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THE WEEK AHEAD – MARCH 22-28 THURSDAY: Partly cloudy FRIDAY: Partly cloudy SATURDAY: Partly cloudy SUNDAY: Partly cloudy MONDAY: Partly cloudy TUESDAY: Partly cloudy WEDNESDAY: Mostly cloudy

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Local focus

Winthrop mayor finishes investigation

MethowTV puts the valley in spotlight

Still snowy in the passes

ARTS Page A5

STORY Page A3

Methow Valley News

PUBLISHED WEEKLY SINCE 1903

TWISP, WASHINGTON

VOL. 109 NO. 45

MARCH 21, 2012

Bear Creek golf course forfeited to lender

Closing of regional processing center will slow mail delivery

By Marcy Stamper

By Marcy Stamper Sending a letter from Winthrop to Twisp will take an extra day if the U.S. Postal Service goes ahead with plans to close a processing center in Wenatchee in May. While there would be no changes at the four post offices in the Methow Valley, the proposed closing of the processing and distribution center in Wenatchee means that all mail would be routed through Spokane. The Postal Service has a moratorium on any closures until May 15 but, “Unless they come up with financial relief, it’s a done deal – it’s their intention to close it,” said Ernie Swanson, communications program specialist for the Seattle District of the Postal Service. Closing the facility is among the Postal Service’s recommendations to address ongoing deficits – $3.3 billion in the last three months of 2011 alone, according to Swanson. The Wenatchee facility is one of 252 such centers across the country considered for closure. After an evaluation the Postal Service recommended closing all but 20 of them. The largest local impact from the change would mean that standards for delivery of local first-class mail, currently set at one day, will double to two days. Mail that used to be delivered in two days – say, from Twisp to Seattle – would take three. Letters mailed in the Methow are already trucked to Wenatchee for processing, but first-class mail typically returns the next day. Under the new arrangement, the mail would be trucked to Wenatchee and transferred See MAIL on Page A2

75¢

Photo by Laurelle Walsh

NH & L Rare Earth spokesman Tim Henderson stands in front of tailings piles set for reprocessing at the old Alder Mill property that his company purchased in November.

Permit questions halt work at Alder Mill cleanup site

By Laurelle Walsh Cleanup work has stopped at the Alder Mill site near Twisp while the property’s owners respond to Okanogan County’s requirement for a conditional use permit. Applying for a permit is likely to be complicated and to involve other state and federal agencies either as commenters or as additional regulators – a prospect that Tim Henderson, spokesman for NH&L Rare Earth LLC, sees as an unnecessary obstruction to his company’s ambitious plans for the historic site. In an interview on Monday (March 19) Henderson acknowledged receipt of the stop-work order from the county and said, “As far as I’m concerned, the DOE [state Department of Ecology] are the instigators. The county was ordered to issue the

stop-work order by the DOE.” Henderson threatened unspecified legal actions against people or agencies that NH&L perceives as hindering the company’s efforts. “It’s harder to get permitted in the state of Washington than anyplace else in the world,” Henderson said. “The DOE and [federal] EPA don’t have jurisdiction, and I have proof. According to law we have the right to do what we are doing.”

County needs information

That has yet to be resolved, however, and for now work has ceased at the site. NH&L plans to recover metal values that were missed during the initial processing of the ore. After processing, the tailings may be sold as fertilizer or used for other industrial purposes. NH&L also wishes to have the site

removed from Ecology’s Hazardous Sites list. Company representatives stated that the proposed use of the site, after it is cleaned up, would be for home sites. Okanogan County Director of Planning Perry Huston said the stopwork order was driven by ground disturbance in proximity to mapped wetlands on the site. According to Huston, he received verbal permission to enter the property from Henderson, and visited the Alder Mill site on March 8 after receiving complaints from neighbors. The stopwork order was issued by mail on March 12, he said. Until NH&L lays out a scope-ofwork plan, it is unknown what permits will be required, Huston said. The county has issued no permits to the company and has not received any See ALDER on Page A2

The developer who bought the Bear Creek Golf Course in 2007 has defaulted on the loan, forfeiting the 175-acre property to a bank. It had been more than a year since McCormack Vineyard Partners last made a payment on the $2.2 million loan, said Greg Oakes, chief lending officer with Cashmere Valley Bank, which now owns the golf course, clubhouse and 11 adjoining lots. In December, McCormack agreed to a forfeiture rather than a foreclosure, avoiding complicated legal proceedings, said Oakes. Bill Sygitowicz, a partner with Mike McCormack in the development company, said McCormack was the financial partner and had put up all the money, while Sygitowicz, based in Bellingham, did all the work and would share in the potential profits. Sygitowicz said he learned in December of the negotiations with the bank. McCormack, who is based in California, referred questions to Sygitowicz as the local person and declined further comment. “Whatever he told you, he told you. Let’s leave it at that,” said McCormack. The bank is working out the details of managing the golf course and intends to open it “approximately on time,” said Oakes. If the property doesn’t sell, the bank will operate the golf course, but will close it if that turns out to be impossible, he said. Sygitowicz, who has managed the golf course for the past several years, said he had been in discussions with the bank to continue that role through a lease, but on Monday (March 19) a bank representative told him, “Hold it – we have different plans,” he said. Sygitowicz said he had contracted

See BEAR CREEK on Page A3

Medicine that transcends borders By Marcy Stamper “When life seems a little too straight and mundane, I know it’s time for another mission,” said Skip Edmonds, who has worked as a volunteer for Doctors Without Borders in Nigeria, the Congo and Libya during the past year and a half. Working in areas with pressing needs “certainly makes you appreciate what we have in this country,” said Edmonds, who recently retired from a 30-year career as an anesthesiologist in Seattle and unwinds at his house in Mazama. The Methow provides a real refuge from chaos and violence Edmonds has witnessed around the world. “I love to decompress over here – it’s the perfect place,” said Edmonds, who has been coming with his wife, Diane, a retired nurse, to their home in Mazama for the past decade. Working with Doctors Without Borders (referred to by volunteers as MSF, the abbreviation for the organization’s French name, Médecins Sans Frontières) was Edmonds’ first experience volunteering as a physician. He initially contacted the group after the earthquake in Haiti but, because of the lengthy vetting process – to make sure a person is a good match and will be successful working in the field – it was eight months before Edmonds’ first

mission, to the oil-producing Niger Delta in Nigeria in December 2010. Last year Edmonds went twice to Libya, first for an emergency mission at the height of the war and later to Misrata, where he cared primarily for rebel soldiers coming in from the front and for wounded prisoners from Kaddhafi’s army. MSF, created by doctors and journalists 41 years ago and awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1999, is completely impartial and sends physicians wherever they are needed. In war zones they treat the wounded from all sides of a conflict. The majority of work is done by local staff – of the 25,000 people working with MSF around the world, only 2,000 are expatriates – and only 20 percent of the volunteers provide medical care. The work exposes volunteers to staggering conditions caused by various catastrophes, not only by war. Edmonds’ mission in the Niger Delta took him to one of the most polluted places in the world, where people vandalize pipelines to steal oil, spilling the equivalent of one Exxon Valdez every year, he said. Over the past two to three decades life expectancy there has dropped by 20 years, to just 45. “It’s not a war zone – there’s just a high level of endemic violence,” with injuries from cars, bullets and machetes, said Edmonds.

Most of Edmonds’ missions have been surgical, using his skills as an anesthesiologist (one of the specialties most in need by MSF), but in the Congo Edmonds’ main focus was in the emergency room, treating children with cerebral malaria, which is often fatal. While the facilities are remote (it took Edmonds a week to get to the hospital in the Congo), the operating rooms are adequately equipped, he said. “We’re not doing sophisticated medicine. We’re just trying to save as many lives as we can until the country can provide care,” he said. MSF typically renovates an existing hospital or clinic but sometimes has to build a facility. The organization always works with local physicians and staff and, once a facility is operational, returns it to local people as soon as possible, said Edmonds. “Their strong suit is logistics and response to need,” he said. Volunteers work 12 to 18 hours a day, seven days a week. Edmonds’ average day began with breakfast in accommodations shared by some 30 volunteers, followed by a security briefing – a description of what to expect and any reports of new violence. They made rounds at the hospital for as many as 100 patients before starting in the operating room by 10 a.m., where they worked until 8 p.m. before

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Photo courtesy of Skip Edmonds

Skip Edmonds at work in the operating room in Nigeria’s Niger Delta in December 2010, his first of four missions with Doctors Without Borders. returning to their lodging for dinner and falling into bed. While the situation is stressful, with high levels of chaos and often violence – in Libya there was intermittent shelling – Edmonds said he didn’t worry about security, but about medicine. Others in the organization handled safety issues, building on strong relationships with local con-

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tacts. In fact, the missions tend to be more stressful for family and friends at home than for those in the field, since communication can be difficult or even impossible. MSF office personnel do what they can to keep families informed. “You’re working in a stressful, See MEDICINE on Page A2


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Page A2

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Methow Valley News

Settlement date set MAIL in White wolf case By Marcy Stamper The state’s wildlife violations case against William and Tom White has been set for settlement on May 31. State and federal prosecutors and attorneys for the Whites have been negotiating a potential joint settlement that would address the state charges for illegal hunting as well as federal charges against the two men for shooting at least two endangered gray wolves, according to Okanogan County deputy prosecuting attorney David Gecas. While the two cases are separate, the potential settlement would address both state and federal charges, said Gecas. State charges against William White and his son Tom White include hunting black bears out of season and illegal use of dogs to hunt black bears. William White is also charged with hunting black bears without a tag, hunting mule deer out of sea-

son, unlawfully transporting wildlife and providing false information. In the federal case, both men have been charged with shooting at least two, and possibly as many as five, gray wolves from the Lookout Mountain pack. The 12-count indictment resulted from an investigation that began in December 2008 following a botched attempt to smuggle a wolf pelt. Tom’s wife, Erin, is charged with smuggling in an attempt to ship the pelt to Canada. Prosecutors and attorneys are still awaiting the preparation of paperwork and an investigation report related to the federal charges, which could affect the timeline in the case, said Gecas. The Whites raise cattle and manage timber on a 600-acre ranch near Lookout Mountain, bordering forested land where a gray wolf pack was discovered in the summer of 2008.

MEDICINE difficult environment, but it’s very worthwhile. Every single mission challenges you in a different way – I always find I learn something,” said Edmonds. “For people who love routine, it’s not a good thing, but if you enjoying facing challenges and not knowing what’s around the corner, send in an application,” said Edmonds, who offered to talk to anyone

From Page A1 who is considering volunteering. “It’s probably the most gratifying medicine I’ve had the opportunity to practice. People tend to be very grateful – it’s totally devoid of concerns about payment.” Edmonds expects to go on another mission this year and is waiting for an assignment. “All I’ve got to do is tell them I’m free,” he said.

From Page A1

after next year. to a larger truck for the trip While the Postal Service to Spokane, said Swanson. handled a record volume of Ironically, mail starting out mail as recently as 2006 (213 closer to Spokane, which billion pieces) the amount, would not have to make particularly of first-class the extra round trip, could mail, has dropped every get here overnight if mailed year since then, so that last early in the day, he said. year there were only 178 bilLetter carriers’ schedlion pieces. Projections are ules and the time of day for first-class mail to drop when mail is delivered here, by half in the next 10 years, as well as pick-up times at while standard, less-profitcollection boxes, are not able mail (mass advertising) expected to change, said will remain steady or even Swanson. increase slightly, according While the Postal Service to the Postal Service. is a semi-governmental Many of the Postal agency, a 1970 law required Photo by Marcy Stamper Service’s own studies are it to become largely self-susTwisp postmaster Dario Vizcaria helps a customer ship a packavailable on a website called taining. The Service received age. While mail will take an extra day to reach most destinations, Save the Post Office. The a Congressional approprialocal delivery times and routes will not change. professor at New York Unition to support the transiversity who maintains the tion but covered its own Today the Postal Service site questions the projected savcosts annually from 1982 until resulting in further revenue 2006, said Swanson. Despite losses as customers turn else- gets almost no public fund- ings and points to testimony this quasi-independent status, where. They contend that ing, and a $15 billion line of to the Postal Regulatory ComCongress still has the authority closing thousands of rural post credit from the U.S. Treasury, mission in December about the for setting postage rates and offices would save less than 1 is “just about tapped out,” said effect of slower first-class mail percent of the annual budget Swanson. on revenues, suggesting that operating procedures. the “plant consolidation plan Since 2006 the Postal Ser- but would have a devastating vice has also been subject to a impact on local communities. Lower volumes lead to cuts would impact mail volumes Closing the Wenatchee even more than the Internet” The Congressmen urge a requirement to pre-fund retiree health benefits through 2016, restructuring of the require- facility would probably mean through 2020. Delivery of the Methow which amounts to $5.5 billion ment that the Postal Service the loss of 20 jobs, although a year, said Swanson. The ac- fully fund the retirement there may be the need for ad- Valley News to local subscribcount currently has a surplus benefits, noting that no other ditional employees in Spokane, ers would probably not be that Swanson said would cover public or private entity in the said Swanson. The closure is affected, but deliveries outside U.S. is required to do so. Mu- projected to save the Postal of the valley would probably these benefits for 75 years. Two members of the U.S. nicipalities with the highest Service $1.4 million a year, he take another day or two, said Swanson. House of Representatives sent credit ratings typically fund said. After the proposed cloThe earliest closures would a letter to colleagues earlier future benefits at 80 percent or sures, Washington would have take effect May 19. Any fathis month about the budget less, they say. The Postal Service was only two processing and distri- cilities not closed by August 31 crisis facing the Postal Service, warning against being “rushed granted a break on paying into bution centers, in Spokane and would remain open until next into false choices which could this fund through August, and Seattle, down from 11. Nation- year so as not to interfere with accelerate the decline of the other bills pending in Congress wide, 186 of the 673 processing mail-in ballots for the upcomwould provide additional centers have been closed since ing presidential election. Postal Service.” The official public comThe two argue that end- relief, but there has been little 2006, and the Postal Service ing next-day delivery would action on any of the legislation, envisions that fewer than 200 ment period on the closures will be needed to process mail ended in December. significantly degrade service, said Swanson.

ALDER

From Page A1

permit applications from NH&L at this time, he added. “What they need to do depends on what they want to do,” said Huston. “I have bits and pieces of information but no application.” If Okanogan County issues a conditional use permit to NH&L, commenting agencies will be notified, Huston said. “Quite likely other agencies will be involved,” Huston said. For example, if NH&L wants to excavate, the Department of Natural Resources will be involved. The Environmental Protection Agency “may step in” due to the property’s historic status as a Superfund site, he said. “If what they do rises to the level of the Metals Mining and Milling Act [RCW 78.56], the Department of Ecology would be involved,” Huston added. The county has ordered NH&L

not to disturb the site further until the permitting process is complete, Huston said.

February meeting

A pre-application meeting between three representatives of NH&L Rare Earth, and eight Department of Ecology staff plus one member of the Governor’s Office of Regulatory Assistance and one member of the Department of Natural Resources, was held at DOE offices in Yakima on Feb. 17. According to Ecology’s minutes from the meeting, Richard Nevitt of NH&L clarified that the mining company does not own the property where the Alder Mill buildings – part of an earlier EPA Superfund site cleanup – were located, or the Alder Mine. (During a visit to NH&L’s property with a Methow Valley News reporter on Monday, Henderson confirmed that his company does not own the land where

the actual mill building – demolished during the Superfund cleanup in 2002 – once stood. Nor does the company own the pond downslope of the mill. The tailings pond that NH&L intends to work lies above the old mill site and was the source of the 1952 flood that preceded the closure of the mill.) Ecology program representatives offered permitting comments. Minutes stated that Air Quality permits may be required for stationary engines that exceed a certain horsepower threshold and for dust control. Newly generated tailings must be tested to make sure they do not exceed hazardous waste limits. A State Waste Discharge Permit will be required, and a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit may be required. Jason Shira of Ecology’s Toxic Cleanup Program stated that the cleanup associated with the proposed

The DirT DocTor

project could be accomplished under the “voluntary cleanup program” or be an “agreed order.” Shira went on to say that any cleanup must meet the requirements listed in WAC 173-340, the Model Toxics Control Act. For groundwater usage above 5,000 gallons per day, NH&L would have to secure a water right, according to Tom Mackie of Ecology’s Water Resources program. John Bromley of Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) stated that based on the size of the proposed operation, a surface mining permit will be required through DNR. In closing comments, NH&L’s Nevitt stated that since the project is located on private property, Okanogan County would be the lead agency for the State Environmental Policy Act, according to minutes. Henderson told the Methow Valley News that he and business partner

Nevitt “disagree with the meeting minutes” from the Feb. 17 meeting with Ecology. “They whitewashed the minutes,” Henderson said. “A lot of things both sides said were not in the minutes.” According to Henderson, he stated twice at the meeting that, “If they didn’t do things right, I’d sue them.” He added that he plans to take legal action against individuals who were present at the meeting. Henderson likened the Department of Ecology to a “dictatorship,” adding, “They’re supposed to be there to help you, but their agenda is to stop you.” Henderson praised the Okanogan County planning department, saying, “They are for mining and for business in the county. The county planners are some of the best people I’ve met,” he said.

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Methow Valley News

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Page A3

Twisp to review mutual police aid pact with Winthrop

Acheson says investigation turned up no reason to act, but Ing-Moody says concerns remain By Ann McCreary The Twisp Town Council will consider whether to reinstate a mutual law enforcement assistance agreement with Winthrop’s police department that was suspended last December by Twisp Mayor Soo Ing-Moody, who said then that unspecified actions by Winthrop police posed “concerns for officer and citizen safety.” Those actions remain unspecified. Winthrop Mayor Dave Acheson said last week that he had conducted a personal investigation into the incidents that prompted IngMoody’s decision to suspend the mutual aid agreement, and he concluded that “the instances did not involve issues of officer or public safety.” That conclusion essentially rebuts the original concerns of last December, as characterized by Twisp when it terminated the mutual assistance agreement, and may not be satisfactory to Twisp officials. Acheson has encouraged Twisp to reinstate the mutual aid agreement, but did not provide details about his investigation, because he said it was a “personnel matter.” In the three months since suspension of the mutual aid agreement, officers from the

Winthrop Marshal’s department have not been asked to assist with any law enforcement activities in Twisp. In comments this week, Ing-Moody said Acheson’s conclusion “doesn’t change anything for us. The next step is to take this to the council … to decide if we want to ratify it (the suspension) and make it permanent.” She said the matter will be on next Tuesday’s (March 27) council agenda. Ing-Moody said she and Acheson “have a good working relationship. I respect his decision based on what he feels is best for his (police) department and town … although I disagree with it.” Neither mayor has discussed specifics of the incidents that prompted suspension of the mutual assistance agreement, but Ing-Moody said Twisp Police Chief Paul Budrow had expressed concerns to her last fall about working with Winthrop officers. “All of the (Twisp) officers were concerned and had written letters to their supervisor (Budrow). Then Paul sent me one, which I reviewed and conducted an investigation,” Ing-Moody said. She said her decision to end the mutual aid pact was prompted by a specific incident last fall that occurred

Winthrop Mayor Dave Acheson’s full statement “In response to the Town of Twisp December 20, 2011 withdrawal of jurisdictional consent for law enforcement officers of the Town of Winthrop to provide services within the Town of Twisp, I conducted an investigation. Twisp expressed concerns regarding officer safety and potential liability exposure as a result of certain specific instances. I interviewed individuals involved in the instances and reviewed other related information. I concluded that the instances did not involve issues of officer or public safety. Also, none of the instances originated from or resulted in any citizen complaints. While the initial reaction of the Town of Twisp to these instances indicates that Twisp may not agree with the results of the investigation, I encourage Twisp to reevaluate its position regarding mutual jurisdictional law enforcement consent. Regardless of the position of Twisp concerning jurisdictional law enforcement consent, I look forward to continuing to work with the Mayor, Town Council and staff of the Town of Twisp on matters of mutual interest and benefit to our communities.” within Twisp town limits and involved officers from both police departments as well as Aero Methow Rescue personnel. “There was a concern by officers for their own safety as a result of the way it was being handled by Winthrop police officers,” Ing-Moody said Monday (March 19). She

said her personal investigation of the incidents provided “affirmation that it had happened as reported.” She said her concerns also included potential liability for the town of Twisp. Ing-Moody said she has been waiting to hear whether Winthrop town officials “had the same mutual concerns.”

Given Acheson’s statement that the instances did not involve issues of officer or public safety, Ing-Moody said Twisp officials “would have to reassess the situation as a whole and determine whether or not the level of risk would be reduced or eliminated.” On the apparent gap between the Town of Twisp’s concerns and the result of his investigation, Acheson said, “Sometimes there is a difference in perceptions of issues like this.” Regarding whether he was hoping for any particular response from Mayor IngMoody, Acheson said, “I know the Town of Twisp will do what they feel is best. Soo and I have a good relationship and this issue doesn’t change the strong ties between the towns.” Acheson said this week that he “interviewed personnel from multiple agencies in the course of the investigation,” which he conducted by himself. The investigations included conversations with Winthrop’s police officers. “I deemed no disciplinary action is necessary,” Acheson said, but added some procedural changes will take place as a result. “We will make improvements in how we do things, specifically effective commu-

BEAR CREEK with and paid consultants as recently as January and February, but had not been reimbursed by McCormack. “We were left with significant unpaid invoices also,” said Sygitowicz, who said his firm, Vineyard Development Company, had not been paid for about two years.

Original plan for homes

The developer ’s initial plans were for “an environmentally sensitive community” with home sites overlooking the fairways and cabins near the clubhouse for short-term stays. Over the past several years they began to explore the possibility of foregoing development in exchange for a conservation easement. They still hoped to double the number of holes from nine to 18. “We are continuing to pursue our goal of reallocation of the water and real estate

rights to place the land under a conservation easement and generate funds to expand the golf course to 18 holes, with the goal of doing no residential development,” said Sygitowicz this week. Sygitowicz said he had been in discussions with Trout Unlimited and the Methow Conservancy over the past three years in an effort to negotiate a conservation easement. “We were in the final throes of fulfilling our goal when the whole thing collapsed,” he said. Lisa Pelly, director of the Washington Water Project with Trout Unlimited, confirmed that her organization had been in discussions with Sygitowicz. Trout Unlimited’s main interest is to help the golf course implement irrigation efficiencies to be able to return water to instream flows in Bear Creek. The golf course is a key player because it holds

nications between agencies on-scene and off-scene. We will clarify when it’s appropriate to do civil standbys,” Acheson said. Acheson said all the Winthrop Town Council members have been briefed on his findings. “It was challenging to conduct the investigation within a part-time mayor’s schedule,” Acheson said. “Part of why it seemed to take so long was because several key personnel were on vacation, so I had to wait to talk to them until they got back to the valley.” Both Twisp and Winthrop have three-man police departments, and receive back-up from the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Department and the Washington State Patrol. Acheson said he hopes the Twisp Council will decide to reinstate the mutual assistance agreement. “Regardless of the position of Twisp concerning jurisdictional law enforcement consent,” Acheson wrote, “I look forward to continuing to work with the mayor, Town Council and staff of the Town of Twisp on matters of mutual interest and benefit to our communities.” Reporter Laurelle Walsh contributed to this article. From Page A1

the largest water right by far on the creek, which is often dry by the end of the summer, said Pelly. The Methow Conservancy helped facilitate a conversation between McCormack Vineyard and Trout Unlimited to explore opportunities for restoring more natural flows to Bear Creek, said Conservancy executive director Jason Paulsen. “While we have monitored the situation from the time [they] first purchased the golf course, the Methow Conservancy has never engaged in formal conservation easement discussions with McCormack or Sygitowicz,” said Paulsen by email. “This is based in the fact that conservation easements and golf courses are generally not a good fit for land trusts.” The three groups met as recently as the fall but the golf course owners did not provide the additional information

Trout Unlimited had requested and “the conversation just sort of stopped,” said Pelly.

Developer’s plans evolve

McCormack Vineyard bought the golf course for $3.5 million in June 2007 and subsequently acquired several smaller adjacent parcels for $250,000. They relinquished an option to purchase 265 acres between the golf course and Pearrygin Lake State Park, which were later purchased by Washington State Parks. McCormack Vineyard also approached State Parks in 2010 with a plan to use some park land to expand the golf course and restore wetlands in the park. The real estate manager for State Parks said the discussion “just dwindled away” after some initial exchanges. In January 2011 the 163 acres that make up the main part of the golf course were divided into eight lots of ap-

Bear Creek Golf Course proximately 20 acres each; in addition, there are four smaller parcels, from one to four acres. The county assessor’s records put the taxable value of the 20-acre lots from $215,000 to $285,000, with a total value over just over $2 million. “I’m still in love with the

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101 S Glover St, Twisp

MVN, pg 3

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File photo by Joyce Campbell

project,” said Sygitowicz, who said he had been trying to find a new partner to purchase the property but acknowledged that could be difficult in this financial environment. “It’s all in limbo right now. We’ll see what shakes out in the next few days,” he said.


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Page A4

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Methow Valley News

Opinion

No Bad Days

A rare encounter

Many days on the way to work I see bald eagles perched in treetops along the Methow River, solitary and magnificent even from a distance. Neither those far-off sightings nor watching them elegantly soar over the valley can prepare you for what a grown eagle looks like close-up and life-size. On Sunday I happened to be in the newspaper office when state Fish and Game wildlife officer Cal Treser stopped by with the body of a bald eagle that had recently died. The bird had been found by local residents, who called Treser. He brought it by for our sports and outdoors editor, Mike Maltais, to photograph in connection with a story Mike is doing. (See photo on B6.) The eagle showed no evident signs of traumatic injury, Treser said. But the bird was fairly old, he said – one way you can tell is by feeling the breastbone to see if it is meaty or shrunken – and like everything else, they sometimes just die. That appeared to be the case with this eagle, Treser said. Even in death, it was breathtaking – Don Nelson the broad wings, powerful beak and huge, sharp talons marked the bird as a raptor to be reckoned with. More than that, it was simply beautiful. Seeing the long, lustrous wing feathers that close-up, I understood why they are so valued and sought-after. I found myself wondering what it would be like if the eagle suddenly came to, backed us off with a fierce glare, and took to the air again. Of course, that wasn’t going to happen. But I felt privileged to pay tribute to an icon. And I was again reminded not to take for granted the wildlife we share this valley and mountains with. What we accept as common experiences – even an occasional cougar in a back yard – would be considered wondrous in most other places. The bird’s body will be sent to a U.S. Fish and Wildlife forensics lab in Ashland, Ore., before its final destination at the National Eagle Repository near Denver, Colo.

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It’s hard to argue with Bite of the Methow’s success. This year’s event set records for attendance, auction items sold and money raised for Kiwanis Club of Winthrop projects. That all added up to an elbow-bumping capacity crowd at the Winthrop Auditorium. The long line for food snaked around the room until those at the front of the line were able to converse with those at the back of queue. A few people looked at the daunting line and decided to look elsewhere for sustenance. But even with the wait, everyone was well fed by evening’s end, many finding seating in the balconies and upstairs meeting room. Just moving around the big room, you couldn’t help but be social, and everyone seemed to be enjoying the atmosphere. In casual conversation since then, a couple of people have mentioned that perhaps it’s time to look at how to accommodate such impressive turnouts – not necessarily by moving to a different venue, but possibly by rearranging things a bit. One suggestion was to move the food serving area outside to big tents. The obvious issue with that idea is that no one can predict what vagaries the weather will visit upon us. It’s what you might call a happy problem, given the community’s involvement and generosity, and the participation of local chefs. One bit of advice you may want to store away for next year: Buy your tickets early. It’s going to be another great party. Don Nelson is publisher of the Methow Valley News

Clarification Joseph Marver, owner of a nine-unit hotel called Twisp River Suites that is being built on Twisp Avenue, clarified this week that although he is asking the Town of Twisp to allow conversion of the units to possible condominium sales at some point, the units are not currently for sale and will be available for nightly, weekly or monthly rentals. A Twisp Planning Commission hearing on the request for a “change in ownership pattern” is scheduled for April 11 at 7 p.m. The hotel is scheduled to open in late May.

Methow Valley News PUBLISHED WEEKLY SINCE 1903 101 N. Glover St., P.O. Box 97, Twisp, WA 98856 Telephone: (509) 997-7011 FAX: (509) 997-3277 Email: editor@methowvalleynews.com Homepage: www.methowvalleynews.com Don Nelson, PUBLISHER/EDITOR Marilyn Bardin, OFFICE MANAGER Robin Doggett, ADVERTISING MANAGER Sue Misao, THIS 'N' THAT Callie Fink, ADVERTISING Marcy Stamper, REPORTER Janet Mehus, OFFICE ASSISTANT Ann McCreary, REPORTER Dana Sphar, AD DESIGN/PRODUCTION Mike Maltais, SPORTS Linda Day, AD DESIGN Laurelle Walsh, REPORTER/ PROOFREADER Jay Humling, DISTRIBUTION contributors

Bill Biddle, Erik Brooks, Tania Gonzalez Ortega, Sally Gracie, Patrick Hannigan, Jim & Jane Hutson, Rosalie Hutson, Ashley Lodato, Patrick McGann, Sam Owen, Joanna Smith, Bob Spiwak, Solveig Torvik, Dave Ward

Display advertising deadline for this newspaper is on the Friday previous to publication at 5 p.m. Classified advertising deadline is Monday at noon. The deadline for news items is Monday at noon. Member of the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association. THE METHOW VALLEY NEWS (USPS Publication No. 343480) is published weekly by MVN Publishing, LLC, 101 N. Glover St., Twisp, WA 98856. Subscription rates: $30 inside Okanogan County, $40 outside of Okanogan County and $50 outside of Washington State per year (in advance). Periodical class postage paid at Twisp, Washington, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE METHOW VALLEY NEWS, P.O. Box 97, Twisp, WA 98856. THE METHOW VALLEY NEWS does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that the newspaper might fail to meet its obligation to publish each week of the individual subscription period, in which case the prorated cost of those issues missed would be refunded.

Box 97: Letters to the editor

Tania Gonzalez Ortega

Great celebration Dear Editor: We truly have a wonderful community and they came out to celebrate. It was so much fun to participate in the Centennial Celebration for the Methow Valley Community Center. It is really hard to fully capture the evening but it was unique. Horse Crazy played a great mix of swing and waltz tunes. Line dancers taught a fun group waltz. The dance floor was full. To end the evening our very own valley roller derby women gave use a taste of what this newly formed group can do. All in all it was a great success. Just a quick reminder that Community Center membership letters will be arriving soon.  Hope everyone fills it out and returns it. We are so lucky to have this great center. Carolyn Sullivan Winthrop

Prayer and natural healing Dear Editor: I read with interest the Methow Valley News article about the Carlton couple, the Swezeys, who have been accused of seconddegree murder for allowing two to three days to elapse before seeking medical help for their sick son. My parents believed in letting nature take its course when it came to youngsters getting sick. The first time I can remember going to a doctor, aside from vaccinations, was when I was 14. I came down with the flu which lasted for the better part of two weeks. My parents took me to see Dr. Malzacker in Twisp after I’d lost quite a bit of weight; apparently if you don’t eat you lose weight. Dr. Malzaker, who was not known for his soothing bed-side manner, told my parents that I was going to be fine and that he was gratified that they hadn’t trotted me in earlier when I could have given it to many of his waiting patients. He said to take me home and prescribed ice-cream to fatten me up; fine by me. My grandmother lived with us during this time and watched over me with some dread as she had lost two of my mother’s siblings to flu during the early 1900s period. My parents were quietly religious, my old-country Lutheran grandmother more so, all very much believed in the power of prayer. What this background leads to is many people believe in natural healing, waiting to see a doctor, and the power of prayer. I don’t know what kind of charges they would have faced today because they waited for nearly two weeks to take me to the doctor, perhaps attempted murder. I don’t believe the government has any business pursuing this couple or any other couple in their situation. In the same issue there was another article of note which I read with a mixture of alarm/chagrin. Okanogan County Prosecutor Karl Sloan, who is pursuing the Swezeys, is running for Superior Court Judge. I guess it might be the cynic in me but it crossed my mind that Sloan wants headlines that indicate to the people of Okanogan County that he is tough on crime. Keith Hole Methow

Keep the momentum

Dear Editor: Please vote yes on our upcoming school levies and bond. There are many markers of student excellence in the Methow Valley School District: • Consistent high rankings in test scores. • The wide participation in our competitive athletic programs.

• Our top-tier finishes in the Math is Cool competitions, state qualifiers in Knowledge Bowl, Speech and Debate and History Day competitions all reflect a focus on academic excellence. Each of us with kids in school can make our own lists of successes. This is no accident. Start with a prudent, creative school board who care deeply about improving learning for all students, and are learners themselves. Add an administrative team that articulates the district vision that all students can learn, and provides a climate where everyone is encouraged to do their best in a safe environment. Then add caring and capable teachers who are working together to consistently upgrade their programs. Complete the recipe with dedicated parents who work as partners with the school to support their kids. As a result, students come to school expecting to learn and be challenged in a caring place. These elements combine to create a formula for continued progress and improvement. Our district is moving forward. We need to keep the momentum going. It is time once again for the community to do its part for our future. Two levies and a bond are before us. Each one is important to continuing our first-rate effort to give our kids the best education possible. The good news is that these are essentially roll-over funding packages that will not raise the school tax we are currently paying. The other good news is that the total rate is about $1.80 for $1,000 of valuation. It is among the lowest rates in the state and is a killer deal. Surrounding schools pay twice and three times that rate in their levies. In these days when the state is cutting funding, it is imperative that we not lose ground in our school improvement or cut vital programs. Please endorse our district’s positive momentum with a yes vote on the upcoming levies and bond. Gordy Reynaud Adrian Chavey Twisp

Mud, Dust, Smoke & Snow

It’s OK, we have a study for that

Hans and the other biologists are dedicated, competent and they are doing a good job. The steelhead fishery rebound on the Methow is nothing short of a miracle. And the steelheaders it brings is one of the top tourism categories we depend on. OK, then. Why am I still twitching? Another way to look at root balls and log jams placed in a stretch of the river considered nearly irresistible to hapless, clueless and probably inebriated tourists is Uh-oh. I think that’s my ... booby traps. And to the extent pager going off. possible, the habitat biologists When I read that story I will try to mitigate it so these thought it was the usual preobjects are not so controversial season cautionary tale about or deadly or vice versa. the sheer folly of stepping foot By mitigation, I think signs in the runoff-swollen Methow were mentioned, as in, “AbanRiver, kind of like the annual don hope all ye who put in caveat Barry Stromberger sends here.” Or perhaps something in about sticking your hand into in the way of disclosure: “Cauyour powered up snow blower tion, river booby trapped.” Or to free an obstruction. perhaps pre-emptive blame But something about it Patrick McGann shifting: “Whatever. Studies wasn’t quite right. For one thing have determined it’s your fault.” it was too early. We’re too busy There, I think that last one is falling down on the ice or lost in a snowdrift the one. I can stop twitching now. to worry about drowning. For another, I The study, The Recreational Use had this sense of being in the dark with Assessment, conducted by Wave Trek someone else in the room. My editorial Rescue out of Index and paid for by the guard hairs were twitching. Yakamas, shows that tourists are prone to ignorance, disregard to danger, silliness, “... what we put in the river ... ” The Yakamas, the feds and the state carelessness and at times astonishing acts have been improving the fish habitat on of idiocy. Well, slather me in honey and the Methow and its tributaries. I already throw me at a grizzly bear. The study was confined to a particular knew that. I also knew that improving said habitat involves installing wood, such as stretch of river where biologists would like to place wooden fish habitats which root balls and logs. I know this because I am a fish person. could possibly constitute an aggravating I have spent a career advocating for just this factor in the standard behavior of tourists. sort of thing. Habitat restoration is good. And I would imagine that it did not take It is necessary. It is difficult. We benefit a team of actuaries, statisticians and Tarot tremendously by the efforts of the state and card readers to come to the conclusion that the Yakamas from their restoration efforts. there may be some curiosity exhibited as “We want to do restoration – that’s our primary goal – but we take social factors and constraints very seriously and will mitigate our projects as much as possible so what we put in [the Methow River] isn’t going to be controversial or jeopardize people’s lives.” –Yakama Nation habitat biologist and Twisp Town Council Member Hans Smith, quoted in a Methow Valley News story, Feb. 29.

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to why, at some point in the future, there will have been an increase in mayhem on that stretch of the river. Basically we have a baseline. Two or three rescues per year per 1,000 floaters. But I have a feeling that’s two or three rescues per year for the entire river while the 1,000 figure comes just from the Winthrop-Twisp stretch. I’m guessing. So two or three rescues from, let’s guess, 2,000 floaters. Not exactly a panic button situation, if you ask me, even considering the potential lethality of inner tubes. However, if we then place a bunch of deadly objects like 27 sweepers, 32 dead heads, 13 log jams and 107 tangled up root balls, then what? What should we then expect in the way of rescues per 1,000? A decrease? Perhaps not. And then somebody is likely to say, “Hey, what’s going on?” And then somebody else is likely to say, “Hey, maybe if we get all this garbage out of the river, the tourists will stop trying to kill themselves on it.” And then somebody else will probably say, “Hey you can’t do that. There’s an Endangered Species Act.” And then somebody else will say, “Hey, let’s make some laws and regulations about inner tubes and rafts and kayaks and helmets and personal floatation devices and beer and maybe require some competency testing, and perhaps fence off the access points until after runoff, and levy some fines, and issue some permits at $45 per inner tube, and ... and ... and ...” And then somebody else will say, “And why are we infringing ourselves so?” And then somebody will answer and say, “Well, there was this study ...” And progress marches on. Patrick McGann lives in Twisp.


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Methow Valley News

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Arts LBHS students’ artwork honored

Four Liberty Bell High School students were honored at the 33rd annual Regional High School Art Show that opened last Saturday (March 17) at the Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center. About 200 students from throughout the North Central Educational Service District have works in various media on display. Submitted works were judged by a panel of local artists; a number are designated “Best of Show” and will advance to the state show in Olympia at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, April 6 through June 1. Among them will be a work entitled “Caged,” a colored pencil drawing by Liberty Bell senior Mollie J. Hunt that won a Best of Show award. Other Liberty Bell winners were: • Freshman Willy Duguay, second place in photography for “Self Portrait.” • Freshman Elise Putnam, third place in decorative arts for “Hunger.” • S o p h o m o re Fletcher Rickabaugh, second place in graphic arts for “Midsummer’s Night Dream.” "Midsummer's Night This piece will be on Dream" by Fletcher display in the lobby Rickabaugh of the Merc Playhouse for its A Midsummer Night’s Dream production, which opens Friday (March 23). Other Liberty Bell students who entered the show were Jason Herrst, photography and drawing; Amber Ness, ceramics/3-D; Amalia Webber, photography/ graphic arts; Dawn Smith, mixed media; Crickett Whittaker, photography; Kelsie Lenz, graphic arts; Olivia Smith-Bowers, painting; Eli Klemmeck, computer drawing; and Emilee Bailey, drawing and painting. The exhibition runs through May 5. The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information contact call 1-888-6240, or visit www.wvmcc.org. "Caged" by Mollie Hunt

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& Culture

MethowTV spotlights local characters, events By Laurelle Walsh MethowTV – the brainchild of local Renaissance man Terry Hunt – has a new studio, re-vamped website, and fresh video content designed to showcase the eclectic characters who live, work and play in the Methow Valley. “Dedicated to bringing you fun, inspiring, educational and interesting videos and news about this place that we love so much,” according to MethowTV.com, a web-based platform for viewing locally made documentaries, interviews, musical performances, sporting events and other archived videos. The MethowTV studio moved last December into room 7 of the Methow Valley Community Center. There, an AVID media composer – the same film and video editing software used to produce TV shows and movies – and a “slightly high-end home music recording studio,” share the 700-square-foot Photo by Sue Misao space with Hunt’s music classroom, In his MethowTV studios high atop the Community Center in Twisp, Terry Hunt, at the camera, video recording studio and website prepares to film a segment of The Danbert Nobacon Show. Here, Nobacon, right, interviews design space, Hunt said. Lynx Vilden, left, the subject of a show focusing on her primitive skills classes. “This all used to be at my home studio in my garage, but clients couldn’t get up the driveway in winter,” said Hunt, explaining the move. The premiere episode of the “Danbert in 2009 from the Icicle Arts Alliance for North For the last four to five years MethowTV Nobacon Show” features anchorman Noba- Central Washington. He now has two other has been the primary focus for Hunt, who con seated in the newsroom before a green projects in the works along the same lines: sees Internet-based TV as the future of televi- screen, conducting a six-minute interview With Respect to Art: Artists In Their Element sion. He chose the web-based video hosting with Methow Valley Rollergirls organizer for which he’s already interviewed artists service VIMEO to broadcast his videos. “I’m Rose Weagant-Norton. Episode 2 is an in- Mary Powell, Jeremy Newman and Allison reluctant to use YouTube because I want my terview with primitive skills teacher Lynx Ciancibelli; and With Respect to Our Elders, content to be exclusive to my site. I want Vilden. in which he profiles people 90 years old and people to come to MethowTV to view my Hunt welcomes collaborators on the up, including Lester Boccuzzi and the late work,” he said. MethowTV team and said he had wanted Marty Mendro. The website now features “The Danbert to find an anchorperson for the news show Hunt aims to release the five- to sixNobacon Show,” a news program “beam- for some time. minute “With Respect to …” segments as a ing at you from the tallest building in the “Danbert came upstairs to check out the web series rather than save all the footage Methow Valley: the tower of the Community studio on a Thursday and we discussed the for full-length documentaries. Center in Twisp,” according to collaborator, concept of producing a local news show. He MethowTV is not monetized at all at this performance artist and news anchorman came back on Sunday and we started filming point, said Hunt, whose projects have been Danbert Nobacon. self-funded for the last 10 years. Episode 1,” Hunt said. It’s not your parents’ news show, how“I believe in the maxim, ‘Do what you Phyllis Daniels is putting her 30 years ever. Hunt sees “The Danbert Nobacon in the movie business to good use too, ren- love and the money will follow.’ I just wish Show” as a news program for the valley. He dering assistance with the studio’s green the money were coming a bit quicker. I trust hopes to produce one 10-minute show per screen and other professional tricks of the that it’s all going to pay off,” Hunt said. week featuring valley news, profiling com- movie industry. Hunt sees potential revenue generation munity characters, pitching local products, Liberty Bell High School senior Tanner through product placement, having compaperforming comedic sketches and conduct- Radwick is doing his senior project with nies sponsor video “webisodes,” and producing roundtable interviews along the lines of Hunt, and collaborations with other young ing short promotional videos for businesses. “Charlie Rose,” Hunt said. videographers from LBHS’s video produc- “It’s the wave of the future; anybody can have “There are so many characters in this tions class can be viewed on MethowTV. their own video of their business,” he said. valley; you couldn’t dress up an actor and get Hunt’s first independent project was the The Methow Valley News showcases one him to be more interesting and believable than film With Respect to Farming, for which he won MethowTV video per week on its website, the people we have right here,” said Hunt. the prize for best feature-length documentary methowvalleynews.com.

Methow Conservancy On behalf of our volunteer Board of Directors, thank you for helping us to inspire people to care for the land of the Methow Valley! www.methowconservancy.org

Methow Conservancy Board Members: (back row) Phil Davis, Richard Hart, Craig Boesel, Gordy Reynaud, John Sinclair, Tom Doran, Kevin van Bueren, Scott Jennings, Vic Stokes; (front row) Jane Gilbertsen, Char Alkire, Kristin Devin, Beth Sinclair, Carrie Stokes, Mary McCrea.

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012

What’s Happening

Thursday March 22

Methow Valley News

Meetings, etc.

STRESS REDUCTION: Introductory presentation on mindfullness-based stress reduction at Winthrop Fitness. 997-2152. Free. 6-7pm

and other weekly things

Friday March 23 FREESTYLE DANCE: Heart-centered dance at The Studio, Twisp. $5. 9962017. 5:45-6:45pm VALLEY TEEN CENTER: Design charrette for valley teens to tell organizers what kind of Teen Center they want. Meet in the TwispWorks offices. 9979211. 6pm CHILDREN’S THEATER: A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Merc Playhouse, Twisp. 997-PLAY. $5-$12. 7pm COWBOY ROCK: The Last Outlaws perform at the Old Schoolhouse Brewery, Winthrop. Free. 996-3183. 7pm MV THEATER: Nunsense at MV Community Center, Twisp. 997-7062. $15$25. 7:30pm

Saturday March 24 SILK SCARF DYEING: Paint with dyes on silk with artist Dan Brown at Confluence Gallery, Twisp. For ages 12 and up. $65 (materials included, scholarships available). 997-2787. 8am-noon SPRING TEA & SALE: At the MV Senior Center, Twisp. 997-7722. 9am-2pm FOLK/SOUL/ROCK: Andrew Vait performs at the Old Schoolhouse Brewery, Winthrop. Free. 996-3183. 7pm ORCHESTRA & CHORUS: Okanogan Valley Orchestra & Chorus presents its Spring Concert at the Winthrop Barn. $8-$12. (509) 422-2456. 7pm CHILDREN’S THEATER: A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Merc Playhouse, Twisp. 997-PLAY. $5-$12. 7pm MV THEATER: Nunsense at MV Community Center, Twisp. 997-7062. $15-$25. 7:30pm

Sunday March 25 MV THEATER: Nunsense at MV Community Center, Twisp. 997-7062. $15-$25. 2pm CHILDREN’S THEATER: A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Merc Playhouse, Twisp. 997-PLAY. $5-$12. 2pm

Monday March 26 DINNER: Winthrop Barn Appreciation potluck dinner and membership meeting. Ham provided. Live music by Lazy R Pickers. Also, a raffle. 996-2117. 6pm LINE DANCING: Join others in the Twisp Valley Grange. $4. 997-8805. 6:30pm

Tuesday March 27 STORY TIME: Listen to stories at the Twisp Library. 997-4681. 1pm

Wednesday March 28 SOUP: “His Bread and Bowl” soup lunch at Tappi in Twisp. Free/donations. 9972875. Noon-2pm

Wednesday 3/21 Closet Quilters: Open studio, 309 Highway 20, Twisp. Free. 997-7020. Noon-5pm Eagles Auxiliary: Meeting at Eagles Hall, Twisp. 996-3869. 1pm Family Planning Clinic: Room One, 315 S. Lincoln St., Twisp. Info: 997-2050. 2-5pm LBHS Booster Club: Meeting at LBHS library. 996-3766. 7pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Calvary Church, Twisp. 997-0356. 7pm Winthrop Town Council: At the Winthrop Barn Hen House. 996-2320. 7pm

Barn tunes

File photo by Sue Misao

Lazy R Pickers, also known as Kip and Celeste Roberts, will perform oldtime music at the Winthrop Barn’s Appreciation Dinner on Monday. STRESS REDUCTION: Introductory presentation on mindfullness-based stress reduction at Winthrop Fitness. Free. 997-2152. 1-2pm STORY TIME: Stories read aloud at the Winthrop Library. 996-2685. 1:30pm VALLEY TEEN CENTER: Community open house at the new Teen Center in the TwispWorks office building. Bring questions and ideas, etc. 997-9211. 6pm

Thursday March 29 MASSAGE FOR SENIORS: Free 15-minute massages at MV Senior Center, Twisp. 923-1965. 10am-3pm CHILDREN’S THEATER: A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Merc Playhouse, Twisp. 997-PLAY. Pay-what-youcan. 7pm MV THEATER: Nunsense at MV Community Center, Twisp. $15-$25. 997-7062. 7:30pm

Friday March 30 CHILDREN’S THEATER: A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Merc Playhouse, Twisp. 997-PLAY. $5-$12. 7pm BLUES: The Vaughn Jensen Band performs at the Old Schoolhouse Brewery, Winthrop. Free. 996-3183.7pm MV THEATER: Nunsense at MV Community Center, Twisp. 997-7062. $15$25. 7:30pm

Saturday March 31 FRIENDS OF MUSIC: Vocal duets by Steve Cockfield and Joel Yelland at Omak First Presbyterian Church. Donation. (509) 422-2456. 3pm

FERMENTED FOODS: Learn to make sauerkraut, kimchi, creme fraiche and cultured butter with Kari Bown at Glover Street Market. $40. Register 997-1320. 6:30-9:30pm CHILDREN’S THEATER: A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Merc Playhouse, Twisp. 997-PLAY. $5-$12. 7pm BLUES: The Druthers perform at the Old Schoolhouse Brewery, Winthrop. Free. 996-3183.7pm MV THEATER: Nunsense at MV Community Center, Twisp. 997-7062. $15$25. 7:30pm

Sunday April 1 CHILDREN’S THEATER: A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the Merc Playhouse, Twisp. $15-$25. 2pm

Wednesday April 4 DEMENTIA: Community outreach for nonprofessional caregivers and families at Community Covenant Church, Twisp. $10 for 4-week series. Register (509) 679-7300. 6-8pm

Saturday April 7 EASTER EGG HUNT: Bring your basket to Pearrygin Lake State Park, Winthrop. Also, the Easter Bunny. Free. 997-8229. 11am FLAMENCO: Eric and Encarnacion perform at Twisp River Pub. $5. 9976822. 8:30pm

Sunday April 8 EASTER: Sunrise service in the Twisp Commons. 997-4904. 7am

94 min PG

TS AR ST IDAY FR

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Thursday 3/22 Twisp Chamber: Luncheon meeting at Community Covenant Church, Twisp. Noon Spinners & Weavers: Meets at 137 Old Twisp Highway. 9975666. 1pm Food Bank: “More than just food” at The Cove, 128 Glover St., Twisp. 997-0227. 1-4pm Career Path Services: Meets at Room One, Twisp. 9972050. 3-4pm Pipestone Orchestra: Rehearsal at MV Community Center, Twisp. 997-0222. 6:30pm Firefighters District 6: Training and meetings at local fire halls. 997-2981. 7pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Friendship Church, Winthrop. 996-8174. 7pm NA: Narcotics Anonymous meets at Horseshoe Mobile Home clubhouse, 305 Magers St., Twisp. (509) 826-6371. 8pm

Friday 3/23 Doctor: Free health care to uninsured people 18 and under at The Country Clinic, Winthrop. Appointment: 996-8180. Twisp PDA: Regular board meeting at TwispWorks. 9973300. 11am-1pm Bingo: Play at the Eagles Hall, Twisp. 997-8133. 6pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Friendship Church, Winthrop. 996-8174. 7pm

Saturday 3/24 TaiChi/QiGong: Gentle practice at The Studio, Twisp. $3. 996-2017. 9-10am Democrats: Democratic Central Committee potluck and discussion of caucus rules at the home of Jackie Bradley, 240 Crestview Dr., Okanogan. (509) 422-3723. Noon AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Forest Service building, 24 W. Chewuch Rd., Winthrop. 996-8174. 7pm

Sunday 3/25 NA: Narcotics Anonymous meets at Horseshoe Mobile Home clubhouse, 305 Magers St., Twisp. (509) 826-6371. 4pm

AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Masonic Hall, Twisp. 997-0356. 6:30pm

Monday 3/26 County Commissioners: Open meeting, Okanogan County Admin. Bldg., 123 Fifth Ave. N., Okanogan. (509) 422-7100. 9am-5pm Pool & Poker: Billiards (free) and poker ($5 buy-in) at the Eagles Hall, Twisp. 997-8133. 3pm-close Al Anon: Support group for families of those with chemical dependencies meets at the Masonic Hall, Twisp. 997-9805. 5pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Masonic Hall, Twisp. 997-0356. 6:30pm

Tuesday 3/27 TOPS: Take Off Pounds Sensibly at MV United Methodist Church, between Twisp and Winthrop. 997-0102. 8:30-10am County Commissioners: Open meeting, Okanogan County Admin. Bldg., 123 Fifth Ave. N., Okanogan. (509) 422-7100. 9am-5pm TwispWorks: Tour the site in Twisp. 997-3300. 11am Healthy Steps: Classes in therapeutic exercise, with instructor Nancy Farr at Twisp Valley Grange. 996-2017. Noon-1pm Herbal Health: Consultations at Room One. $0-$50 sliding scale. Appointment (509) 5573660. Noon-4pm Free Pool: Play billiards at Three Fingered Jack’s. 996-2411. 6pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Masonic Hall, Twisp. 997-0356. 6:30pm Twisp Town Council: Meets at Town Hall. 997-4081. 7pm Electric Coop: Board meeting at the OCEC office, Winthrop. 996-2228. 7pm

Wednesday 3/28 Closet Quilters: Open studio, 309 Highway 20, Twisp. Free. 997-7020. Noon-5pm Family Planning Clinic: Room One, 315 S. Lincoln St., Twisp. Info: 997-2050. 2-5pm Noxious Weed Control Board: Meeting in the commissioners’ hearing room, County Courthouse in Okanogan. (509) 422-7165. 4pm Community Action: Council board meeting at 424 S. 2nd, Okanogan. (509) 422-4041. 5:15pm MV School Board: Meeting at MV Elementary School board room. 996-9205. See agenda: www.methow.org, click “school board and staff.” 5:30pm MV Eagles Aerie #2584: Meeting at Eagles Hall, Twisp. 997-8133. 7pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Calvary Church, Twisp. 997-0356. 7pm


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Methow Valley News

Sports and

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

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Recreation

Knowledge Bowl team takes eighth at state By Mike Maltais

Liberty Bell High School’s Knowledge Bowl Team traveled to the state championships at Spokane’s Central Valley High School last Saturday (March 17) and capped a solid performance with an eighth-place finish among Washington State 2B schools. The Mountain Lions team included captain Larkin Hubrig, Nathan David, Kameron Smith, Tim Lewis and alternates Tommy Zbyszewski and Johnnie Duguay. Coach Leverett Hubbard described the action as a real nail-biter at several stages in the competition when scores were so close that the outcome was anybody’s guess. “There were 18 teams that qualified for the finals but a couple of last year’s top finishers, including Saint George’s that won it all in 2011, didn’t even make it that far, “ said Hubbard. “That was an upset from the very beginning.” The 18 finalists were divided into two brackets of nine teams each, and each bracket featured

four rounds of competition between teams. “The morning began with a written round and we scored 37 out of a possible 50 points, the second-highest among all 18 schools,” Hubbard said. Next came the first of four oral rounds that matched Liberty Bell against Adna and Darrington. “We scored 14 in the first oral round and Adna had 18, but with our points from the written round added in we had 51 while Adna had 49,” Hubbard recalled. Reardan, who would end up finishing second, also had 49 after the first oral round. “At that point we were in first place in our nine-team bracket,” Hubbard said. “We were definitely in the hunt.” The competition intensified through the remaining oral rounds, and when those were completed the top three teams from each bracket plus the next three teams with the highest scores among all schools advanced to the afternoon finals. Then occurred one of the nail-biter moments. “We were tied with Colfax

for the ninth-highest team overall with 76 points,” Hubbard said. “However, our written round score was higher than Colfax’s, so based on that margin we advanced into the afternoon final.” In the first round of afternoon competition Liberty Bell squared off against Adna once again and Waitsburg. “Adna scored 13, Waitsburg got 10, and unfortunately we scored only five so that dropped us into the bracket for seventh, eighth and ninth,” Hubbard said. The Mountain Lions faced La Conner and league rival, Manson, in the consolation round and encountered another close call. “The competition involved a round of 50 questions and after question 45 all three teams were knotted at nine points each, certainly a nail-biter,” Hubbard said. By question 50, La Conner had been eliminated but Liberty Bell and Manson remained tied for seventh place. A five-question tiebreaker and another tensionfilled finish ended with Manson taking seventh and the Mountain Lions eighth. Northwest Christian captured the state 2B title.

Photo courtesy of Kameron Smith

Members of the Liberty Bell High School Knowledge Bowl Team show off the eighthplace trophy the group won at last weekend’s state championships in Spokane. Pictured is team captain Larkin Hubrig holding the plaque, Tim Lewis, Nathan David, coach Leverett Hubbard, Tommy Zbyszewski, Johnnie Duguay and Kameron Smith.

Soccer squad starts fast with four-game week By Mike Maltais The Liberty Bell High School boys’ varsity soccer team got off to the fastest start among the five LBHS spring sports teams opening season action this month with four games over the eight-day period from Tuesday, March 13 through Tuesday (March 20). And if any of Liberty Bell’s

spring teams felt the absence of the junior class away on its trip to the nation’s capitol last week it was the soccer squad. Playing without eight of its nine junior veterans the team nonetheless made a strong statement against its first opponents of the year –Tonasket and Okanogan – at the Tonasket Jamboree March 13. The Mountain Lions

Photo by Mike Maltais

Junior Duncan Hanron practices an instep kick during practice Monday at the soccer pitch adjacent to the Twisp airport. Following a busy four-game opening week the Mountain Lions were scheduled to play the Tigers at Tonasket last Tuesday.

opened the jamboree against Tonasket of the 1A Caribou Trail League and held the Tigers to a 0-0 standoff through both 10-minute halves of the abbreviated game. “We dominated the play,” said coach Erik Olson, recapping the poise of his young team. “Had we played another 20 minutes I think we could have won.” Liberty Bell’s second match was against a fresh Okanogan team playing its first game of the jamboree. “They beat us 3-0, but we had another good performance,” Olson said, adding that weather conditions were very windy during their game. On Thursday (March 15) the Mountain Lions were back at Okanogan for a full game against the Bulldogs but still without the traveling juniors. On top of that, sickness and ineligibility whittled Olson’s crew even further. “We took eight players; one junior, four freshmen and three eighth graders,” Olson counted off. “So we had no subs for the entire game.” Predictably, a stronger Okanogan team won 8-0 but its strength came more from sheer numbers against an opponent with no bench. “They played us eight-oneight,” Olson said. “ We made a couple little mistakes, but they subbed and subbed and subbed and that wore us into the ground.” Following a day of rest the Mountain Lions traveled to Chelan Saturday (March

17) for a non-league shot at a talented Goats team. Fortunately the missing contingent of juniors arrived home from D.C. in time to rejoin the team for the game. Olson opted to play it safe and utilized his upperclassmen for only the first 20-minute half, during which time Liberty Bell held last year’s 1A Caribou Trail League champs scoreless. Olson subbed liberally during the second half and Chelan took advantage of the younger, less experienced lineup to build a 4-1 gamewinning lead. “Zane Stanbery had an outstanding game on goal,” Olson said, commenting on the junior veteran’s level of play that harkened back to his freshman season when he was voted to the All-League first team as goalkeeper, an unusual honor for a first year varsity player. Freshman standout Jorge Lara scored Liberty Bell’s only goal during the second half on an “excellent single player effort” noted Olson. The Mountain Lions ushered in the first day of spring with a game on the road at Tonasket Tuesday (March 20). On Thursday (March 22) Liberty Bell travels to Omak to take on the Pioneers. A string of four league games begins on Tuesday (March 27) when the Mountain Lions play the Hornets at Oroville followed by road games against Bridgeport, Manson and Brewster. Liberty Bell will host its first opponent when Warden comes to town April 17.

Go fish: Steelhead season opens in spots Beginning last Friday (March 16), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) reopened selective fisheries for hatchery-reared steelhead on the Methow, Wenatchee and Icicle rivers on a short-term basis. Anglers will be allowed to catch whitefish in the Methow and Wenatchee rivers so long as those rivers are open to steelhead fishing, WDFW said in a press release. Steelhead fisheries in all three rivers are tentatively scheduled to run through March 31, but could end sooner if fishing impacts on wild steelhead reach annual federal limits, said Jeff Korth, regional WDFW fish manager. Korth recommends that anglers check

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the department’s Fishing Hotline at (360) 902-2500 or Fishing Rule website, http://wdfw. wa.gov/, for updates. The Similkameen and Okanogan rivers will remain open for steelhead fishing, although sections of the Okanogan River around the mouth of Omak and Tonasket creeks was closed to all fishing March 16 to protect wild steelhead staging for spawning. The daily limit on all rivers open to fishing is two hatchery steelhead, marked with a clipped adipose fin and measuring at least 20 inches in length. Selective gear rules apply to all areas where steelhead seasons are open. Areas that were open to fishing for hatchery steelhead on March

16 include: • Methow River: From the mouth to the confluence with the Chewuch River in Winthrop. Fishing from a floating device is prohibited from the second powerline crossing to the first Highway 153 Bridge. Night closure and selective gear rules apply. • Wenatchee River:  From the mouth to the Icicle River Road Bridge, including the Icicle River from the mouth to a point 500 feet downstream of the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery Barrier Dam. Night closure and selective gear rules apply. Motorized vessels are not allowed. • Okanogan River:  From the mouth upstream to the Highway 97 Bridge in Oroville.

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Night closure and selective gear rules apply. All fishing is closed from the first powerline crossing downstream of the Highway 155 Bridge in Omak (Coulee Dam Credit Union Building) to the mouth of Omak Creek and from the Tonasket Bridge (Fourth Street) downstream to the Tonasket Lagoons Park boat launch. • Similkameen River:  From the mouth upstream to 400 feet below Enloe Dam. Areas that opened to fishing for whitefish on March 16 include: • Methow River: From Gold Creek to the falls above Brush Creek. • Wenatchee River: From the mouth to the Highway 2 bridge at Leavenworth.

MVN, pg 1

Nordic team travels to Junior Nationals

Methow Valley Nordic Team members Ella Hall, Olivia Ekblad, Sage Abate, Jacqueline O’Keefe, Tulie Budiselich, Maya Seckinger, Paul Everett, Casey Smith and coach Laura McCabe traveled to Soldier Hollow, Utah, to compete in the Pacific Northwest Ski Association’s Junior Nationals earlier this month. David Lawrence, head coach and program director of the MVNT, compiled the following results: Classic Sprint Qualifier 3/5/12 OJ Boys (age 17-18) Winning Time 2:52.8 Casey Smith, 26th (3:02.4) eliminated in quarterfinals J1 Boys (16-17) Winning Time – 3:09.5 Paul Everett, 46th (3:28.5) J2 Girls (14-15) Winning Time – 3:25 Olivia Ekblad, 30th (3:45) eliminated in quarterfinals Maya Seckinger, 49th (3:55) Ella Hall, 50th (3:55.8) J1 Girls Winning Time – 3:17.0 Jacqueline O’Keefe, 54th (3:45.3) Sage Abate, 72nd (3:53.4) Tulie Budiselich, 78th (3:58.2) 5k/10k/15k Skate 3/7/12 OJ Boys Casey Smith, 28th J1 Boys Paul Everett, 22nd J2 Girls Olivia Ekblad, 30th Maya Seckinger, 44th Ella Hall, 33rd J1 Girls Jacqueline O’Keefe, 63rd Sage Abate, 77th Tulie Budiselich, 57th

Photo by Curt Hawkinson

Maya Seckinger competing at the PNSA Junior Nationals in Utah. Relays 3/10/12 OJ Boys 16th - Casey Smith, Max Christman (Bend), Reitler Hodgert (Bend) J1 Boys 13th - Paul Everett, Ruben Castren (North Shore), Cole Christman (Bend)

J1 Boys Paul Everett, 40th

J2 Girls 6th - Olivia Ekblad, Aja Starkey (North Shore, MT), Emily Hyde (Bachelor Nordic) 15th - Maya Seckinger, Ella Hall, Vivian Hawkinson (Bend)

J2 Girls Olivia Ekblad, 30th Maya Seckinger, 32nd Ella Hall, 43rd

J1 Girls 19th - Tulie Budiselich, Andi Zontek (Bend), Jacqueline O’Keefe

J1 Girls Jacqueline O’Keefe, 64th Sage Abate, 76th Tulie Budiselich, 80th

OJ Girls 17th - Sage Abate, Gretha Eifert (Leavenworth), Holly Bushman (Bend)

5k/10k/15k Classic 3/9/12 OJ Boys Casey Smith, 24th

Bourn leads Eastern Oregon Mountaineers to Elite Eight Former Liberty Bell High School basketball star Korrie Bourn, now a junior playing for Eastern Oregon University, was a pivotal figure in leading the Mountaineers to the school’s first-ever appearance at the quarterfinals of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics’ Division II championships at Sioux City, Iowa, earlier this month. Bourn recorded two of her season’s eight double-doubles in the playoffs, scoring 14

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points and pulling down 11 rebounds in a first-round 66-58 win over Ave Maria University (Fla.) and 14 points, 13 rebounds in EOU’s 74-55 loss to College of the Ozarks in the Elite Eight bracket. Her performance earned her a spot on the All-Tournament Second Team; the first time an EOU player has been so honored in the national championships. Bourn is the daughter of Melinda Bourn of Winthrop and Mike Bourn of Oroville.


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Methow Valley News

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Immediately following the Nordic Junior Nationals at Soldier Hollow, Utah, earlier this month Elise Putnam, Paul Everett, Gareth Hardwick and Casey Smith joined up with the Methow Biathlon Team and traveled to West Yellowstone, Mont., to compete in the U.S. Biathlon Nationals March 15-18. In the sprint competition held Thursday (March 15) Putnam placed fifth in the youth women’s 6-kilometer event; Everett finished eighth and Hardwick 12th in the youth men’s 7.5K distance. On Saturday (March 17) Putnam had the performance of the week when she placed second in the youth women’s 10K pursuit race. “Elise shot really well,” said team coach Betsy Devin Smith. “She only missed three out of 20 targets in two prone and two

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Page B2

More sports

Biathletes compete at West Yellowstone By Mike Maltais

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Track team attracts a host of new faces By Mike Maltais

standing rounds. And she was competing against some kids who are on the junior national team.” Everett took seventh and Hardwick 12th in the youth men’s 10K pursuit. Putnam placed fifth in the youth women’s 10K mass start event Sunday (March 18). Paul finished ninth and Hardwick 13th in the youth men’s 12.5K distance. In all three events Casey Smith, competing in the junior men’s division, placed first in the sprint, pursuit and mass start. Shortly after returning home from West Yellowstone, Smith was notified that he has been selected by the U.S. Biathlon Team to compete in the Swedish National Biathlon Championships at the end of the month and will be departing for that venue Thursday (March 22). “It’s the first time he is being sponsored by the U.S. Biathlon Team,” his coach added. “That’s an exciting development.”

Photo by Mike Maltais

Christina Purtell practices her forehand on a newly cleared portion of the tennis courts at Liberty Bell High School. The Mountain Lions were set to play Tonasket Tuesday (March 20).

Loup ski discounts On the Sundays remaining in the ski season (hopefully through April 1), the Loup Loup Ski Bowl is offering half-day prices for lift tickets all day. Usually, half-day tickets are sold starting at noon. For the next two Sundays, half-day tickets will be available starting at 8:30 a.m.

Liberty Bell High School varsity track coach Rocky Kulsrud should be all smiles this season as he reviews the roster of girls and boys who have turned out for this year’s track and field team. In addition to returning veterans and state qualifiers from last season, Kulsrud has a promising group of new faces – 10 freshmen, two sophomores, a junior and two seniors. Back this year is sophomore Austin Watson, who was the fastest 2B freshman sprinter in the state last year. Also back are seniors Kyle Putnam, Jonathan McMillan, Sidnee Glenn and Cheyenne Ott; juniors Taylor Woodruff, Tim Lewis, and Justin McMillan; and sophomores Liam Daily,

Service Directory

Cesar Dominguez, Morgan Ott, Dana Anderson, Hannah Hafsos, Estrella Corrigan, Lilly Schlotzhauer and April Oakes. New to the team this year are seniors Gunnar Doggett and Ema Manzo; junior Johnnie Duguay; sophomores Jaymis Hanson and Zoey Marchiney; and a bunch of freshmen including Gage Cotner, Ryan Kensrud, Quinn Shelby, Garrett Dornfeld, Sarina Williams, Tabitha BergevinKrumme, Ashley Watson, Chloe LaChapelle, Jessica Johnson and Lori Ludeman. After practicing on hard surfaces like the hallways of LBHS and the concrete surfaces around the perimeter of the school, the Lions get their first taste of a real track surface Thursday (March 22) against the Bridgeport Mustangs.

This week in sports Thursday, March 22

Baseball: LBHS @ Bridgeport(NL), 4pm Soccer: LBHS @ Omak(NL), 4:30pm Tennis: LBHS @ Omak(NL), 4:30pm Track: LBHS @ Bridgeport, 4pm Saturday, March 24

Baseball: LBHS @ Cashmere, DH (NL), 12pm Tennis: LBHS vs White Swan (@ Eastmont), 12pm Tuesday, March 27

Baseball: LBHS @ Oroville, 4:30pm Soccer: LBHS @ Oroville, 4:30pm Tennis: LBHS @ Wilson Creek, 3pm

Service & Health Directories ~ Deadline for ad placement & changes is Friday at 5 pm for insertion in the next Wednesday’s paper. Directory ads are $8 per column inch. Additional charges may apply for color. To have your service listed please call 997-7011. ATTORNEYS

CONTRACTORS

BYRO CONSTRUCTION Specializing in Concrete • Foundations • Slabs • Daylight Basements • Retaining walls • & More

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STORAGE

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC Office (509) 422-0295 Cell (509) 429-0417

For All Your Concrete Needs

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Installed Insulation & Garage Doors

Boom Truck Services Available Brian Baseler, General Contractor

PROPANE SALES, cont.

casconcrete@methownet.com

ELECTRICIANS

Horizon Flats, Winthrop

Lic. #BYROCI*01OJE

TREE SERVICE

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WATER WELL SERVICES

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Brewster

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996-2884 cell 509-322-3032

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www.palmconstructioninc.com

B & B Excavating, Inc. Backhoe Dozer Dump Truck Excavator

ROOFING

997-0082 Lic. #BBEXCI*000PL

Serving the Methow Valley for Over 25 Years

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E S I N C in the valley since 1999

The DirT DocTor

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PEST CONTROL

Kris Labanauskas 997-1899

methowmountainhomes.com #METHOMH990BC

WELL DRILLING

Complete Excavation Service 509-996-2033 Locally owned and operated since 1995

MeMber: better business bureau • wa Lic. #doughe1003jn

FEED DEALERS

TWISP FEED & RENTAL

BUILDING SUPPLIES

ALL

YOUR BUILDING NEEDS

Feed, Seed, Ranching, Fencing & Garden supplies Rental Equipment & Small Engine Repair

North Valley Lumber

996-2264 www.nvlumber.com Horizon Flats, Winthrop

SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

997-3621 Corner of Highway 20 & 2nd Ave., Twisp

GARBAGE COLLECTION

Boom Truck WE DELIVER

PROPANE SALES

997-8862

TWISP FEED & RENTAL

Full Service Garbage Collection Reasonable rates, flexible pickup schedules

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MVN, pg 2


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Methow Valley News

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Okanogan County Sheriff March 9 SICK ANIMAL: A deer with a broken leg was reported on Highway 20 near Winthrop. TRESPASSING: A man was reported to be squatting along the river on Twisp-Carlton Road with several dogs. Information from Washington State Parks indicated that the subject has several dogs that are out of control and had previously been advised to leave. When contacted, the reporting person told the officer that he is a taxpayer and has the right to complain about someone squatting on public land that he himself has the right to use. The squatter was to be contacted and told he had 14 days and then has to leave the area.

March 10 AGENCY ASSIST: A deer was reported caught in a fence on Frost Road near Twisp. No officers or wildlife agents were immediately available. The reporting person called back to report that he had

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News of Record

freed the deer from the fence and no response was necessary. CIVIL MATTER: Officers received a report of a civil disagreement near Winthrop. The reporting person said a man was threatening to move her items out of a residence they share and are both still living in. Officers made contact with both parties to advise them of their options. THEFT: Reporting person told officers that he had left a snowmobile near Gold Creek Road the night before because it was having mechanical difficulties, and it was gone when he returned the next day. The reporting person said the snowmobile is owned by his cousin in Spokane, and Spokane police would be contacted for a stolen vehicle report. Officers reported that they would use a snowmobile to get to the theft scene and attempt to locate the stolen vehicle. FIRE: A small fire was reported along Highway 20 near Twisp. A person was found to have a small brush pile burning, and told officers they would keep an eye on it.

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Compiled by Don Nelson

March 11

ANIMAL PROBLEM: A cougar was reported at a residence on Highway 20 near Winthrop. Fish and Wildlife was contacted. ACCIDENT: An accident was reported on Highway 153 near Twisp. A Jeep-type vehicle rolled over and came to rest about 40 feet off the road.

Twisp Police Dept.

West Twisp Avenue. The dog’s owner was located and the dog taken home.

March 13 FOUND PROPERTY: Some property was reported found at Twisp Town Park. SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY: Suspicious activity was reported at Covenant Church.

Winthrop Marshal

March 10 THEFT: A theft was reported on West Twisp Avenue. UNSECURE PREMISES: An open door on a moving trailer was reported. When contacted, the person said they had forgotten to close the door.

March 11 LOST PROPERTY: Lost property was reported in the Twisp area. STRAY ANIMAL: A stray dog was reported on

March 12 CITIZEN ASSISTANCE: A citizen assist request was made on Riverside Avenue. AGENCY ASSIST: An injured deer was reported on the side of the road on Twisp-Winthrop Eastside Road. The deer was removed from the roadway.

March 14 HIT AND RUN ACCIDENT: A hit-and-run incident was reported on Wister Way.

Classifieds

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - 997-7011

24.....................FOR RENT, Con’t.

34..................... SERVICES, Cont.

E-MAIL TO frontdesk@methowvalleynews.com All classifieds to be prepaid. Deadline: Monday, Noon. Weekly: $6.75 for 15 words or less. $8.75 with email or web site address. 20 cents for each additional word. CLASSIFIED SPECIAL: Buy 3 weeks, get 4th week free. No refunds or changes please. Prepayment required to qualify.

Classified display ads: $10.00 per column inch. Deadline for CLASSIFIED DISPLAYS & LEGAL NOTICES: Friday, 5 p.m.

Directory FOR SALE ................................10 YARD SALE ..........................14 FARM EQUIPMENT ..............15 AUCTIONS ............................16 REAL ESTATE ..........................20 MOBILE/MFD. HOMES ........22 FOR RENT ............................24 WANTED TO RENT ..............25 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ..30 EMPLOYMENT .........................31 WORK WANTED ..................32 SERVICES ............................34 CARS & TRUCKS .....................40 RVS .......................................42 ANIMALS ..................................50 LIVESTOCK ..........................52 HORSES ...............................54 PETS .....................................56 MISCELLANEOUS ...................70 WANTED ...................................75 THANK YOU .............................80 COMMUNITY EVENTS .............83 PERSONALS ............................85 FREE .........................................90 LOST & FOUND........................95

10.................................FOR SALE

NEW SANYO 26” flat screen TV. HDTV, LCD, DVD combo. Still in box - $175. Was $220 plus tax when purchased. 509.996.9229. 45 FRUIT TREE PRE-SEASON special. Order now for bare-root in April and get 10% off. Also blueberry, strawberry, & asparagus plants avail. at Zen Gardens, 4 mi. south of Carlton. 509.923.2380. 46 14.............................. YARD SALE

YARD SALE 6 Wildflower Rd., Wolf Creek, Winthrop. Sat., Mar. 24, 8am. 45 METHODIST CHURCH Rummage Sale and Lunch. Mar. 23, 9am3pm & Mar. 24, 9am-1pm. Good clean articles gracefully accepted Mar. 22, 9-noon. Please, no TVs, large appliances/oversized items. 509.997.9292. 45 20.......................... REAL ESTATE

PUBLISHER'S NO TICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll-free at 1-800669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

BY OWNER- SHY 5 ACRES, septic, well, and power in and functional. Full set-up for RV plus spare power, septic dump and water hook-ups. 8X12 storage building. Large, level building site. Backs to FS land, SF Gold Creek Road maintained by county - $99,500. 509.679.8873 Twisp. 43tf (3) COMMERCIAL I LOTS. 100’ (on Hwy 20) X 150’-plus deep (across from Hank’s) - $327,000. 509.997.3962. 46

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56......................................... PETS

CHESAPEAKE BAY Retriever. Female, 5+ yrs old. Loves a close relationship w/her owner and going for walks. Needs to be an only dog. She has all her shots and they are up to date. Free to approved home. Contact for more info: 509.556.2753. 48

20............... REAL ESTATE, Cont.

OLDER 3BR on Burgar St., Twisp $150,000. 509.997.7777. 21tf

STATEWIDE ADS 31......................... EMPLOYMENT

24................................ FOR RENT

TWISP RENTAL, avail. mid-Apr.. $400/mo., plus utilities. 1BR, no smoking, credit references required, 509.996.3277. 45 TWIN LAKES spacious, nearly new 3BR 2BA with access to pool and trails. Looking for long-term tenants w/refs. No smoking, pets negotiable - $800/mo., 1st/last/dep. 509.969.3073. 46 TWISP: 2+BD 1BA, nice floor plan, master suite, fully finished basement, laundry room, carport, fenced yard - $850/mo. includes city water/sewer, no pets. 509.421.3729. 48 THE METHOW VALLEY Dining and Recreation Room is available to rent for meetings, dinners, memorials, wedding receptions and other such uses. Fully equipped kitchen, tables, chairs and utensils. Seats about 70 persons. This facility is located on the lower level of the Masonic Center is Twisp, handicap accessible. Call Don Wilson at 509.997.5423 for scheduling info. 47 2 BRAND NEW HOMES avail., with 2BR/2BA, gas fireplaces, in North Village close to the town of Winthrop - $1,200/month, 1 year lease, no-smoking. 1,438 sq.ft. commercial building available, located on Hwy. 20, Sunflower Cafe building in Winthrop, with 1,000 sq.ft. downstairs and 438 sq.ft. upstairs. 2-3 year lease, rent negotiable. Contact Kristin Devin, RE Broker at 509.996.4400 or email at info@kristindevin.com . 47 WINTHROP OFFICE SPACE for rent. One office at 450sf or two separate offices 225sf each. Includes utilities. Common area with kitchen and conference room. Internet ready. Conveniently located next to the Red Apple. Call George 509.322.6139. 45 DOWNTOWN TWISP. Furnished 2BR full BA - $375/mo + $150 dep. Includes all utilities & internet. 509.997.0209. 46 OFFICE SPACE avail. in Chewuch Professional Bldg., Winthrop. High-speed internet, fiber optics, conference room, PLUS gorgeous river views and common kitchenette. 509.996.2820. 34tf RV STORAGE – Enclosed and secure, 3 miles south of Winthrop. 509.996.3431. 47 WINTHROP BOARDWALK 1000 sq.ft. commercial space available in Purple Sage Building across from Glassworks. 509.996.9969. 48

NOCA COFFEE HOUSE now hiring for a part-time barista position, possibility of full time in summer. Must be 21. Food service and barista experience required. Good customer service skills a must. Please send resume listing relevant experience to PO Box 297, Winthrop, 98862 or drop off at Noca Coffee House. 46 THE COURTYARD QUAIL and French Quail are looking for an energetic, friendly person to join our team. Send resume or application to PO Box 932, Winthrop, WA 98862. 48 CINNAMON TWISP BAKERY is now accepting applications for counter/barista, day prep, and evening prep. Applicant must be avail. weekends. Pick up details and an application at the Bakery, 116 N. Glover St. 509.997.5030. 46 OLD TIME PHOTO is taking applications. Looking for energetic person w/great people skills, some computer knowledge, and willing to work most weekends. 509.996.9912 or 997.7393, photoparlor@hotmail.com . 45 31...............EMPLOYMENT, Cont.

ADOPTION ADOPT -- California Music Executive, close-knit family, beaches, sports, playful pup, unconditional love awaits 1st miracle baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-561-9323 CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866483-4429. www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com FOR SALE SAWMILLS from only $3997 -- Make and save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext. 300N HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVERS -- Daily Pay! Hometime choices: Expess lanes 7/ON-7/OFF. 14/ ON-7/OFF, Weekly. Full and Part-Time. New trucks! CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com DRIVER -- New to Trucking? Your new career starts now! * 0$ Tuition cost * No Credit Check * Great Pay & Benefits. Short employment commitment required. (866) 306-4115 www. joinCRST.com HELP WANTED -- SALES NATIONAL NUTRITION Company seeking local reps for placement of Immune Health Newspapers in high traffic locations. Excellent income potential with residuals. Call today (800) 808-5767

34.................................SERVICES

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LEGAL NOTICE Superior Court of Washington, County of Okanogan. JOSEPH E. REID, a single person, Plaintiff, vs. GENE B. WILLIAMS and MAXINE D. WILLIAMS, husband and wife, and their unknown successors and/or heirs and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real estate described in the Complaint herein. Defendants. No. 12-2-00009-5 Summons By Publication. The State of Washington to: Gene B. Williams and Maxine D. Williams and their unknown successors and/or heirs and all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real estate described in the Complaint herein.

MVN, pg 3

LEGAL ADS, Cont.

LEGAL ADS, Cont.

You Are Hereby Summoned to appear within sixty (60) days after the date of the first publication of this Summons, to wit, within sixty (60) days after February 22, 2012, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled Court, and answer the Complaint of the plaintiff above described, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for plaintiff, David Ebenger, at his office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the Complaint, which has been filed with the Clerk of said Court. The object of this action is to quiet title in certain real property in Okanogan County, Washington, to-wit: The Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 17, Township 34 North, Range 22, East W.M., Okanogan County, Washington EXCEPTING the West 500 feet of that portion lying Southerly of the State Game Department Roadway easement as described in instrument recorded under Auditor’s File No. 510345, Okanogan County Records. Dated: February 17, 2012. David Ebenger, WSBA #4939, Attorney for Plaintiff, PO Box 217, Winthrop, Washington 98862. Published in the Methow Valley News February 22 and 29, March 7, 14, 21 and 28, 2012. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Application: Shoreline Substantial Development Permit WIN SDP 11-3. Notice Is Hereby Given that George Baumgardner, 599 N Siwash Ck. Rd., Tonasket, WA 98855, has submitted application for a Shoreline Substantial Development Permit to complete development of the Winthrop Town Lights project, including renovation of existing buildings, construction of 1 new building, paving of parking areas, stormwater drainage, landscaping and site restoration. The project is within the shoreline area of the Methow River, within the urban shoreline designation. No structures will be placed, nor will work occur below the ordinary high water mark, nor within the conservancy area. The project is located on tax parcels 3421020016 and 3421110009, at 716 East Highway 20, in the Town of Winthrop. Information Available: A JARPA form, SEPA Checklist and other application materials are on file at Winthrop Town Hall, 206 Riverside Ave. Persons wishing to view project information or receive notice of the action taken on the application may contact Winthrop Town Hall between the hours of 9am and 4pm, Monday – Friday. For further information contact Rocklynn Culp at (509)996-2320. SEPA Determination: A threshold Determination of Nonsignificance was issued for the project on March 15, 2012. The comment period for the SEPA Checklist and Threshold

Determination ends on April 6, 2012. The Town of Winthrop (lead agency) has determined that this project does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement is not required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This decision was made after review of the information described above, which is available upon request. The DNS has been issued under WAC 197-11-340(2). Comments: All persons are welcome to submit written comments concerning this application and the related SEPA Checklist and Threshold Determination. Comments or requests for notification of the action taken on the application must be submitted to the Town Planner, Town of Winthrop, PO Box 459, Winthrop, WA 98862, no later than 4:00pm, Monday, April 30, 2012. This notice is given pursuant to RCW 90.58.140, Winthrop Shoreline Master Program Chapter 7.09 & Winthrop Municipal Code Chapter 19.06. Dated: March 15, 2012. Rocklynn Culp, Town Planner. Published in the Methow Valley News March 21 and 28, 2012. LEGAL NOTICE State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) WAC 197-11-360 Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) Project Summary: Proponents: Methow Salmon Recovery Foundation, PO Box 1608, Okanogan, WA 98840. Agent: Chris Johnson, Same. Project Description: The SEPA responsible official for Okanogan County has issued a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) regarding the proposed active restoration effort to restore natural processes, improve existing conditions and protect riparian and side channel habitat along and adjacent to the Methow River. A Threshold Determination of Significance was issued April 7, 2011 and scoping was conducted thru May 18, 2011. The SEPA Responsible Official is accepting comments regarding the DEIS until 5:00pm April 25, 2012. Project information is available at www. okanogancounty.org/planning or by contacting Charlene Schumacher at 509-422-7113 or cschumacher@co.okanogan. wa.us. Project Location: Middle Methow Reach from river mile 45.5 to 49.2. Township 34N, Range 21, 22 E Sections 13, 18, 19, 24, 25, 30. Comments must be made in writing to the Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave N Ste. 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, no later than April 25, 2012. Failure to comment by the due date above shall be determined to deny a party standing to appeal the final determination. Published in the Methow Valley News March 21, 2012.

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012

By Laurelle Walsh

Room One halfway to 10K

Room One, the nonprofit health and social services organization in Twisp, reports that it is more than halfway towards its goal of raising $10,000 to keep a family planning clinic open for the valley. After Okanogan Family planning in Omak closed its Twisp clinic because of funding problems in January, Room One worked out an arrangement with Family Planning of Chelan-Douglas Counties to continue providing services here. That new arrangement took effect Feb. 1. Room One, which is letting Family Planning of ChelanDouglas Counties use space rent-free, needs the $10,000 to pay for nursing services and other costs. For more information, visit www.roomone.org.

Foundation offers endowment

The Community Foundation of North Central Washington (CFNCW) is celebrating its 25th “Silver Linings” anniversary this year by offering a $50,000 endowment grant to a regional nonprofit. The grant is available to one eligible nonprofit organization in Chelan, Douglas or Okanogan County. The application deadline is June 15, with reviews and/or interviews scheduled in July. The award finalist will be announced in September. The ideal candidate is a well-established, extraordinary organization making a significant impact on the community it serves, the foundation said in a press release, and has experienced leadership at both the board and staff level who will use the grant to move the organization to the next level of expertise. For grant application and eligibility requirements, visit www.cfncw.org/grants. For questions or more information, contact CFNCW Program Manager Lila Edlund at (509) 663-7716 or lila@cfncw.org. An endowment allows for accessing a set amount of funds annually and creates an opportunity for funds to grow in perpetuity.

“You gotta love the Barn,” says Susan Philbrick, manager of the Winthrop Auditorium. “It’s a beloved local institution.” The Winthrop Auditorium – also known as the Barn – holds its annual Barn Appreciation Dinner on Monday, March 26 at 6 p.m. All supporters and community members are welcome to the potluck event. The Winthrop Auditorium Association will provide a baked ham entrée; guests are encouraged to bring a salad, side dish or dessert, said Philbrick. The Lazy R Pickers – Winthrop’s old-time Americana musical duo of Kip and Celeste Roberts – will provide entertainment for the evening on guitar, voice and dobro. Attendees may place bids at the silent auction table, or enter into a raffle, with all proceeds to benefit the Barn. All will have the opportu-

nity to renew their memberships to the Barn Association. First-time members will receive a reusable fiber shopping bag with the Barn logo. Memberships to the Winthrop Auditorium Association are crucial at this time, Philbrick said. “It’s an aging building and will continue to need attention,” she said. Auditorium board president Dennis Gardner said by supporting the Barn you are supporting the community. “All Methow Valley citizens are invited – not just people from Winthrop,” he added. Having spent the last 13 years on the Barn board, Gardner said he has seen many improvements made to the facility: a new roof, new paint, and a generator that allows the building to serve as an emergency shelter in case of widespread power outage. And the new grease trap that was installed as part of the commercial kitchen’s upgrade last year forestalled the need

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Give the Barn some love

Community briefs

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for a new septic system. “It did the trick,” Gardner said. Philbrick pointed out that in 2011, in addition to the kitchen upgrade, the auditorium invested in a professional sound system. “We’ve also had some unexpected expenses that have left the coffers dry,” she added, referring in part to frequent furnace repairs required to keep the building warm and operable this winter. Nonetheless, bookings remain strong for arts events, fundraisers, flea markets, club dinners, meetings, weddings and dances at the busy 500-person capacity venue. “We had a really good fall and we already have a full spring schedule,” Philbrick said. “We invite all members of the community to become backers of the Barn,” Philbrick said, adding that a membership campaign by mail during April will be another opportunity for people to show their support.

Share a ride: www.methowrideshare.org or take the bus: 997-7722

Harts Pass

Farmers Market applications available

Applications are available for vendors who want to be part of the 2012 Methow Valley Farmers Market – familiarly known as the Twisp Farmers Market – and must be postmarked by April 1 to be considered. The application form and 2012 policy handbook are available online at methowvalleyfarmers market.com. This season’s 29 market days – from 9.m. to noon on Saturdays – begin on April 14 and run through Oct. 27 at the Methow Valley Community Center in Twisp. The application, along with a $12 service fee, should be sent to MVFM, P.O. Box 1085, Twisp WA 98856.

by Erik Brooks

Apply for ed scholarship

Okanogan county residents who are at least a college junior, working toward an initial teaching certificate, and are committed to a career in an educational field, may apply now for this scholarship that is offered by the Okanogan County School Retirees Association. The scholarship amount will be no less than $600. Deadline for completed application form is May 1, 2012. Applications are available from: Homer and Jennie Hedington, 1079 2nd Avenue South, Okanogan, WA 98840, or by calling (509) 422-2954. Applications are also available from the OCSRA website: okanogancsra.com.

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PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


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Julia Jensen Wenner, whose family homesteaded on Benson Creek in 1906. They lived on that ranch until 1956, when Julia, Bren and their son Paul moved to the Puget Sound area. Bren died in 1964. In 1967, Julia married Bob Jensen, and the couple traveled extensively. Eisenzimmer reports that the Feb. 19 birthday celebration at Chateau Pacific in Lynnwood included friends and family from the Puget Sound area, Arizona, California and North Central Washington.

available for investment, said Amy Stork, TwispWorks executive director. Each investor will receive an annual payment between 2012 and 2020 based on the amount of energy produced and the investor’s share of the total project. The project is expected to produce 44,000 kWh and provide investors an average annual return of 5.8 percent, and a total return on investments of about 46 percent over eight years, Stork said. Payments may be higher or lower depending on weather and other factors. “One of the reasons the return is high is because TwispWorks got a grant to cover

Obituaries

Senior news Come celebrate spring with us on Saturday (March 24) from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mothers, grandparents and children, come with your best bib and tucker, hats or costumes, whatever puts a twinkle in your eyes. The cost for the tea luncheon is $5 for adults and $3 for children. And if we have leftovers, you get the best deal going. While you are here having tea and lunch you can shop for a new spring wardrobe at our Spring and Summer Sale, and pick up some Easter items and fancy

dresses. Our bus driver, volunteer and board member, and cook who had surgeries are on the mend. We are all wishing them speedy and full recoveries. Old Man Winter just doesn’t want to go away, and I hear the Farmers Market is going to start early this year. Hope they all have a snow shovel handy, as I hear there is more of the white stuff on its way. Happy first day of spring! Rosalie Hutson

Senior menu Thur, March 22: French dip au jus, beets, cucumber salad, peaches, tapioca. Fri, March 23: Spanish meatballs, Caesar salad, creamed corn, pears, garlic bread, cookies. Mon, March 26: Sweet and sour pork, rice, spinach salad, pineapple salad, garlic bread, frosted cake. Thur, March 29: Chicken and Swiss cheese quiche, green salad and tomatoes, Capri vegetables, grapes, blueberry muffin.

TwispWorks solar project has room for more investors There is still an opportunity for local residents to invest in a community solar project to be built at TwispWorks this spring. The system will generate electricity with 180 solar panels mounted on rooftops of two buildings at TwispWorks. The project will be funded primarily through investments of $500 to $15,000 by customers of the Okanogan County Public Utility District. The project is seeking investments totaling $250,000. As of this week, it has received pledges of about $200,000 from investors, leaving $50,000

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Community

@MethowNews By Ann McCreary

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Methow Valley native celebrates 95th birthday Julia Salmon Wenner Jensen, born on a ranch north of Winthrop in 1917, entered the Methow Valley the same year pioneering empire-builder Guy Waring left for the East Coast. Julia no longer lives in the valley, but at her retirement center apartment in Lynnwood she is surrounded by antiques, mementos, photos and memories of her Methow Valley homes and experiences. Friends and family recently helped Julia celebrate her 95th birthday, where they were given copies of “Julia’s Story,” an account of her life written by her daughter Betty Wenner Eisenzimmer, using information from a time line Julia had kept chronicling her life. Julia was born on a ranch her parents, Tom Salmon and Olive Hotchkiss Salmon, purchased in 1910. In 1920, the Salmon family moved to a ranch at Twisp River Road and Elbow Coulee Road. Julia graduated from Twisp High School in 1936. In 1938, she married Bren

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upgrades for the infrastructure and solar panels,” Stork said. Investors must be PUD customers who have participated (or be related to someone who has participated) in an event or program sponsored by Partnership for a Sustainable Methow, a local nonprofit organization that is administering the community solar project. Investments must be made in $500 increments. Information about investing in the project and an application are available at www. SustainableMethow.net. The TwispWorks project will be the largest of three community solar installations built in the Methow Valley under a

state renewable energy incentive program. Similar projects were built at the Okanogan County Electric Cooperative in 2010 and on property owned by the Town of Winthrop in 2011. The new system is expected to be installed and generating electricity in April. TwispWorks will receive credit from the PUD for the energy produced, saving an estimated $2,200 a year, said Stork. When the incentive program ends in 2020, ownership of the solar power system will be conveyed to TwispWorks, and the modules are expected to continue producing energy for another 30 to 50 years, Stork said.

William V. (Bill) Johnston

William V. Johnston (Bill) Bill will be greatly missed passed away suddenly on by everyone who knew and March 15, 2012. loved him. Bill is survived by Bill was born Sept. 3, 1952, his wife Karen, his two children to Roy and Agnus Johnston in Deena and Quinn, his lovTacoma. Bill graduing parents, his two ated from Franklin sisters, Sheila and Pierce High School Linda, his brother in 1971. He was in the Wayne, grandson MiNavy Reserve until chael, and numerous he received a medical nephews and nieces. honorable discharge. Bill was preceded in In 1982 Bill moved to death by his grandTwisp. parents, uncles and Bill loved taking Bill Johnston aunts. long trips, spending Bill’s service will time with family and friends, be Saturday, March 24, at 2 p.m. reading westerns and war sto- at Precht Nearents Chapel in ries, and doing his crossword Twisp. A potluck will follow; puzzles. bring a dish to share.

Frank M. Simmons

Frank M. Simmons of Mazama went to be with his Lord and Savior on Saturday March 17 at Sedro-Woolley after a five-year battle with lymphoma. He was surrounded by his family as he made his final journey into the presence of his Heavenly Father. Frank was born on Aug. 19, 1926, to Charley and Anna Simmons in Oskaloosa, Iowa. When he was just a few years old the family moved to Rochester, Minn., where Frank spent most of his life. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II in the Pacific theater on board a troop transport ship and drove troop landing crafts. Frank went to work for the Mayo Clinic in Rochester in 1948 and spent most of his career in the anesthesia department. During his time at Mayo

Clinic Frank worked on and developed many medical devices that are still in use worldwide today. Frank retired in 1977 as supervisor of the Anesthesia Equipment Repair Section to pursue his next career of over 40 years working on real estate development projects in Washington State. Frank is survived by his wife, Marlys, son Randy (Starrlee), a son Brian (Annette), a grandson Taylor (Diana), a granddaughter Kari, stepdaughter’s Branda (Pat) Jerich, and Cheryl (Jim) Melby, stepchildren Grant Jerich, Austin Jerich, Luke Jerich, and Mikhyla Melby. Memorial services will be held at His Place Church in Burlington, Wash., on April 20, at 1 p.m. with Pastor John Berk officiating.

School menu Mon, March 26: Cheeseburger, french fries, green beans, fruit, milk. Tue, March 27: Teriyaki chicken, rice, peas, fruit, milk. Wed, March 28: BBQ ham sandwich, pasta salad, fruit, milk. Thur, March 29: Cheese zombie, tomato soup, salad, applesauce, milk. Friday, March 30: Soft tacos, salsa, corn, fruit, milk.

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Aero Methow Rescue Office: 997-4013


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There have been various reactions, or more correctly, attitudes toward the weather we have been having since late February. Some sun, snow, some rain, nights usually Bob Spiwak around the freezing mark. The snows have varied in depth but in the end they are all “rotters,” meaning that whatever falls will melt and rot the stuff beneath it. It is a prelude to mud season, and that which melts beneath the winter wonderland

By the time you read this column, the Normans have invaded England, and the 17th of Bill Hottell’s winter history classes has ended.  Many of Sally Gracie these classes have been followed by trips abroad – to Greece, Italy, France – where Bill’s students toured the places they had studied. No trip is planned to follow “Part One: The History of the British Isles,” Bill told me, though 14 people signed up for the tour just in case. Val Sukovaty says that this class began with a study of geography, and the 65 students (the class size seems to grow each year) memorized the mountain ranges and the rivers. Bill always emphasizes the connection between the land and the culture that grows from it. Aidan Catlin, the youngest student at 8 years old, learned all the counties of England, and sometimes was called to the front to point out places on Bill’s ubiquitous maps. “The History of the British Isles” was a family affair for five students. Aidan attended the class with his mother, Mishon Catlin, and his grandparents, Mary Ann and Dennis Kirkland. When Mishon couldn’t make a class, Aidan’s dad Monte filled in. According to Bill, this class had the widest age range ever: Aidan is 8 and Bill’s youngest student in 17 years; and Lloyd Bjerge is a young 95. Lloyd and Alice Glandon have attended most of the past 11 classes together. Both Aidan and Mishon contributed, musically, when the subject matter was particularly “grim,” Bill told me. Aidan performed an Irish jig on his guitar during one session, and Mishon sang lovely folk melodies at the next-to-last class. These were to cheer Bill’s students up after studying the brief reign of Aethelred the Unready (d. 1016). Lauralee Northcott also played and sang at an earlier class. Don and Jan Wallis were among many students “new” to Bill’s classes. Don says, “It didn’t take discipline to take Bill’s class. The desire has been there for a long time,” and now their lives give them the time to participate. According to Don, Jan is the history buff, and he’s the engineer, but both enjoy reading history. Don sees history as “a look into human nature, ‘unmasked,’” and it opens a “window to understand the moment we’re in.” The Wallises appreciate the dialogue in the class. Other students also find that questions, comments and jokes among the members of the class keep it interactive and enjoyable. The class is “a gift to the local area,” Don says. Mishon feels “privileged” to have taken a Hottell class for the first time. Bill concludes most of his classes with 45 minutes or so of slides of the people, places, art and architecture, etc., that have he has taught during that session. Many slides are from trips he and Diana have taken over their years together. Bill told me he has 25,000 slides, which will eventually become part of the National Archives in New Mexico. So another Hottell History Class has ended, but Bill’s students are lifelong learners. Many will prepare for “Part Two,” reading books about the British Isles after 1066. Others will join him for the popular History Book Club that begins in April.

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012

ing to use a walker getting to the car, and toss it in the front passenger seat where his dog generally rides, but is kind enough to relinquish it in this special time and ride in the back. Ken will probably be boogying around on both legs ere the warm weather arrives. With a little luck that should be in July or August. On the subject of falling, a few evenings ago Ms. Gloria and I went to watch the women’s roller derby team practice at Liberty Bell High School. They are being coached by Kurt Meacham, who lives in West Boesel and has been the Ubermeister of the ice skating rink this winter. Fortunately, the day before, he gave me a primer on what the sport is all about. I have some memories of watching teams of women as well as male counterparts

in separate teams whizzing around the banked oval track via a blackand-white telly with a 12-inch screen. There were about 20 women who turned out for the practice, and I was really impressed by how little they crashed onto the floor. I admit to being unbalanced on skis or skates (and accused of the same malady above my neck) and am quite envious of people who can glide along on roller skates, especially in a combat zone. They wear protective pads and helmets, and watching the flying elbows induced me to inquire of the coach whether the ladies’ upper regions were protected. He said they were not as far as he knew and I dropped the inquiry there. Up at Harts Pass the snow level is now almost 120 inches and the water/ snow ration is 6 per cent above normal.

Photo by Laurelle Walsh

Seeds of optimism Mothers and daughters planned for the upcoming garden season at Sunday’s Seed Savers Exchange held at the American Legion Hall in Twisp. Kim Romain Bondi, left, with daughter Amelia, and Rose Weagant-Norton and daughter Magnolia carefully packaged and labeled a variety of vegetable, herb and flower seeds on offer from several local seed savers.

Welcome to Carlton, where everything is kind of real. Things have been disturbingly weird ever since last week’s solar Sue Misao flare particles tunneled their way straight through the walls of our houses, passed through our dogs, bounced off a few dirty socks strewn about the floor and embedded in our heads, causing everything to appear, or appear to appear, real different. Also, I can hear the moon, and to top it off, someone sent me a copy of the Constitution of the United States of

America in the mail, which is convenient because I’d been planning to read it online but am suspicious of anything online because you know, hackers. But recent politics has made it a must-read. Mostly I wanted to reinforce my stalwart belief that America is a Christian nation but I was stymied. So I turned to The Declaration of Independence, and there it was, four times: Creator, Nature’s God, Supreme Judge of the world, and Divine Providence. The rest is mostly a bunch of whinging, as they say, about the king of Great Britain, as well as some incidental independence declaring. Anyway, that’s why the Declaration of Independence is the new Constitution, because it is so completely obvious to whom the four above-mentioned deities refer. I don’t know, though, some people might balk at attending The Church

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Valley Life is ice and it can be deadly. Two people I know have taken serious falls in the past week and several prior to that. Our woodshed is in a portion of the barn and the dirt floor is covered by a thick layer of firewood leavings, from bark chunks to chips to bark dust. All of these are taken out periodically and spread as the ice sheet grows and walking becomes hazardous. In some places even Yaktrax are not too effective. For those not exposed to them, these are like springy tire chains that slip over one’s shoes or boot bottoms and offer some grip on the slick surface. One slip victim now recovering from hip surgery is Ken Westman, who I visited this past weekend. He is doing quite well and now able to drive. He works for that luxury, hav-

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of Nature’s God (is it a tree?) or The Church of the Supreme Judge of the world (currently some guy named Pete from Slovakia. You could look it up). Still, all those other religions have got to admit, “Creator” pretty much sums it up. Moving on to less stressful topics, Carlton survived the ides and celebrated the first day of spring with its usual snowstorm. Still, spiders are showing up. That always makes me happy, a state of being I have an unalienable right to pursue. And speaking of hacking, you should really subscribe to the print version of this newspaper because even I’ve been known to infiltrate our own website and rewrite the Carlton news on occasion. Like for instance, I’m going to take “and” and “of” out of this sentence. Twice. It’s terribly confusing, especially to me.

Judith and David Wright recently returned from a three-week trip to Sweden, where they participated in the Vasaloppet Nordic event series. The Vasaloppet is the oldest Ashley Lodato and longest crosscountry ski race in the world, with more than 40,000 people participating in one or more of the seven races held over the course of a week. Named after Swedish nobleman Gustav Vasa, who led a rebellion in the 1500s to shake off the yoke of the Danish king and gain Sweden’s independence, the main Vasaloppet course follows a 90-kilometer route from Sälen to Mora, as it has done since the first race in 1922. Judith and a friend participated in the 30-kilometer TjejVasan ladies’ race, while David and a friend completed the 90-kilometer Öppet spår, which is the recreational version of the Vasaloppet. Not surprisingly, given the reputation of the Swedish people, the events were all efficiently well-organized, with participants on the long races carrying computer chips so that their progress could be monitored by cell phone; Judith was able to track David and surprise him at a couple of checkpoints. Energy drinks and traditional warm blueberry soup were served at the seven checkpoints during the 90-kilometer races. David reports that he was most impressed with the sizeable number of senior citizens participating in the Öppet spår, with more than 100 septuagenarian skiers and nearly twenty participants between the ages of 80 and 85. Ostensibly the venue for the wellreceived House Jacks performance on Saturday night, the Winthrop Barn also became an ad hoc birthday party. Salyna Gracie kicked things off by putting a twist on the usual birthday tradition of receiving gifts by doling out “happy my birthday” handmade gourmet chocolates to many lucky people who saw her on her special day. Salyna joined several of her fellow St. Patrick’s Day weekend birthday buddies (including Kraig Mott, EA and Rachelle Weymuller, and Kathleen Jardin) up on stage to be serenaded by the House Jacks and the rest of the audience. Ten Little Star Montessori School teachers headed off last Thursday to attend a Montessori conference in San Francisco: an event they started saving money for six years ago. A Snoqualmie Pass closure caused them to miss their flight, stranding them in Cle Elum for much of the day. After seeing six years’ worth of fundraising flash before their eyes in a blur of lost registration fees, plane tickets, and hotel rooms, they decided to push on to the airport and hope that something could be negotiated, in spite of reports that all flights were full. It all eventually worked out and all 10 teachers made it to the conference. Thanks to all who have supported the Little Star staff development fund over the past six years.

Contact your local representative Mazama: Bob Spiwak 996-2777 or badwater@centurytel.net

Spread eagle Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife enforcement agent Cal Treser holds the remains of a bald eagle he retrieved along the Methow River between Twisp and Carlton last weekend. Nearby residents reported seeing the carcass at the base of a cottonwood tree and notified Treser. The eagle will be sent to a U.S. Fish and Wildlife forensics lab in Ashland, Ore., before its final destination at the National Eagle Repository near Denver, Colo.

Winthrop: Ashley Lodato 996-3363 or ashleylodato@alumni.stanford.edu Twisp: Sally Gracie 997-4364 or sgracie@centurytel.net Carlton: Sue Misao 997-7O11 or sue@methow valleynews.com Methow: Joanna Smith (509) 341-4617 or joanna@joannanews.com

Photo by Mike Maltais

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Methow Valley News-Gen'l Excellence-03.21.12