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dividends T h e M a g a z i n e o f t h e M I S S I S S I P P I S T A T E U n i v E R S I T Y C o l l EGE o f B usINE S S • 2 0 1 2


college of business welcome A

s we begin our 98th year of existence, it is notable that the MSU College of Business is one of the oldest recognized business programs in the south. The past year has been one of great momentum and progress. Once again, our College of Business has been ranked number one in the world in Family Business Research. Our incredible team of dedicated faculty has assumed leadership positions in both national and international organizations. During this past year we have been able to recognize the efforts of numerous faculty through new endowed chairs and professorships as well as our Notable Scholars program.

Our MBA client teams have worked diligently throughout the year to help client companies solve business problems. In the coming year, we plan to work even more closely with the businesses of this great state and region through our newly launched Corporate Engagement Program. In this issue of Dividends you will read about the many successes of our entrepreneurial students as they launch new business ventures. These students work closely with a dedicated team of faculty who mentor them through every stage of business development. We celebrated the 25th anniversary of Insurance Day at MSU this past year with nearly 600 attendees. And for the fifth consecutive year, the top banking student in the state of Mississippi was an MSU student. In November, we officially opened our Strategic Finance Laboratory. This state of the art facility is designed to bring the Wall Street experience right into the classroom. This Laboratory would not have been possible without the unselfish donations of many alumni and friends of MSU. On the alumni front, we launched several new programs to include our Dividends Club and our Women Leaders in Philanthropy Advancement, designed to engage more alumni in the College. And, by now most of you have received our first e-Dividends, a quarterly newsletter designed to keep you informed. Finally, I would like to personally thank our alumni and friends. Your enthusiasm and love for this College gives us all a sense of pride. We would love to hear from you. Please e-mail business@ msstate.edu to share your personal success stories and updates. We hope you enjoy this Dividends magazine. Go Dawgs!

Executive Advisory Board

David P. Abney Richard C. Adkerson

contents Dividends is a publication of the College of Business at Mississippi State University | 2012

Drew Allen Rick Anderson Marsha Blackburn Charles P. Boyd Stanley L. Bulger William Anthony Clark James A. Coggin Cynthia Cooper Alan Crockett Larry Favreau

Jan L. Gwin

A New Era Has Begun Dean Sharon Oswald has had a big impact in a short time.

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From Wall Street to McCool Hall

The COB’s new Strategic Finance Laboratory sets the bar.

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How to Succeed in Business While You’re Still in College

MSU fosters the aspirations of student entrepreneurs.

12 Going Pro

Linda M. Garrett H. Devon Graham, Jr.

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Alumna Michelle Kinney harnesses the passion she had as a student athlete to compete in business. _REH8172.NEF

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Paying Dividends

The COB’s new alumni and friends organization is growing.

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Taking the Philanthropy Lead

Women Leaders in Philanthropy Advancement takes off.

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It’s a Family Thing

Alumna Kathy St. John joins her family in giving to MSU.

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From Opponents to Classmates

Two freshmen PGM students who competed in high school now have common goals.

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Making a Difference – Louis A. Hurst, Jr.

Mr. L.A. Hurst, Jr.’s generosity has made a big impact on the lives of students.

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_REH8174.NEF How Much Capital...

COB’s Executive in Residence, Lewis Mallory, offers an opinion on the banking industry.

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Cookies for a Cause

Students learn about marketing and charity.

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A Nationwide Standout

The 25th anniversary of Insurance Day is cause for celebration.

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John M. Hairston Charles A. Jordan, Jr. Paul J. Karre Lewis F. Mallory, Jr. Clyde Manning Don Mason Lee Miller C.R. Montgomery Jay C. Moon Roderick A. Moore Carl L. Nicholson, Jr. Debrah Oberkirch Shirley Olson Ron J. Ponder Richard Puckett, Sr.

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R.L. Qualls Billy Roberts Pat S. Robertson Ken B. Robinson James J. Rouse Robert A. Sheely William A. Taylor, III Cyndi A. Tucker Jimmy L. Walden Blake Wilson

Dividends is published by Quest Group, LLC. www.getquest.com

40 High Five

The past five years’ Swayze Scholars have been COB students.

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News Briefs

Catch up on the latest COB news.

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Thank You to Our Donors


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new era

A New Era Has Begun

his past year brought many exciting changes to the College of Business, one of the most influential being the completion of Dr. Sharon Oswald’s first year serving as dean of the college.

From students and faculty to alumni and friends, Dean Oswald is recognized as a positive driving force behind the college and has already made a lasting impression on the personal lives of those she has encountered.

Reaching out to the alumni on a personal level, Dean Oswald has hosted Meet-the-Dean alumni meetings on multiple occasions in Jackson, MS; Greenville, MS; Denver, CO; and Houston, TX.

“Dean Oswald has quickly made the transition to the Bulldog family. She projects an inclusive leadership style as she guides the College of Business to focus on its strengths and build a strategy for the continuous improvement of business programs at MSU.” – Dr. Kevin Rogers, Associate Dean of the College of Business Emily Moak, customer service associate for AstraZeneca and 2012 graduate of the College of Business, reflects on the impact that Dean Oswald had on her life as a student and the role that she continues to play in her life as an alumna of the college. “From wrapping up senior year of college, to countless job applications and accepting a job offer, Dean Oswald has encouraged, mentored and shaped some of the most important changes and decisions a senior in college faces,” she shares. “Her tireless efforts in assisting with my job search showed her compassion and desire for success in her students and willingness to help in any way possible. It takes a special person to make such an impact on others’ lives in a matter of 12 months, and I know I share this sentiment with my fellow recent graduates of the College of Business, among many others. “Dean Oswald’s efforts the past year have not only shaped students’ lives, but her experiences and decisions are helping shape the college to be better as a whole,” she adds. “As an alumna, it is reassuring to know someone with such great leadership and devotion is directing future graduates in the college. I respect Dean Oswald, and I know we will only see great things to come from her presence as a leader.”

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

“Dean Oswald is a breath of fresh air. Her radiance lights up the room. What means the most to me about Dr. Oswald is that she cares about every student personally,” he says. “You’re not just another number to her. She reaches out and really cares about you as a person and the things going on in your life.”

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She has spent a great deal of time during her first year as dean getting to know the faculty, alumni and students. Senior international business student Charvis Davidson was quick to point out that with Dean Oswald, people come first.

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academic excellence

In a commitment to the alumni and in an effort to increase interaction, Dean Oswald has implemented e-Dividends, an electronic newsletter to be distributed three times a year, as well as encouraged additional College of Business tailgates before a number of home football games. Both of these new endeavors are designed to engage alumni and friends with the College of Business on a deeper level.

“Dr. Oswald brings a wealth of research, teaching and international experience to our College. Her dedication to academic integrity and rigor is creating a renaissance among students, faculty, alumni and staff.” - Dr. Bob Otondo, Associate Professor of Information Systems Academic success is excelling under her leadership. This year’s entering MBA students had an increase of more than 30 points in GMAT scores, and with the creation of the new assistant director for recruiting and events position, the College is well equipped to continue recruiting the highest caliber of students. Faculty support remains a top priority for the College of Business. Dean Oswald’s commitment to that goal led to the establishment of two endowed professorships and five new faculty fellowships. In addition to the establishment of new endowed positions, the John Nutie and Edie Dowdle Finance Professorship was awarded to its first recipient, Dr. Jacqueline Garner. Garner is one of six new faculty members in the College of Business. “As a new faculty member in the College of Business, I have been very encouraged by the focus on research, teaching and community here at Mississippi State University,” says Garner. “I am excited by the discussions I have had with Dean Oswald and others in the College about ways we can serve the students, alumni and the greater research community. Dean Oswald’s passion for research and teaching is infectious! For me personally, I am honored and grateful for the support of the John Nutie and Edie Dowdle Professorship, which will allow us to promote research, teaching and community endeavors.” We are proud of how far the College of Business has come under the guidance and leadership of Dean Oswald and confidently look to the future with high hopes and great enthusiasm.

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experience

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It was she who recognized the need for a college-focused annual giving campaign, which led to the formation of the Dividends Club in the College of Business. Her guidance has led to the development and hiring of the advancement coordinator position in the College – one of the first positions of its kind on campus. In an effort to better brand the college, 2012 also saw the launch of a new College of Business website, www.business.msstate.edu and the new College of Business logo.

About Dean Oswald

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r. Sharon L. Oswald has served as Dean of the College of Business at Mississippi State University since July 2011. Prior to that appointment, she was a faculty member at Auburn University in the College of Business for 24 years, where she held the title of Colonel George Privett Professor of Management and served for twelve years as the head of the Department of Management. Dr. Oswald started the first international studies programs in the College of Business at Auburn in the mid-1990s and led the student program in the Czech Republic and Hungary for ten years. She was instrumental in forming a partnership with an international accounting firm that led to an information assurance initiative funded, in part, by private donations. Under Dr. Oswald’s leadership at Auburn, the College of Business was one of only 37 academic institutions to become an approved partner of the Information Resource Management College of the National Defense University. She was a core instructor in the Physician MBA program and taught the capstone class in the on-campus and distance MBA program. She holds a BA degree from Auburn University, an MBA from the University of Alabama in Birmingham and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. Dr. Oswald has published more than 70 articles in several prestigious journals and co-authored one book, several teaching cases and one book chapter. She has served as a strategy facilitator and business consultant to both private and governmental agencies. Her primary research interests today are entrepreneurship/family business and domestic and international health care strategy. Dr. Oswald has been invited on two occasions to participate in an international panel on health care issues at the U.S. Embassy in the Czech Republic. She serves on an international board of directors for the Academy of Health Care Management headquartered in Prague, Czech Republic, and has previously served as the supervisor of the Academy’s Health Care MBA. Prior to an academic career, Oswald spent 10 years in hospital administration. She is a native of Cleveland, OH. Photo above: Dean Sharon Oswald speaks with business student Donald Williams and Loretta Walker, chief human resources officer at Turner Broadcasting Systems, Inc. Mrs. Walker was the 2012 College of Business Leo W. Seal Jr. Distinguished Executive Speaker.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Under her leadership, the College of Business has increased the positive connection with the Division of Business on the Meridian campus, and through her encouragement, the two entities have built closer relationships. Dean Oswald has overseen the creation of the College of Business Faculty Advisory Board and the Women Leaders in Philanthropy Advancement.

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Her dynamic personality is perhaps shadowed only by her sincere professionalism, dedication to the alumni, faculty and staff and commitment to the betterment of the educational experience of all students who walk the halls of McCool.

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wall street

From Wall Street to McCool Hall

Mississippi State business students are getting a taste of reality in their classroom and learning experiences.

The Laboratory is an advanced learning environment designed to integrate investment education, financial research and professional practice. Replicating a true trading experience, this state of the art facility functions as both classroom and laboratory, while bringing the excitement of a Wall Street brokerage house to Mississippi State University.

The SFL offers 21 student terminals and the ability to have interactive professor/student learning in a simulated trading floor environment. The room is complete with a 24-foot stock ticker and ten 51-inch televisions that provide live coverage of the financial markets and world news.

“It is very rewarding to see an idea, one that began in an e-mail conversation with a development officer five years ago, transformed into a reality,” states Highfield. “To know that so many other individuals bought into our vision and financially supported that vision is really special.” The dream shared by a few started to become a reality during the summer of 2011 when construction began on the first floor of McCool Hall. A year later, students are able to enjoy all that the lab has to offer and experience learning in a real-world trading atmosphere unparalleled by any school in the state. Highfield adds, “Thanks to our generous alumni and friends who supported the construction completely with private dollars, the SFL will also hold some upper-level courses [e.g., Mortgage Finance and Financial Statement Analysis] that are increasingly technology-intensive.” For more information about the Strategic Finance Laboratory, please contact Dr. Mike Highfield at mhighfield@ cobilan.msstate.edu.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

The trading room is designed to provide students with a competitive edge as they obtain jobs in the investments industry or sit for professional certification exams. This multi-disciplinary facility will also play a role in student recruiting, industry relations and the interactions between alumni and students.

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“This Strategic Finance Laboratory is a game changer for the College of Business and Mississippi State University,” says Dr. Mike Highfield, Finance and Economics department head and associate professor of finance. “Students and faculty will have real-time access to financial market data in the largest and most technologically advanced classroom of its kind in the state and region. In addition to simulated trading exercises that allow students to observe typical market reactions to news announcements, students will also have hands-on experience with portfolio decomposition and attribution analysis.”

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Thanks to our loyal alumni and friends, College of Business students have the opportunity to learn in a realworld trading atmosphere right in McCool Hall’s Strategic Finance Laboratory (SFL).

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succeed

How to Succeed in Business

While You’re Still in College

any students have jobs while they are in college, but at Mississippi State some take it a step further and start businesses of their own.

College of Business seniors Chandler Carr and Parker Stewart have found business ownership to be a creative source of income as well as education beyond the classroom. Carr, a marketing major, began Carr’s Cords – now Carr’s Outfitters – in August 2011. The job he held at the time provided spending money but did not keep his interest. An avid outdoorsman, he decided to try generating income instead by making and selling paracord survival bracelets to local stores.

“I used vibrant colors and marketed them to an audience who wanted to be connected with outdoor culture, even if they didn’t use the bracelet for actual survival,” he remarks. “I also added versions in school colors so people can show their team loyalty.” In keeping with his upscale outdoor market, he makes custom display units tailored to each retailer. One for a running and fitness store, for example, would have an entirely different look from that of a hunting and fishing store. Reed’s of Columbus was the first to buy his bracelets, soon followed by Reed’s of Starkville. Twenty-six small specialty retail stores in four states now carry them. Harry Mayer of Harry Mayer Clothiers in Meridian sought Carr out because a friend in Kosciusko had purchased the bracelets and was impressed with their quality. “Chandler is very mature, very thorough, very bright and sharp as a tack,” states Mayer. “I really enjoy doing business with people like him, and I really admire what he’s been able to accomplish at his young age.” Parker Stewart, whose management major includes an emphasis on entrepreneurship, has been attracted to business development since high school. That interest, combined with a desire to make better personal decisions, led to his founding Night & Day Vending. Knowing judgment can be impaired before the effects of alcohol are felt, Stewart had sought out a personal handheld breathalyzer. In doing so he realized others would have the same need and began to look at the business possibilities. He began to research various breathalyzer businesses, and what emerged as the best option was IntoxBox, a wall-mounted breathalyzer vending machine. Night & Day Vending now holds exclusive rights to distribute IntoxBox in the state of Mississippi. These machines, installed primarily in bars and restaurants, allow patrons to check their blood alcohol content for $2 before making a decision about driving.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Carr decided to target the higher-end clothing market as well as the outdoor sector, adding a fashion aspect to the utilitarian product. His tagline is “Stylishly Adventurous.”

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These bracelets are woven from durable lightweight nylon rope. They are a convenient way for outdoor enthusiasts to carry rope that may have a variety of uses such as lashings, snares, shoelaces, tourniquets and splint bindings.

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Old Venice Pizza Company general manager Martin Crawford, who had an IntoxBox installed in June, agrees.

Carr has used his New Venture Challenge winnings to expand the scope of his company. “Some of my advisers, who are outdoor retail store owners, wanted to see more from me,” he comments. “Over the summer, I started adding a t-shirt line. They’re an inexpensive way for people to show their interests.” Following graduation, if Carr’s business will support him, it will become his full-time work. If it has not yet reached that stage, he will take a position with another company and keep Carr’s Outfitters as a side business. Some of his ideas for his company down the road are retail space and wholesale distribution.

Stewart’s company installs and maintains the machines with the permission of bar and restaurant owners, who receive a commission.

“[IntoxBox] is a very good idea for bar owners and for patrons,” notes Crawford. “I’m seeing more people use it each week. It’s gotten good reviews, and people have been using the cab-call feature.” Both Stewart and Carr credit MSU and the College of Business for an environment that nurtures startup businesses.

“I plan to saturate the state of Mississippi in the next few years and move into neighboring markets,” he states.

Stewart’s professor, Allison Pearson, connected him with Jeffrey Rupp, COB director of outreach and corporate engagement. Rupp, in turn, linked him with an accountant, an attorney, his first potential client and an MBA student team to consult on the business.

For now, what Stewart and Carr are learning in the classroom is informing their businesses, and their businesses are bringing to life the principles they are studying.

“I went to get help organizing my business. The next thing I knew, they had me in front of the advisory board asking for $1,000 in startup funds for a website and some materials – and I got it!” shares Stewart. “The Entrepreneurship Center advisory board helped me with funding through the Thad Cochran Endowment for Entrepreneurship, and they made sure I knew who to talk to, where to go and how to get all my bases covered.”

“My classes directly correlate to what I’m experiencing,” says Stewart. “There have been days when I’ve learned something and been able to apply it the same day.”

The MSU Entrepreneurship Center works to create a culture of entrepreneurship on campus by providing resources like mentoring, incubator space, networking opportunities and financial support through means such as awards, grants and scholarships.

“These guys are focused and driven toward continuous improvement in their businesses,” says management professor Allison Pearson. “They go into overdrive in their courses, seeking out how anything presented in class could be used to help their business grow and succeed.” She adds, “They also become more aware of maximizing the value of the limited resources they often have access to. If one student firm has web development expertise and another has a great list of retailers, they exchange services and information in lieu of the ever-absent student firm resource – start-up capital. They become enterprising problem solvers.” Both Stewart and Carr have returned to Pearson’s class – this time in the role of speaker.

The center’s E-Club offers Carr and Stewart a forum to meet with fellow student entrepreneurs and share ideas. The approximately 30 members represent various fields such as business, engineering, biomedical science and chemistry. “It’s been good to get to know students in similar situations,” says Stewart. “We’re able to grow with and help each other.” Stewart, in fact, now works at the E-Center, arranging meetings for angel investors and connecting students with people who can help them with some particular aspects of their developing businesses. The center encourages students to participate in competitions, and Stewart and Carr have had their business ideas and plans judged favorably. Stewart won first place in the student elevator pitch competition at last February’s Investing in Innovation Conference held by the MSU Office of Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer (OETT). Both young men

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“I can tell them the good and the bad,” remarks Carr. “I’m a real world example professors can show their classes.” And somewhere among those listening, ideas for new businesses are being sparked….

Learn more about Carr’s Outfitters and Night & Day Vending:

carrsoutfitters.com | nightanddayvending.com

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

There is no liability because the machines require patrons to agree to a waiver before use. They do not store information or print results.

Stewart too would like to make his business his full time career upon graduation. At press time, he had machines in various locations in Starkville, Oxford and Jackson, and he anticipates rapid expansion in the year ahead. He is gaining visibility for IntoxBox at events like Top of the Hops Jackson Beer Festival and Bulldog Bash in Starkville and is pursuing networking opportunities like membership in the Mississippi Hospitality & Restaurant Association.

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“Some insurance companies give discounts on liability insurance to bar owners because of the machines’ cab-call feature, which allows patrons to send for a cab with the touch of a button,” he notes.

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“Some people think ‘buzzed driving’ is not drunk driving,” he says. “This is a very cut and dried answer to that. I think it will cut down on accidents.”

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participated in the elevator pitch contest at the University of Tampa’s Southeast Entrepreneurship Conference in March, with Stewart taking second place. Stewart then earned third place in his division of the Mississippi Technology Alliance’s business plan competition. Carr took first place and Stewart second in the OETT and E-Center’s Talos Energy New Venture Challenge, a business plan competition for enterprises that have begun operating and generating revenue.

“Most people who get DUIs aren’t stumbling drunk. They’re just over the legal limit,” points out Stewart. “I’ve talked to people who claim they’re good to drive because they’ve only had a few beers then change their attitude after using IntoxBox.”

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going pro

Going Pro

As an NCAA ad points out, most college athletes go pro in something other than sports.

The Memphis native graduated in 2007 with a double major in economics and banking & finance, having also had a rather remarkable college sports career. Initially recruited to Mississippi State as a track athlete, Kinney ran cross-country and competed in the 3,000-meter steeplechase. When tendonitis and stress fractures in her feet began to plague her, track coach Al Schmidt suggested that with her high school softball experience, she might try throwing the javelin. “I thought he was joking at first,” recalls Kinney. “But in my freshman year, I picked up a javelin for the first time in my life. I turned out to be pretty decent at it.”

She approached softball coach Jay Miller and asked to try out for the team after surgery on her arm and rehabilitation. Knowing her background, he gave her the opportunity. She made the team as a walk-on then qualified for a scholarship in her fourth and fifth years. Throughout college, she was equally tenacious in preparing for her career. “Since my senior year in high school, I had wanted to be a financial analyst for a major corporation,” she says. “I never changed majors [from banking & finance], though I did add economics because I took a couple of classes and fell in love with it.”

Kinney was named to the SEC Honor Roll for five years and received the National Fastpitch Coaches Association All-America Scholar-Athlete award three times and MSU’s Newsom Award for scholar athletes twice. After graduation and a couple of years as a marketing manager for Aspen Bay Candles in Starkville, Kinney went on to the career she had planned. She joined John Hancock in Memphis and began working as a financial adviser. It was during this time, in continuing to pursue her personal physical fitness, that she first learned of CrossFit. “It’s a workout methodology they say produces the fittest athletes in the world,” she remarks. “It doesn’t focus on a single component like weights or running, so it won’t produce the strongest man in the world or the winner of the Boston Marathon. It focuses on well-rounded fitness – strength, endurance, speed and agility.” The intensity and slightly competitive nature of the CrossFit workouts appealed to Kinney. Then she found out the growing sport also offered competitions, and she was sold. “I had been looking for something that could satisfy my appetite for competition beyond my college years. I got very excited about it,” she says. Soon she realized the training increasingly held more focus for her than her work in finance. After much contemplation, she decided to leave John Hancock and become a certified CrossFit coach.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Then a torn UCL in her throwing elbow cast doubt on her future with the javelin, so she determinedly sought yet another way to compete.

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More than decent, most would say. She was consistently in the top eight in the conference, scored a seventhplace finish in the SEC conference meet and earned all-SEC honors.

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But Bulldog Michelle Kinney found that leaving behind the rush of sports after graduation was not easy, and it was her drive to compete athletically that redirected her from a finance career into the world of entrepreneurship.

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Her success at the Games drew attention, and she began to pick up sponsors. “The sport is growing, so competitions and endorsements are increasingly becoming an avenue for revenue,” she notes. Kinney missed qualifying for the Games this year by one spot, but that is understandable. Not only has she been pursuing a master’s degree in economics, but she also got the opportunity to become one of three partners in a new CrossFit gym. “I jumped at it as quick as I could,” she says. “The sport is really picking up in popularity, and Memphis was an underserved market for CrossFit.” She comments, “When we were forecasting fixed and variable costs and establishing our rates, we determined that after six months we’d hope to have between 100 and 125 members. I thought that might be a tall order, but we’ve kind of blown it out of the water.”

CrossFit Chickasaw opened May 18, 2012, and within four months had grown to a membership of 170, equaling or exceeding established CrossFit gyms in the area. “Now I’m not just a coach and employee – I’m an entrepreneur and business owner,” Kinney comments. She and her partners have kept a close eye on the growth, adapting or adding classes and equipment as needed to maintain clients’ satisfaction. They have done no traditional marketing but have relied instead on social media and on living examples that show they are good at what they do.

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A member of the M-Club, Kinney usually returns to campus for a couple of football weekends each fall and for the annual softball alumni weekend in spring. She gives a great deal of credit to her experiences at Mississippi State. Athletics instilled a work ethic where nothing less than 100 percent effort was an option, and it rounded out her definition of fitness to include strength and agility as well as running. Her COB education has served her well, whether she is tracking CrossFit Chickasaw’s finances, talking with their accountant or dealing with their attorney.

“I feel super confident in all I do on the business side because of what I learned at Mississippi State,” she declares. In what free time she has when not running her business or coaching or training or studying, she helps out with her father’s team of Southeast high school all-star softball players. “I enjoy helping them refine their abilities,” she says. “They’re at that prime age for being recruited.” One day, these young players too will “go pro” as businesswomen, doctors, teachers – maybe even athletes. Michelle Kinney may be helping them on the field now, but she is also teaching them a couple of things about preparing for their futures: Equip yourself with the tools to succeed, and don’t be afraid to follow your passions.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

To preserve the focus on broad, general fitness, specifics of CrossFit competitions are not announced ahead of time. One event from the three-day 2011 CrossFit Games had Kinney swimming 300 meters in the Pacific Ocean, running 1,500 meters in soft sand, doing 50 pull-ups and 100 pushups and 200 squats, and then running another 1,500 meters in sand.

She adds, “We have a bunch of Bulldogs who are members. They weren’t student athletes, but they certainly are athletes now!”

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In 2010, Kinney progressed through multiple levels of competition to become one of 50 women and 50 men to qualify for the CrossFit Games – the international championships. She placed tenth in the world, and the following year she placed seventeenth.

“We want our members to become walking billboards,” Kinney states. “They may be 16 or 63, former college athletes or former couch potatoes, but they all have light bulb moments when they reach a personal record or simply realize what they’re doing is making a difference. I love those moments.”

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In her new job at a Memphis CrossFit gym, her COB education and her work experience enabled her to help with the business side in addition to coaching. Meanwhile, she also concentrated on her own training.

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Kinney professional

“It was an interesting conversation with my parents,” she laughs. “But the decision was about following my passions.”

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dividends

Paying Dividends

t is an exciting time to be a part of the College of Business at Mississippi State University! Now more than ever, supporters of the College of Business understand the importance of offering students a high quality learning experience right from the start of their college career, including classroom renovations and advancements in technology as a teaching tool. The newest community of alumni and friends, the Dividends Club, was established in July 2012, to help meet the needs of our students by supporting improvements and providing advancement opportunities within our College. Members of this annual giving program enjoy events throughout the year including tailgates, dean’s events and annual dinners.

Dividends Club members enjoy a tailgate brunch prior to the MSU-Auburn game in September.

“I know through my membership in the Dividends Club, I am helping ensure that the College of Business is equipped with the necessary resources to excel in all of our endeavors,” Pearson says. “By giving an annual unrestricted gift, I have the ability to touch the lives of the students where the need is the greatest. I hope others will join me and become members of the Dividends Club.”

Membership in the Dividends Club is available to all alumni and friends who give $500 or more annually to the MSU College of Business Advancement Fund. These gifts will help support improvements and provide advancement opportunities within our College. For more information contact Heather Skaggs, advancement coordinator, 662.325.0159, hskaggs@cobilan.msstate.edu.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Dr. Allison Pearson, the Julia and Jim Rouse Professor of Management, quickly saw the benefits of joining the Dividends Club.

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Members of the Dividends Club joined the College of Business employees and staff for a tailgate brunch before the MSU vs. Auburn game on September 8, in the McCool Atrium. Everyone enjoyed live music performed by Jeff Cummings while munching on breakfast fare before adjourning to Davis Wade Stadium to watch the Bulldogs beat the Tigers.

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philanthropy

Taking the Philanthropy Lead

Women Leaders in Philanthropy Advancement established in the College of Business

t is a widely accepted fact that women, historically, have been very giving of their time and talents. They are generally quick to volunteer and eager to say yes. Today’s women are using that same philanthropic spirit and taking more leadership roles in sharing not only their time and talents, but also their financial contributions. Did you know that women today make up 53 percent of the workforce? In addition, did you know women control over half of the wealth in the United States and make 80 percent of all purchases? The College of Business recognizes this trend and is committed to helping educate women of all ages about becoming financially independent and philanthropically savvy. It is through this dedication that the College of Business is happy to announce the establishment of Women Leaders in Philanthropy Advancement (WLPA) under the leadership of Dean Sharon Oswald and COB alumna Kathy St. John of Madison, MS.

n WINSTON CHURCHILL

The goals of WLPA are to: n Increase philanthropy and membership commitment n Cultivate full leadership potential n Achieve financial decision making and donor independence n Impact the financial landscape through the collective efforts of women n Provide a forum and speaker series for women to collaborate and network n Establish an endowment fund that will nourish scholarships, mentoring and educational opportunities

Initiatives:

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”

WLPA has been created to educate, enable and empower a community of women of all generations as independent philanthropists, role models and leaders through the support of the MSU College of Business.

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“It is my ultimate vision that WLPA will empower women of all ages to attain financial decision making insight through the forum events while impacting the philanthropic landscape by means of the members’ efforts both individually and collectively. Ultimately, this community of women will grow as leaders, role models and supporters of Mississippi State University and the College of Business,” says St. John.

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n WLPA Fund | Academic funds to enhance the education of MSU College of Business students n Mentoring | Dress for Success program n Networking | Leadership Luncheon series and other education programs n Civil Engagement | WLPA participation, service and programmatic funds in endeavors which improve the quality

of life for community initiatives n Fundraising | Showcase WLPA goals with events to recognize achievements of women at regional and national levels

“Without a doubt, I know Women Leaders of Philanthropy Advancement is designed to successfully equip tomorrow’s leaders by educating and empowering the women of today,” states Oswald. “I am committed to seeing the goals and initiatives of WLPA lived out, and I am excited to watch as this community grows in both number and impact. “Today’s women deserve something of this magnitude and importance. The experiences and educational foundation we will be able to provide will benefit generations of women to come. This has the power to shape the future of individual women, our state and our nation.” The first WLPA Leadership Luncheon series is set for February of 2013, in Jackson, MS. For more information about how you can join us in educating, enabling and empowering future generations of women at Mississippi State University and beyond, please contact Heather Skaggs at 662.325.0159 or hskaggs@cobilan.msstate.edu. Sources: Forbes.com, The National Foundation of Women Business Owners and Philanthropy Among Business Women of Achievement

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family

It’s a Family Thing

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athy St. John has taken steps through her involvement with Mississippi State University as a proud graduate to assist the College of Business as it moves toward the future.

In recent months, Kathy has worked closely with Dean Sharon Oswald, dean of the College of Business, to initiate Women Leaders in Philanthropy Advancement. The organization is gaining steam as it seeks to educate women as independent philanthropists and leaders and engage them with furthering the College’s mission through mentoring opportunities and activities. The first WLPA speaker series and forum is scheduled for February 2013.

a part of this endeavor that I know will have a lasting impact on the College of Business.” n KATHY ST. JOHN

Because she understands the importance of philanthropically supporting MSU, she recently established an endowment in the College of Business. The Kathy Moreton St. John Endowed Fellowship in Marketing will assist in attracting and retaining outstanding faculty to the COB. Earnings from the endowment will furnish a salary supplement for the Kathy Moreton St. John Faculty Fellow. Her intent in establishing the fund is to recognize exceptionally meritorious faculty.

“I feel like my calling as a marketing alumna is to ensure business college faculty have the opportunity to pursue their goals and strengthen their position with the university,” states Kathy, who works as a contracts consultant for a purchasing group for nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Kathy is not the only member of her family who shares a passion for MSU. Her husband, Drew St. John II, is a 1980 landscape contracting alumnus from Hattiesburg who served as the university’s Bully mascot from 1976 to1978. The two met as MSU students and married in 1979. Following graduation from MSU, Drew enjoyed a 28-year career as a landscape contractor. Since 2007, he has served as CEO of Madison-based New South Access and Environmental Solutions. The company made Inc. magazine’s 2011 list of the 500 fastest-growing privately held companies in the United States. Ranked number 270, the company is the largest U.S. distributor of Emtek engineered hardwood mats. Drew was able to tap into the valuable resources available to businesses through the University Center and Jeffrey Rupp, director of outreach and corporate engagement in the College of Business. New South Mat was assigned a research team of MBA graduate students to help them with marketing, new products, logistics and other pertinent issues.

Above: A trio of MSU alumni: Drew and Kathy St. John with her father, Jimmy Moreton

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

“I am very excited to be

Creating awareness and cultivating the involvement of women in educational causes university-wide is important to Kathy. As a marketing graduate, she willingly participates as a mentor in Career Chats with students. Outside of the College, she volunteers her time with her sorority, Delta Gamma.

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“I am very excited to be a part of this endeavor that I know will have a lasting impact on the College of Business while also helping women become better equipped to understand how their personal growth can allow them to become philanthropists in the truest sense,” Kathy says.

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For a number of years, she has served as an advisory board member for the Department of Marketing and has been active with its scholarship drive. However, she wanted to do more to assist the department and the college with their long-range goals and motivate other alumnae to join her efforts.

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St. John tradition family

The St. John family – Sarah, Katie, Lawrence, Kathy and Drew

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“Our team of three outstanding graduate students delivered high level data, research, market intelligence and summary recommendations that are proving vital to the success and growth of our business,” Drew says. He adds, “An article published by MSU sparked the idea for New South, and Kathy and I want to make sure we consider the university’s graduates for positions with our company in the future.” The St. Johns have three children – daughters Sarah and Katie and son Lawrence. Katie is a senior at MSU, and Lawrence attended MSU before joining the family business. Lawrence is married and has given Kathy and Drew their first granddaughter. Sarah graduated from the University of Kentucky but continues to support the Bulldogs whenever possible. Standing behind MSU has long been a family tradition. Kathy’s father, James R. “Jimmy” Moreton, has been a Bulldog supporter for many years. Most recently, the 1956 engineering graduate established the James R. Moreton Endowed Fellowship in the areas of forestry and forest products. He was president of the First Federal Savings and Loan of Brookhaven for 30 years and taught Kathy the importance of giving back to her community. Drew also extends his financial support to MSU. His most recent gift established the Drew St. John Endowed Scholarship in environmental and wildlife conservation, which will assist students enrolled in the College of Forest Resources. “Our family shares a love of all things Bulldog, and we are happy to say together we give back as volunteers and financial supporters,” shares Drew. Drew and Kathy during their MSU student days

Kathy agrees.

“Involvement with MSU academics and athletics is key for us,” she says. “The education we received at MSU has been the basis for our success in life, and we want to ensure Mississippi State continues to offer its students the best education possible.”

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Imagine being able to turn a passion for golf into your

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From Opponents to Classmates by Cele Eifert

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ndrew Bradberry graduated with honors from Whitewater High School in Fayetteville, GA, and Robert Eifert graduated with honors from McIntosh High School in Peachtree City, GA. Both were on their schools’ varsity golf teams and competed against each other.

men, the first step on that path happened when they started college in August

While both young men have been coached by and taken lessons from PGA and Nationwide Tour professional David Schreyer, now teaching through Canongate Golf in Georgia, their golf backgrounds couldn’t be more different. Bradberry has been playing golf since he was four and first swung a club on the Wee Links at Fripp Island, South Carolina. He has competed on the Atlanta Junior Golf Tour for many years and had the Low Stroke Average on the Whitewater team for two years. He won the Captain’s Award his senior year. He currently has a 3.3 handicap. Eifert has only been playing since July 2009. He competed in both roller hockey and golf during his sophomore year of high school but gave up roller hockey in May 2010 to concentrate solely on golf. He has a 5 handicap.

During their senior years, both Andrew and Robert applied for and were admitted into the Professional Golfers Association of America (PGA) Professional Golf Management (PGM) concentration program at MSU, the second oldest program in the nation. In order to be accepted into the program, a student must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 and a golf handicap index of 8.0 or lower. These young men have joined the 130 other golf-loving undergraduates in the program who represent 25 states and two countries. Incoming freshmen live together in the PGA Golf Management Living-Learning Community in the brand new Magnolia Hall. In addition to living side by side, PGA Golf

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

PGM freshmen Robert Eifert and Andrew Bradberry

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at Mississippi State.

Bradberry was also a 3-year varsity football letterman, earning the Chick-fil-A Student Leadership Award last year. He was on the Class of 2012 Executive Board and a member of Beta Club, the National Honor Society, Spanish Club and the Spanish Honor Society. Eifert played roller hockey from third through tenth grades and was a member of the PTC Hockey Association 18U Spring 2010 League Championship Team. Eifert is an Eagle Scout. He was a three-year volunteer with the Fayette County Humane Society and attended Boys State. He was also a member of Beta Club and the McIntosh Jazz Band. He attained the Jade Fundraising Level in the 2011 Fayette County Relay for Life and the Silver Level in 2012.

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life’s work. For two young

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Management freshmen take classes and play golf together, which helps them form bonds that last well beyond their college years.

Bradberry chose Mississippi State over Coastal Carolina and Campbell because, “Mississippi State offers the best golf management program in the nation.”

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Both Bradberry and Eifert were awarded freshman non-resident tuition scholarships in recognition of their impressive high school résumés. Eifert also earned an academic excellence scholarship and an Eagle Scout scholarship. Students in the Mississippi State program graduate with bachelor’s degrees in marketing and concentrations in PGA Golf Management. Classroom studies cover subjects such as turf management, food management, landscape architecture, human resources, operation of a golf shop (including marketing, merchandising, accounting and small business management), golf course maintenance, public relations, teaching skills, rules of golf, club repair and fitting, the organizing and conducting golf events and even golf penmanship and calligraphy. Each student is required to complete three approved internships totaling 16 months at golf facilities with PGA professionals or in administrative positions in PGA-affiliated organizations. In addition, students are also required to pass a Playing Ability Test, pass examinations conducted by the PGA and attend seminars conducted by PGA faculty members. These examinations give students the chance to demonstrate their competency in many academic and technical areas covered in the PGA Golf Management curriculum and during internships.

Both Bradberry and Eifert agree that one of the many impressive aspects of the program at Mississippi State is the Lyle Hansberger - GolfTEC Learning Center. GolfTEC, a golf training and improvement company founded by two Mississippi State PGM grads, is the undisputed industry leader with millions of lessons given and a 95 percent success rate. The co-founders wanted to give back to their alma mater so they had the state of the art facility installed for the benefit of all Mississippi State PGM students. Inside the learning center are a Full Swing Simulator and GolfTEC SEVA System Motion Analysis Equipment.

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The Full Swing Simulator allows students to play 56 golf courses from around the world and review statistical information from their rounds. Statistical information includes driving accuracy percentage; average driving distance; average score on par three, par four and par five holes; greens in regulation percentage; average distance to the hole and more. The simulator also incorporates an extensive practice area in which students can work on their games between classes. Students conduct competitions throughout the semester in the simulator. Some of the competitions include golf tournaments, skins games, online tournaments, closest to the hole contests and long drive contests. The GolfTEC SEVA System Motion Analysis Equipment allows students to compare their golf swings with more than 225 tour professionals. Students are outfitted with motion sensors that register movement during the golf swing and, when used with the full swing simulator, can see how body positions impact ball flight. Swings are stored in the system and compared to individual tour players, other students’ or a student’s own swing as he or she makes adjustments. In addition to indoor golf technology, PGM students can participate in regularly scheduled tournaments run by the PGM Student Association at the MSU Golf Course. There is also a Ryder Cup style tournament played every year between regional opponents – Mississippi State plays Sam Houston State in the Heritage Cup – and the prestigious PGA Jones Cup, held annually at the PGA Course in Port St. Lucie, FL, for teams from all of the PGM universities. The Jones Cup was initiated by the Bulldogs in 2002 and is named after the university’s first PGM program director Dr. S. Roland Jones. The PGA Jones Cup provides an opportunity for all participants to display professionalism, integrity, character and camaraderie, all of which are characteristics these students strive to emulate. Mississippi State has won the PGA Jones Cup a record three times. Another event which Bradberry and Eifert look forward to attending is the annual PGA Merchandise Show held in Orlando, FL, every January. All PGA Golf Management universities send a contingent of students to represent their programs at this important gathering. It is a three-day business, education, marketing, merchandising and networking forum which features an ambitious schedule of product presentations, special events and seminars. Over 40,000 industry leaders, PGA professionals and retailers from 75 countries attend. Among these are golf’s premier companies and brands, an all-star cast of golf and other celebrities and the industry’s leading educators set to launch an array of new products and grow the industry. The MSU PGM program has a 100 percent job placement rate. Graduates have job opportunities across the country, and typically a student’s final six-month internship is at a course or facility where he or she might like to be employed. Both Bradberry and Eifert have high career aspirations. Bradberry hopes to one day be the head professional at one of the Top 100 Golf Courses in America while Eifert wants to pursue an MBA and either work in the business side of the golf industry or be the general manager at a private country club. With the education, experience and tools that will be provided at Mississippi State, both students are sure to achieve the success they seek in the golf industry and make their families and friends back home in Fayette County, GA, proud.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Eifert was accepted to Clemson, Florida State University, Coastal Carolina and the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, but chose Mississippi State because, “the program and the university are so welcoming that I felt like it was the place where I’d have the best opportunity for success.”

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The program was founded in 1985, ten years after the inaugural program began at Ferris State University in Michigan. In addition to Mississippi State and Ferris State, there are 18 other PGAaccredited universities nationwide. Roughly 2,500 students are enrolled in these programs.

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difference

Making a Difference: Louis A. Hurst, Jr.

“Sometimes Professor Brown graded me a little harder than I thought he should have, but he taught me a lot,” laughs Hurst. “I am grateful to have had him for a professor.” Following graduation, Hurst took a job in Minnesota with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). Deciding that bank examination was his calling, he spent his full career with the FDIC, mostly in the Southeast. His final assignment was in Memphis, where he served the last 13 years of his career as the assistant regional director of the Memphis region. He retired in 1982 and moved to Houston, TX, to be near his sister and her family. For many years Hurst has been dedicated in his support of Mississippi State. In addition to serving two terms on the MSU Foundation board of directors, Hurst has been named the COB Alumnus of the Year and the MSU Alumnus of the Year. He has also had a dormitory named in his honor. He has been generous with both his time and money.

“I thought it would be a good thing to help young people be able to go to college,” says Hurst when asked why he has directed some of his gifts toward scholarships. “If it hadn’t been for the G.I. Bill, I wouldn’t have been able to go to Mississippi State. I hope to inspire others to help students with their tuition.”

< Hurst Scholarship recipients: Back row (l to r): Ben Bailey, Brett Garraway, Austen Meyers. Front row (l to r): Catherine Waddell, Jennifer Stutts, Daisy Edwards, Erica Ring. Not pictured: Andrew Sommerman

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Mr. Louis A. Hurst, Jr.

The 87-year-old credits professors Malcolm Gray and particularly Edwin Brown for teaching him thoroughly about his chosen field of accounting.

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Following his honorable discharge from the U.S. Navy in 1946, Hurst enrolled in Mississippi State along with hundreds of war veterans. Thanks to the G.I. Bill, the Poplarville native was able to attend MSU, instead of the local junior college. His father and uncles were State graduates and strong supporters, so it was a natural choice for him. He enrolled in the College of Business and quickly found he had a knack for accounting.

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e’ve all seen the photos, but Mr. L.A. Hurst, Jr. lived the memories of Old Main dorm – the pillow fights, the fire hose wars, the pranks on faculty. The memories of his years at Mississippi State in the very oldest “Polecat” section of Old Main are fond ones, which is perhaps part of his impetus for giving to his beloved alma mater.

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He may have encouraged some donors by his example, but his compassion has also had an impact on the student recipients of his scholarships.

gratitude

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Sommerman and senior international business major Ben Bailey plan to acquire master’s degrees before entering the workforce, with Sommerman hoping to pursue a sports-related career and Bailey entering the international business arena. For Jennifer Stutts, career goals are something very specific.

“I hope to attain a job at St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital in their financial department,” says the sophomore accounting major.

Senior accounting major Catherine Waddell adds, “His generosity has definitely inspired me to do the same thing when I have the ability to do so.”

To a person, each recipient of the Hurst Scholarship says that being granted this opportunity has given him or her a sense of responsibility to make the most of it.

The students receiving aid from Hurst are rising stars. They have strong GPAs and are leaders in a variety of service clubs, social clubs and student organizations. They volunteer their time in the community, and their involvement in the university ranges from the Shackouls Honors College to the Famous Maroon Marching Band to the Baptist Student Union.

Ring comments, “I feel very honored and blessed to have received this scholarship. It really means a lot to me that I was chosen. I am going to continue to do the best I can throughout my life because receiving a scholarship like this one reminds me of why I study so hard and strive to do the best.”

All express a sense of gratitude for Hurst’s generosity. “I very much appreciate the honor of receiving the L.A. Hurst Scholarship,” states sophomore Brett Garraway. “Having worked two jobs this past summer to earn money toward supporting myself at MSU, I have learned the value and importance of having the necessary resources to support my educational endeavors. The scholarship funds from Mr. Hurst are very important in contributing to my ability to study accounting at MSU.” Austen Myers, another accounting major, asserts, “Being recognized for hard work only makes me want to work harder!” It is a good feeling for these young people to know there is someone in their corner. “Mr. Hurst’s generosity definitely has inspired me to be the best I can be,” offers Andrew Sommerman, a junior studying business administration. “If someone who doesn’t know me is willing to help me out financially, I now have added determination to be my best. It has inspired me to possibly do something like this in the future.” The L.A. Hurst scholarship recipients’ career goals cover a broad spectrum. Edwards is interested in exploring a career in immigration law and would like to work in South America. Waddell and Ring will work toward master’s degrees in professional accountancy at MSU with plans to become CPAs. Garraway, too, plans to pursue public accounting.

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Hurst’s desire to help students with their tuition has equipped them with far more than a classroom education. They have learned valuable life lessons from this humble man’s gifts that they hope to pass on. “The L.A. Hurst Scholarship has helped me realize the contributions of those who have come before me to drive the future of society,” says Bailey. “If I am successful one day, I should give back in the same way. Individuals like Mr. Hurst, who contribute to education, are key to helping solve the world’s problems. By his helping educate the minds of tomorrow, we will be better equipped to solve anything that might arise.”

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

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“I am inspired by anyone who gives for the betterment of others. Mr. Hurst has done just that,” says Daisy Edwards, a sophomore international business major. “I think such acts of benevolence can keep people from getting discouraged and nudge them toward completing their goals.”

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capital

How Much Capitalâ&#x20AC;Ś

Would This Really Be Positive for Community Banks? by Lewis Mallory

1. Narrowing what qualifies as capital: A greater focus is placed on common equity, creating a new regulatory capital component labeled Common Equity Tier I Capital.

2. Requiring higher capital ratios to be established for all banks: New minimum capital requirements would include: n n n n

Common Equity Tier I/Total Risk-Weighted Asset Ratio of 4.5 percent (new) Tier I Capital/Total Risk-Weighted Asset Ratio of 6 percent (increased from 4 percent) Total Capital/Total Risk-Weighted Asset Ratio of 8 percent (unchanged) Leverage Ratio of 4 percent (unchanged)

A new capital conservation buffer would be established that would effectively add up to an additional 2.5 percent to the minimum common equity Tier I ratio of 4.5 percent. Failure to maintain this buffer would result in restrictions on dividends and certain bonus payments.

3. Requiring higher risk weightings of assets for all banks: The methodology for calculating risk-weighted assets would be modified to include higher risk-weights for residential mortgages and increased capital requirements for past due loans. Construction and development loans would also be subject to revised risk-weights. New due diligence requirements would be imposed to capture any securitization exposure banks may have.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Currently, bank regulators determine the adequacy of bank capital by breaking it down into several categories and measuring these categories of capital against the bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assets which have been risk rated, i.e., higher riskweighted assets require higher amounts of capital allocation. Summary material produced by the American Bankers Association (ABA) points out that Basel III would fundamentally change how banks and bank holding companies would calculate their capital ratios. Briefly, these proposals would change the way banks and holding companies calculate their capital ratios as a result of:

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Although no conclusion has been reached on how to determine if a bank has adequate capital, proposals to strengthen the level of capital requirements and improve the quality of bank capital have recently been put forward by federal banking regulators. These proposals mostly reflect the work of Basel III, which has been a regulatory project conducted in Europe (Basel, Switzerland) and attended by an international group of bank regulatory experts, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision. The intention of Basel III is to develop a uniform set of adequate capital levels that would apply worldwide. While that concept may have merit, the details of Basel III need to be carefully considered in light of whether they are good for all U.S. banks and the economy.

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apital has always been of major importance to banks and their regulators. How much capital a bank should carry on its balance sheet and what factors should be considered in determining this amount have long been debated by banks, banking analysts and bank regulators. Attention to this issue has surged again in recent years as the fallout from the 2007 financial crisis significantly weakened many banks and caused others to fail. The current financial problems seizing Europe continue to emphasize this question.

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It should be noted that these are only a brief summary of the primary Basel III capital proposals. The resulting new minimum capital ratios would need to be fully implemented on January 1, 2015, and the capital conservation buffer would be phased in between 2016 and 2018, with full implementation on January 1, 2019.

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Broadly speaking, the application of the broad Basel III proposals to the entire U.S. banking community also creates a number of other significant issues: 1. The U.S. banking model varies greatly from the European model and the model of many other developed nations around the world. We have approximately 7,000 independent banking institutions operating in this country, whereas only a dozen or so major banks typically make up the entire banking population of most countries. There are many who believe the Basel III rules were written to apply to only the largest, most complex, systemically important banking institutions, not to the broad sector of smaller community banks which populate the United States. 2. The question of who would enforce the Basel III requirements and what assurance could be given that they will be applied uniformly on a global basis in a manner that would not distort a large bank’s global competitiveness must be asked. Recently, the Florida Bankers Association prudently posed the question of who would enforce these standards in China? 3. The proposed rules are extremely detailed and complicated. They will be expensive to apply and make it difficult for investors and analysts to determine the real capital condition of the bank. 4. Higher capital requirements will almost certainly reduce returns on banking company stocks. How much of a negative would this represent to investors and ultimately the availability of capital to the banking community? Sufficient capital is necessary to support loans and investments. 5. The proposed rules will raise the risk-weighting applied to certain areas of residential mortgages, thus threatening to increase the cost of borrowing for a home and even reducing the financing alternatives to home buyers. 6. Currently, the U.S. banking industry is registering historically high capital levels. The risk of reducing economic activity by applying even higher capital requirements is questionable at this time.

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8. Smaller community banks that have limited or no access to capital markets could be severely affected. Their inability to raise capital could do great economic harm to their communities and the banks themselves and ultimately threaten their very survival. These banks represent the majority of banks in this country and account for approximately 40 percent of small business loans. 9. There would appear to be little doubt that the cost of lending would be increased for most community banks as a result of the higher risk-weightings required by Basel III. The U.S. banking industry and its regulators are currently weighing the wisdom of the uniform application of the Basel III proposed regulations to all U.S. banks. Banks are being asked to comment. There is no question that a strong capital base is a critical component for a safe, sound and competitive banking system. Well formulated capital standards are a good thing. However, a broad set of rules formulated by a group of international regulators meeting in Europe and applied uniformly across the full American banking model raises important questions. Is a “one size fits all” standard really applicable for the thousands of smaller banks in this country that do not engage in any of the complex, higher risk transactions of larger international institutions?

Banks and their regulators need to have a candid and constructive discussion of these proposals before their full weight is thrust upon the nation’s banks. Sensible modifications should be made that will allow them to provide the benefit intended on the January 1, 2015, beginning date.

Executive in Residence Lewis Mallory The College of Business is fortunate to have Lewis Mallory serve as Executive in Residence in the Department of Finance and Economics as a finance lecturer. A 46-year veteran in the banking industry, Mallory brings a wealth of industry knowledge to the classrooms in the College of Business. Mallory retired in 2011 after serving as Chairman and CEO of Cadence Bank and its parent, Cadence Financial Corporation, where he was employed for nearly 46 years. Mallory also served for almost 15 years as a director in the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis and as a member of the Federal Advisory Council to the Board of Governors in Washington, DC, representing the Eighth Federal Reserve District (St. Louis Federal Reserve). Mallory resides in Starkville with his wife, Pie.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Focusing nationally, the Federal Reserve has estimated that current proposals put forth in Basel III would require an additional $60 billion of capital in U.S. banks. While this may not be an overly burdensome amount for the nation as a whole, under the capital formulas being recommended it would reduce available credit by a projected $600 billion. A credit reduction of this magnitude could have adverse effects on the national economy and more so on local economies.

7. Although space does not permit a detailed discussion, other important areas that could be affected by the Basel III proposals include the impact on regulatory capital of the accounting treatment of unrealized gains/losses on certain segments of a bank’s investment portfolio; potential reduction in home equity lending; a negative impact on certain acquisition, development and construction commercial real estate loans; the ability to work with delinquent loan customers and adverse effects on small savings and loan holding companies by requiring that they comply with Basel III.

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The obvious question that follows is what might be the impact of these proposals on U.S. banks and the nation’s economy. Of particular interest to us in Mississippi would be the impact on our state’s community banks and the communities, businesses and consumers they serve.

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Cookies for a Cause

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or the past four years, students in Joel Collier’s MBA Marketing Management class have had the opportunity to put their marketing skills to the test in unique fashion by competing in The Bulldog Challenge.

Selling under those conditions could be a potential disaster for a business. Yet, students use creative marketing and eye-catching tools to draw customers in year after year. From promotional giveaways and surprise appearances by Bully to carnival games and even live animals and musicians, students find ways to sell their products regardless of the hurdles presented to them. While the students gain valuable real-life business and marketing skills, they also have an opportunity to shift their attention to philanthropy.

“In business, we talk a lot about generating and sustaining revenue, but this project also teaches students about giving back to the community.” n JOEL COLLIER

Linda Bell

The proceeds from The Bulldog Challenge have increased with each passing year, making this year’s $11,750 donation to the Foundation the largest donation to date.

The check was presented by the winning team to Bell’s mother, Linda Bell, at a reception held in McCool Hall. Mrs. Bell thanked the students for their hard work in helping keep the promise her son made – a promise to a life-long commitment of mentoring young people as a way to serve and give back to his community. Over the past four years, Collier’s class has raised over $30,000 for local nonprofits such as the 4-H Therapeutic Riding and Activity Center Program, the United Way of North Mississippi and Junior Auxiliary’s Child Assistance Program. In addition to receiving coverage from several newspapers and television spotlights, in 2011 Collier was named Community Member of the Year for his class’ outreach to the Starkville community. “In business, we talk a lot about generating and sustaining revenue, but this project also teaches students about giving back to the community,” says Collier. The class project was recently highlighted at the Graduate Management Admissions Council, a national organization emphasizing graduate education. The Bulldog Challenge also won the “Philanthropy Award” which honors a university initiative that promotes philanthropy while educating students on the principles of business. For more information about the Nick Bell Mentoring Foundation, please visit www.nickbellfoundation.org. Dr. Joel Collier is an associate professor of marketing in the College of Business. He can be reached by e-mail at jec360@msstate.edu.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Nick Bell was a Mississippi State student and a starting defensive lineman for the MSU football team who lost his battle with cancer in 2010 at the age of 20. Nick’s passion for mentoring children and young adults is being lived out in his honor through this foundation, which aids underprivileged students by providing them with mentoring, scholarships and other programs to help foster their success.

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Each year, the students choose a nonprofit organization that will receive the proceeds from the challenge. This spring, the students chose the Nick Bell Mentoring Foundation.

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The Bulldog Challenge is a class exercise in which student-led teams compete against one another in selling an actual product. However, there is a catch: teams are constrained to sell the same product, at the same time, at roughly the same location. Under these restrictions, students are forced to focus on marketing at a whole new level.

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A Nationwide Standout

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he past 25 years has been one of growth for Mississippi State University’s Insurance Day and the Risk Management and Insurance (RMI) program. Insurance Day has brought speakers such as Karl Rove and Mike Huckabee to campus and has had over 500 attendees for the past 5 years.

During the opening ceremony on April 12, Cary Breedlove with Travelers Insurance, Brad Little with FCCI Insurance and Kenneth Stevens with SouthGroup Insurance were inducted into the Mississippi State University Insurance Hall of Fame.

“Insurance Day is a great example of Mississippi State’s dedication to the interaction of academics and industry.” n MIKE HIGHFIELD Department of Finance and Economics, Head

“I speak with many insurance professionals throughout the year that bring up the importance of I-Day as a time to get together with friends and colleagues to discuss the business,” notes Chip Wade, assistant professor of insurance. “I-Day has become the face of the Risk Management and Insurance program at MSU and arguably the College as a whole.” Wade adds, “I have had the opportunity to visit a number of industry conferences across the country, and few compare to the attendance and pride our alumni and friends have in the annual MSU I-Day. This pride is a testament to the current and past teams we have put together and a tribute to our advisory board and program committee for the tireless work they provide.” Local, regional and national businesses also reap the benefits of I-Day. “[Insurance Day] gives active industry business leaders an opportunity to not only interact with each other and gain valuable continuing education in a professional environment, but it also promotes the Risk Management and Insurance program and overall university at a very intimate level that would not be possible otherwise,” says Cary Breedlove, account executive for Travelers Commercial Accounts Group in Flowood, MS. He continues, “Active employers regionally and nationwide spend two days on our campus seeing and experiencing the quality of the educational offerings. They interact with our students in a business social setting and often return to seek out our graduates as a result. As an example, in our own department five of the eight underwriters are MSU graduates between our Alabama and Mississippi offices.” The 2013 I-Day is set to take place on campus in April. The golf tournament has been moved back to its original location at the MSU Golf Course, and the reception will once again be held in the beautiful Hunter Henry Center. For more information about Insurance Day or the Risk Management and Insurance program in the College of Business, please contact Dr. Chip Wade at 662-325-7475 or cwade@cobilan.msstate.edu or Kendra Evans at msuinsurance@cobilan.msstate.edu.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Insurance Day, or “I-Day” as it’s commonly called, is often thought of as an “industry” meeting, but it is much more than that to alumni and supporters.

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“What started as a small event for local professionals is now one of the largest insurance conferences in the South and welcomes guests from all over the country,” says Kendra Evans, RMI’s assistant director. “We are proud of our success and look forward to many more years of providing this event.”

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

The 25th Anniversary of Insurance Day was celebrated in the spring of 2012 with over 600 participants attending the two-day event, which included continuing education sessions, a golf tournament, a reception and a lunch, where Coach Dan Mullen addressed the crowd. The keynote speaker was Colonel Mark Tillman, Commander of Air Force One during September 11, 2001.

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high five

High Five

Mississippi State’s banking and finance majors have developed quite a reputation. For each of the past five years, an MSU banking student has been recognized as the best in the state.

The Swayze Scholar receives a $2,500 award and a medallion to wear at graduation. Runners-up receive $1,000 awards. The program is a tribute to Orrin Swayze Jr., a former senior officer at Trustmark (then First National Bank of Jackson) and former director of the Graduate School of Banking at LSU.

“It was a great honor to have received the award,” echoes 2010 recipient Michelle Peach. “It evidenced the great education I received at Mississippi State.” Peach is now a third year law student at Vanderbilt. In addition to her law degree, she is earning a law and business certificate. A Vanderbilt Law Ambassador, she aids with recruiting, and she is one of 30 members of the school’s Moot Court Board. Following graduation, Peach will join the corporate banking and business section of the Dallas office of Fulbright & Jaworski, an international firm and one of the largest in the country. Will Robbins, the 2012 Swayze Scholar, is now a few months into the 18 to 24 month training program at Renasant Bank in Tupelo. His primary interest is in retail and lending, and he comes by those interests honestly. His father, 1980 MSU banking alumnus Jerry Robbins, works in that area and has been with Renasant over 30 years. The younger Robbins comments, “I’ve always had Mississippi State in my blood, and I loved my time there. It was a huge honor to represent the university in that way.” Jeff Overstreet, too, joined Renasant. The 2008 honoree is now a commercial loan officer for the bank in Starkville. With the longest career of the five, Overstreet has had time to become actively involved in community and professional service as a member of Kiwanis, the Quarterback Club, First Baptist Church and MYB. < Swayze Scholar recipients: Top (l to r): Rob Chittom, Will Robbins, Hunter Futch. Bottom (l to r): Jeff Overstreet, Michelle Peach.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

“We value the relationship between the university and the state’s banking sector,” states COB finance and economics department head Mike Highfield. “It’s a strong point of pride to have Mississippi State students selected as Swayze finalists. To have one recognized as the Swayze Scholar – the best in the state – for five years running is incredibly gratifying!”

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“The Swayze Award winners from Mississippi State reflect very well on the quality of the university’s finance and economics program. I commend these students along with the faculty who have contributed to their success,” says MBA president Mac Deaver.  “MSU should be rightly proud of these young people and the recognition they have brought to the university.”

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

The Orrin H. Swayze Jr. Scholar is selected by the Mississippi Young Bankers (MYB) section of the Mississippi Bankers Association (MBA). Banking professors around the state nominate seniors for the awards. Five finalists are named based on leadership, campus and community involvement and commitment to the banking industry, as well as academics. The MYB Scholarship Committee interviews the finalists at its annual conference and selects the Swayze Scholar.

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He observes, “Every banker in Mississippi knows what the Swayze Scholar award is and what it means. It opened a lot of doors for me, including helping me secure employment.” Hunter Futch, the 2009 Swayze Scholar, says the recognition gave him confidence and motivation. “For me, it was one of those initial steps or accomplishments that provide expectations for where you’ll get in life,” he comments. After earning the award, the banking and finance student decided to stay on at Mississippi State and add a second major – risk management, insurance and financial planning – and a minor in economics. During this time he secured two highly competitive insurance internships and was elected Student Association treasurer. He credits the Swayze award with having boosted both his résumé and his confidence in these pursuits.

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“I want to help young kids blossom and grow and learn,” he remarks. In attending the MYB annual conference, where their expenses are covered by the organization, the Swayze finalists get to take advantage of the networking and educational opportunities it offers. “I met a lot of people at the convention, and got to know several Renasant bankers,” says Robbins. “It was a huge help in getting a job.” Chittom remarks, “It was an honor to have Mississippi State put me in that position, and it was an honor to go and stand in front of people who were doing what I was hoping to do – to meet them and learn from them and ask questions and have them advise me on situations I might encounter.”

In Memoriam

Dr. Gaines M. Rogers, 94, of Cookeville, TN, passed away Wednesday, July 3, 2012. Rogers was the dean of the College of Business and Industry from July 1, 1968, to June 30, 1982. On July 1, 1982, he was named dean emeritus of the College of Business and Industry. He served as a professor of finance from August 16, 1982, to May 15, 1983, and was named professor emeritus on August 18, 1983. Dr. Rogers retired on May 15, 1983, before returning as a professor of finance from January 1, 1984, to May 15, 1984. Rogers is survived by daughters Cita R. Pickett of Cookeville, TN, and Liza R. Killough and husband Barry of Martinez, GA; granddaughters Beth Pickett Jones and husband Joseph of Huntsville, AL, Becky Pickett of Cookeville, TN, and Laurel Killough Canipe and husband Ryan of Martinez, GA; grandson Joseph Gaines Killough and wife Jennifer of Martinez, GA, and three great-grandchildren, Matthew Jones, Cameron Killough and Brenna Canipe. He was preceded in death by his parents, his first wife of 45 years Betty P. Rogers, his second wife of 18 years Algene Davis Rogers, son-in-law Gary C. Pickett and several brothers and sisters. The faculty and staff of the College of Business would like to extend our deepest sympathy to the family of Dr. Rogers.

“As a student at the conference, I realized the impact MYB has on Mississippi,” adds Overstreet. “It made me want to get involved, and Renasant has supported me in that. It’s been neat to go and see the next four Swayze Scholarships be awarded to Mississippi State students.” Overstreet is a county chairman for MYB and hopes one day to serve on its executive council. Through the MYB “A Banker in Every Classroom” program, he speaks regularly to Starkville High students about credit. He notes that COB finance department head Mike Highfield has been an inspiration to him as both teacher and mentor. All of these scholars acknowledge the strength of their Mississippi State banking education and the support of their professors. As Robbins points out, “To win the Swayze Scholarship five years in a row says a lot about the College of Business and the banking program.” Chittom found his transition into a career was smooth. “I stepped right out of college into a knowledge of what I was doing in the working world. Dr. Wayne Kelly especially put forth a lot of effort to help me get where I needed to be.” “The way the professors made classes almost entrepreneurial gave me independent study and problem solving skills,” comments Peach. Department head Highfield credits both students and faculty members. “The Swayze Scholar recognition is a very prestigious award that reflects highly not only on our students, but also on the faculty who work with them on a daily basis,” he notes. As to the future, each of these impressive young people hopes to remain on the career paths where they have begun, moving into leadership and contributing to the success of their companies, their professions and their communities.

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Dress Your Best Scholarship Expanding; Accepting Donations The Dress Your Best Scholarship Closet is a clothing scholarship that was started in March 2011, by Emily Moak, a College of Business marketing major. The closet provides deserving recipients with the professional clothes needed to succeed in job interviews, co-ops and internships. In 2011, through donations made by individuals and companies, Dress Your Best had the opportunity to provide the foundation of a professional wardrobe to five female students. This year, in addition to awarding female students, Dress Your Best is looking to award professional clothing to male College of Business students. The clothing scholarship program is now accepting donations of gently used or new men’s and women’s clothes of all sizes. For more information about Dress Your Best and how you can help, please contact Emily Moak by phone at 601.400.0218 or e-mail at dressyourbestmsu@gmail.com.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Being back in his hometown has enabled him to take an active role with 4-H, where he had been involved as a youngster.

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Rob Chittom knew even before college that community banking was the place for him. The 2011 Swayze Scholar became a teller for First National Bank of Pontotoc his senior year in high school and worked his way through college by continuing in that position in the summers. During the summer before graduation, he was able to do an internship that rotated through all departments of the bank. Now, he is a loan officer and assistant cashier.

DIVIDENDS

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

Futch is now working as a senior account coordinator in excess and surplus lines property insurance placements for CRC | Crump Insurance Services in Nashville. He is licensed for property and casualty insurance in Tennessee and is pursuing the Associate of Risk Management designation.

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MSU Names Rouse Top Alumnus of 2012

Rural entrepreneurs Additional Grant Equips MSU to Reach Rural Entrepreneurs

The College of Business is receiving an additional $650,000 grant to leverage university resources for economic development. The award from the federal Economic Development Administration will enable the university to continue housing a University Center, an entity designed as a resource for entrepreneurs in rural areas. “This EDA grant will further enable MSU’s College of Business to have a real, measurable impact on creating jobs and opportunities for Mississippi businesses and communities,” states Jeffrey Rupp, director of outreach and corporate engagement for MSU’s College of Business. The mission of the EDA within the U.S. Department of Commerce is to promote innovation and competitiveness, preparing American regions for growth and success in the worldwide economy. The University Center will partner with the Venture Incubator, a non-profit organization in Jackson, to meet entrepreneurial needs by taking training to people in rural areas rather than requiring them to come to the campus to benefit from university resources. MSU is the state’s only university receiving the five-year grant. For more information, please contact Jeffrey Rupp at 662.364.7021 or 662.325.8122.

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welcome

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Francis C. “Franc” Lee, 1989 banking and finance graduate, was named the 2012 College of Business Alumnus of the Year. Since 1999, he has served as president and CEO of First Tower Corporation, a consumer finance company that owns and operates 158 branches throughout Louisiana, Mississippi and Missouri.

New Faculty Welcome 2012 new College of Business faculty members:

Frank G. Adams, Ph.D.

Robert Crossler, Ph.D.

Josh Daspit, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Marketing

Assistant Professor of Information Systems

Assistant Professor of Management

Jacqueline L. Garner, Ph.D.

Iryna Topolyan, Ph.D.

Claudia R. Williamson, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Finance

Assistant Professor of Economics

Assistant Professor of Economics

John Nutie and Edie Dowdle Professor of Finance

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Mississippi State University has honored a College of Business alumnus and former oil company executive with its highest alumni honor. James J. “Jim” Rouse of Houston, TX, received the 2012 National Alumnus of the Year award on February 10, 2012. Born in Libertyville, IL, and reared in Germantown, TN, Rouse retired in 2004 as corporate vice president of ExxonMobil.

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Lee Named College of Business Alumnus of 2012

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

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It is with heartfelt gratitude that the College of Business at Mississippi State University acknowledges and thanks the many alumni, friends and businesses who have generously given to the College during the 2012 fiscal year. Named here are those who have provided financial resources that were received by the College of Business between July 1, 2011, and June 30, 2012. Every effort has been made to ensure the completeness and accuracy of this list. Any corrections may be sent to business@msstate.edu.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS | MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Ms. Chaille E. Clements Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Clemons Mr. and Mrs Charles L. Cleveland Mr. Jeffrey R. Clifton Ms. Margaret K. Clingan Mr. and Mrs. Neal Clinkscales Mr. and Mrs. John W. Coalter Mr. and Mrs. R. Buck Coats Mr. and Mrs. James B. Cochran, III Mr. Josh N. Cockrell Mr. and Mrs. James A. Coggin Mr. and Mrs. David A. Cole Mr. Stewart Collins Mr. Phillip A. Collins Mr. Robert E. Coltharp, Jr. Mr. Robert E. Coltharp, Sr. Columbia Insurance Group Community Bank - North Mississippi Mr. and Mrs. John W. Compton, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Connor, III Dr. and Mrs. Roy A. Cook Mr. and Mrs. Chad B. Cooley Mr. John P. Coombs Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Cooper Ms. Megan N. Fulgham-Copley Mr. Charles S. Corder Mr. and Mrs. Dennis A. Cornwell Mr. David A. Costa Drs. Michael J. and Sandra Cotter Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Cotton Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin J. Cousins Mr. and Mrs. Kelvin F. Covington Ms. Kathleen M. Coward Ms. Lora A. Cox Mr. Rushton B. Cox Mr. Charles K. Crain Mr. Thomas J. Crane Mr. and Mrs. Trey Crawford CRC Insurance Services, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Crisler P.E. Mr. Michael W. Criswell Dr. Jason C. Crittenden Dr. and Mrs. James R. Crockett Mrs. Melissa A. Croke Mr. and Mrs. John Cronin Ms. Andrea S. Crouther Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Crow C Spire Mr. and Mrs. Herman M. Cumberland Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Cummins Mr. and Mrs. Danny E. Cupit Mr. Carl W. Curbo Mr. and Mrs. James B. Currie Dr. Helen M. Currie and Mr. Dayne Zimmerman Ms. Charlene N. Hanson Cybercomm Marketing Mrs. Jane G. Dacey Mr. Jason Daerr Mr. and Mrs. Darrell P. Daigre Mr. Hal W. Dale, Jr. Mr. Timothy F. Dalton Mr. George P. Dampeer, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Daniel Mr. and Mrs. William L. Daniel Dr. and Mrs. Robert H. Darville, III Mr. Bradley C. Davis Mr. Howard R. Davis, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. John S. Davis

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Freeport-McMoRan Foundation Mr. and Mrs. William E. “Ted” French Dr. and Mrs. Spencer R. Frye Dr. Phillip R. Fuller Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Fulton Mr. Brandt C. Galloway Galloway-Chandler-McKinney Mr. Carlos G. Garcia Mr. William P. Gardner Ms. Marva J. Garland Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Garmon Mr. Jack K. Garrard Mrs. Linda Martin Garrett Gary Chittom Annual Get-A-Way Gathings Insurance Services, LLC Mr. and Mrs. David Geeter Mr. James S. Gibson Mr. and Mrs. Kwame R. Gibson Mr. and Mrs. Roger E. Gilbert Mr. James H. Giles Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Gill Mr. and Mrs. Hugh B. Gillespie, IV Mr. Bobby E. Glass Mr. and Mrs. William B. Glass Mr. and Mrs. Matthew K. Gnemi Ms. Karen D. Goff Mr. and Mrs. Ken Goforth Mr. and Mrs. Harvey A. Gold Mr. and Mrs. Jerry M. Goolsby Rev. and Mrs. Prentiss Gordon, Sr. Mr. Michael L. Gorum Ms. Sonja J. Goss Dr. and Mrs. Lee A. Graf Mr. Robert G. Graham Mr. and Mrs. H.D. Graham, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James Granier Ms. Charlotte L. Grantham Mr. Bob Graves Mr. and Mrs. Brian C. Gray Mr. and Mrs. James A. Grayson Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Green Dr. and Mr. Thomas L. Green Mr. and Mrs. O. L. Grierson Mr. and Mrs. Howard K. Griffin Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Griffin Mr. and Mrs. Murray S. Griffin Ms. Quadesha R. Grissom Group Health Specialist, Inc. Dr. Ronald P. Guidry Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Y. Gunter Ms. Robbie J. Gurley Dr. and Mrs. Larry A. Haase Haddox, Reid, Burkes, & Calhoun Ms. Suzanne Haggard Mr. and Mrs. John Hairston Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Haley Ms. Morgan G. Halford Ms. Anna E. Hall Mr. Chris R. Hall Mr. and Mrs. Tommy A. Hamilton Ms. Leslie M. Hammons Mr. and Mrs. Bryan D. Hancock Mr. Michael C. Hancock Mr. and Mrs. Brett Handler Mr. Joseph R. Hanko, II Mr. and Mrs. Bobby F. Hannaford Ms. Kathryn E. Hannon Dr. and Mrs. William G. Hardin, III Mr. and Mrs. Jim Hardy Mr. and Mrs. Brian J. Harless Mr. Thomas N. Harmond Ms. Tracy L. Harmond Mr. and Mrs. Scott C. Harper Ms. Joan Harrelson Mr. and Mrs. George M. Harrigill Harris Farms

Ms. Angela M. Harris Mr. and Mrs. Boyce E. Harris Ms. DeLyon L. Harris Mr. and Mrs. Jack M. Harris Mr. James E. Harris Ms. Rashann D. Harris Lt. Col. and Mrs. Glenn Harrison Mr. Noel R. Harrison Mr. and Mrs. William B. Harrison, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Hartzog Mr. Clarence Harvey Mr. and Mrs. Kevin L. Harvey Mr. Louis G. Hataway, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Hatch Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Hatchett Mr. Jeremy T. Hatfield Mr. Chris P. Haynes, III Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Haynes Mr. William F. Heard Ms. Jessica Anne Hearn Mr. and Mrs. John S. Heath Mr. and Mrs. David K. Heflin Mr. and Mrs. William A. Hegi Dr. and Mrs. Jan R. Heier Mr. and Mrs. John P. Helms Mr. and Mrs. Craig A. Henderson Mr. and Mrs. James L. Hendricks, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Hengst Dr. and Mrs. Steven A. Henning Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Henry Mr. and Mrs. Brad A. Henry Mr. and Mrs. Hunter W. Henry Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Henson Mr. Christopher B. Herring Mr. and Mrs. David E. Herring Dr. Dora R. Herring Mrs. Christina D. Hester Hewlett Packard Mr. A. W. Hickman Mr. and Mrs. Perry H. Hickman Mr. Calvin L. Hicks Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hicks Mr. and Mrs. Ralph C. Hiden Dr. and Mrs. Michael J. Highfield, CFA Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hight, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin W. Hill Mrs. Mary Jo Hill Mr. and Mrs. George W. Hillman Mrs. Barbara Hodges Mr. and Mrs. Allen C. Hodo Mr. Chester L. Hoffer Mr. Nathan L. Holladay Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Holladay Mr. and Mrs. David Holland Mr. and Mrs. Roger L. Holland Mr. Jeremy R. Holley Ms. Wanda S. Holley Mr. Nathan A. Holloway Mr. Robert G. Holloway Honours Group, LLC Mr. and Mrs. David B. Hoon Mr. and Mrs. David O. Hopkins Mr. Lionel Hopkins Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. Hopkins, CPA Ms. Denise M. Hora Mr. and Mrs. William D. Horne Mr. and Mrs. Jerry E. Horner Mr. and Mrs. Rudy Horta Mr. and Mrs. Joe C. Horton Mr. and Mrs. Gerard R. Host Mr. and Mrs. Alan M. Hotard Houston Endowment Inc. Mr. and Mrs. David Houston Mrs. Deirdre L. Howard Mr. Glenn J. Howard Mr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Howard

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Howarth, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. David M. Howell Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Howell Mr. and Mrs. Randy D. Howell Mr. and Mrs. Willie G. Howell, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William J. Howse, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Hubley Mr. Edward S. Hudnall Mr. Bradford W. Hudson Mr. David H. Hudson Mr. and Mrs. John E. Hughes, III Mr. Lee R. Hughes Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Hulett Mr. Thomas N. Humphreys Mr. William B. Hunt, III Mr. Christopher R. Hussey Ms. Dena N. Hutcheson Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Hutcheson Mr. and Mrs. Terry W. Hutchins Mr. Larry E. Hyde Mr. and Mrs. William W. Iupe Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Izard Mr. Frank T. Jackson Mr. and Mrs. Milburn Jackson Mr. and Mrs. Darrel Jackson Mr. and Mrs. Sherron Jackson Mr. and Mrs. H. Wynne Jacobs Mr. Kenneth G. Janous Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Jarman Mr. B. Frank Jarman, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. George G. Jarman Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy A. Jeffreys Ms. Chiquita R. Jenkins Mr. and Mrs. Homer L. Jenkins Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Jenkins Mrs. Lisa F. Jenkins Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Jenkins, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Gerald L. Jernigan, Jr. John S. Heath, C. P. A. Mr. and Mrs. Earl Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Eugene F. Johnson, Jr. Mr. Peder R. Johnson Miss Tammye K. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Harvey D. Johnston Mr. and Mrs. James M. Johnston, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Ab Jones Mr. and Mrs. James E. Jones, III Ms. Jessica A. Jones Ms. Jessica L. Madewell Mr. and Mrs. Joe D. Jones Ms. Katherine S. Jones Ms. Lindsay E. Jones Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Jones, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Martin Jones Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Jones Mr. Taylor R. Jones Mr. Timothy F. Jones Mr. and Mrs. Troy A. Jones Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Joorfetz Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Jordan, Jr. Mr. JonMark Jordan Ms. Mary Barron Jordan Mr. Michael Jordan Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Joseph Mr. Timothy M. Joseph Mr. Bradley C. Joyner Mr. and Mrs. Paul Karre Mr. and Mrs. Michael T. Kavanagh Mr. and Mrs. Steven T. Kean Dr. and Mrs. Hubert L. Keasler, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Rodger D. Keene Ms. Amanda G. Keeton Ms. Meredith P. Kelley Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Kelley Mr. and Mrs. William T. Kemp, III Mr. and Mrs. James A. Kendall, Jr.

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Mr. and Mrs. Hampton R. Bryan Mr. and Mrs. Lynn H. Bryan, III Dr. and Mrs. Glen E. Bryant, Sr. Ms. Shavonte S. Bryant Daniel and Janet Bryant Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. Bryant Mr. and Mrs. Stanley L. Bulger Mr. and Mrs. Derek Bullock Mr. and Mrs. Gordon E. Burke, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Timothy T. Burns Mr. and Mrs. James L. Burrell Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Burwell, Jr. Mr. Clement L. Burwell, III Mr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Burwell Mr. and Mrs. George W. Butler, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Buttross Mr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Butts Mr. and Mrs. William T. Byrnes Ms. Arteisha C. Cabiness Mr. and Mrs. William M. Cade Mr. and Mrs. James W. Cagle Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Cahoon Mr. and Mrs. Jerry W. Cain Mr. Bryan P. Callahan Ms. Tara N. Calloway Mr. and Mrs. David R. Campbell Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Campbell Mr. Travis W. Campbell Mr. and Mrs. John Capocaccia Mr. and Mrs. Jerry D. Carlisle Carl’s Cleaners Mr. and Mrs. Ted Carmical Dr. and Mrs. Roy E. Carpenter Mr. and Mrs. William T. Carpenter, III Carr, Riggs, & Ingram, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Timothy E. Carr Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Carraway Mrs. Earlene G. Carrubba Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Carson Mr. and Mrs. Clifton Carter, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Claude E. Carter Mr. and Mrs. Justin P. Casano Mr. and Mrs. Joe D. Cash Ms. Betty J. Caswell Thompson, Dunavant PLC Chamberplus, Inc. Ms. Torrie R. Chambers Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Chamblee Mr. John P. Chambless Mr. Brian C. Chancellor Mr. and Mrs. Larry C. Chapman Charitable Gift Fund Ms. Linda E. Chase Mr. and Mrs. Tse Y. Chen Ms. Aneka M. Chess Mrs. Patricia G. Chesser Mr. Matthew R. Chisholm Dr. and Mrs. Sang T. Choe Mr. Timothy L. Christopher Mr. and Mrs. Don E. Chunn Citicorp Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. Clark, CPA Mr. Franklin D. Clark, Jr. Mr. Kenneth S. Clark, II Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Clark Mr. Tony Clark Mr. William R. Clark Honorable and Mrs. Eugene S. Clarke, IV Ms. Ann R. Cleland

Mr. Michael D. Davis Mr. and Mrs. Stuart L. Davis Mr. and Mrs. Wyatt J. Davis, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. John P. Dazey, III Mrs. Gloria J. Dedmon Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur G. Dees, Jr. Mrs. Whitney G. Denham Mrs. Catherine D. Denman Department of Finance and Administration Ms. Sharon Devine Harris Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Dew Mr. and Mrs. Tommy G. Deweese Mr. David G. Dickard Mr. Richard P. Dickard, Jr. Ms. Jennie F. Dill Dixon Hughes Goodman, L.L.P. Ms. Grace A. Dixon Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Dixon Mr. Kevin L. Dodson Mr. and Mrs. James F. Dorris, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Dotter, II Mr. and Mrs. James D. Douglas Mr. and Mrs. John N. Dowdle Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Drake, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James S. Dryden Mr. and Mrs. Pat M. Duran Mr. and Mrs. Ryan W. Dyer Mr. and Mrs. George H. East, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred F. Eaton, Jr. Mr. Kevin R. Edelblute Dr. and Mrs. Emmet D. Edwards, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James A. Edwards, III Mr. Thomas M. Edwards Ms. Tareshia D. Egerson Mr. and Mrs. James J. Eickerman Dr. Michael T. Elliott EMC Insurance Companies Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Emerson Dr. and Mrs. Michael D. Ensley Mr. and Mrs. D. Pierce Epes Mr. and Mrs. David M. Epps Mr. and Mrs. Rodney K. Epps Mr. and Mrs. Thomas K. Erickson Mr. and Mrs. Andy A. Estes Mr. and Mrs. John A. Etheridge, Sr. Mr. Henry B. Everage Mr. and Mrs. Larry E. Everett Mr. and Mrs. Denis Everett Mr. Michael G. Ewell Mr. and Mrs. David Ewing, Jr. ExxonMobil Global Services Co. Farmlinks, L.L.C. Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Farrior Mr. Rick Faucette Mrs. Linda J. Faver Mr. and Mrs. Larry E. Favreau Mr. David B. Feldman Mr. Joe M. Fenwick Mr. Matthew G. Ferrell Fidelity National Loans Mr. and Mrs. Russ M. Fields Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Filarowicz Dr. and Mrs. James A. Files Mr. Daniel S. Fisackerly Fisher Brown Bottrell Insurance Inc. Mr. Ron Foley Mr. Adam W. Foote Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Foreman Mr. Ronald N. Forest Mr. and Mrs. James O. Foster Mr. and Mrs. David R. Fowler Mr. and Mrs. James Foy Mr. Harvey C. Freelon Freeport-McMoRan Copper and Gold Foundation

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Ms. Lisa M. Battle Mr. and Mrs. David M. Baylot Dr. and Mrs. Habib H. Bazyari Mr. Roger E. Beachum Mrs. Claire Becker Mr. Jacques P. Bell Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Bell Ms. Susan Bell and Mr. Patrick Morris Benefits Management Group Mr. A. Mark Bennett, III Dr. and Mrs. Dan Bennett Dr. and Mrs. Blaise J. Bergiel Dr. Ronald L. Berry Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Berryhill Mr. Paul A. Betbeze Mr. Nicholas G. Beussink Mr. Stacy L. Bewley Ms. Suzanne C. Biggers Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Bilotta, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Norris C. Bishop Dr. and Mrs. Ralph B. Bisland, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Gary A. Blair Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Blaise Mr. and Mrs. Ralph H. Blakeney Mr. Howard D. Bland Mr. Alexander J. Blanton, III Mr. Christian K. Blough Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Mississippi Inc. Mr. and Mrs. W. Harold Blue, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Boatner Mr. Novis S. Bogard Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence F. Boland Mr. and Mrs. Anthony D. Bolin Mr. and Mrs. Gary C. Bonds Dr. Quinton Booker Mr. Edgar E. Boone, Jr. Mr. Steven A. Booth Mr. James W. Boozer Mr. Ronnie D. Boozer Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Bounds Mr. Rickey T. Bowden Mr. Max S. Bowman Mr. Alexander H. Boyd Col. and Mrs. Billy M. Boyd Mr. Charles P. Boyd and Dr. Beverly Langford Mr. and Mrs. Christopher T. Boyd Mr. Randy D. Boyd Mr. and Mrs. Ollie D. Boykin, Jr. Boyles, Moak, Brickell, Marchetti Insurance Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Braddock, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Brian Bradford Mr. and Mrs. Ronald A. Braswell Mr. Joseph L. Breal, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. John K. Brewer Mr. Richard L. Briscoe Brock Accounting Financial & Tax Services Mr. and Mrs. Jerry W. Brock Mr. William E. Brockenshire Mr. and Mrs. Riley W. Brooks Mr. and Mrs. William L. Brooks Mr. Christopher L. Broome Mr. Eric R. Broome Mr. and Mrs. Jason A. Brown Mr. and Mrs. Clark Bruce Ms. Ashley K. Bryan

DIVIDENDS

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

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Mr. and Mrs. David Abney Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Abney Mr. and Mrs. James A. Adair Ms. Melissa A. Adair Mr. and Mrs. Boyce E. Adams Mr. and Mrs. Whit D. Adams Mr. and Mrs. Wiley R. Adams, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Noel D. Addy, Jr. Ms. Adedoyin S. Adebiyi Mr. Richard C. Adkerson Mr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Adler Mr. and Mrs. Glyn A. Agnew Mr. and Mrs. James Agostinelli, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Agostinelli, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James T. Akin Ms. Joan M. Albert Alfa Insurance Allen Beverages, Inc. Allen Financial Group, P.A. Mr. and Mrs. Grant Allen Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Allen, II Mrs. Janice H. Allen Ms. Laura L. Allen Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Allen Mr. Charles E. Allgood Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence E. Allison, Jr. Mr. John M. Alston Mr. Jay C. Ambler AmFed Companies LLC AmWINS Group, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Craig Anderson Mr. Michael A. Anderson Mr. Rodney C. Anderson Mr. and Mrs. Talmadge Anderson Mr. Ira C. Andrews, III Mr. and Mrs. Ronald L. Andrews Dr. Cheryl L. Anglin Mr. and Mrs. Joe Anglin Ms. Mary Kendall Archer Col. and Mrs. Richard Armstrong Mr. James R. Armstrong Dr. and Mrs. Kirk P. Arnett Mr. David R. Arnold Mr. and Mrs. Frank S. Arnold, III Mr. and Mrs. W. Todd Arnold Mr. Justin M. Arras Dr. Tammy Y. Arthur Ms. Rosiland Y. Ashford Mr. Steven S. Atherton Ms. Mary C. Atwood Dr. Melinda J. Austin Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Aycock Mr. Steven S. Aycock Mr. William S. Ayres, Jr. Ms. Cynthia M. Baird Mrs. Angella R. Baker Mr. and Mrs. Brett E. Baker Baker Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, Pc Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Ball, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James R. Ball Dr. Jerrell R. Ballard, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Barber Mr. and Mrs. David K. Barger Mr. and Mrs. Henry O. Barger, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Don Barnes Mr. and Mrs. John R. Barr, III Mr. Brett A. Barton Mr. Matthew D. Bates

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donors COLLEGE OF BUSINESS | MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Mr. Nathan U. Peacock, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Travis R. Peden Mr. Charles B. Peeler Mr. and Mrs. Theo D. Penton Peoples Chapel Funeral Home Mr. and Mrs. Jason L. Perry Mr. and Mrs. Stan B. Perry Ms. Leigh R. Phillips Mrs. Martha J. Phillips Mr. Noble F. Phillips Ms. Wanda L. Phillips Mr. Charles W. Pickering Pioneer Credit Company Ms. Lajuanda F. Pittman Mr. John Pitts Mr. Robert Pitts, II Mr. and Mrs. Wesley L. Platt Mr. and Mrs. Eric Plunkett Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Switzer Mr. and Mrs. David W. Poland, CFP Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Poole Mr. and Mrs. Stanton T. Pope Ms. Jennifer L. Powell Mr. and Mrs. Howard E. Powell Mr. Brian A. Powers Miss Ellen C. Prescott Mr. and Mrs. William A. Presley Ms. Amanda Price Mr. Eric R. Price Mr. and Mrs. David L. Pringle Mr. and Mrs. Billy G. Proctor Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Puckett Mr. and Mrs. Tom R. Pullen Mr. and Mrs. George R. Purnell Mr. and Mrs. Stanley P. Purvis Mr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Quaka Dr. and Mrs. R.L. Qualls Mr. Joseph D. Quick Mrs. Mary Anna Raburn Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Radlinski Ms. Pattie A. Ramage Mrs. Elizabeth L. Ramsey Mr. and Mrs. James B. Randall, III Ms. Melissa C. Randolph Mr. and Mrs. Steve D. Ray Mr. Daniel J. Recker, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Redding Mr. Chad D. Reed Mr. Paul R. Reed Mr. and Mrs. Rodger C. Reeves Refreshments Inc. Mr. Jonathan B. Reid Renasant Insurance Agency Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Reynolds Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. Rhyne, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Greek L. Rice Ms. Renee W. Rice Richard Accounting and Computer Service Richard C. Adkerson Family Foundation Mr. Leo C. Richard Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Richards Ms. Shelbi D. Richards Mr. and Mrs. John K. Richardson Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Richardson, III Mr. Zachary O. Richardson Mr. Don C. Richmond Mr. and Mrs. Randal J. Riddle Mr. Matthew S. Ridenhour Mr. Quinn A. Rigby Mr. John M. Rigdon Dr. and Mrs. John T. Rigsby, Jr. Mr. James C. Riles Ms. Lauren E. Riley

DIVIDENDS

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Rimkus Consulting Group, Incorporated Mr. Rodolfo F. Rios-Cruz Mr. Jeffrey J. Risher Risktek Solutions Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Q. Robbins Mr. Christopher A. Roberts Mr. and Mrs. David B. Roberts Mr. and Mrs. Don H. Roberts Mr. and Mrs. John L. Roberts Mr. Charles W. Robertson Mr. and Mrs. Billy J. Robertson Mr. Edward R. Robinson Mr. Harry G. Robinson Mr. and Mrs. James M. Robinson Mr. and Mrs. Everett L. Robinson Ms. Shannon G. Rodman Mr. and Mrs. David G. Roeder Mr. George F. Roesch, Sr. Mr. Jared B. Rogers Dr. Kevin Rogers Mr. Van D. Rogers Ms. Crystal D. Rose Ross & Yerger Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Ross, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. James J. Rouse Mr. Jon A. Rousseau Mr. and Mrs. Alvin C. Russell Mr. and Mrs. Lonnie J. Russell Mr. and Mrs. Kristofer R. Saffle Mr. and Mrs. Edwin E. Sallis Mr. and Mrs. James H. Sanderford Mr. and Mrs. Jon B. Sanderson Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon D. Sanford Mr. and Mrs. Mark T. Saxon Dr. James Howard Scheiner Dr. and Mrs. Jim Scheiner Mr. Steven W. Scheiner Mr. and Mrs. Allen Scott Mr. and Mrs. Carl V. Seago Mr. Lee B. Seago Mr. and Mrs. Dennis H. Seid Ms. Anna C. Sharp Mr. and Mrs. Bob Shearer Ms. Teresa G. Shearron Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Sheely Shelter Insurance Dr. Kaye F. Sheridan Mr. Subind Shetty Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Shull Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Shurden Mr. and Mrs. Craig H. Sieber Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Simmons Mr. and Mrs. Edward T. Simmons Mr. Jonathan T. Simmons Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Simpson, II Mr. Zackary D. Sims Mr. Christopher L. Skinner Mr. Thomas L. Skinner Mr. and Mrs. John P. Skrmetti Ms. Amanda R. Slawson Mrs. Deanna M. Slay Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Slenker Smith Barney, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Tyler W. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Billy G. Smith Mr. Christopher A. Smith Ms. Cynthia A. Smith Mr. and Mrs. David R. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Garland T. Smith Mr. and Mrs. George S. Smith Mr. Michael Wayne Smith Mr. and Mrs. Philip Smith Mr. and Mrs. Roger M. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Stanley E. Smith

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Soen Drs. Sesan Kim Sokoya and Dr. Banji Sokoya Mr. and Mrs. Steven W. Solomon Southern Cash Systems Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Co. Ms. Lisa C. Spence Ms. Melanie J. Spradling Mr. and Mrs. Drew T. St. John, II Mr. and Mrs. Ronald W. St. John Staplcotn Dr. and Mrs. Carl D. Stark State Farm Companies Foundation Mr. and Mrs. William P. Steinwinder Mr. and Mrs. James S. Stephenson Ms. Bailey C. Stewart Stewart, Sneed, Hewes, Incorporated Mr. Will T. Stewart Mr. and Mrs. Herbert C. Stillions Mr. and Mrs. Marvin E. Stockett Stonetrust Commercial Insurance Company Ms. Barbara L. Straight Mrs. Rachael A. Strickland Dr. J.B. Stroud Dr. and Mrs. Judson P. Stryker Mr. and Mrs. Clyde E. Stuart, Jr. Mr. Stanley D. Stuart Ms. Frances E. Stubbs Ms. Nancy E. Stubbs Mr. Frederick A. Stuckey Mr. and Mrs. Roger C. Sullivan Mr. Richard W. Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. R. Michael Summerford Mr. and Mrs. Brady W. Swinney, Jr. Mr. John S. Sykes T.E. Lott and Co. P.A. Mr. and Mrs. Vernon B. Tabor Mr. William H. Talley Ms. Sheila V. Taylor Mr. and Mrs. William A. Taylor, III Mr. John S. Tenhet Col. Lester R. Terrell Thames Family Foundation The Schwab Charitable Fund The Taylor Foundation Mr. and Mrs. E. Anthony Thomas Drs. Roy and Paula Thomas Mr. Dale S. Thompson Mr. Harold S. Thompson Mr. and Mrs. William R. Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Chris Thornton Mr. James W. Tillman Mr. Billy R. Tinsley Mr. Toris E. Tolbert Brig. General and Mrs. W. T. Tolbert

Mr. Jake E. Tomlinson Mr. Barry S. Toney Mr. Randy A. Trahan Travelers Insurance Mr. Brent W. Travers Mr. and Mrs. Jerry L. Tribbey Mr. John H. Triplett Mr. and Mrs. John A. Tucker Mr. Leundra Tucker Mr. and Mrs. David W. Turner, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Chris Turner Mr. and Mrs. Jon Turner Ms. Amanda M. Ulbrich Dr. Brooke and Mr. David D. Uptagrafft Chip and Susanna Vance Mr. Billy A. Vaughan, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Cecil R. Vaughan, Jr. Mr. Jack P. Vaughan Mr. and Mrs. Carl R. Veazey Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Veazey Mr. Joel P. Verdon Dr. and Mrs. George L. Verrall Mr. Lance W. Vinson Mr. Henry E. Viola Ms. Virginia M. Virden Mr. and Mrs. David R. Voss WAC Consulting, Inc. Mr. Corey D. Wages Walden Group, L.L.C. Mrs. Mildred Walden Mr. Carl R. Walker, Jr. Mr. Daren D. Walker Mr. and Mrs. Jon P. Walker Mr. and Mrs. Harold D. Walker, III Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Walker, Jr. Mr. William R. Walker Mr. Russell L. Wall Ms. Angela D. Berry Mr. and Mrs. John T. Walters Mr. Shawn D. Walters Mr. and Mrs. John J. Walton Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Ward, Jr. Waring Oil Company Mr. and Mrs. D. P. Waring, Jr. Mr. Victor C. Warnsley Ms. Kelly A. Wassum Watkins Ward and Stafford PLLC Mr. Charles L. Weatherall Ms. Carolyn Weathersby Mr. Hugh B. Weaver Mrs. Jane S. Weaver Mr. Thomas P. Webb Mr. and Mrs. Tom Webb Mrs. Janice G. Wedgworth Mr. and Mrs. Tommy L. Weems Mr. and Mrs. David Welch

Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Welch Mr. and Mrs. Alvin B. Wells, Jr. Ms. Tonya J. Wells Mr. and Mrs. David H. Wesley Mr. Ray L. Wesson Mr. Robert M. Whitaker Mr. Kevin J. White Mr. Marty F. White Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. White Mr. Terry G. White Mr. and Mrs. Gregory B. Whitehead Mr. H. Lewis Whitfield Mr. Thomas R. Whitfield Mr. and Mrs. Don Whitmire, Jr. Mr. Paul R. Whitmire Mr. John D. Wicker Mr. and Mrs. Timothy T. Wigginton Mr. Hoyt B. Wilder, IV Mr. and Mrs. Steve Wilkerson Mr. and Mrs. Cary Williams Mr. Charles Williams, Jr. Mr. Johnathan T. Williams Mrs. Jordan Trotter Williams Mr. and Mrs. Joe C. Williams Mr. Robert A. Williams Mr. Shionell S. Williams Dr. James Williamson and Mrs. Linda Williamson Mr. and Mrs. James B. Williamson Mr. and Mrs. Blake A. Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Jerry T. Wilson Ms. Laura E. Wilson Mr. Perry G. Winstead Mr. and Mrs. Everette M. Winters Mr. and Mrs. James L. Wise, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Wise Mr. Carey J. Witten Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Wiygul Mr. Stephen R. Woo Mr. and Mrs. David Work, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Larry A. Wright Mr. and Mrs. Nathan W. Wright Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Wright, II Ms. Brandi L. Wust Ms. Yan Xi Dr. and Mrs. Rice P. York, Jr. Ms. Ameilia R. Young Mr. and Mrs. James B. Young, Sr. Mr. Jason J. Young Mr. Jimmy V. Young Mr. Monte A. Young Mr. Benjamin R. Zapp Mr. Jie J. Zhang Mr. Joseph B. Zimmerman Ms. Mary J. Zummo

For more information about giving to the College of Business please contact:

Rob Jenkins Director of Development rjenkins@foundation.msstate.edu 662-325-9055

Jimmy Kight Assistant Director of Development jkight@foundation.msstate.edu 662-418-7444

Heather Skaggs Advancement Coordinator hskaggs@cobilan.msstate.edu 662-325-0159

MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIVERSITY

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Mitchell Mr. and Mrs. James N. Mitchell Ms. Lori S. Mitchell Ms. Rachel R. Mitchell Mr. and Mrs. Eric Moake Mr. Jared M. Monsour Mr. and Mrs. Bob Montgomery Mr. Ralph A. Montgomery Mr. JaQue D. Moody Mr. and Mrs. Bobby J. Moon Mr. and Mrs. Al B. Moore Mr. and Mrs. Christopher K. Moore Mr. and Mrs. Dudley M. Moore Mr. and Mrs. James R. Moore, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley S. Moore Mr. and Mrs. James L. Moore Ms. Norma J. Moore Mr. and Mrs. Roderick A. Moore Mr. Ryan J. Morehead Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd P. Moreland, Sr. Morgan Keegan Inc. Morgan Stanley Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Mr. Rance E. Morgan, IV Mr. and Mrs. Shad P. Morgan Mr. Daniel H. Morrison Mr. and Mrs. Brian B. Morrow Mr. David B. Moskal Mr. and Mrs. C. Brooks Mosley Mr. and Mrs. Larry E. Mullins Mr. and Mrs. Brian P. Murphy Mr. and Mrs. Bryan K. Murphy Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Murphy, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Tommy S. Murphy Mr. and Mrs. William G. Murphy, III Ms. Mary A. Myers Mr. and Mrs. Fred E. Nabors Mrs. Brenda J. Nalepa and MSgt. Norman Nalepa (Ret.) Dr. and Mrs. Henry W. Nash Mr. and Mrs. Warren L. Nash Mr. and Mrs. William R. Nation, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Neely Mr. Rhyne E. Neubert Jr. New South Equipment Mats, L.L.C. Dr. Vinh Q. Nguyen Mr. and Mrs. Donnie D. Nichols Mr. Erskeen A. Nichols Mr. Tony M. Nichols Mr. and Mrs. William V. Nickels Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence S. Nickles Dr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Niemeyer Mr. James C. Nix, Jr. Mr. Will Norris Mr. and Mrs. William L. Norris Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Novarini Mr. and Mrs. James L. Nowell Mr. and Mrs. James J. O’Briant Ms. Kristen A. Odom Olson Consulting Group Mr. Harry E. O’Steen, Jr. Dr. Sharon L. Oswald Dr. and Mrs. Robert F. Otondo, II Mr. Ira E. Owen Ms. Takiela L. Owens Mr. and Mrs. Scott A. Pace Ms. Victoria E. Pace Mr. John K. Palmer Mr. Christian M. Pappas Ms. Kit K. Parker Mr. LeeCoye Parker Mr. and Mrs. Sidney L. Parker Mr. Ashish Patel Mr. Jason E. Patrick Mr. Michael K. Pawlik Ms. Misti L. Fikes

DIVIDENDS

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Mr. and Mrs. Clyde V. Manning Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Manning Dr. Lawrence K. Marett Mr. and Mrs. James M. Marlin Mr. Anthony L. Marshall Mr. George M. Martin Mr. and Mrs. James W. Martin Mrs. Julia P. Martin Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Martin Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Martin Mr. and Mrs. William A. Martin, III Mr. and Mrs. George R. Marx, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Harold G. Mashburn Mr. and Mrs. Don E. Mason Mr. and Mrs. Christopher A. Mathison Ms. Mallory E. May Mr. Steven L. Mayo Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. McAlexander Mr. and Mrs. James A. McAlexander Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. McBride Mr. and Mrs. Kermit S. McCaleb Mr. and Mrs. Joseph McCall Ms. Cynthia D. McCarter Mr. and Mrs. Jack R. McCarty Ms. Kimberly A. McCarty Mrs. Carolyn M. McCaughan Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. McClain Mr. Willie C. McClendon Dr. and Mrs. Randy D. McCoy Mrs. Brenda S. McCreary Mr. and Mrs. Hubert G. McDaniel Mrs. Kaci J. McDill Mr. and Mrs. John McDonald Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth P. McDonald Mr. Bowdre McDowell Mr. and Mrs. Alphonso McDowell Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. McElroy Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. McFadden, CPA Mr. and Mrs. Joe L. McFadden Mr. J. L. McGinnis Mr. Roy D. McGuffie Mr. Matthew C. McHan Mr. and Mrs. S. B. McKay Ms. Lauren M. McKee Mr. Scott A. McKenzie Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. McKeough Mr. James C. McKinney Col. and Mrs. William D. McKinney Mrs. Rita W. McKown Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery R. McLaurin Mr. John E. McMurray Dr. Frances M. McNair Ms. Melanie A. McNeal Mr. and Mrs. Durward D. McNeer Mr. and Mrs. Hugh E. McNeil Mr. Kelly L. McQueen Mr. John W. McWhorter Mr. and Mrs. Logan E. Meeks Mrs. Rebecca E. Melton Mr. and Mrs. Mark Merritte Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Metcalfe Meyer & Rosenbaum Inc. Ms. Camille M. Meyer-Arendt Mr. Joshua C. Michael Mr. Ronnie G. Michaels Mr. and Mrs. John P. Michaud Mrs. Ann C. Middleton Miss Anna J. Miesse Mr. Nicholas L. Milam Mr. and Mrs. E. Richard Miller Mr. and Mrs. Lee Miller Mr. and Mrs. David R. Mills Mr. and Mrs. Jerry M. Milton Mr. Gary A. Minyard Mr. Tommy B. Miskelly MS Manufacturers Association

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COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

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Mr. Daniel E. Kennebrew Mr. and Mrs. Carl W. Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Kennedy, Jr. Mr. Troy T. Kestenbaum Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy C. Kight Mr. and Mrs. Joe W. Kilgo Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Kimbrough, III Mr. and Mrs. John E. Kimbrough, IV Mr. and Mrs. T. Lester King Mr. and Mrs. William F. King, Jr. Mrs. Brette P. Kirk Mrs. Mary Katherine Kirk Mr. and Mrs. Kerry D. Kittrell Drs. Ray and Lee Knight Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Knight Mr. and Mrs. Ronald W. Knight Mr. Michael J. Koon KPMG LLP Mr. Ty L. Kretzinger Dr. and Mrs. Mark J. Kroll Mr. and Mrs. Jason G. Kumm Mr. and Mrs. Gary Kutz L.D. Hancock Foundation Mr. and Mrs. James H. Lacey, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery G. Lacoste Mr. Dean Ladner Mr. Matthew T. Laird Ms. Mallory A. Lambert Mr. Clinton T. Lancaster Dr. Mary C. Landin Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Landrum Ms. Debra A. Langford Mr. and Mrs. David C. Langston Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Lanier Mr. James O. Latham, Jr. Ms. Brittny M. Laukhuff Mr. and Mrs. Al M. Lawler, III Mr. Richard K. Lawrence Mr. and Mrs. Tim Lawrence Ms. Brandi E. Ledbetter Mr. Paul R. Lee, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James C. Lee Mr. Donald J. Leiden Dr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Lemay Ms. Denise M. Lemon Lemon-Molker Insurance Agency Mr. and Mrs. Emmet T. Leonard Mr. and Mrs. Christopher M. Leopold Ms. Leah E. Lepicier Drs. Harvey and Di Ann Lewis Mr. and Mrs. John H. Lewis, Jr. Dr. Qinyu Liao Ms. Shawna C. Lindsey Mr. J. Walton Lipscomb Mr. and Mrs. Phil K. Livingston Ms. Heather P. Lloyd Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Loftin Mr. James M. Long Mrs. Julie M. Long Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Love Mr. and Mrs. Louis G. Luby, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond P. Lucas Mr. and Mrs. Douglas T. Luce, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Jay J. Luke Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Lummus Mr. John L. Lumpkin Ms. Sarah F. Lutz Mr. James R. Lynch Mr. Daniel G. Lyons, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Gary T. Lyons Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. MacKey Mr. Christopher R. Madison Mr. and Mrs. Joe A. Magee Ms. Sonya M. Magyar-Cooper Mr. Derick M. Malone Mr. Gil W. Maneclang

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NON-PROFIT U.S. POSTAGE PAID BIRMINGHAM, AL PERMIT NO. 159

Mississippi State University College of Business Box 9588, Mississippi State, MS 39762

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