M State Magazine Fall 2015

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FALL 2015

Focus on

Health Care Offering quality education online and on our campuses in:

Detroit Lakes

Fergus Falls

Moorhead

Wadena


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Regional Health Care Needs Drive New M State Programs

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College Responds to Critical Need for Nurses

Surgical Technology Degree Fills Gap as Hospitals Expand

A letter from the PRESIDENT Dear Friends and Alumni: Minnesota State Community and Technical College, with campuses in Detroit Lakes, Fergus Falls, Moorhead and Wadena, is still Realizing what we do well, Reconnecting with the needs of our stakeholders and Redesigning those areas that will help us to better achieve student/stakeholder success and organizational excellence. Two-year colleges are dynamic by nature; we must be in order to meet the changing needs of the regional workforce, our students and our communities. Faculty and staff are deeply committed to contributing to student and workplace success, teaching and learning quality, strengthening workforce strategies to better meet the needs of business and industry, working with external partners on common purposes, monitoring financial and enrollment viability, and continuously improving programs and processes. These remain the top M State priorities for 2015-16. Dr. Peggy D. Kennedy President

This biannual magazine describes the highlights of our efforts and contributions to our communities to date. I sincerely hope that you will enjoy the articles in this edition. They tell the stories of students who overcame barriers to complete their education and enter promising careers – primarily in our region. There are also stories about students who began their academic careers at M State and went on to excel at universities, along with news about businesses and organizations that support the college in so many ways. This edition features the regional health care industry and the creative ways we have partnered with companies to meet regional workforce needs. We are “taking the teaching and learning” to our communities, in addition to our traditional campus-based programs. You will learn, too, about the awards that have brought renewed recognition to the college, its faculty and staff, and our students.

On the cover: Students enrolled in M State’s health care programs include (leŌ to right) Sarah Dolan (Nursing), Jami Johnson (Nursing), Alyssa Kadrie (Dental Hygiene), Bobbie Carr (Nursing) and Corinth Booker (Nursing).

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We share these stories to highlight how profoundly M State impacts the communities in our region and beyond with the sincere hope that you will continue to support our efforts so that we may continue to accomplish our mission: To provide dynamic learning for living, working and serving. Enjoy! Sincerely,

Dr. Peggy D. Kennedy President

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

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‘Opportunities are Endless’ for Prairie Restoration Project

M State Spring Courses

What’s INSIDE 4 12 5 14 6 15 M State Plays Vital Role in Meeting Health Care Needs

Regional Health Care Needs Drive New M State Programs

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Surgical Technology Degree Fills Gap as Hospitals Expand HIT is ‘the Way to Go’ Online program makes new career possible

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‘A Blessing in Disguise’ Cancer diagnosis inspires Tangen’s career in medicine

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A World Away Nursing education continues in India

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Exploring Careers at Scrubs Camp

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Foundations Support M State Mission

A Dream Come True Hargan finds her calling in nursing M State on the Road to Redesigning Education

M State Delivers Innovation College Responds to Critical Need for Nurses

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Transportation Center on Track for Fall 2016 Opening ‘Opportunities are Endless’ for M State Prairie Restoration Project M State’s Petermann Named Educator of the Year

m a g a z i n e Career Preparation Volume 4, Issue 1

Transfer Education

College Administration Peggy D. Kennedy President

Carrie L. Brimhall

Vice President/Chief Academic Officer

Peter A. Wielinski

Vice President/Chief Student Development Officer

Jill Abbott

Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs

An M State Education Pays Off, Brookings Study Says

Dacia A. Johnson

M State Spring 2016 Courses

Chief Information Officer

Foundations Support M State Mission

Patrick A. Nordick

Congratulations, Fall 2015 Graduates! Friends, family, faculty and staff are invited to join our graduates as they celebrate their graduation from M State.

Workforce Development

Chief Human Resources Officer

Daniel L. Knudson Denise A. Laymon

Chief Development and Alumni Officer Chief Financial Officer

G.L. Tucker

Dean of Custom Training Services/ Business & Entrepreneurial Services

M State Magazine is the official magazine of Minnesota State Community and Techncial College. It is published by the college’s Communications and Marketing Department each spring and fall. Articles may be reproduced without permission if credit is given to the instituiton. Peter Wielinski

Vice President of Student Development Services and Marketing peter.wielinski@minnesota.edu

Tina Bartels

Magazine Art Director tina.bartels@minnesota.edu

Peg Kalar

2015 Fall Semester Commencement Ceremony All campuses: 1 p.m. Friday, December 18, on the campus of Concordia College, Moorhead

Magazine Editor peg.kalar@minnesota.edu

Minnesota State Community and Technical College is a member of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System.

M State Magazine | Fall 2015

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M State Plays Vital Role in Meeting Health Care Needs Health care may be the ideal career choice for those who feel a calling to care for others and improve the well-being of their communities while working in a secure, high-demand profession. For more than a half century, Minnesota State Community and Technical College has been educating health care workers for the region’s clinics, hospitals, dental offices, medical offices and long-term care facilities. The impact of M State’s health care programs is apparent at nearly any medical or health care facility in northwestern Minnesota and southeastern North Dakota, both among the medical staff who provide hands-on care and in administrative positions in the health care industry. “M State strives to be the premiere partner in health care education, offering programs to meet the region’s health care demands,” said Jennifer Jacobson, dean of health careers for M State’s campuses in Detroit Lakes, Fergus Falls, Moorhead and Wadena and for online programs offered through eCampus. “Our mission is to provide an exceptional education experience that prepares students for entry-level health care positions and for continuing their education for more advanced degrees in the health care field.” The health care industry plays a crucial role in the region’s economy, as well as in the health and well-being of its residents. More than 20,000 people work in health care in northwestern Minnesota, according to data compiled by the Minnesota

Department of Employment and Economic Development. DEED estimates that about 9 percent of Minnesota’s workforce, 250,000 people, are employed in health care and health care support, but an even higher percentage – about 10 percent – are employed in those jobs in northwestern Minnesota. Future prospects look bright for health care professionals, as well. DEED anticipates that 3,500 health care workers will be needed in northwestern Minnesota by 2022 to replace existing workers who retire or leave their jobs. Health care is also crucial to North Dakota, where health care and social assistance is the state’s second largest industry category. The North Dakota Labor Market Information Center projects a “bright outlook” for nurses, with job growth expected to be faster than average through 2022 with a “striking statewide shortage” of licensed practical nurses. Recent figures from the North Dakota Job Service estimate more than 17,000 people are employed in health care and social assistance in Cass County, which includes the city of Fargo, and long-term industry projections show an industry employment growth of nearly 23 percent from 2012-2022, Many of M State’s health care programs were created in response to industry needs, and all are supported by industry partners and advisory committees that work to ensure students are learning the skills that are desired by future employers.

M State Health Care Education Options

Biological Sciences

Dental Assisting Dental Hygiene

Dialysis Technician

Nursing

New in Fall 2016

Health Information Technology/Coding Mental Health Behavioral Aide II

Medical Laboratory Technology Phlebotomy Technician

Medical Office Careers Medical Administrative Assistant Medical Coding and Insurance Medical Office Assistant Medical Receptionist Medical Transcription

Health Information Technology Specialist

Pharmacy Technology

Radiologic Technology

Surgical Technology


Regional Health Care Needs

Drive New Programs

Needs in the regional health care community are the driving force behind several new programs at Minnesota State Community and Technical College.

Dialysis Technician Planning is underway for a 16-credit Dialysis Technician certificate program in response to a staffing shortage in the health care community, said M State Dean of Health Careers Jennifer Jacobson. Hemodialysis is a process that uses specialized equipment to remove waste from the blood of patients with renal failure and chronic kidney disease. The new program will train technicians to work under the supervision of registered nurses in providing care to patients in outpatient dialysis centers. “It’s a good stepping-stone into a nursing program,” Jacobson said, with students learning to provide direct care for dialysis patients and families and to operate and troubleshoot the equipment used during the procedure. “The program was requested by industry in the Fargo-Moorhead area, and we’re responding to that need. The need for these technicians is continuing to grow in every M State community.” Graduates of the program, which will be offered on the Moorhead campus beginning in the fall of 2016, will gain clinical experience as part of their studies.

Sue Abderholden, executive director of NAMI Minnesota, said the original legislation was introduced “to address a problem we saw in the children’s mental health system.” “We do have workforce shortages, especially in children’s mental health,” Abderholden said. “This (MHBA II certificate program) creates a nice pathway into the field, and it helps (mental health) providers by creating a pool of people who understand the basics and are ready to begin working with children and their families.” Behavioral aides work under the supervision of psychiatrists, psychologists and other mental health professionals to support skill-building services for children with mental illnesses.

Future programs M State has been exploring a third new health care program in a high-demand field, Cardiovascular Technology. The 60-credit Associate of Applied Science degree program would train technologists to work with medical professionals in caring for patients during cardiac catheterization procedures. Jacobson said the program could be offered as early as fall 2016. For more M State program information, visit minnesota.edu/ programs or call the M State Solution Center at 1-877-450-3322.

Mental Health Behavioral Aide II This 16-credit certificate, offered for the first time in the fall of 2015, was designed to fill a gap in the care provided to children with mental illnesses, according to Dr. Gary Henrickson, M State’s dean of academics. State lawmakers, interested in improved training for workers in the field of mental health, directed the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system to create a MHBA II certificate program during the 2013 legislative session. Henrickson said M State and Minneapolis Community and Technical College volunteered to take the lead in its development. The certificate, available through online courses, was developed with the collaboration of state mental health policy and provider representatives and advocates for individuals with mental illness, including the Minnesota chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

M State Magazine | Fall 2015

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College Responds to Critical Need for Nurses It’s been nearly 1½ years since Tammy Courtright had a licensed practical nurse apply for job at the Twin Valley Living Center. There are jobs open, just no applicants. And the dearth of LPN applicants is typical of rural nursing homes in the region. Courtright, the director of nursing at the 58-bed long-term care facility in Twin Valley, knows she and her colleagues are facing a crisis as a majority of their LPNs – who provide the backbone of medical care in long-term care facilities – approach retirement age and no one is available to fill their positions. Fearing a future calamity, Courtright looked to the past for a solution – to a time 25 years ago when she was a nursing assistant at the same facility and there was a similar shortage of LPNs. “We had a severe shortage of nurses in the area, and the administrator was going to send me to the nursing program at (Detroit Lakes Technical College),” she recalls. “But when I

M State Delivers Innovation When it comes to providing quality education, Minnesota State Community and Technical College can truly say it delivers. Next spring, about two dozen nursing assistants in the Twin Valley area will begin their practical nursing programs in a classroom at the Twin Valley Living Center, where many of them already work. By delivering the diploma program in Twin Valley, M State makes it possible for nursing assistants from longterm care facilities in Twin Valley and three nearby rural communities to continue to work while attending college. To accommodate their work schedules, the program will be taught part time over two years. Students in the practical nursing program on M State’s campuses in Detroit Lakes, Fergus Falls, Moorhead and Wadena attend full time for one year. The practical nursing courses will be taught by instructors from the M State nursing programs in Detroit Lakes and Wadena. The project already has sparked interest in other communities where there is a need for licensed practical nurses.

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Minnesota State Community and Technical College

found out I couldn’t work while I attended college full time, I couldn’t do it. I had a husband and five children at home.” So, rather than asking prospective nursing students to drive an hour to Detroit Lakes for classes and enroll full-time, the Detroit Lakes campus offered a practical nursing diploma satellite program part-time in Twin Valley. Courtright said she and about 25 other nursing assistants from nursing homes in Twin Valley and nearby communities enrolled and earned their practical nursing degrees in that program. Three of the LPNs still on the Twin Valley Living Center staff were her classmates there, and Courtright herself went on to become a registered nurse. “The beauty of the program was that we all had a vested interest in it,” she says. “The nursing homes needed LPNs, and we wanted to further our education and be able to work.” Fast forward 25 years, and northwestern Minnesota’s rural communities are again facing a shortage of LPNs. Once again, Courtright says, her nursing home employs aides who want to advance their careers, but circumstances make it impossible to enroll full-time at a college an hour or more from their homes. “I thought, I’m going to go out on a limb and present this to M State,” she says. “I knew it would work, because it worked so well back then.” As result of Courtright’s advocacy, about two dozen nursing assistants who already work at long-term care facilities will have the opportunity to begin their practical nursing studies part-time in January in a building owned by the Twin Valley Living Center. Eight of Courtright’s 32 nursing assistants are enrolling in the M State program, along with others from nearby facilities in Ada, Ulen and Halstad. “I encouraged as many of my employees as I could, because I feel everyone is entitled to an education,” she says. “They’re very excited, and we’re very excited and very grateful for M State to take on this project with us.” The nursing assistants recruited by Tammy Courtright (far right) for the prac cal nursing program at M State’s Twin Valley site include, le to right, Kelsey Dalby, Anne e Thorson, Samantha Steele, Marina Daigh, Bethany Bennefeld and Katrina Schultz.


Surgical Technology Degree Fills Gap as Hospitals Expand

Fascinating. That’s the word Angie Stevenson uses to describe her work as a certified surgical technologist. “There is not a day that goes by that you do not see something that’s fascinating,” says Stevenson, who has been a surgical technologist for 25 years and now directs the new Surgical Technology program at Minnesota State Community and Technical College. The 60-credit AAS degree program was offered for the first time this past spring on the college’s Moorhead campus. The impetus came from Fargo-Moorhead’s health care industry, which faces a shortage of surgical technologists as new hospitals open in the F-M area, including a Sanford Health facility scheduled to open in 2017 in West Fargo.

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It’s not just, ‘This is a clamp and this is how you hand it to the surgeon.’ We want students to understand the surgical steps for all specialty areas.” Angie Stevenson M State Surgical Technology Director

“In surgery, you cannot do a procedure without a surgical technician,” says Stacy Lund, director of surgical services at Sanford Health and a member of the advisory board for M State’s Surgical Technology program. “As we try to grow and serve our population, we do see a shortage of surgical technicians. We’re very excited about the program, and we’ll take our first M State clinical students this fall.” Stevenson, who is also a registered nurse, says people often wonder about the difference between a nurse and a surgical technologist. While there are nurses present in an operating room during surgery, she says, it’s the surgical technologist whose primary role is to assist the surgeon. “Surgical technologists are specifically trained to work in operating rooms in hospitals, trauma centers, surgical centers and family birthing centers,” Stevenson says. “They’re trained to anticipate the needs of the surgeon in any procedure.”

M State’s Surgical Technology classroom is a mock operating room, with some equipment donated by Sanford Heath and HERO (Health Equipment Recycling Organization). The program is currently going through the accreditation process and is on track for accreditation in March 2016. Prior to graduation, Stevenson’s students will spend a semester working in operating rooms under the supervision of practicing surgical technologists. In addition to Sanford, M State’s Surgical Technology students will do their clinical studies at Essentia Health and the Fargo Veteran’s Administration hospital. Stevenson herself currently works at several hospitals in the Fargo area. “I consider myself privileged to be able to work in the industry,” Stevenson says. “That’s very, very important to me so I can remain current in my teaching practices.”

“We cover all the surgical specialty areas, from plastic surgery all the way to brain surgery. It’s not just, ‘This is a clamp and this is how you hand it to the surgeon.’ We want students to understand the surgical steps for all specialty areas.”

M SSt State tat a e Ma Maga Magazine ga azin zine zi ne | F Fall a l 20 al 2015 2015 5

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HIT is ‘the Way

to Go’

Online program makes new career possible

Alyssa Maksimenko eCampus 2012-2014

Alyssa Maksimenko already had two degrees but was looking for a career when she enrolled online at Minnesota State Community and Technical College. She earned her first degree, an AA from Cambridge Community College, after attending college classes as a high school junior and senior. She then earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education with minors in health and coaching from St. Cloud State University in 2000. While attending SCSU, Maksimenko also began but didn’t complete an online program for medical transcription – something she long regretted. Following graduation from SCSU, Maksimenko was the education director at Boys and Girls Club in Elk River, then became licensed as a nail technician. While working as a manicurist, she was recruited by one of her clients – a regional manager for Target – for a human resources job with the company. A few years into the job, she realized she wasn’t interested in getting on the company’s management track, though, so Maksimenko accepted a job at the Sherburne County Jail.

She was working there when her two daughters were born, but “scheduling wasn’t conducive to the family life my husband and I wanted,” Maksimenko says, “and that’s when I made the move to go back to school.” Her sister works in health care, so Maksimenko quizzed her about career opportunities, and her sister talked to her colleagues. Their advice was that “a degree in health information technology is the way to go.” “I wanted a program that was completely online, as I was a mom and working part-time and didn’t have much time to travel to attend classes at a campus,” says Maksimenko, who lives in Becker. “One of the other reasons I chose this field is that there are so many directions you can take, and there are a lot of work-from-home positions that would be great for my family’s needs.” Maksimenko’s research led her to M State in the fall of 2012; she took classes online and worked part-time during the evening when her husband, Nick, could be home with daughters Myka and Macy, now 5 and 4. Health information technology focuses on health information management, which is a combination of health care and information technology. Job growth in the field has been spurred in part by the health care industry’s conversion to electronic health records. Maksimenko worked at Buffalo Clinic, a private physicianowned clinic in Buffalo, as part of the required practical experience for M State’s HIT degree. She was hired by the clinic and then promoted to an insurance specialist position before she even graduated. She’s enjoying the job, but more college still may be in her future. “M State has the best teachers,” Maksimenko says. “They’re understanding, and they realize that life happens. It’s not just black and white, especially with the nontraditional students. That’s why I like community colleges – they don’t lose that personal touch. “In fact, I hope to someday be one of those teachers. That’s one of my goals.”

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Minnesota State Community and Technical College


‘A Blessing in Disguise’

Cancer diagnosis inspires Tangen’s career in medicine

spent growing up in the small southeastern Minnesota town of Grand Meadow. “What stands out was the personal connection – the communication between the students and the teachers was wonderful,” he says. “They cared about you as a person and a student, and they wanted you to be successful not just in the program but afterward. “I grew up in a small town and, to me, M State has that same small town feeling. Everybody knows who you are, and everybody is there to help.” After graduating from M State in 2009, Tangen worked as a registered nurse in Wheaton for a year, then in the critical care unit at St. Luke’s Hospital in Duluth until 2011, when he joined the staff in the cardiac intensive care unit at Sanford Medical Center in Fargo. Tangen, who’s now married to a nurse in Wheaton, returned to college in May 2014 in the nurse anesthetist program at St. Mary’s University in Minneapolis and will graduate with his master’s degree in August 2016. He enjoyed the challenge of working with cardiac patients, but Tangen says he was inspired to become a nurse anesthetist by his own “whirlwind” experiences after his cancer diagnosis. The tumor was diagnosed on a Friday, he met with a specialist late in the day Monday and his surgery was at 8 a.m. Tuesday.

Craig Tangen

Fergus Falls Campus 2007-2009 Craig Tangen was working for Pheasants Forever in central North Dakota when a cancer diagnosis sent his life in an unexpected direction.

“The nurse anesthetist was excellent and must have been able to sense my trepidation and was able to calm me down,” he recalls. “This person had such an impact on that time in my life. “Maybe me having cancer and going through that was a blessing in disguise. We never really know how things are going to work out … but sometimes things that seem awful change your life for the better.”

He’d graduated from North Dakota State University with a zoology degree in December ember 2002, and the diagnosis of testicular cancer came in September of the next year. The experience – including surgeryy and subsequent radiation – sparked his interest in a medical career. “It just got to the point where I thought, if I don’t do it now, I’m never going to do it,” says ys Tangen, who enrolled in 2007 in the Advanced Degree Nursing ng program on the Fergus Falls campus of Minnesota State Community mmunity and Technical College. Tangen, now 35, compares ares his years at M State to the years he

M St SState tate t M Magazine agazine i |F Fall all 20 2015 015

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A World Away

Nursing education continues in India Rhea Neuberger

Moorhead Campus 2010-2012 A nurse who began her education at Minnesota State Community and Technical College continued her learning this year more than 8,000 miles away from the Moorhead campus, in Bangalore, India. Rhea Neuberger, a native of Colorado Springs, Colo., and a 2012 M State graduate, said she and four fellow students opted to do their nursing practicum in Bangalore when that option was offered by North Dakota State University.

All were enrolled in the LPN to BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) program at NDSU in Fargo. Like Neuberger, three of the four earned their practical nursing degrees at M State in Moorhead before continuing their nursing education at NDSU. Accompanied by two NDSU nursing faculty members, Neuberger said she and her four classmates spent about a month in the teaching hospital at Ramaiah University and making home health care visits. While they saw many similarities in health care in India and the United States, Neuberger says, there were also notable differences. It wasn’t uncommon to see adults with large growths or tumors that, if they lived in the United States, would have been reth moved when they were small children. And even though health mo care might be free, Neuberger says, it is still inaccessible for rucar ral villagers who don’t have transportation and cannot walk 25 miles to the nearest clinic. mi She was impressed, though, with the tradition of involving famSh ilies in the care provided to patients. ilie “I absolutely loved that, when people were in the hospital, the family was there to help care for them and feed them,” she says. fam “When the patient was getting ready to leave, they’d teach the “W whole family how to take care of the patient. It really struck me, wh and I’ve taken it to heart about involving the whole family.” an Ne Neuberger earned her BSN in an online program, so she and her NDSU classmates didn’t develop the same camaraderie enhe joyed by M State nursing students, but she now shares “great joy friendships” with her fellow travelers – none of whom knew fri each other before the India trip. eac She plans to continue her education and earn a doctorate at Sh NDSU with a focus on women’s studies. ND

ow red wit h fe ll u t ic p ) ft le ity’s d fro m e rg e r (s e co n a ia h U n ive rs m a R t a n R h ea N e u b re il d e nt s a n d ch n u rs in g st u d l. s p it a t ea chin g h o 10

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

“I am so grateful that I started at M State,” she says. “I learned so much, and it really prepared me to become an RN. We really had an amazing time.” ha


Exploring Careers at

C A M P How are your organs affected when you suffer a heart attack? What happens when you go into shock? What do your vital signs mean? Nearly 30 teenagers clad in blue scrubs learned the answers to these questions and more during the first-ever Scrubs Camp on the Fergus Falls campus of Minnesota State Community and Technical College in June.

‘‘

My son talked about it the entire ride home! He wants to ... be a nurse, and this camp really gave him enthusiasm about what a career in nursing can be for him. It was so good to hear him excited about the possibilities.” Parent of a Scrubs Camp participant

The three-day residential camp was one of nine in the state last summer – and the only one outside the Twin Cities area – cosponsored by HealthForce Minnesota and local health care employers to allow high school students to explore careers in health sciences.

Students explored medical careers through hands-on activities and treks into health care facilities in the community. On campus, they took part in stations covering emergency medical services, blood sampling, nursing, speech therapy and biology, all led by health care professionals and instructors in M State’s health care programs. Organizers plan to offer Scrubs Camp again on the Fergus Falls campus during the summer of 2016. For more information, contact M State at 877.450.3322.

“It was exciting to see the light bulbs go on for our Scrubs participants when they could talk and interact with health care providers,” said M State Director of Student Development Services Nancy South. “They learned not only what skills and training were needed for various careers but also the tasks performed on a daily basis.”

M State Magazine | Fall 2015

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A Dream Come True Hargan finds her calling in nursing

Betty Gundersen Hargan

Fergus Falls Campus 1992-1995 Betty Gundersen Hargan’s career has taken some interesting eresting ngg twists, but she never strayed from her dream of being a nu nurse. urse rsse. e. “Ever since I can remember as a young girl, I wanted to be a nurse like my mom,” she recalls. us Fa F allls So after she graduated from Hillcrest Academy in Fergus Falls bt – she in 1992 – and with an eye toward avoiding student debt gistered enrolled first in the practical nursing and then the registered nursing program on Minnesota State Community and Technical College’s campus in Fergus Falls. “My plan was always to attend college in Fergus Falls and live at hom me with home my parents to save some money,” m says Hargan, who gra aduated graduated from M State’s RN program gram in 1995 and enrolled that fall in thee Bachelor th Ba of Science Nursin ng pr prog o ram at Minnesota ing program SSt tate Un U ivver e sity Moorhead. State University Tw wo years year ye ars later, ar l teer, la r bachelor’s deTwo ggree gr ree eeee iin n hand, h nd ha d, she s e began work sh o her on her e master’s mast aasster’ r s de egr g ee at the degree Uni Un iver versity i of Mi Minn nnesota. University Minnesota. “I feltt ve very ry p r pa re p red when prepared I began be my my BSN BSN N after aft fter er leaving M State, State,” ,” Ha H Hargan rgan say says. ys. “In all I went str straight rai aigh ght thr through roug ugh h se seve seven v n years of colle college ege and w would ou uld d d doo it the same w way ay aallll ov over ver ag ve again. gaiin n.. I always worked d ful fullll time during my college yea arss in in a variety vari va riet etyy of nursing years job bs to gain eexperience xperrieence aand nd jobs

pay fo or school along the way. When I look back on these years, for I neve er have had any regrets about following my dream to benever come a nurse.” Harga Hargan began her career as a medical/surgical nurse, but an MSUM course piqued her interest in medical research. She worke worked as a clinical research nurse coordinator while she was completing her master’s degree, a job she said “opened many compl doors for my career including compliance and project management.” ment. In all, she spent more than a decade in research – three years doing clinical research for hepatitis C, a liver disease, and eight years iin cardiology research. Family eventually drew Hargan and her husband from the Twin Cities to Jackson in southwest Minnesota, and for the past three years sshe has worked as the infection preventionist and quality improvement specialist for Lakes Regional Healthcare in Spirit impro Lake, Iowa. In that role, she educates hospital employees about infecti infection prevention and helps develop policies and procedures to me meet infection control standards. The qquality improvement facet of her job includes patient satisfacti isfaction and the development and implementation of quality impro improvement activities for all departments. The move from the Minneapolis area to a small town was “qui “quite a change, but we love it, and it is a perfect place to raise our ttwo children,” she says. “I feel very blessed in every way!”

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Minnesota State Community and Technical College


M STATE SUCCESS STORY BEGINS HERE

Start your college career at M State and you can go anywhere. Our tuiƟon is aīordable, and small class sizes oīer e excepƟonal experiences. Take advantage of all our student life acƟviƟes, including athleƟcs and Įne arts. ee At M State you can earn a transfer degree e plan to save money on your four-year degree reer or enroll in one of our more than 70 career d programs to land a great job. Come and check us out.

Arrange a visit today

Yearly tuition and fees total $5,361 $5 361 at M State (compared to $8,094 at a state university or $35,464 at a for-proĮt college).

at minnesota.edu/visit. We look forward to showing you all we have to oīer!

Our Spartan Centers get students the support they need to succeed, Įnd employment or transfer to a four-year insƟtuƟon.

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eCampus

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PROGRAMS OF STUDY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

AccounƟng AdministraƟve Assistant AdministraƟve Support American Sign Language Architectural DraŌing Associate of Arts (AA) AutomoƟve Service Technology Biological Sciences Business Business AdministraƟon Business Entrepreneurship Business Management MarkeƟng and Sales Carpentry Chemistry Child Care And EducaƟon Cisco Networking Civil Engineering Technology Commercial RefrigeraƟon Computer Programming ConstrucƟon Management Cosmetology Criminal JusƟce Culinary Arts Dental AssisƟng Dental Hygiene Diesel Equipment Technology DraŌing and 3D Technologies Early Childhood and Paraprofessional EducaƟon Electrical Line Worker Technology Electrical Technology Engineering Environmental Science Equine Science EstheƟst Fire Service PreparaƟon Gas UƟlity ConstrucƟon and Service General EducaƟon Golf Management Graphic Design Technology Health InformaƟon Technology Specialist Health InformaƟon Technology/Coding HeaƟng, VenƟlaƟon and Air CondiƟoning/ RefrigeraƟon • Human Resources • Individualized Studies • Industrial Workplace and Industrial Electric • InformaƟon Technology • Liberal Arts and Sciences • Management InformaƟon Systems • Manicurist • Marine Engine Technology • Massage Therapy • Medical AdministraƟve Assistant • Medical Coding and Insurance • Medical Laboratory Technician • Medical Oĸce Assistant • Medical RecepƟonist • Medical TranscripƟon • Mental Health Behavioral Aide II • Music • Network AdministraƟon and Security • Network Security • Nursing • Paralegal • Payroll Specialist • Pharmacy Technology • Phlebotomy Technician • PowerSports Technology • Radiologic Technology • Sign Language Interpreter PreparaƟon • Social Science • Surgical Technology • Survey Technician • Theatre Arts • University Transfer • Virtual Oĸce Professional • Visual Art • Voice and Video Over Internet Protocol M•State | Fall 2015 13 WebMagazine Development


M State on the Road to Redesigning Education Mobile welding trailer wins innovation award Minnesota State Community and Technical College’s efforts to redesign education were recognized this summer with a Minnesota 2015 State Government Innovation Award. The college’s mobile welding trailer was one of three top winners of the innovation awards, announced in July at a luncheon hosted by the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs and sponsored by the Bush Foundation. “The mobile welding trailer redefines education, as we’re trying to take education to the student,” said G.L. Tucker, director of M State’s Custom Training Services. More than 280 men and women have been trained in the college’s welding trailer since it went on the road in May 2013. CTS developed the trailer to meet industry training needs in the college’s 19-county region and to provide education to workers who were unable to enroll in on-campus or creditbased courses. The college has partnered with workforce centers, state agencies, businesses and high schools to provide the training, which generally is free to the students. The trailer, a converted refrigerated semi-trailer, houses 12 training stations where instructor Josh Heibel teaches welding skills in sessions that range from 16 to 160 hours.

14

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

“We really feel this is invaluable for businesses,” Tucker said. “It has probably exceeded our expectations as far as demand. At the same time, students are able to get jobs and careers in welding. By all measures we would say this has been very successful for us and for the students we serve.” Given the success of the CTS welding trailer, M State is using grant funds to develop three additional mobile trailers to provide training related to commercial driver’s licenses, industrial/ construction workplace safety and precision measurement/ manufacturing. View a welding trailer video at https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=m8e5ZwZRsfA.


Transportation Center

on Track for Fall 2016 Opening New building reflects changing industry needs

Work is on schedule for the $7 million Transportation Center under construction on Minnesota State Community and Technical College’s Moorhead campus, with classes set to begin in the center in the fall of 2016. With the completion of the center, students in both the Diesel Equipment Technology and Automotive Service Technology programs will be learning in state-of-the-art facilities – diesel students in a 23,000-square-foot addition and automotive students in a renovated space that includes part of the former diesel labs. M State broke ground in the spring of 2015 for the project, which was funded by the 2014 Minnesota Legislature. “Our weather really has been cooperating,” said college Facilities Director Matt Sheppard, adding that the building’s exterior should be largely completed over the winter. The incorporation of technology and the increasing size of modern equipment are changing the needs in the transporta-

tion programs. The new facility will include larger bay doors that provide more natural light, additional space for students, a more powerful overhead hoist system and improved air handling and circulation systems, according to Academic Dean Dllona Clendenen. Both the new and renovated space also will include more and better access to computerized diagnostic machinery and digital displays. “The new Transportation Center will provide both the space and the equipment needed in today’s transportation programs,” Clendenen said. “There will be more hoists to improve efficiencies in training and less down time for the students. With more space, Automotive Service can better accommodate their students, Diesel Technology can expand and students in both programs will have additional space to work and learn.” The new center will provide state-of-the-art learning sites for a total of 60 first- and second-year automotive students and for 88 first- and second-year diesel students.

M State Magazine | Spring 2015

15


‘Opportunities are Endless’

for Prairie Restoration Project

There are big plans in the works for a little-used tract of land on the north side of the Fergus Falls campus of Minnesota State Community and Technical College. College officials are working with community partners on a prairie restoration project that will convert 45 acres of campus land into outdoor learning spaces and community walking trails. The land – now largely unused, aside from the annual hay crop that’s cut by a local farmer – will be restored to prairie flowers, grasses and wildlife habitat. The tract includes five wetlands. M State biology instructor Matt Borcherding said the project was discussed about three years ago with officials from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, then was revived earlier this year. While Borcherding and his fellow M State science instructors occasionally use the land for water and soil testing by students, the project envisions a much broader use. “Academically having 45 acres of restored prairie on a college campus is unheard of,” Borcherding said. “The opportunities are endless from a course perspective. We could expand the use of the land from water and soil testing to long-term longitudinal plant community studies, wildlife studies and other ecological interactions. Any academic discipline could find ways

16

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

to use the restored space, from history to sociology.” He said South Dakota State University has expressed interest in partnering with M State to develop a wildlife management program, “and the restored prairie would be a natural fit.” M State’s partners in the project include the USFWS and its Prairie Wetlands Learning Center, Otter Tail County Soil and Water Conservation District and the Fergus Falls campus foundation.

‘‘

There are certain pieces of ground in this country where we shouldn’t be growing corn and soybeans. Anybody who lives in this country should understand what it looked like long ago.” Fergus Falls farmer Rick Drevlow

One of the supporters at the FWS is Dave Ellis, who is now an instructional systems specialist with the federal agency but previously taught fourth grade in Fergus Falls and led efforts


to create the Prairie Wetlands Learning Center in Fergus Falls. “This has the potential to transform higher education,” Ellis said. “There are places around the country that do use the outdoors, but there’s nothing like this within the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system. M State can use the space it already has, and for $8,000 they can have an outdoor classroom that’s not only good for the mind but for the spirit.” Fergus Area College Foundation is currently in the midst of a campaign to raise just over $8,000 for the project. “This project fits perfectly into our mission. We are here to provide resources to enrich learning, living, working and serving,” said Lori Larson, FACF executive director. “This will mean unique opportunities for students attending M State’s Fergus Falls campus. We have seen this concept shine for younger students at the PWLC. What a testament to M State and the people of the Fergus Falls area that we’re able to provide this opportunity at the college level.” Rick Drevlow is a retired Fergus Falls agricultural banker and former FACF board member who recalls long-ago conversations about the possibility of restoring the college land to preserve the

area’s prairie heritage. He’s also a farmer and provided some technical assistance recently during the project’s planning phase. “There are certain pieces of ground in this country where we shouldn’t be growing corn and soybeans,” said Drevlow, who now grazes 70-80 head of cows. “Anybody who lives in this country should understand what it looked like long ago. It’s sure going to be fun to see a good stand of prairie grass out there.” The land was sprayed with herbicide this fall to kill the existing plants. Soybeans will be planted in the spring to increase the nitrogen content of the soil and, in the spring of 2017, a prairie seed mix of native forbs, grasses and wildflowers will be planted on all 45 acres. Dr. Carrie Brimhall, M State’s vice president of academics, said the college has been focused on ways to bring the community to the college and the college to the community. “We are so fortunate to have a large and beautiful piece of property in the middle of Fergus Falls,” Brimhall said. “Restoring our land and making it useable for community members is an exciting development for the college.”

SStudents St tud ude in MaƩ Borcherding’s Environmental Science course collected water from a slough on the campus prairie and did water quality tesƟng in a campus lab.

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17 17


M State’s Petermann Named Educator of the Year Microbiology instructor Shana Petermann isn’t happy if her students simply memorize facts about microbes, bacteria and viruses. She wants them to enjoy learning. For her enthusiasm and dedication to her students, Petermann Shana Petermann was named a 2015 Educator of the Biological Sciences Year for Excellence in Teaching, the highest teaching honor awarded by the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system. The award was announced in April. Petermann began teaching in the Biological Sciences program on Minnesota State Community and Technical College’s Moorhead campus in 2002. “For the time that the students and I are together, they get all of me. They know there is no place I’d rather be, or nothing I’d rather do, than serve as their tour guide into the amazing world of microbiology,” Petermann says. “It’s my mission to ensure that they gain the content, hone their critical thinking skills and have fun doing it. I hope each student leaves our class

feeling valued, confident in their abilities and looking forward to the rest of their story.” Prior to joining M State, Petermann served as a teaching assistant and microbiologist at North Dakota State University. She has a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in microbiology and is pursuing her Ph.D. at NDSU in molecular pathogenesis, which is the study of microbes and the mechanisms that allow them to interact with their hosts and initiate the disease process. M State’s James Bainer, an instructor in the Diesel Equipment Technology program on the Moorhead campus, also was recognized by MnSCU as an Outstanding Educator for 2014-15 and was a candidate for Educator of the Year. M State’s Paul Carney, an English instructor and director of M State’s up2U program, was a 2012 MnSCU Educator of the Year, and previous Outstanding Educators include M State’s Roberta Freeman, Loren Haagenson, Nandini Banerji, Teresa Beacom, Nancy Stigen, Bill Evans and Dixie Fjeld. The MnSCU Board of Trustees Excellence in Teaching awards program recognizes professional accomplishments and encourages ongoing pursuit of excellence among faculty at its 31 twoyear and four-year colleges and universities.

An M

State Education Pays Off, Brookings Study Says How do graduates of Minnesota State Community and Technical College fare financially in their careers? Very well, according to a national study that considered the “value-added” by degrees from two- and four-year colleges nationwide. M State ranked in the top 10 of two-year colleges with the best return on investment in the first-of-its-kind study released earlier this year by Brookings Institution, a Washington, D.C., think tank. Another Minnesota college, Carleton College in Northfield, was ranked in the top 10 among the nation’s four-year institutions. The study indicated that graduates of M State earn more than most of their peers from similar colleges, based on salary and other data from government and private sources. At mid-career, according to the report, M State graduates earned on average $59,900, or 13 percent more than similar graduates of comparable colleges. The study measured the income graduates earn, the occupations in which they work and their loan repayment rates. M State President Peggy Kennedy called the report “welcome

18

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

M State graduates rank in the top 10 nationally among twoyear college graduates for midcareer earnings, according to a 2015 Brookings Institute study.

good news” for M State students and the college’s faculty and staff. “We work hard to ensure all our students are successful, and it’s gratifying to have our efforts and the accomplishments of our graduates recognized,” she said. The authors of the 2015 study wrote that value-added, as defined in the report, reflects both measurable aspects of college quality such as graduation rates and the market value of the skills it teaches, along with “unmeasurable ‘x factors,’ like exceptional leadership or teaching, that contribute to student success.” The full Brookings Institution report, Beyond College Rankings, is available at brookings.edu.


LEARN MORE.

PAY LESS! M State’s options make college possible Minnesota State Community and Technical College helps make college possible with many programs that lower the cost of earning a degree.

In addition, special scholarships and programs make attending M State even more affordable.

Our tuiƟon already is an excepƟonal value. TuiƟon for M State students has been frozen since 2013, and it will decrease by 1 percent for the 2016-17 academic year at M State and the other colleges within the Minnesota State Colleges and UniversiƟes system.

Check out these opportuniƟes, and remember that the Įrst step in geƫng Įnancial assistance through most scholarships and grants is Įlling out the Free ApplicaƟon for Federal Student Aid at fafsa.ed.gov. (M State’s FAFSA Code is 005541.) You must complete the FAFSA in order to demonstrate Įnancial need, which is required for many grants and scholarships.

$32,1 08 The Most Affordable Option* Average annual tuiƟon and fees for full-Ɵme students (before scholarships and grants)

$16,0 78

$12,74 4 $7,99 9

Four-Year Institutions Private Non-ProĮt Colleges and UniversiƟes

University of Minnesota

$5,36 1

Two-Year Institutions Minnesota State UniversiƟes

Private For-ProĮt Colleges and UniversiƟes

M State 19

* Data from 2015-16 Guide to Minnesota State Colleges and UniversiƟes

M State Magazine | Fall 2015


Alliss Grant The Alliss Two-Year Opportunity Grant is available to students who have Įnancial need and are enrolled in AA, AS, AAS, AFA, diploma, cerƟĮcate and Minnesota Transfer Curriculum courses designed to transfer to baccalaureate programs. Students who enroll at M State are automaƟcally considered for the Alliss Grant as part of the Įnancial aid award process; qualiĮed students will be contacted and asked to complete an applicaƟon. Awards range from $350 to $1,100 per year and may be renewable. Students who already earned a baccalaureate degree are not eligible.

PSEO The Post-Secondary Enrollment OpƟons program allows high school students to take college courses (taught by college or university faculty members) on a college campus or online. TuiƟon and the cost of textbooks are paid by the school district. Students who parƟcipate in PSEO for their last two years of high school and complete the required number of credits are able to graduate concurrently from high school and M State with an associate degree. To be eligible, high school juniors and seniors must meet minimum academic criteria. If you are interested in PSEO, talk to your high school guidance counselor and college admissions staī to determine if you qualify and learn the speciĮc deadlines for enrollment. It is not necessary to demonstrate Įnancial need in order to qualify for PSEO. minnesota.edu/pseo

for degreeseeking students

20

save while in high school

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

Foundation Scholarships

Tuition Match

M State awards numerous scholarships through its four campus foundaƟons, which are dedicated to making college aīordable for qualifying students. Thanks to the generosity of M State’s supporters and alumni, our foundaƟons are able to award over 200 scholarships totaling more than $200,000 each year.

Students on the Moorhead campus may be able to parƟcipate in the tuiƟon savings program TuiƟonMatch – MN.

For more informaƟon, contact z

Denise Laymon, Chief Development and Alumni Oĸcer Detroit Lakes Area College FoundaƟon and Wadena Area College FoundaƟon, 218.846.3720 or 218.631.7931 z Lori Larson, ExecuƟve Director Fergus Area College FoundaƟon, 218.736.1514 z Mark Altenburg, Director of Advancement Moorhead Community and Technical College FoundaƟon, 218.299.6826 minnesota.edu/foundaƟons

funded by campus foundations

Students eligible for the program can set aside up to $960 in a special savings account (either making a one-Ɵme deposit or deposiƟng $40 a month for 24 months). That money is then matched 3:1, so parƟcipaƟng students receive up to $3,840 toward their postsecondary educaƟon. ParƟcipaƟng students also receive – at no cost – 12 hours of Įnancial literacy training in their Įrst semester and 10 hours of career counseling in their second semester. Both are oīered through D2L Brightspace. For more informaƟon, contact Mark Altenburg, at mark.altenburg@ minnesota.edu.

dollarfor-dollar match

These special scholarships and programs make attending M State even more affordable.


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Business Sponsorships

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M State Magazine | Spring 2015

21


M State 2016 Spring Courses Accounting ____________________________________________________________ ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT ACCT

1012 1101 1108 1120 1124 2201 2202 2203 2211 2212 2213 2215 2216 2255 2622 2630 2640 2800

Prin of Bookkeeping ................................................... 3 Payroll ....................................................................... 3 Business Math/Calculat .............................................. 3 Business Law .............................................................. 3 Spreadsheet Applicatio ............................................... 3 Fin Accounting I Lab ................................................... 1 Fin Accounting II Lab .................................................. 1 Managerial Accounting Lab ........................................ 1 Fin Accounting I ......................................................... 3 Fin Accounting II ........................................................ 3 Managerial Accounting............................................... 3 Computerized Acct App .............................................. 3 QuickBooks ............................................................... 3 Income Tax-Individual ................................................. 3 Intermediate Acct II ..................................................... 4 Fund/Nonprofit Acct ................................................... 3 Accounting Internship ..............................................1-4 ACAT Review.............................................................. 3

Administrative Management Technology ____________________________________________________________ ADMT

2600

Trends in Office Tech .................................................. 3

Administrative Support ____________________________________________________________ ADMS ADMS ADMS ADMS ADMS ADMS ADMS ADMS ADMS ADMS

1100 1104 1110 1116 1128 2124 2205 2212 2216 2240

Keyboarding I ............................................................ 3 Skillbuilding ............................................................... 1 Word Processing ........................................................ 3 Business Comm I........................................................ 3 Records/Database Mgmtm .......................................... 3 Computer Technology In ............................................. 3 Adv Word Processing .................................................. 1 Integrated Software Ap................................................ 3 Business Comm II ....................................................... 3 Internship .................................................................. 3

Agriculture ____________________________________________________________ AGRI

1400

Farm Marketing & Mgmt ............................................. 3

American Sign Language ____________________________________________________________ ASL ASL

1113 1114

ASL & Deaf Cult III...................................................... 4 ASL & Deaf Cult IV ..................................................... 4

Anthropology ____________________________________________________________ ANTH

1100

Anthropology ............................................................. 3

Architectural Technology ____________________________________________________________ ARCH ARCH ARCH ARCH ARCH ARCH ARCH ARCH

1122 1126 2218 2220 2232 2244 2248 2250

CADD for Arch........................................................... 4 Residential Project I..................................................... 3 Architectural Internsh .................................................. 3 Spec Writing for Const ................................................ 3 Civil & Structural Int .................................................... 3 Commercial Projects ................................................... 4 CADD Alternatives...................................................... 3 Project Administration ................................................. 2

Art ____________________________________________________________ ART ART

22

1108 1110

Foundations of Art, 3-................................................. 3 Intro to Art ................................................................. 3

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

ART ART ART ART ART ART ART ART

1111 1112 1122 1140 1141 2241 2260 2999

Drawing I .................................................................. 3 Painting I ................................................................... 3 World of Art II ............................................................ 3 Handbuilt Ceramics.................................................... 3 Ceramics I ................................................................. 3 Adv Ceramics ............................................................ 3 Art, Portfolio Design.................................................... 1 Art Capstone Exhibitio ................................................ 1

Auto Body Collision Technology ____________________________________________________________ ABCT ABCT ABCT ABCT

2210 2212 2214 2216

Collision Damage Repai ............................................. 5 Mechanical Components ............................................ 2 Major Collision Lab II ................................................. 5 Spot Repair & Paint Bl ................................................. 2

Automotive Service Technology ____________________________________________________________ AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST AMST

1102 1105 1109 1111 1114 1116 1122 1126 1132 1136 2206 2209 2218 2233 2237 2240 2292

Alignment & Suspension.............................................. 3 Brakes I ..................................................................... 3 Starting & Charging.................................................... 3 Automotive Electronics ................................................ 3 Basic Maintenance Serv .............................................. 1 General Automotive Srv .............................................. 5 Engines I ................................................................... 3 Engines II................................................................... 3 Drive Trains I .............................................................. 3 Drive Trains II ............................................................. 3 Body Elec/Mech I ....................................................... 3 Body Elec/Mechanical I .............................................. 3 Elec Powertrain Cntrl .................................................. 3 Auto Transmission I..................................................... 3 Auto Transmission II .................................................... 3 Heating Ventilation A/................................................. 3 Internship .................................................................. 1

Biological Sciences ____________________________________________________________ BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL BIOL

1104 1107 1108 1123 1125 1152 2202 2220 2240 2260 2261 2262 2263 2265 2267 2268 2970

Human Concerns ....................................................... 3 Env Science Issues ...................................................... 3 Env Science Issues Lab ................................................ 1 Gen Biology II ............................................................ 4 Immunology .............................................................. 2 Food Science ............................................................. 3 Principles of Nutritio ................................................... 3 General Microbiology................................................. 4 Genetics .................................................................... 4 Human A & P I (lecture ............................................... 3 Human A & P I Lab ..................................................... 1 Human A & P II Lecture ............................................... 3 Human A & P II Lab .................................................... 1 Diagnostic Microbiolog............................................... 4 Med Microbiology Lectu.............................................. 3 Med Microbiology Lab ................................................ 1 Internship Experience ...............................................1-3

Business Management ____________________________________________________________ BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS BUS

1120 1146 1300 2150 2202 2204 2206

Sp’sheet/Database Cncp............................................. 3 Personal Finance ........................................................ 3 Fin Statement Analysis................................................. 3 Legal Environment of B ............................................... 3 Mgmt Info Systms ....................................................... 3 Princ Mgmt ................................................................ 3 Princ Marketing .......................................................... 3


Article Sub-title BUS

2220

Global Business ......................................................... 3

Carpentry ____________________________________________________________ CARP CARP CARP CARP

1109 1110 1112 2220

Interior Finishing I ....................................................... 3 Intro to Cabinet Build ................................................. 3 Exterior Finish I ........................................................... 3 Carpentry Internship ................................................... 3

Chemistry ____________________________________________________________ CHEM CHEM CHEM CHEM CHEM

1100 1105 1112 2225 2970

Fund Concepts Chem ................................................. 3 Medical Chem ........................................................... 3 Gen. Inorganic Chem II .............................................. 5 Organic Chemistry II .................................................. 5 Internship Experience ...............................................1-3

Child Care Education ____________________________________________________________ CDEV CDEV CDEV CDEV CDEV

2200 2229 2236 2246 2290

Integrating Play .......................................................... 3 Imaginative Learning .................................................. 3 Occupational Experienc .............................................. 1 Foundations in Literac ................................................. 3 Internship .................................................................. 3

Civil Engineering Technology ____________________________________________________________ CIVL CIVL CIVL CIVL CIVL CIVL

1102 1138 2209 2238 2242 2246

Survey I: Fundamentals ............................................... 2 CADD II: Plan Layout .................................................. 3 Construction Inspectio ................................................ 3 CADD III: Project Desi................................................. 3 Glob Pos Sys Tech & Eq .............................................. 3 Intro to Hydrology ...................................................... 3

Commercial Refrigeration ____________________________________________________________ REFR REFR REFR REFR REFR REFR REFR

1110 1112 1130 2211 2212 2213 2215

Refrig, A/C & Htg Prin................................................. 3 Refrig, A/C & Htg Lab ................................................. 3 Refrigeration Mgmt ..................................................... 2 Adv Refrigeration Prin ................................................. 4 Adv Refrigeration Lab.................................................. 3 Adv Electrical Theory .................................................. 3 Adv Electrical Apps ..................................................... 3

Communication ____________________________________________________________ COMM COMM COMM COMM COMM

1100 1120 1130 1140 2230

Comm & Effect Hum Rel ............................................. 3 Intro to Public Speaki .................................................. 3 Sm Group Comm ...................................................... 3 Interpersonal Comm ................................................... 3 Intercultural Comm .................................................... 3

Computer ____________________________________________________________ CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR

1001 1100 1104 1106 1108 1115 1122 1130 1138 1148 1170 2200 2224 2230 2236 2238 2242

Intro Prog & Script ...................................................... 3 Fund Computers Concept ........................................... 1 Intro to Computer Tech ............................................... 3 Microcomputer Database............................................ 3 Cisco 1 ..................................................................... 3 COBOL Prog ............................................................. 4 Microcomputer Maintena ............................................ 3 IT Essentials 2 ............................................................ 3 Information Systems .................................................... 3 Microcmptr Operating S ............................................. 3 Web Engineering I ...................................................... 3 Cisco 3 ..................................................................... 3 Linux I ....................................................................... 3 Struc Query Language ................................................ 3 Network Security ........................................................ 3 Database Integration .................................................. 3 Java Programming ..................................................... 3

CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR CPTR

2245 2252 2272 2294 2296 2400

Enterprise Network ..................................................... 3 Microcomputer Sys Prjc ............................................... 3 Network Operating Sys ............................................... 3 Internship .................................................................. 3 Topics in Computers ................................................... 3 Web Integration ......................................................... 3

Computer-Aided Drafting ____________________________________________________________ CADD CADD

1102 1114

Fundamentals of CADD .............................................. 4 Intro Solids/Paramtrc .................................................. 4

Computer Network Security ____________________________________________________________ CSEC CSEC CSEC CSEC

2210 2212 2222 2228

Security Breaches ....................................................... 3 Web Security .............................................................. 3 Network Security Desig ............................................... 3 Network Defense ........................................................ 3

Computer Science ____________________________________________________________ CSCI CSCI CSCI

1101 1110 1155

Computer Essentials ................................................... 1 Informatics................................................................. 3 Bus/Society Utilizatio .................................................. 3

Construction ____________________________________________________________ BLDG

1120

Construction Estimatin ................................................ 2

Construction Management ____________________________________________________________ CONM CONM CONM CONM CONM CONM CONM CONM

1101 1108 1124 2204 2206 2210 2217 2222

Construction Docs & Co ............................................. 3 Princ of Estimating ...................................................... 4 Building Systems......................................................... 3 Materials Testing ........................................................ 3 Building Codes .......................................................... 2 Construction Schedulin ............................................... 3 Comp Estimating & Bidd ............................................. 3 Construction Mgmt Inte .............................................. 2

Cosmetology ____________________________________________________________ COSM COSM COSM COSM COSM COSM COSM COSM COSM COSM COSM COSM

1000 1130 1157 1159 1163 1171 1179 1200 2000 2300 2500 2800

Prin and Practices ....................................................... 3 Prop of the Hair & Sca ................................................ 1 Hist of the Skin ........................................................... 1 Facials/Make-up/Hair r .............................................. 1 Hair Color ................................................................. 1 Principles of Hair Des ................................................. 1 MN Cosmetology Laws ............................................... 1 Salon Practicum ....................................................1-18 Artistry in Hairstylin ..................................................... 1 Anatomy Head Face Neck........................................... 1 Salon Business ........................................................... 1 Alex Body Sugaring .................................................... 1

Criminal Justice ____________________________________________________________ CRJU CRJU CRJU CRJU CRJU CRJU CRJU CRJU

1101 1104 1108 1109 2202 2206 2210 2235

Intro Criminal Ju ........................................................ 3 Juv Justice/Deliq ........................................................ 3 Phys Ctrl Tactic/Corrc ................................................. 3 Behavioral Science ..................................................... 3 Criminal Procedures ................................................... 3 Police Report Writing................................................... 3 Criminalistics ............................................................. 3 Crim Justice Internshi ...............................................1-4

Culinary Arts ____________________________________________________________ CULN CULN CULN CULN

1106 1112 1118 1124

Salad and Baking Lab ................................................. 6 Poultry & Seafood ....................................................... 3 Fry and Broiler Lab ..................................................... 5 Menu Plan & Merchandis ............................................ 2

M State Magazine | Fall 2015

23


s U NEW ti P a n l it y R O G d Co R A Se n s M r v tr u ice c t ion Ga CULN CULN CULN CULN CULN CULN CULN

2204 2206 2214 2222 2236 2238 2240

Breakfast Preparation .................................................. 5 Buffet & Garde Mngr La .............................................. 3 Qnty Food Prp & Btchr ................................................ 6 Production/Planning La ............................................... 6 Ethnic Foods .............................................................. 2 Confectionery Art ....................................................... 2 Internship .................................................................. 2

Dental ____________________________________________________________ DENT DENT

1102 1122

Dental Anatomy Lecture .............................................. 2 Dental Ethics&Jurispru ................................................ 1

Dental Assisting ____________________________________________________________ DNAS DNAS DNAS DNAS DNAS

1105 1114 1119 1212 1215

Clinical Assisting II...................................................... 5 Dental Practice Mgmt ................................................. 2 Advanced Functions.................................................... 5 Radiology Lab II ......................................................... 1 Dental Specialties ....................................................... 1

Dental Hygiene ____________________________________________________________ DNHY DNHY DNHY DNHY DNHY DNHY DNHY DNHY

1108 1119 1123 1136 2220 2223 2232 2246

Oral Histology/Embryol .............................................. 2 Dental Hygiene Prin II ................................................. 4 Dent Hygiene Prac II ................................................... 5 Dental Pharmacology ................................................. 2 Dent Hygiene Prin V.................................................... 1 Dent Hygiene Prac V ................................................... 6 Dental Hygiene Review ............................................... 1 Clinical Affiliation I ..................................................... 1

Diesel Equipment Technology ____________________________________________________________ DSET DSET DSET DSET DSET DSET DSET DSET DSET

1110 1132 1134 1144 2206 2210 2220 2238 2240

Power Train I .............................................................. 3 Intro to Engine Theory................................................. 2 Intro to Engines .......................................................... 3 Elec Troubleshooting................................................... 3 Electronic Controls ..................................................... 3 Mobile Hydraulics ...................................................... 4 Internship .................................................................. 3 Transmissions & Drive ................................................. 4 SOE II ....................................................................... 3

Diesel Equipment Technology - Case IH and New Holland ____________________________________________________________ DCNH DCNH DCNH

2210 2218 2238

Mobile Hydraulics ...................................................... 4 CNH SOE III .............................................................. 3 Transmissions & Drive ................................................. 4

Diesel Equipment Technology - Truck Option ____________________________________________________________ DTRK DTRK

2238 2240

Transmissions & Drive ................................................. 4 SOE II ....................................................................... 4

Economics ____________________________________________________________ ECON ECON ECON

1150 2210 2222

Essentials of Economic ................................................ 3 Macroeconomics........................................................ 3 Microeconomics......................................................... 3

Education ____________________________________________________________ ED EDUC

2294 1113

Educational Psyc ........................................................ 3 Career Life Planning ................................................... 2

Electrical Line Worker Technology ____________________________________________________________ ELWT ELWT ELWT ELWT ELWT

24

1110 1112 1114 1116 1118

Line Worker Theory II .................................................. 4 Transformers .............................................................. 2 Line Construction Repo ............................................... 2 Pole Top/Bucket Rescue .............................................. 1 Field Construction I .................................................... 3

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

ELWT ELWT ELWT ELWT ENST ENST

1120 1122 1130 1132 2001 2223

Field Construction II.................................................... 3 Field Construction III ................................................... 3 Elec Line Worker Inter ................................................. 2 Elect Line Worker Inte ................................................. 3 Fundamentals of Utilit ................................................. 4 GPS Mapping ............................................................ 2

Electrical Technology ____________________________________________________________ ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC ELEC

1108 1110 1112 1114 1116 1130 1170 2212 2214 2216 2222 2225 2234 2248

Electrical Circuit The ................................................... 4 Elect Motors & Generat .............................................. 4 Residential Wiring....................................................... 3 National Electrical Co................................................. 2 Conduit/Tool Applicati ................................................ 2 Elec Blueprints ........................................................... 3 Predictive Maint Tech .................................................. 2 Commercial Wiring .................................................... 3 Industrial Wiring ......................................................... 2 Motor Control Applicat ............................................... 3 Adv Prog Logic Control ............................................... 3 Transformers .............................................................. 2 Hydraulics/Pneumatics ................................................ 2 Code Applications ...................................................... 2

Engineering ____________________________________________________________ ENGR ENGR

2210 2230

Eng Mech I ................................................................ 3 Mech of Materials ...................................................... 3

Engineering Technology ____________________________________________________________ ENGT ENGT

1118 1126

Construction Math...................................................... 3 Engineering Graphics ................................................. 3

English ____________________________________________________________ ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL ENGL

0096 0097 0098 1101 1205 1210 1215 2200 2230 2236 2239 2310 2321 2372 2374

Read/Write Strategies ................................................. 6 Express English ........................................................... 3 Accelerated English .................................................... 3 College Writing I ........................................................ 3 Writ About Lit ............................................................. 3 Writing Current Issues ................................................. 3 Prof and Tech Writing.................................................. 3 Intro to Creative Writ .................................................. 3 Environmental Literatu ................................................ 3 Intro Lit: Novel ........................................................... 3 Nature Writers............................................................ 3 Mythology ................................................................. 3 Women in Literature ................................................... 3 Child Literature .......................................................... 3 Poetics Rock Lyrics ...................................................... 3

English Language Learners ____________________________________________________________ ELL ELL ELL ELL ELL

0050 0060 1060 1080 1175

ELL Foundations ......................................................... 4 ELL Reading ............................................................... 3 ELL Writing I ............................................................... 4 ELL Writing II .............................................................. 3 Eng Lang Learner Liste ................................................ 3

Entrepreneurship ____________________________________________________________ ENTR ENTR ENTR ENTR

1100 2200 2220 2222

Intro to Entrep ............................................................ 3 Entr Field Study .......................................................... 3 Bus Eth Prof ............................................................... 3 Bus Plan Develop ....................................................... 3

Equine Science ____________________________________________________________ EQSC EQSC EQSC

1060 1131 1160

Equine Repro & Nutriti ................................................ 3 Stable Operations II ................................................... 2 Eng Equitation ........................................................... 3


NE W B e M en P R ha ta O vio l H GR r a l ea A M A id lt h eI I EQSC EQSC EQSC EQSC EQSC

1170 1180 1200 2200 2300

Intro to Horse Train..................................................... 1 Equine Evaluation....................................................... 2 Equine Events Mgmt ................................................... 1 Recog and Mgmt Equ ................................................. 3 Applied Stable Op...................................................... 3

Esthetist ____________________________________________________________ ESTH

1801

Adv Skin Treatments.................................................... 1

Fire Department Company Officer ____________________________________________________________ FIRE FIRE FIRE

1130 1140 1152

Tech Rescue ............................................................... 3 Fire Insp Code Enforce ............................................... 3 Build Construct .......................................................... 3

Geography ____________________________________________________________ GEOG

1110

World Geography ...................................................... 3

Graphic Design Technology ____________________________________________________________ GDTC GDTC GDTC GDTC GDTC GDTC GDTC GDTC

1115 1144 1150 2214 2238 2242 2258 2276

Design & Layout II ...................................................... 3 Electronic Drawing II................................................... 3 Process Printing Theor ................................................. 3 Integ Graphic Des ...................................................... 3 Layout & Design Studio ............................................... 3 Electronic Publishing ................................................... 3 Graphic Dsgn Prof Prac .............................................. 3 Graphic Dsgn Internshi ............................................... 3

Golf ____________________________________________________________ GOLF GOLF GOLF GOLF GOLF

1100 1101 1102 2201 2500

Rules of Golf.............................................................. 1 Golf Club Repair ........................................................ 1 Tournament Op ......................................................... 1 Soils and Fertilizers ..................................................... 3 Fund Golf Inst ............................................................ 3

Health ____________________________________________________________ HLTH HLTH HLTH HLTH HLTH HLTH HLTH

1110 1115 1116 1122 2208 2213 2215

Intro to Anatomy & Phy ............................................... 3 Intro to Nursing in LT .................................................. 3 Medical Terminology .................................................. 3 CPR-First Aid .............................................................. 1 Pathophysiology ......................................................... 3 Emergency Responder................................................. 3 EMT Basic ................................................................. 6

Health Information Technology ____________________________________________________________ HITM HITM HITM HITM HITM HITM HITM HITM HITM HITM HITM

1155 1159 1160 2204 2211 2238 2253 2262 2272 2275 2284

Medicolegal Aspects ................................................... 3 Prof Prac Exp I ............................................................ 2 Hlth Info Sys & Stats .................................................... 3 Fund of Elec Hlth Rec.................................................. 3 Basic Pharm Coders ................................................... 2 Advanced Coding CPT ............................................... 2 Quality Mgmt Studies ................................................. 3 Reimbursement Systems .............................................. 2 Prof Practice Exp Codi................................................. 2 Hlth Rec Document..................................................... 1 Adv ICD-10 ............................................................... 2

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning/Refrigeration ____________________________________________________________ HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC HVAC

1104 1224 2205 2212 2220 2221

HVAC Electrical Contro............................................... 3 Gas & Oil Heating ..................................................... 3 Adv Duct Fitting Const ................................................ 2 Hot Water Heating ..................................................... 3 Heat Pump Theory ...................................................... 1 Heat Pump Ther & Op ................................................ 3

History ____________________________________________________________ HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST HIST

1111 1112 1113 1600 2212 2220

West Civil 1400-1600 ................................................ 3 West Civil 1600-1800 ................................................ 3 West Civil 20 Cnt ....................................................... 3 History of Baseball...................................................... 3 Am History: 19th Centu .............................................. 3 MN & North Plains His................................................ 3

Human Resources ____________________________________________________________ HRES HRES HRES HRES HRES HRES

1122 1126 1134 2204 2212 2254

HR Management ........................................................ 3 Employee Processes .................................................... 3 Training & Development.............................................. 3 Policy Administration ................................................... 3 Wage/Salary Adm ...................................................... 3 HR Sys & Portfolio Eva................................................. 3

Humanities ____________________________________________________________ HUM HUM HUM HUM HUM HUM

1101 1105 1110 2230 2236 2301

Intro to Humanities ..................................................... 3 Religion:Humanities.................................................... 3 Native Amer Culture ................................................... 3 World Cinema ........................................................... 3 Technology in Humaniti .............................................. 3 Heroes, Moral & Cultur .............................................. 3

Industrial Mechanical Maintenance ____________________________________________________________ IMMA

1110

Intro Power & Mech Sys............................................... 3

Industrial Workplace ____________________________________________________________ IND

1101

Intro to Industrial Wo .................................................. 4

Information Technology ____________________________________________________________ ITSS

2100

Support End User Appl................................................ 3

Manufacturing ____________________________________________________________ METC

2222

Fluid Power Systems .................................................... 3

Marine Engine Technology ____________________________________________________________ MRNT MRNT MRNT MRNT MRNT MRNT

1105 1107 2210 2218 2222 2227

Intro to Marine ........................................................... 2 Drive Systems I ........................................................... 3 Engine Service ........................................................... 3 Adv Electrical Diagnos ................................................ 3 Transom Mid Sec........................................................ 4 Transom Plate I .......................................................... 3

Marketing ____________________________________________________________ MKTG MKTG MKTG MKTG MKTG MKTG MKTG MKTG MKTG MKTG MKTG MKTG

1106 1110 1116 2204 2214 2218 2230 2232 2234 2236 2290 2400

Professional Selling ..................................................... 3 Customer Service ....................................................... 3 Advertising and Promot ............................................... 3 Adv Professional Selli .................................................. 3 E Marketing ............................................................... 3 Retail Mgmt ............................................................... 3 Marketing Research .................................................... 3 Marketing Management .............................................. 3 Computer Marketing App ........................................... 3 Small Business Mgmt .................................................. 3 Supervised Occ Exp I .................................................. 3 Marketing Management .............................................. 4

Massage Therapy ____________________________________________________________ THPY THPY THPY THPY THPY

1123 1130 1135 1142 1150

Integrative Massage.................................................... 2 Advanced Massage Tech ............................................. 2 Deep Tissue Massage ................................................. 2 Student Clinic ............................................................ 3 Business Development ................................................ 2

M State Magazine | Fall 2015

25


Su NEW rgi ca P R l T OG ech RA no M log y Mass Communications ____________________________________________________________ MCOM

1142

Pop Cult & Soc Media ................................................ 3

Mathematics ____________________________________________________________ MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH MATH

0055 0085 0095 1000 1020 1100 1114 1115 1116 1118 1122 1135 1213 1213 2259

Foundational Mathemati ............................................. 2 Elementary Algebra I .................................................. 2 Elementary Algebra II.................................................. 2 Technical Math........................................................... 3 Intermediate Algebra .................................................. 3 World of Math ........................................................... 3 College Algebra ......................................................... 4 Func/Trig ................................................................... 4 College Trigonometry ................................................. 3 Precalculus ................................................................ 5 Appl Calc/Lin Alg ....................................................... 3 Calc II ....................................................................... 5 Intro Statistics ............................................................. 4 Intro Statistics ............................................................. 4 Differential Equations.................................................. 4

Mechanical Drafting and Design ____________________________________________________________ MCDD MCDD MCDD MCDD MCDD MCDD

1106 1124 1210 2206 2248 2252

Mech Engineer Draw II ............................................... 4 Mech Drafting App I ................................................... 3 Drafting Practices ....................................................... 1 Mech Engineering Draw.............................................. 2 CNC Application........................................................ 3 Mech Drafting App II .................................................. 4

Medical Administrative Assistant ____________________________________________________________ ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM ADMM

1110 1122 1140 1150 1152 1160 1162 1200 2122 2130 2150 2270 2320

Med Documentation Fund........................................... 4 Medical Office Procedu .............................................. 4 Medical Language App ............................................... 3 Medical Billing/Insura ................................................. 4 Outpatient Coding ..................................................... 4 Beg Medical Transcript................................................ 3 Interm Med Transcripti ................................................ 3 Medical Office Technol ............................................... 2 Medical Office Mgmt.................................................. 3 Medical Career Insight................................................ 2 Medicare Coding/Billin ............................................... 3 Medical Office Simulat ............................................... 2 Medical Office Capston .............................................. 1

Medical Laboratory Technician ____________________________________________________________ MLT MLT MLT MLT MLT MLT MLT

1114 2217 2218 2220 2221 2222 2230

Basic Lab Tech II......................................................... 1 Clinical Hematalogy ................................................... 3 Clinical Urinalysis ....................................................... 1 Clinical Blood Bank .................................................... 2 Clinical Microbiology.................................................. 3 Clinical Chem & Spec C ............................................. 2 Clinical Applications ................................................... 1

Music ____________________________________________________________ MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC

26

1114 1116 1117 1118 1122 1124 1135 1141 1145 1151 1160 1162

Beg Class Piano ......................................................... 2 The World of Music .................................................... 3 Beginning Guitar ........................................................ 2 Rock and Pop Music ................................................... 3 Basic Theory and Musc ............................................... 3 Sight/Ear Trng 2 ......................................................... 1 Voice Ensemble .......................................................... 1 Concert Choir ............................................................ 1 Area Chorale ............................................................. 1 Ind Voice Lsn.............................................................. 1 Music Business ........................................................... 3 Jazz Ensemble ............................................................ 1

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC MUSC

1164 1181 1185 1191 2224 2232 2251 2281 2285 2291

Concert Band ............................................................ 1 Pri Inst Lessons ........................................................... 1 Music Comp Lessons .................................................. 1 Piano Lessons ............................................................ 1 Sight/Ear Training IV ................................................... 1 Adv Theory and Musc IV ............................................. 3 Pri Voice Lsn............................................................... 2 Priv Instrumental Less .................................................. 2 Adv Music Comp Lessons ............................................ 2 Pri Piano Lessons ........................................................ 2

Nursing ____________________________________________________________ NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS NURS

1400 1406 1415 1416 1426 2426 2437 2438 2447 2448 2455 2464 2466

Intro to Prof Nursing ................................................... 2 Nursing Fundamentals I .............................................. 3 Nursing Clinical I ....................................................... 2 Nsg Fundamental II .................................................... 4 Reproductive Health ................................................... 2 Reproductive Disorders ............................................... 2 Nursing Clinical II ...................................................... 4 Restorative Nursing I ................................................... 4 Nursing Clinical III...................................................... 4 Restorative Nursing II .................................................. 3 Advanced IV Therapy .................................................. 1 Nursing Leadership..................................................... 1 Mental Health Nursing................................................ 2

Paralegal ____________________________________________________________ PARA PARA PARA PARA PARA PDEV PDEV

1104 1106 1112 2202 2210 1101 1102

Civil Law for Paralega ................................................. 3 Wills, Trusts & Probat .................................................. 3 Legal Ethics/Paralegal ................................................. 3 Research & Writing II .................................................. 3 Adv Paralegal Practice ................................................ 3 Campus Life-Active Liv ................................................ 3 Contemp Career Search ............................................. 1

Pharmacy Technology ____________________________________________________________ PHRM PHRM

2002 2004

Pharmacy Prin/Prac II .................................................. 5 Drug Prop/ Distributio ................................................. 3

Philosophy ____________________________________________________________ PHIL PHIL PHIL PHIL PHIL

1200 1201 1211 2220 2225

App & Prof Ethics........................................................ 3 Ethics ........................................................................ 3 Intro Philosophy ......................................................... 3 Environmental Ethics ................................................... 3 Bioethics.................................................................... 3

Physical Education ____________________________________________________________ PE PE PE PE PE PE PE

1141 1192 1193 1199 2201 2240 2241

Intro Strength Trainin................................................... 1 Varsity Basketball ........................................................ 1 Vars Baseball ............................................................. 1 Vars Softball............................................................... 1 Lifeguard Water Safety ................................................ 2 Ath Inj/Care/Prev ....................................................... 2 Principles of Coaching ................................................ 3

Physics ____________________________________________________________ PHYS PHYS PHYS PHYS

1105 1120 1402 1412

Fund Concepts in Physi ............................................... 3 Intro to Astronomy ...................................................... 3 Clg Phys II ................................................................. 4 Univ Physics II ............................................................ 5

Political Science ____________________________________________________________ POLS

1130

State and Local Gov ................................................... 3


NE Th W P e a RO t r e GR Ar AM ts PowerSports Technology ____________________________________________________________ PWST PWST PWST PWST

1302 2308 2311 2312

Snowmobile I ............................................................. 5 Adv Snowmobiles ....................................................... 3 Motorcycles II............................................................. 3 Adv Motorcycle Sys ..................................................... 3

Practical Nursing ____________________________________________________________ PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG PNSG

1217 1221 1223 1226 1232 1234 1236 1500 1510 1512 1514 1520 1524 1526 1530

Hlth Promotion II ........................................................ 4 Psychosocial Nursing .................................................. 2 Hlth Promotion III ....................................................... 4 PN Clinical II ............................................................. 4 Principles of IV Thera .................................................. 1 Nursing Roles............................................................. 1 Practicum .................................................................. 2 Nursing Care of Adults ............................................... 3 PN Foundations ......................................................... 5 Practical Pharmacology............................................... 2 PN Clinical I .............................................................. 4 Women/Newborns/Childre ......................................... 2 Psychosocial Nursing .................................................. 2 PN Clinical II ............................................................. 5 Nursing Care of Adult................................................. 5

Psychology ____________________________________________________________ PSYC PSYC PSYC PSYC PSYC PSYC PSYC PSYC

1101 1200 1201 2220 2222 2224 2226 2230

Human Interaction...................................................... 3 General Psychology .................................................... 3 Intro Mental Health Ai................................................. 4 Abnormal Psychology.................................................. 3 Developmental Psy ..................................................... 3 Social Psyc ................................................................. 3 Behavior&Environment M ............................................ 3 Personality Psychology................................................. 3

Radiologic Technology ____________________________________________________________ RADT RADT RADT RADT RADT RADT RADT

1102 1132 1140 1146 2120 2130 2280

Fund Concept Rad Tech .............................................. 2 Princ of Radiobiology .................................................. 4 Radiographic Imaging ................................................ 4 Rad Procedures III....................................................... 4 Rad Tech Clinical V..................................................... 5 Rad Tech Clinical VI .................................................... 5 Board Review ............................................................. 2

Sign Language Intrepreter ____________________________________________________________ IPP IPP IPP IPP IPP

1111 2112 2113 2217 2218

Intro to Interpreting ..................................................... 3 Adv ASL to Eng .......................................................... 3 Adv Eng to ASL .......................................................... 3 Interpret Internship...................................................... 6 Internship Seminar ...................................................... 1

Social Work ____________________________________________________________ SW

2250

Intro Social Work........................................................ 3

Sociology ____________________________________________________________ SOC SOC SOC SOC SOC

1111 1113 2213 2215 2216

Intro Sociology ........................................................... 3 Social Problems.......................................................... 3 Sociology of the Fam .................................................. 3 Criminology ............................................................... 3 Minority Grp Rel ......................................................... 3

Supervisory Leadership ____________________________________________________________ SUPL

1118

Lead & Facilitate Team ................................................ 3

Surgical Technology ____________________________________________________________ SURT SURT

1215 1220

Surgical Pharmacology ............................................... 3 Surgical Technology II ................................................. 5

Theatre Arts ____________________________________________________________ THTR THTR THTR THTR THTR

1105 1120 1125 2120 2130

Acting I...................................................................... 3 Theatre Perf Prac ........................................................ 2 Theatre Tech Prac ....................................................... 2 Script Analysis ............................................................ 3 Design for the Stage ................................................... 3

Transportation ____________________________________________________________ TRNS TRNS TRNS TRNS TRNS TRNS TRNS TRNS TRNS TRNS TRNS

1001 1003 1005 1006 1015 1016 1102 1104 1112 1193 1194

Fuel Systems I ............................................................ 3 Off-Road Computer Syst ............................................. 2 OffRoad Electrical Sys ................................................. 2 Off-Road Maintenance ............................................... 4 Ignition Lab................................................................ 2 Ignition Theory ........................................................... 1 Intro to Transportatio .................................................. 2 Transportation Elec ..................................................... 3 Heating Ventilation A/................................................. 3 Fuel Systems II Lab...................................................... 1 Fuel Systems II Theory ................................................. 2

Voice and Video Over IP ____________________________________________________________ CVNP

2216

VoIP and IP Telephony................................................. 3

Web Development ____________________________________________________________ WEBD WEBD WEBD WEBD WEBD WEBD WEBD WEBD WEBD WEBD WEBD

1000 1010 1020 1110 1120 1140 2030 2100 2110 2120 2140

Foundations of Web Des ............................................. 3 HTML ........................................................................ 3 Photoshop ................................................................. 3 CSS .......................................................................... 3 UX Design ................................................................. 3 JavaScript .................................................................. 3 SEO .......................................................................... 3 Web Projects II ........................................................... 3 Web Portfolio ............................................................. 3 Mobile Applications .................................................... 3 Web Applications II..................................................... 3

Women’s Studies ____________________________________________________________ WMST

1130

Women’s Studies ........................................................ 3

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M State Magazine | Fall 2015

27


FOUNDATION NEWS

I found myself ...

Laura Boreen,

Meet M State Alumni Ambassador I am a 2012 graduate of M State - Detroit Lakes Campus with an associate degree in liberal arts. I am passionate about promoting M State to potential students and supporters due to my personal story. I grew up in a small town in Ohio, and I can’t recall a conversation about college or even grades taking place in our house. When my classmates bragged about which university they would attend, I changed the subject. As much as I wanted to move away and attend college, I did not even believe that I could get in. I held a C average at best. Graduation came, my peers moved away and I began full-time work. At 19, I moved to Colorado, where I met my husband. We married and lived in Colorado, then moved to Bismarck. Now starting our own family, I felt the need to return to Ohio, but my husband missed hunting, work in the building industry and his close family relationships. I agreed to a “final” move back to his hometown on one condition: I could attend college. After much convincing and the use of a return on investment worksheet detailing the long-term financial benefits of a college degree, he agreed! I applied to M State and was accepted, and he took his job. We moved on our daughter’s 2nd birthday, almost five years ago now. The day we rolled into town was the first time I visited Detroit Lakes.

L aura B oreen w ith her N ick, an hu d their daughter sband, , Morgan

I had no preconceived opinions about M State. I was just beside myself that I was accepted into community college. School was going to be my full-time job, and our family made sacrifices to make this happen. I was on a mission to prove to my husband that we made the right choice. First semester was scary yet exciting. I studied hard and spent a lot of time on campus, disciplined to do well. As grades started coming back I was receiving A’s in ALL my classes, and that was awesome! College writing also happened that first semester. I was expected to read a book. Not a big deal, right? Well, I had never read a book front to back. I had managed to wiggle my way through high school without ever doing so … but in Teresa Beacom’s class there was no way of getting around it. I was going to have to read the entire book. Because of that class and the book “Into the Wild” by Jon Krakaur, I now love reading. It’s sad I was 28 when I found this out but grateful for her expectations and no nonsense. Soon I began g to feel something – something that made me smile, stand taller tall and confident. That feeling was self-worth. I finally realized I was capable and worthy of this opportunity. I was better than tha a C average, and I could do anything that I heart ttruly tr u y pu ul putt my h ea into. I was hooked on that feeling. nished myy de degree with a perfect 4.0. I was offered a great I finish ni ished ed m sscholarship sc cho hola ho lars la rshi h p an hi and d attended Concordia College for one year, then transferred of Minnesota-Crookston and finished ttr ran ansf sffer e re red d to University U my llast my a t ye as yyear a oonline. ar nlii By this time I was balancing full-time work, full-time full fu ll-t ll -tim -t tim imee fa ffamily mi and full-time school. I recently graduated degree in Health Care Management. wiith with h a bbachelor’s a h ac myy life hadn’t crossed paths with M State and the IIf m faculty fa acu cu there, my story would be much different. I am a blessed to have decided to start my college education here. Not to discredit the faculty, ed d bbut I learned more about myself on a personal llevel than I did academically, and for that my M State experience is invaluable.

Human Resources Director Laura Boreen with resident Laverne Nordgulen at Ecumen in Detroit Lakes.

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Minnesota State Mi S Community C i and d Technical T h i l College C ll

Real R e People. Real Education.

Real Results.


Building

Alumni - Stay In Touch Name: ________________________________________________

FACF Scholarships COMMUNITY

Last name while in college/maiden: ________________________

Open Building Doors

Street address: _________________________________________ City: __________________________State:______Zip:__________ Work phone: (___) ______________________________________ Home phone: (___) _____________________________________

to Opportunities PARTNERSHIPS

Cell phone: (___) _______________________________________ Bob Footitt, Sr. Douglas Duncan Founder Chief Economist Email: ________________________________________________

Bob Footitt Construction, Inc. Fannie Mae Moorhead Campus of ‘69study: _________________________________ Fergus Falls Campus ‘73 Major/program

Year(s) of attendance: ___________________________________

This year, with generous support from donors, Fergus Area College Foundation awarded over $150,000 in scholarships to more than 100 students at Minnesota State Community and Technical College’s Fergus Falls campus.

Did You Know?

WhenTh you make three an investment ese included full-tuition Presidential and five half-tuin M State, youscholarships are: ition Dean’s which are awarded to students based on high school academic record, high school and community involvement, original and recommendations. Both • Providing accessibleanand qualityessay education through scholarship scholarships are renewable for a second year with a minimum opportunities for students 3.0 innovative GPA. • Providing and state-of-the-art classroom resources that allow hands-on learning experiences Three of this year’s recipients share their experiences. • Supporting economic and community progress

Receiving a scholarship the ______________________________________ Fergus Area College FoundaCampusfrom attended: tion has providedCurrent me a great start to my college education, and employer: ______________________________________ that is somethingTellI will never take for granted. I understand us what you’ve been doing since you left M State: that this came at a cost to many individuals, and I am very ______________________________________________________ grateful for their generosity. Because of this scholarship, I was ______________________________________________________ able to prepare for a future career in the medical field. M State Would you like more on: dreams. has given me a solid foundation for information pursuing my  M State events Mary Brenk  M State scholarships Robert Iken II Publisher Executive Vice President  Serving on an alumni committee Detroit Lakes Newspapers Falls and Park Rapids Mid-Central Federal Savings Bank Enterprise Wadena Campus ‘79  Nominating an outstanding M State graduate Detroit Lakes Campus ‘75 for college publications

McKenna Kvern

Fergus

Receiving this Dean’s Scholarship is such an honor, and it means are married, didhard your spouse attend M State? so much to me. ItIf you is nice to see my work recognized, and Yes this  No the feeling of reliefthat scholarship brings is huge. It is heartRebecca Oehler warming to thinkFirst of name: the generosity of the donors, and I am so ____________________________________________ Your gifts allow Fergus Fallsyou to leave a lasting legacy thankful for that!Last I am so grateful for this scholarship, as it is name: ____________________________________________ assisting me with furthering my education and working toward while you help enhance the education we provide at  Address same as above: I received the Dean’s Scholarship from Fergus Area College my goals! Minnesota State College. Street address: _________________________________________ Foundation, andCommunity it has meant the and world Technical to me. I took PSEO • Pip plus photos classes in high school so this is my only year at M State in Fergus City: __________________________State:______Zip:__________ Falls, and with the help of this scholarship I didn’t even have to Work phone: (___) ______________________________________ • Darin Stanislawski/Lori is still working toWolden Wayne Dave Lenzmeier pay for it. The money I’ve saved by choosing M State and receivAdditional recipients of the Presidential Scholarship through Business Manager Home phone: (___) _____________________________________ CEO get photos Minnesota State Community ing this scholarship will help me very much when I continue FACF include Betsy Pearson of Ottertail and Danielle Pratt of Milk Specialties Global and CellTechnical phone: College (___) _______________________________________ Fergus Falls Campus ‘84 Wadena Campus ‘83 my schooling. Clarissa. Additional recipients of the Dean’s Scholarship include • Very brief blurb about the SpartanEmail: BoostBilly Juul of Evansville ________________________________________________ and Julia Christenson and Mary Sanders After I graduate this spring I’m planning on our attending a four-year Major/program of study: _________________________________ ers, both of Fergus Falls. Enhancing education to support university to major inworkforce sociology.forAgain, I’m very grateful for this region’s more than 50 years! Year(s) of attendance: ___________________________________ scholarship and the opportunities I have because of it, and I thank Since 1966 FACF has been working to provide financial supCampus attended: ______________________________________ the Fergus Falls Area College Foundation very much for awarding port and advocate for the development and advancement of M employer: ______________________________________ If you me would like to make the Dean’s Scholarship. State’s Fergus FallsCurrent campus. In addition to scholarship support, What has he/she been doing since leavingand M State: the foundation provides funding for faculty initiatives caman investment in M State, contact: pus improvements. ______________________________________________________ Bethany Enderson Denise Laymon ______________________________________________________ Fergus Chief FallsDevelopment and Alumni Officer FACF also sponsors the Bigwood Lecture, an annual event which Detroit Lakes Area College Foundation Do you have any other family members attend(ed) Newzad Brifki Kaul Hendrickson & Wadena Area College Foundation connects citizen participants with engaged leaders.Riana If youwho have ques- M State? Founder/Director Survey Technician I always knew scholarships would turn out to be helpful one day;  Yes  No denise.laymon@minnesota.edu Community America with Moore Inc. tions or would likeKurdish to become moreofinvolved FACF,Engineering, please conthat or spending hours filling out applications and asking for mul218.846.3720 218.631.7931 Moorhead Campus ‘06 Detroit Lakes Campus ‘14 Name:_________________________Year(s) attended: _________ tact Lori Larson at lori.larson@minnesota.edu or 218-736-1514. tiple references, collecting transcripts and scrambling through

Lori Larson Director past Executive awards and accomplishments would someday pay off. Fergus AreaI College Foundation didn’t realize, however, the impact of a scholarship until the lori.larson@minnesota.edu end of first semester rolled around and I owed the school noth218.736.1514

ing! Receiving the Presidential Scholarship meant I could continue my college education without having to think about how Mark Altenburg Director of Advancement would payand it Technical off in the future. It meant I could work less and Moorhead ICommunity College Foundation focus more on my academics. It meant that I could continue the mark.altenburg@minnesota.edu long tradition in my family of attending M State. 218.299.6826

Real People. Real Education.

Name:_________________________Year(s) attended: _________

Real Results.

Denise Laymon, Chief Development and Alumni Officer M State - Wadena Campus 405 Colfax Ave SW, Wadena, MN 56482

FOUN UNDA DATIO IONS NS Learn more at minnesota.edu/alumni

Member of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System. M State Magazine | Spring 29 of diversity. Minnesota State Colleges and Universities is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Veterans/Disability employer/educator committed2015 to the principles


FOUNDATION NEWS

‘Jersey Boy’ Plants

Seeds of Success in Fergus Falls

Gro Growing up in New Jersey, Jer Anthony “Pip” “P Piperata dreamed of being dr a farmer. All he lacked was a farm. la S So, feeling he wasn’t w ready for ates m om ro r/ tle r wres Pip and othe n 1966 ccollege after he on 1949 se da ggraduated from high school in the 196 1960s, he worked at a foundry for a year, then took several college preparation classes with friends at a local extension school, which led to them applying to and being accepted at Moorhead State University. Pip was a wrestler in high school, and his MSU-bound friends were big into wrestling and football. Back then, MSU had a reputation for athletics that stretched all the way to the East Coast. So Pip left his large Italian-American family (30 aunts and uncles and more than 60 cousins) and set out to be only the second person in his family to earn a college degree. His stay at MSU ended with academic probation, and he “figured my college days were over.” There were rumors of a junior college that was starting a wrestling program in Fergus Falls, though, and an encouraging call to the coach ended with him enrolling and joining the wrestling “club team.” The coach moonlighted as a local police officer and kept Pip “on the straight and narrow.”

invited him for dinners and found him work mopping the floors of their country bar in Elizabeth. During his years in Fergus Falls, Pip says he found “happiness, part-time employment, off-campus housing, town friends and great classmates.” More importantly, he found his academic stimulation. “I was a poor student until I moved to Fergus Falls,” he says. “It was at FFJC that I became a competitive student.” With the guidance of the Mankato State University wrestling coach, he was able to transfer to MSU after FFJC. He married his New Jersey sweetheart, and they lived in Minnesota while he earned his education degree. He was drafted during the Vietnam War (he jokes that the draft lottery was the only lottery he ever won) but was lucky enough to be stationed stateside, then earned two master’s degrees with the help of the GI Bill. He taught science and math and – with wrestling in his blood – coached a junior high wrestling team that compiled an 80 percent win record. Pip went on to be a principal, a school superintendent, a college professor and an author. He retired in 1999 as chief school administrator in Newton, N.J., but he continues teaching and working and, from his cabin in upper New York, he fills in as an interim school superintendent when needed. Nearly age 70, he’s enjoying his family of three grown children and two grandchildren, and he sends his thanks to “the great state of Minnesota, the townspeople, the college, my classmates and the faculty for their acceptance of me!”

Fergus Falls Junior College was actually a wing of the local high school and, when the entire building burned in 1967, he and his fellow FFJC students had classes at the Fergus Falls State Hospital. There he met an English and drama lab instructor, Lee Krogh, who discovered Pip’s skills and put him to work building scenery, backdrops and even the stage while earning credits in the drama lab course. Pip also has fond memories of friends Tommy and Charlie Blondeau and their kind mother, Opal, who took to Pip and

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r glish Professo Drama Lab/En stage on p Pi d an 7 Lee Krogh eatre 1967 make-shift th the hospita l

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

Pip a n d wife Linda, marrie ta ke n in 200 d 48 ye ars, 8.


Stanislawski

Connects

with M State

Darin Stanislawski was born in Sioux Falls, S.D., but grew up in Fergus Falls and graduated from Fergus Falls High School. Many kids growing up in small towns have visions of going away to college in a big city, maybe far away from their parents, but not Darin. He chose Minnesota State Community and Technical College and began his college career there during the fall of 2010. While at M State, Darin played baseball for two years while earning his AA degree. “I really enjoyed being a Spartan for many reasons … the biggest reason was how close I became with people at the college,” he says. Darin had a lot of friends on the baseball team but also connected with other students who didn’t play baseball. “It didn’t take long before those colleagues became friends,” he says. Darin remembers his baseball team “started as a bunch of guys thinking they were better than the rest to one big family.” They were very successful both years Darin played ball, and he gives a lot of credit to coach Jarred Aasmus. “He was and is my favorite coach I have ever played for,” Darin says. “I learned not only a lot about baseball from him, but also lessons that I will carry on with me for the rest of my life.” He says that one of his favorite M State instructors, Arlin Nikolas, “was and might still be the best teacher I have ever had.”

He had several classes from Nikolas, but his favorite was History of Baseball. “One might think this class was a breeze, but that was not the case,” Darin says. “His tests may have been some of the hardest tests I have taken in college.” After high school, Darin had offers to attend four-year universities to play baseball, but he says M State “was a great fit for me, and I wouldn’t change a thing.” He was reminded of the advantages of being at a smaller college when he was struggling in his anatomy class and wondered whether he’d pass the course. ”This is where it was nice to be at a smaller school where I could meet with a teacher and discuss my concerns, whereas in a larger school that might not have been possible,” he says. After graduating from M State, Darin enrolled at Mayville State University, where he played ball while working on a major in elementary education and a minor in sports management. He coached the Fergus Falls Legion baseball team for the past three summers and now is student teaching in Ashby with 4th grade teacher Brenda Johnson, who is also an M State graduate and the former Spartan women’s basketball coach.

M State Magazine | Fall2015

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FOUNDATION NEWS

M State Students

‘Pay It Forward’ “Pay It Forward” winner Calvin Samek gave his $250 gift to Jan Nelson and the Heart Springs organization. Jan is the executive director of this Fargo non-profit healing center, which was established in 2008 and specializes in neurological conditions and trauma. It provides integrated complimentary therapies that enhance the health, healing, hope and vibrancy for those with chronic or life-altering conditions. Jan and the center were very grateful to Calvin and the foundation.

Gi recipients at the April scholarship event were (le to right) students Kiin Farah and Sara Crocker, along with donors Shawn Erickson and Evonne Barnum. Not pictured are student recipients Chelsy Klava and Calvin Samek.

Something a little different happened at the Moorhead Community and Technical College Foundation Annual Donor Recognition and Scholarship Awards Event last April. Four students who were being honored as scholarship recipients heard their names announced unexpectedly when they were selected to receive a “temporary gift” of $250 and challenged to “Pay It Forward.” College is about learning – not just about academics but also about life and our world. With that in mind, donors Evonne Barnum, an MCTC Foundation board member, and her daughter, Shawn Erickson, chose to offer this challenge to four our students who were selected because they had expressed the desire to help others. Now they would have the opportunity. Students decided who would receive their gifts and were asked ked to take a photo and provide a few words about the process and nd their choice of recipient. ah. The first student to complete the process was Kiin Farah. n Raised by her grandmother, Kiin gave her gift to a woman who was in need of help due to hardship in her life and noo family to help. The woman reminded Kiin of her grandmother. Kiin said the woman’s story hurt her a lot. When they met and Kiin presented her gift, the grateful woman almost cried.

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Minnesota State Community and Technical College

Chelsy Klava gave her gift to a family that’s close to her and has a young son living with a form of muscular dystrophy. This young man has endured numerous surgeries since being diagnosed at age 6, but his mother says he still has a positive attitude and a great outlook on life. His mom says the gift from Chelsy was appreciated and would be a great help. Sara Crocker chose to “Pay It Forward” to Little Lambs Christian Preschool in West Fargo. Sara says that preschool director Mandy Elseth has such compassion and love for the children who attend this school. The $250 will go toward a scholarship for families that can’t afford to pay for their children to attend the preschool. Sara adds that it warms her heart to know that this gift is going toward education for children, and she appreciated the opportunity to put smiles on a lot of people’s faces. These students were given the opportunity to go out and change the world – even if just in a small way – and make a difference in someone’s life. Evonne says the experience was truly rewarding for her and her daughter. To witness the students’ excitement as they made their decisions and to see the smiles on their faces when they brought in their pictures and information was a great experig ence. Theyy are p proud of the students and their willingness to make this a very special project. Evonne and Shawn hope to offer the challenge again at the 2016 scholarship event in April.


4th Annual M State Golf Scramble a huge success Beau ful weather and a fabulous course made the 4th Annual M State Golf Scramble the most successful event to date. The Moorhead Community and Technical College Founda on thanks everyone who took a day to support students on M State’s Moorhead campus. Golfers included (pictured, le to right) instructors Dennis Miller (Automo ve Technology), Travis DeJong (Commercial Refrigera on), Kim Brewster (re red, Culinary Arts) and Todd Mahoney (Hea ng, Ven la on and Air Condi oning/Refrigera on). The 2015 tournament benefits the Dan Sperling Realize Your Dream Scholarship with more than $5,000 in scholarships to students in need. Next year’s M State Golf Scramble is set for June 22, again at the Hawley Golf and Country Club.

Scholarship Awards Event The Moorhead Community and Technical College Foundation gathered with many long-term donors, new donors, staff, faculty and students to celebrate the 19th Annual Scholarship Awards event at the Oscar Bergos Center on the Moorhead campus this past April.

This fantastic support will help students fulfill the MCTC mission of “Helping Students Afford Their Education and Building the Local Workforce with Skilled Employees.”

More than 80 students were awarded scholarships from individuals, organizations and businesses from across the region. In total, the foundation was able to give away $62,000 to students on a single day.

If you would like to make a scholarship gift for next spring’s 20th Annual Scholarship Event, please contact Foundation Director Mark Altenburg at 218-299-6826.

Thank you to all of our generous donors, and good luck to all the deserving students in their pursuit of a better future.

LEFT: NECA scholarship recipients were introduced by Curt Kasper (far right), assistant director of the Dakotas Chapter of the Na onal Electrical Contractors Associa on. Recipients from the Electrical Technology program included Jesse Hayden, Mark Holm, Jacob Kadrie, Tanner McManus, Masyn Olson, Aus n Ri er, Casey Springer, Sam Tellers and Chase Walton. CENTER: Jason Sla ery (le ) was awarded the Harriet Tu e Memorial Scholarship by Clark Tu e. RIGHT: Don Sco (center) posed with recipients of Alex Stern Scholarships. Student recipients included Kiin Farah, Lukas Feltz, Jennifer Giese, Tabitha Greywind, Rachel Kautzman, Calvin Samek, Danielle Schnase, Ashley Throlson and Carol Van Den Einde

M St Stat State atee Maga at M Magazine agaziinee | F Fall alll 20 a 2 2015 015

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FOUNDATION NEWS

M State

Celebrates 50 Years

of Line Worker Training WACF and long-time board member of nearby Todd-Wadena Electric Cooperative. A majority of the 100 enrolled line worker students attended, among them Phil Shoquen of Dilworth. Shoquen has aboveaverage seasoning in the power industry, having worked for Moorhead Public Service for eight years. What attracted Shoquen to the program? “It was time for a career change. I decided on line work,” he said. “I surveyed my power industry friends. The overwhelming verdict for training was M State at Wadena.” Is Wadena living up to his expectations? “Yes. And then some.”

By Jerry Mevissen Saturday, October 10, was a picture perfect day. Warm autumn temperatures, golden sunshine, peak fall colors. And a perfect day for a party. Minnesota State Community and Technical College and the Wadena Area College Foundation invited the community, their industry partners and alumni to celebrate a program that has trained 1,500 electrical line workers in its 50-year history. Saturday began with a pancake breakfast on the Wadena campus, followed by industry exhibits and training field demonstrations. At five o’clock, the evening events began – a social hour, dinner and program hosted by Dan Skogen, board director of the

Shoquen said line work agrees with his love of the outdoors, both summer and winter. And it’s gratifying, he said, when customers thank him for getting the power back on. It’s relatively reasonable to attend M State, he added, with $10,000 tuition for training that nearly guarantees a high-paying job. M State President Peggy Kennedy echoed Shoquen’s enthusiasm in her opening remarks. “Our mission is to provide dynamic training,” Kennedy said. “The program’s success can be attributed to its development and initiation by a group of electric industry specialists.” She thanked M State supervision and staff for implementing their vision. Mike Thorson, chair of both Todd-Wadena Electric Cooperative and its electric power wholesaler, Great River Energy, provided


an industry perspective in his keynote speech. “This program is a winner for the students, the community and the industry,” he said. “Students learn a trade and develop a career; the community receives high-paying jobs, housing needs and purchasing power. Industry gains highly skilled people, technology development and capital intensive business.

Awards and scholarships wrapped up the night. Faculty members stood and were recognized, followed by alumni and then the line worker student body. Circles of students stood around tables – young, hearty and presentable, like a platoon of fresh Marine recruits. There are no female students in the program this year, although not by design.

“We’ve come a long way in 50 years, and there’s more to come: changes in the grid, distributed generation and alternative energy sources of wind and solar. They all depend on wires.”

The speakers, the graduates and the students are bullish about the financial rewards of a line worker career. Robin Doege, CEO of Todd-Wadena Electric Cooperative, put it best. “Take a look at the co-op parking lot. Notice all the big, new four-wheel drive pickups. Ask a line worker about the rest of his toys. Then ask him about his cabin at the lake.”

“Your career,” Thorson concluded, “requires skill and experience, and a strong work ethic. M State can help you with the first two. All line workers at Todd-Wadena are M School grads; a third of Great River Energy’s line workers are grads. You’re in good hands here at M State.” If the proof of a program is its product, consider Todd Miller. Miller graduated from M State’s one-year program in 1984 and joined the Todd-Wadena cooperative in 1985. “Things have changed,” Miller said. “Back then, we set all 75 poles in the training area by hand at a rate of four or five a day. That’s digging a six-foot hole and lifting and placing the poles manually. We wrapped up our day of instruction by climbing 12 poles.”

Beyond the financial rewards, there’s the reward of a job well done. Todd Miller quotes instructor Monte Scheller, explaining that fire fighters cannot access an area with downed electric wires until it is cleared by line workers. Scheller’s conclusion: “Firemen need heroes, too.” In 2000, Jerry Mevissen emigrated from the Twin Cities to the beautiful Crow Wing River valley, returning to a former haunt, The Land, and discovering a new passion, writing. Between publishing three books and tending his herd of Haflinger horses and Scottish Highland cattle, he served three terms as director of Todd-Wadena Electric Cooperative. When not attending celebrations, he works on book four, “Animal Life,” a collection of short stories.

Miller was recently promoted to line superintendent at ToddWadena. He echoed student Phil Shoquen’s comments about working outdoors as an attraction of line work. That, and a fascination with the exciting electric industry.

Photos clockwise from lower leŌ: Line worker student Phil Shoquen was among the students who a ended the anniversary event. Line worker instructor Steve Johnson (in red) was presented with a plaque honoring his years of service by fellow instructors (le to right) Monte Scheller, Wayne Dykhoff and Jeremy Hensel. Marlene and Chuck Heins received a plaque honoring Stanely Heins for his years of service. Dan Skogen and Mary and Lowell Rasmussen share stories about the line worker program. The Ryan Svor Memorial Scholarship was awarded to Alexander Haugrud.

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Minnesota State Community and Technical College Office of Communications and Marketing 405 Colfax Ave SW Wadena, MN 56482

Affordable Quality. M State offers one of the most affordable higher education options in the region. Completing your first two years at M State can save you from $2,800 to $60,000.

The costs for Minnesota State Colleges and Universities are for average full-time tuition and fees at 30 credits per year. Some colleges and universities charge additional fees. Fees vary by program. For exact tuition and fees, contact the admissions office at the college or university that interests you. The costs do not include room and board for any institution listed. * Source: NDSU 2015-2016 Full Time Tuition Rates, per NDSU website on October 30, 2015.

Annual Tuition and Fees for a Full-Time Student Minnesota State Community and Technical College

North Dakota State University (North Dakota residents)

North Dakota State University (Minnesota residents)

Minnesota State University Moorhead

University of Minnesota, Morris

Rasmussen College

Minnesota School of Business/ Globe College

Concordia College (Moorhead)