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Mitchell Starrs Portfolio


Mitchell Starrs LEED Green Associate

Email Phone Portfolio Website

Arch Experience

mitchell.starrs@gmail.com 314-807-2875 issuu.com/mstarrs/docs/portfolio mitchelljstarrs.com

Intern

Oculus, Inc. - St. Louis, MO

Summer, Winter 2016

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Intern

Agape Construction - St. Louis, MO

Summer, Winter 2014 Summer 2015

Education

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Veteran’s Administration Retail Speculative work VR environments Design + Build Design and client meetings Job site experience as laborer

M.Arch

University of Kansas

General

St. Louis University High School

Recognition

May 2018 Graduation

May 2013 Graduation

Award

ArchDaily

Award

Architect’s Newspaper

Award

World of Architecture

Scholarships

University of Kansas

AIA - St. Louis

2015 MBH Architects Scholarship 2016 Jim Moorkamp Scholarship - PGAV Architects 2016 Bruce Patty Scholarship - BNIM

2016 General Scholarship

Activities

Best Student Design+Build Projects Worldwide, 2016

Best of Design for Student Work 2016

Award for Student Work, 24th Cycle

President

KU Men’s Club Soccer

Student Ambassador

School of Architecture, Design, and Planning

Digital Skills

Revit Enscape

Lumion Sketchup

Indesign Illustrator

Photoshop Unreal Engine


Contents

Page

Academic

1

Academic

9

Academic

17

Professional

27

Professional

29

Culinary School

Judd Museum

Sensory Pavilion

Agape Construction

Gateway Greening


Tulane Culinary School 1351 Canal St New Orleans, LA 70112 Individual Project

Background A growing trend in medical schools across the nation, medical students are learning about diet as a key component of healthy living. Traditionally, physicians refer their patients to a dietician or recommend an exercise routine. Just like design+build practices streamline the design and building process, educating future doctors about holistic lifestyles aims to consolidate the treatment procedure. Given a program including teaching kitchens, a restaurant, and secondary education spaces, I added a fitness center to complement medicine and diet as the pieces of a healthy lifestyle. The site is adjacent to Canal Street, the common parade route through New Orleans. Parades are very popular in New Orleans, drawing large crowds, and the steps up to the complex’s plinth act as bleachers for parade viewing. 1


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Key Plan

Circulation Studies

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Linked Courtyards

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Journey to Restaurant

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Teaching Kitchen Restaurant Fitness Center Cafe Library

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Classroom Lecture Hall Student Lounge Loading Dock

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2 Restaurant

3 Fitness Center

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Donald Judd Museum Crossroads, Kansas City, MO 32, 434 ft2 Individual Project

Background Donald Judd was a prominent minimalist artist of the 20th century. He worked in many mediums, from sculpture to painting, and used industrial materials like concrete and steel to create smooth, rectilinear forms in sculpture. Whether looking at a painting or sculpture of Judd’s, his pieces are characterized by platonic forms that are interrupted by an element that goes against the established rhythm. The following images demonstrate how the Donald Judd Museum acts as an extension of his art, a complementary setting in which to view his work. The Crossroads district of Kansas City is the best place for this museum because of its history as an industrial warehouse neighborhood, which relates well to Judd’s machine aesthetic.

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Key Plan

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Teaching Kitchen Cafe Coat Check Curations Offices

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Event Space Library Loading Dock Mechanical Room Storage

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Fire Stair Study

I found the form of a fire stair the ideal way to join the strong identities of Judd and the Crossroads. Fire stairs are a very common sight in the Crossroads. The former industrial warehouses and light manufacturing spaces lack any lavish features, similar to Judd’s direct, pragmatic taste. Donald Judd’s New York residence included an exterior fire stair, and many of the Crossroads’ buildings bear fire stairs as well.

Axis of movement Dynamic lines of the treads and risers

Platforms on each floor establish a rhythm

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Gallery Iterations Exploring the fire stair in plan

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Model Iterations

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Final

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Site Plan

1” : 50’

Central Street

W 19th Terrace

W 20th Street

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Teaching Kitchen Cafe Coat Check Curations Offices

Event Space Library Loading Dock Mechanical Room Storage

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Wall Section

Membrane 1 Rigid Insulation 2 Corrugated Steel Deck 3 Cellular Beam 4 Gypsum Wall Board 5 Extruded Fins 6 VM-Zinc Metal Panels 7 Sheathing 8 Steel Studs 9 Return Air Cavity 10 Radiant Heating 11 Concrete Slab 12 Fine Gravel 13 Coarse Gravel 14 Foundation Wall 15 Perforated Drain Pipe 16 Spread Footing 17

Section Model

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Design+Build

The Dirt Works Studio Sensory Pavilion Lawrence, KS 263 ft2 ArchDaily - Best Student Design Build Projects Worldwide Architect’s Newspaper - Best of Design for Student Work

Background Our client, Audio Reader, provides its clients recordings of volunteers reading whatever printed material the client requested. Volunteers also do live broadcasts via FM radio. Audio Reader maintains a small garden that appeals to their visually disabled clients, the Sensory Garden. Our task was to replace the dilapidated, octagonal gazebo in Audio Reader’s Sensory Garden. After 6 weeks of design and construction document production, we demolished the gazebo and spent 7 weeks building the pavilion.

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Rammed Earth

Soil, Cement, and Pigment

Earth is the oldest construction material known to man. From ancient settlements in the Middle East to the indigenous tribes of North America, every civilization has used earth in their buildings. Rammed earth, characterized by compressing soil, is similarly embedded in vernacular construction. In the Dirt Works Studio, we added cement, rebar, and dye to the soil to enhance the strength and aesthetic properties of this primordial building material.

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Shou-Sugi-Ban

Translation: Burnt Cedar Board Shou-sugi-ban is a Japanese method of preserving wood, specifically cedar. The carpenters traditionally stacked the wood in a chimney shape and lit a fire in the middle, which would char the cedar over time. The charred finish enhances cedar’s natural resistance to decay, but it also provides fire and insect durability. In the Dirt Works Studio, we used handheld blowtorches and propane to speed the charring process. After charring, we hand brushed every board of the roof to remove the excess soot and ash. The last step consisted of applying a coat of linseed oil to the charred wood.

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Design Charrettes

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Acknowledgements Randy and Colinda Austin, pictured opposite, for their generosity and trust Mike Brunin of Apex Engineers, for his engineering guidance Kansas Public Radio’s Audio-Reader division, for providing us an incredible opportunity Frank Male, for helping us pick sensorially diverse vegetation The various vendors who discounted or donated their goods and services Professor Chad Kraus and my classmates

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Paris Portfolio