas de charbon et les acteurs à une sorte de fourmilière. Parodiant l’illumination newtonienne, Didier Morelli lance une roche dans les airs pour la recevoir directement sur la tête, ce qui l’inspire à aller étudier les forces gravitationnelles. Lors d’une résidence à Skagaströnd, en Islande, une région géographique où l’attraction gravitationnelle est importante, il commence ses explorations hebdomadaires, se filmant en les documentant et les embellissant. Il utilise son corps comme instrument lors de ses expériences scientifiques afin de mesurer et tester les limites de cette force naturelle. Se déplaçant entre les spécimens de taxidermie qui emplissent l’espace du Lieu historique national du Canada du Musée-du-Parc-Banff, D’Arcy Wilson adopte le rôle de gardienne, transportant les animaux dont elle s’occupe vers le sommeil. En des gestes touchants, elle leur

SPANE: Threshold


fait des adieux sereins et paisibles, contrastant avec leur dernière rencontre avec un être humain, alors qu’ils étaient en vie. Par contre, ses actions sont en quelque sorte perverses puisque l’absence de réaction nous confronte à une distance irrévocable qu’elle tente tout de même de franchir. En contrepoids à la douce berceuse de Wilson, la vidéo suivante ouvre sur un plan au ralenti d’un cimetière et les accords de Voodoo Child d’Hendrix. On y voit Jaan Toomik se tordant avec enthousiasme devant une tombe sur laquelle son nom est inscrit. L’action de Toomik de danser sur la tombe de son père établit d’abord un lien inconfortable, presqu’une insulte politique. Bien que ce soit en effet un acte de provocation, il joue avec le tabou, son geste représentant à la fois la célébration et la nostalgie. Chacune de ces vidéos nous offre un aperçu du lien que les artistes entretiennent avec leur environnement, mais nous ne sommes pas le public de ces représentations. Nous sommes à l’écart, distants témoins de ce contact sublime. Ces performances se produisent à l’intérieur de l’artiste dont l’unique présence crée une connexion. Chacun de ces artistes tente de comprendre les concepts de réalité et d’existence en harmonie avec leur environnement en se tournant vers un savoir différent, incorporel. À travers leur corps, une ouverture est créée, non pas une invasion, mais une invitation.

Works cited / Bibliographie Atwood, Margaret. “Progressive Insanities of a Pioneer.” Selected Poems. Margaret Atwood. Simon And Schuster, 1976. 60 Arendt, Hannah. The Human Condition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1958. Bradley, Jessica, and Jolene Rickard. Rebecca Belmore: Fountain. Vancouver: Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, 2005. Wilson, D’Arcy. Protect Your Love. Halifax: Visual Arts Nova Scotia and the Khyber Centre for the Arts, 2013. Townsend-Gault, Charlotte, Rebecca Belmore, James Luna, and Scott Watson.Rebecca Belmore: The Named and the Unnamed. Vancouver: Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, 2003.

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

11


Please Feed the Animals, 2012, Stefan St-Laurent 8:26

SPANE: Threshold


Crab Park Performance, 2011, Robin Brass 2:50

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

13


Float, 2013, Jake Klein-Waller 3:34

SPANE: Threshold


Private Perimeter, 2013, Rebecca Belmore 22:50

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

15


Mutopia 7: Coal Mound, 2012, 4:21

SPANE: Threshold


Gravitational Pull of My Head, 2011, Didier Morelli 7:03

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

17


Tuck, 2012, D’Arcy Wilson (Halifax) 14:29

SPANE: Threshold


Dancing with Dad, 2008, Jaan Toomik (Tallinn) 3:49

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

19


Stefan St-Laurent Stefan St-Laurent, multidisciplinary artist and curator, was born in Moncton, New-Brunswick and lives and works in Ottawa. His performance and video work has been presented in numerous galleries and institutions, including the Centre national de la photographie in Paris, Edsvik Konst och Kultur in Sollentuna (Sweden), YYZ in Toronto, Western Front in Vancouver and the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia in Halifax. He has been a curator and programmer for a number of artistic organisations and festivals, including the Lux Centre in London, the Cinémathèque Québécoise in Montréal, Festival international du cinéma francophone in Acadie, Les Rencontres internationales Vidéo Arts Plastiques in Basse-Normandie (France), Festival international du cinéma francophone en Acadie (Moncton), as well as Pleasure Dome, Images Festival of Independent Film and Video and Vtape in Toronto. He was the invited curator for the Biennale d’art performatif de Rouyn-Noranda in 2008, and for the 28th and 29th Symposium international d’art contemporain de Baie-Saint-Paul in 2010 and 2011. From 2002 - 2011, he worked as Curator of Galerie SAW Gallery, and has been an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Visual arts at Ottawa University since 2010. Stefan St-Laurent, artiste multidisciplinaire et commissaire indépendant, est né à Moncton au Nouveau-Brunswick et réside maintenant à Ottawa. Ses œuvres performatives et vidéographiques ont été présentées dans de nombreux musées et galeries, incluant le Centre national de la photographie de Paris, Edsvik Konst och Kultur à Sollentuna (Suède), le YYZ à Toronto, le Western Front à Vancouver et The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia à Halifax. Il a agi en tant que commissaire pour de nombreux festivals et organisations artistiques, incluant le Lux Center de Londres, la Cinémathèque Québécoise à Montréal, le Festival international du cinéma francophone en Acadie, les Rencontres internationales Vidéo Arts Plastiques en BasseNormandie (France), le Festival international du cinéma francophone en Acadie (Moncton), en plus du Pleasure Dome, Images Festival of Independent Film and Video and Vtape de Toronto. Il a été invité à titre de commissaire pour la Biennale d’art performatif de RouynNoranda en 2008, ainsi que pour les 28e et 29e éditions du Symposium international d’art contemporain de Baie-Saint-Paul en 2010 et 2011. De 2002 à 2011, il a été le commissaire de la Galerie SAW et il est présentement professeur auxiliaire au département d’arts visuels à l’université d’Ottawa depuis 2010.

SPANE: Threshold


Robin Brass Robin Brass (Saulteaux/Scottish) is an interdisciplinary artist originally from the Regina/Treaty IV region of southern Saskatchewan and a busy mom of three boys. She has studied at York University and completed her B.A. in Indigenous Fine Arts, First Nations University of Canada. Robin is co-founder of Sakewewak Artists’ Collective, Circle Vision Arts Corp., Red Tattoo Theatre Ensemble, and Sakewewak’s Distinguished Storytellers Series. From 1997 - 1999, she spearheaded Sakewewak’s development and operations. She has produced works including: Tawihken Kakike-Kakike (making space over and over, again and again) Performance Canada Conference, (2005); Root of Love, for the exhibition ‘Constitution’, Godfrey Dean Art Gallery(2005); Mining Dog, Neutral Ground (2000). As well as contributing to various group exhibits and collaborations including: Pelican Nocturne (2005), Robin Poitras, artistic director; Pooling Time: Beyond Performance, PAVED Arts with TRIBE (2003); Nomadic Recall (1999) & Backtracking: The New Museum (1998), Edward Poitras, artistic director; The House of Sonya, Red Tattoo Theatre (1997), Floyd Favel Starr, director; MexterminatorII, (1997), collaboration with Guillermo Gomez Pena & Roberto Sifuentes. In the fall of ‘99 Robin took a teaching position with the First Nations University of Canada, teaching Native Art History on several Saskatchewan reserves. She moved to northern Saskatchewan in 2000 where she has most recently created new work based upon the intimate relationships between Healers(plants) and Patients(humans), as well as delving deeper into new performance work based in the Nakawe language, further pursuing her true love of Indigenous orality. Robin Brass (Saulteaux/Écossaise) est une artiste interdisciplinaire de Régina/ Région du Traité IV du sud de la Saskatchewan et une mère de trois garçons. Elle a fait ses études à l’université York et a complété son Baccalauréat en Indigenous Fine Arts à l’université des Premières Nations du Canada. Robin est la co-fondatrice du collectif d’artistes Sakewewak, du Circle Vision Arts Corp, de la troupe de théâtre Red Tattoo, ainsi que de la Distinguished Storytellers Series de Sakewewak. De 1997 à 1999, elle a été le fer de lance du développement et de la gestion de Sakewewak. Elle a produit un bon nombre d’œuvres, incluant Tawihken Kakike-Kakike (Tailler une place inlassablement, encore et encore) à la Conférence Performance Canada (2005); Root of Love, pour l’exposition « Constitution » de la galerie Godfrey Dean (2005); Mining Dog, pour Neutral Ground (2000). De plus, elle a contribué à plusieurs expositions de groupe et collaborations, telles Pelican Nocturne (2005), Robin Poitras, directeur artistique; Pooling Time : Beyond Performance, PAVED Arts avec TRIBE (2003); Nomadic Recall (1999) et Backtracking : The New Museum (1998), Edward Poitras, directeur artistique; The House of Sonya, Red Tattoo Theatre (1997), Floyd Favel Starr, directeur; MexterminatorII, (1997), collaboration avec Guillermo Gomez Pena & Roberto Sifuentes. À l’automne de 1999, Robin est devenue professeure à l’université des Premières Nations du Canada, enseignant l’Histoire de l’art autochtone dans plusieurs réserves de la Saskatchewan. En 2000, elle a déménagé au nord de la Saskatchewan, où elle a récemment créé de nouvelles œuvres se basant sur la relation entre les guérisseurs (plantes) et les patients (humains). Elle se penche aussi, dans ses plus récentes performances, sur le langage Nakawe, communiquant ainsi son amour pour l’expression orale autochtone.

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

21


Jake Klein-Waller Jake Klein-Waller graduated in drawing from the Alberta College of Art & Design, and currently lives and works in Calgary, Alberta. Jake is a member of the Calgary based artist collective, HORSE Collective. Jake Klein-Waller a fait ses études en dessin au College of Art & Design d’Alberta et habite présentement à Calgary, en Alberta, où il travaille également. Jake fait partie du HORSE Collective, un collectif d’artistes de Calgary.

Rebecca Belmore Rebecca Belmore is a Montreal-based multi-disciplinary artist from Upsala, Ontario. In 2013 she won the Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts. She gained internationally acclaim at the 2005 Venice Biennale’s Canadian Pavilion where she was the first Indigenous woman to represent Canada. Belmore has exhibited and performed internationally and nationally since 1987. She won the Jack and Doris Shadbolt Foundation’s prestigious VIVA Award 2004 and the 2009 Hnatyshyn Visual Arts Award. Her work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Canada Council Art Bank, the Canadian Museum of Civilization and many others. Native d’Upsala en Ontario, Rebecca Belmore est une artiste multidisciplinaire établie à Montréal qui expose et performe au niveau national et international depuis 1987. En 2013, elle a remportée le Prix du Gouverneur général en arts visuels et en arts médiatiques. Au Pavillon canadien de la Biennale de Venise en 2005, elle a reçu des éloges de partout autour du monde, alors qu’elle était la première femme autochtone à représenter le Canada. En 2004, elle a remporté le prestigieux VIVA Award de la Fondation Jack et Doris Shadbolt, puis le Hnatyshyn Visual Arts Award en 2009. Ses œuvres font parties des collections du Musée des beaux-arts du Canada, du Musée des beauxarts de l’Ontario, du Conseil des arts du Canada, du Musée canadien de la civilisation, ainsi que plusieurs autres.

SPANE: Threshold


Mutopia 7 Video made from a series of scored performance actions during MUTOPIA 7 held in Banff Canada, June 2012. The workshop was facilitated by John Grzinich. The participants included Leslie Bell, Sage Wheeler, Tomas Jonsson, Michael Hansen, Corinne Thiessen Hepher, Natasha Alphonse, Alan Clinton, Dana Buzzee, Yules Wai. Mutopia is a process oriented workshop environment that explores collaboration, collective creativity and open forms of authorship. This is done through social and environmental research, exercises, games and the use of mixed artistic media such as sound, collage, text, performance etc. I’m interested in being much more of a guide for the processes and mediator of the ideas than an artist who shapes the world around me to “fit” certain ideas. With each step of the process we break to desire to determine goals allowing indeterminacy to take its course. – John Grzinich Cette vidéo a été produite à partir des actes performatifs qui se sont déroulés dans le cadre de MUTOPIA 7, à Banff, Canada, en juin 2012. Les ateliers étaient guidés par John Grzinich et les participants de cette édition étaient Leslie Bell, Sage Wheeler, Tomas Jonsson, Michael Hansen, Corinne Thiessen Hepher, Natasha Alphonse, Alan Clinton, Dana Buzzee et Yules Wai. Mutopia est une série d’ateliers orientés sur le processus et qui explore les concepts de la collaboration, la créativité collective et le partage de la paternité d’une œuvre. Différentes méthodes sont étudiées pour ce faire; par la recherche sociale et environnementale, des exercices, des jeux et l’utilisation de divers médias artistiques, tels le son, le collage, l’écriture, la performance, etc. « L’idée d’être un guide des procédés et un médiateur d’idées m’intéresse beaucoup plus que celle d’être un artiste qui façonne le monde qui l’entoure pour correspondre à certains concepts. À chaque étape du processus, nous nous arrêtons pour laisser le désir prendre la place, pour déterminer nos objectifs, permettant ainsi à l’incertitude de faire son chemin. » - John Grzinich

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

23


Didier Morelli Didier Morelli (1989 – born in Montreal and lives in Chicago), is an interdisciplinary artist who combines practice and research in both his academic and performative explorations. His live art practice includes endurance-based durational actions and contextually specific relational interactions. His studio-based work includes drawing, collage, photography and video. Didier Morelli (1989 - , né à Montréal, vivant à Chicago) est un artiste interdisciplinaire qui mélange la pratique et la recherche à travers ses explorations académiques et performatives. Ses types de performances incluent des actions d’endurance de longue durée et des interactions relationnelles contextuelles. Il travaille aussi le dessin, le collage, la photographie et la vidéo à son studio.

D’Arcy Wilson D’Arcy Wilson is a Halifax based interdisciplinary artist working primarily with performance. She received an MFA from the University of Calgary (’08), and a BFA from Mount Allison University (’05). D’Arcy has exhibited her work across Canada in solo and group exhibitions, and has participated in various artist residencies. She sits on the board of directors at Eyelevel Gallery and she is also an art educator. D’Arcy Wilson est une artiste interdisciplinaire établie à Halifax qui se concentre principalement sur la performance. Elle a reçu son baccalauréat en beaux-arts de l’université Mount Allison (2005) et sa maîtrise en arts visuels de l’université de Calgary (2008). D’Arcy a présenté ses œuvres partout au Canada, autant dans des expositions solo que de groupe et a participé à plusieurs résidences d’artistes. Elle fait partie du conseil d’administration de la Galerie Eyelevel et est une éducatrice en art.

SPANE: Threshold


Jaan Toomik Based in Tallinn, the capitol of Estonia, Jaan Toomik was born in 1961 in Tartu, Estonia. Since the early 1990s, when Estonia declared independence from the Soviet Union, Toomik has been exhibiting and performing throughout Europe. Toomik’s video installation marks his first one-person exhibition in the United States. His work is well known in Estonia, where he has exhibited at The Soros Center for Contemporary Arts; The Art Museum of Estonia; Gallery of Tallinn Art Hall; Vaal Gallery; and Tartu Artists’ House. His work has been included in group exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Helsinki; The Contemporary Art Centre of Vilnius, Lithuania; UNESCO Headquarters, Paris; and the Center for Contemporary Art, Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw. Toomik’s video installations have been included in SITE Santa Fe’s 1997 Bienial, the 1997 Venice Biennale, and the 1994 Biennial of Sao Paulo. Jaan Toomik est né à Tartu en Estonie en 1961 et réside maintenant dans la capitale estonienne, Tallinn. Toomik expose ses œuvres et ses performances en Europe depuis le début des années 1990, au moment où l’Estonie déclarait son indépendance à l’Union Soviétique. Alors que son travail est reconnu en Estonie, où il a exposé au Soros Center for Contemporary Arts, à l’Art Museum of Estonia, à la Galerie du Tallinn Art Hall, la Galeire Vaal et le Tartu Artists’ House, c’est la toute première fois qu’il présente une exposition solo en Amérique avec cette installation vidéo. Ses œuvres ont souvent fait partie d’expositions collectives, par exemple au Musée d’art contemporain d’Helsinki, le Contemporary Art Centre de Vilnius en Lituanie, le quartier général de l’UNESCO à Paris et le Center for Contemporary Art à Ujazdowski Castle, Varsovie. Les installations vidéo de Toomik ont été présentées à SITE, la Biennale de Santa Fe en 1997, la Biennale de Venise en 1997, et la Biennale de Sao Paulo en 1994.

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

25


2015 SPANE: Threshold

Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment © M:ST Performative Art Festival 223 12 Ave. S.W. Calgary Alberta T2R 0G9 Translators: Emilie Niquette, Frédérique Hamelin Design: Three Legged Dog Design ISBN: 978-0-9812154-3-3

SPANE: Threshold


Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment

27


SPANE: Threshold

Profile for M:ST Festival

SPANE: Threshold  

The fourth iteration of the Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment (SPANE) features a diverse mix of performance-based vide...

SPANE: Threshold  

The fourth iteration of the Screening of Performance Art in the Natural Environment (SPANE) features a diverse mix of performance-based vide...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded