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GRADUATE G R A D UAT E S C H O O L O F

Pharmaceutical Sciences

2006-2007 w w w . d u q . e d u

Duquesne University 6 0 0 Fo r b e s A v e n u e P i t t s b u r g h , PA 1 5 2 8 2


(When on campus, students only need to dial the last four digits of these numbers).

INFORMATION CENTER For University Activities Duquesne Union, Third Floor Telephone: (412) 396-6632/6633

Mylan School of Pharmacy Bayer Learning Center, Room 306 Telephone: (412) 396-6380

OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Duquesne Union, Sixth Floor Telephone: (412) 396-6113

Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Telephone: (412) 396-5662

PUBLIC SAFETY Public Safety Building Telephone: (412) 396-6002 For Emergency, call (412) 396-4747

DIRECTORY

Admissions Telephone: (412) 396-1172 CAREER SERVICES CENTER Rockwell Hall Telephone: (412) 396-6644 CASHIER – Payment of Tuition and Fees Ground Floor, Administration Building Telephone: (412) 396-6585/6587/6588 COMMUTER AFFAIRS 117 Duquesne Union Telephone: (412) 396-6660 FINANCIAL AID Ground Floor, Administration Building Telephone: (412) 396-6607 HEALTH SERVICE Duquesne Towers, Second Floor Telephone: (412) 396-1650 IDENTIFICATION CARDS 203 Duquesne Union Telephone: (412) 396-6191

REGISTRAR Administration Building, Ground Floor Telephone: (412) 396-6212 – General Office (412) 396-5623 – Transcripts RESIDENCE LIFE Director of Residence Life, Assumption Hall Telephone: (412) 396-6655/5028 – Housing Contract (412) 396-6655/5028 – Room Assignments for Graduate Students STUDENT ACCOUNTS Administration Building, Room 208 Telephone: (412) 396-6585/6587/6588 UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER Administration Building, Room 308 Telephone: (412) 396-6204/6208


DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy Degree Programs

Medicinal Chemistry Pharmaceutics MBA/MS in Industrial Pharmacy Pharmacology-Toxicology MS In Pharmacy Administration

2006-2007


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

RIGHT TO AMEND As the educational process from admission through graduation requires continuing review and appropriate approval by University officials, the provisions of this catalog are to be considered directive in character. The University, therefore, reserves the right to change requirements and regulations contained herein, including fees, tuition, and board and room, and to determine whether an individual has satisfactorily met the requirements for admission or graduation. The material contained herein is subject to change from time to time and this publication cannot be considered an agreement or contract between individual students and the University. The University reserves the right to alter or amend the terms, conditions, and requirements herein, and to eliminate programs or courses as necessary. NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION AND NONHARASSMENT POLICY Duquesne University, motivated by its Catholic identity, values equality of opportunity, human dignity, racial, cultural and ethnic diversity, both as an educational institution and as an employer. Accordingly, the University prohibits and does not engage in discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability or status as a veteran or disabled veteran. Further, Duquesne University will continue to take affirmative steps to support and advance these values consistent with the University’s mission statement. This policy applies to all educational programs and activities of the University, including, but not limited to, admission, educational policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic or other University-sponsored programs. This is a commitment by the University in accordance with its religious values and applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations. Nothing herein, however, should be interpreted as a waiver by the University of its own Constitutional and legal rights based upon its religious affiliation. The person responsible for coordinating its efforts under this policy is Dr. Judith Griggs, Affirmative Action Officer, ground floor, Administration Building, university extension 6661. SECURITY STATISTICS, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES In accordance with the College and University Security Information Act (Pennsylvania Act 73 of 1988) and the U.S. Student Right to Know and Security Act. (P.C. 101-542), information regarding Duquesne University’s crime statistics, security policies and procedures is available in the Admission’s Office, and daily crime logs are available for review in the Public Safety Department. Information contained in this catalog is accurate to the date of publication. Published by Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282.


Contents Directory (inside front cover) Campus Map (inside back cover) Contents Preface ........................................................................................................ 1 The City ...................................................................................................... 1 The University ............................................................................................ 2 Summary Statement of University Mission and Goals .............................. 3 Summary Statement of School of Pharmacy Vision, Mission and Goals .... 4 Academic and Research Resources and Facilities .................................. 4 Application Policies and Procedures ........................................................ 6 Academic Policies and Procedures ........................................................... 8 Master of Science Degree Programs ...................................................... 14 Doctor of Philosophy Degree Programs ................................................ 18 Course Descriptions ................................................................................. 24 Directors and Officers ............................................................................. 32 Administration .......................................................................................... 34 Faculty ...................................................................................................... 34


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Preface The Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences was established in 1990 when the faculty in the Pharmaceutical Sciences of the School of Pharmacy requested and was granted permission to separate from the reorganized College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences offers the Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science degrees in pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacology-toxicology, and the Master of Science in Pharmacy Administration. In conjunction with the Graduate School of Business Administration, the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences offers an M.B.A./M.S. in Industrial Pharmacy. Typically, 70 students are enrolled in graduate programs in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Most recent M.S. graduates have continued studies at the doctoral level or are employed in a variety of research laboratory settings. Graduates of Ph.D. programs are employed in research and administrative positions in industry and in research and teaching in academia.

The City Surrounded by the Monongahela, Allegheny, and Ohio rivers, the downtown “Golden Triangle” of the City of Pittsburgh is a corporate headquarters and the hub of numerous cultural activities. This “most livable city in the United States” supports an internationally renowned symphony orchestra and ballet, opera and numerous dramatic companies. Technology and education flourish in this city of highly esteemed colleges, universities, and trade and technical schools. Pittsburgh supports professional teams in football (Steelers), baseball (Pirates) and hockey (Penguins). Perhaps the most engaging quality of this metropolitan area is the “hometown” flavor of the many individual neighborhoods that comprise the “City of Pittsburgh.”

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The University Duquesne University first opened its doors as the Pittsburgh Catholic College of the Holy Ghost in October 1878 with an enrollment of 40 students and a faculty of seven. From a humble original location on Wylie Avenue in the City’s Uptown section to its present beautifully self-contained campus, Duquesne provides a hilltop vista overlooking one of the nation’s most attractive cities. Today Duquesne University is a progressive educational facility which has more than tripled from its early 12.5 acres to its present, self-enclosed 48-acre campus overlooking the city of Pittsburgh. Tree-lined brick walkways lead to academic buildings, living-learning centers, research and recreational facilities. Duquesne’s academics are recognized both nationally and internationally. Almost every state in the Union and more than 75 countries are represented in the Duquesne family, and our mission of service drives our outreach across the country and the globe. Duquesne’s recent growth has been tremendous with students in ten schools of study, including the College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts (1878); and the Schools of Law (1911); Business Administration (1913); Pharmacy (1925); Music (1926); Education (1929); Nursing (1937); Health Sciences (1990); School of Natural and Environmental Sciences (1994) and the School of Leadership and Professional Advancement (2001). Duquesne’s ten schools offer degree programs on the baccalaureate, professional, master’s and doctoral levels.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Summary Statement of University Mission and Goals Duquesne University of the Holy Spirit is a Catholic university, founded by members of the Spiritan Congregation, and sustained through a partnership of laity and religious. The motto of Duquesne University is Spiritus est qui vivificat, “It is the Spirit who gives life.” Enriching the life of the mind and the life of the spirit of every member of its community is the mission of Duquesne. It is Duquesne University’s special trust to seek truth and to disseminate knowledge within a moral and spiritual framework in order to prepare leaders distinguished not only by their academic and professional expertise but also by their ethics, and guided by consciences sensitive to the needs of society. Therefore, Duquesne is a community of students, faculty, administrators, and others who are willing to make these commitments: ■ To create undergraduate and graduate education of the highest quality in liberal and professional disciplines. ■ To examine the moral and ethical foundations of their thought and action, and to develop their personal values and ethical commitment. ■ To participate in an ecumenical dialogue open to all beliefs. ■ To extend educational opportunities to those with special financial, educational, and physical needs. ■ To promote world community through the development of an international and intercultural vision of the global needs and international responsibilities for peace, justice, and freedom. Duquesne serves God by serving students—through an academic community dedicated to excellence in liberal and professional education, through profound concern for moral and spiritual values, through the maintenance of an ecumenical atmosphere open to diversity, and through service to the Church, the community, the nation, and the world. Complemented by a broad spectrum of nonacademic activities and programs, the curriculum at Duquesne University is designed to prepare young men and women who, upon entering their chosen careers, will possess a broad, well-balanced and fully integrated education and perspective of themselves and the world.

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Summary Statement of School of Pharmacy and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Vision, Mission and Goals The School of Pharmacy is committed to providing excellence in pharmaceutical education. The mission of the school of Pharmacy is to prepare students for careers in the profession of pharmacy. Consistent with the University Mission, the values that guide the School are an appreciation for ethical and spiritual values, and a sense of personal, professional, and social responsibility. The goals of the School of Pharmacy are: ■ To prepare graduates of the professional program to apply the pharmaceutical, social, administrative, and clinical sciences to deliver pharmaceutical care in a manner which promotes positive health outcomes. ■ To provide programs, services and resources that foster an environment for the personal and professional growth of students, alumni, practitioners and faculty. The goals of the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences are: ■ To prepare graduates of the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences to serve as pharmaceutical scientists and educators, and making contributions to the body of scientific knowledge through research and scholarship.

Academic and Research Resources and Facilities The Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences is located in the Richard King Mellon Hall of Science. Laboratory instrumentation includes nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, infrared spectrometers, near-infrared spectrometers, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometers, atomic absorption spectrophotometers, gas chromatographs, high-pressure liquid chromatographs, rheometers, dissolution and disintegration testing equipment, a benchtop quadrupole GC-mass spectrometer with electron impact, positive ion and negative ion chemical ionizations, liquid chromatograph with UV diode array detector, gel permeation chromatograph with laser light scattering, differential pressure viscometry and refractive index detectors, capillary electrophoresis with UV diode array detector, DNA synthesizer, automatic film developer, gamma counter, and image analyzer. Mellon Hall facilities include a fully equipped manufacturing laboratory/ pilot plant with slant cone and high shear mixers, a micro fluidizer, fluid bed and spray dryers, coaters, a capsule filling machine, and fully computer


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

controlled/ monitored 38-station Hata tablet press. Modern animal facilities in adjacent Bayer Hall provide the opportunity for physiological, pharmacological, and toxicological evaluations of drugs and chemicals. Graduate students in the Pharmaceutical Sciences have access to computers in research laboratories and the Pharmacy Computer Center. The Gumberg Library opened in 1978 and was rededicated in 1995. The five-story structure holds an extensive collection which serves the Duquesne community on campus and at a distance, offering access to a collection that includes both print and electronic resources. The Library’s collection has grown to more than 700,000 volumes. The Library makes available more than 190 research databases that index newspapers, research journals, and other publications. It provides access to more than 12,000 electronic journals, newspapers, and other periodicals as well as electronic versions of books, reference works, poems, plays and more. The Library catalog provides links to many electronic resources and to catalogs of other regional libraries. Students have several options for obtaining materials not available at Gumberg Library including E-ZBorrow and ILLiad. The Library is committed to using evolving technology to deliver the information that students need in the most cost-effective manner. The Library participates in local, regional, and state consortia which support reciprocal borrowing. It also maintains agreements with regional academic libraries and hospitals that allow students to borrow books onsite at participating institutions. Professional librarians are available for on-site and remote consultation and assistance. In addition, the Library designed a course to assist students in developing the research and information literacy skills needed to succeed at Duquesne University. The course focuses on basic skills needed by every student regardless of major, and examines selected ethical issues surrounding computing and using information. The Library offers computers in the reference area, electronic classroom, and Assistive Technology Center for research needs. The Assistive Technology Center has computers equipped for the visually impaired, blind, hearing impaired, learning disabled, and students with limited English. Wireless access is available throughout the Library. Students can connect their personal laptops or loaner laptops anywhere in the Library.

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Within the Gumberg Library, there is the Maureen P. Sullivan Curriculum Center and other prestigious collections that are recognized locally, regionally, nationally and also internationally. One of these collections, The Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center, promotes the advancement of phenomenology by collecting and making available in one place all the literature on phenomenology and sponsors continuing research and original scholarship. The other special collections include the Cardinal Wright Collection, the Rabbi Herman Hailperin Collection, and the Honorable Michael A. Musmanno Collection. The University Archives is also part of the Library and is the center for the documented history of Duquesne University. In keeping with its mission and by supporting the traditions of academic excellence and the Spiritan identity of Duquesne University, the Gumberg Library is the primary locus for distinctive intellectual resources, information literacy instruction, and related library services for students. The Library is open more than 100 hours per week for research and study. However, the electronic resources are available 24/7 anywhere on campus and remotely. For more information about the Library’s collections, services, policies, departments, and facilities go to www.library.duq.edu. The website also provides access to the Library’s online catalog, research databases, electronic journals and texts, and Library newsletter.

Application Policies and Procedures The Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences welcomes applications from individuals who have earned a baccalaureate degree in chemistry, biology, pharmacy, allied health sciences, or social/behavioral or business sciences, depending on the proposed field of study. Students are admitted for the fall or spring semester of the academic year. Applications must be received in sufficient time to permit processing and evaluation before enrollment for the preferred semester. Applications for the fall semester which are received prior to February 1 will be given primary consideration. Application forms and materials may be obtained from the Director of Graduate Studies. The completed application and supporting documents (official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work, a brief statement of purpose and intent with regard to the specific area of graduate study chosen, three letters of recommendation from persons acquainted with the academic abilities of the applicant, and results of the GRE General Test) must be sent to the Director. All applicants whose native language or principal language of instruction is not English are required to submit their TOEFL scores to the Graduate School. International students who are applying for a teaching assistantship are required to submit their TSE scores to the Graduate School.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

TYPES OF ADMISSION On graduate faculty evaluation of an applicant’s credentials for admission to an M.S. and/or Ph.D. program, students will be admitted as: 1. Regular. This is a full and unconditional admission into a graduate degree program. 2. Provisional. Subject to the fulfillment of a specific requirement normally stated in the letter of acceptance. When the requirement has been fulfilled, the student must submit a request for a change in status, in writing, to the Director of Graduate Studies. 3. Special Students. A qualified student who does not wish to become a degree candidate may, with the approval of the department or professor concerned, enroll for a particular course or courses. The student may receive official credit for the course. Special Students must be enrolled in another program within the University or submit to the Director of Graduate Studies a written request to attend graduate classes and evidence of a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited academic institution. The application fee is five dollars. 4. Temporary Transfer. This is granted to a student in good standing in any recognized graduate school who wishes to enroll in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Duquesne University for one term or summer session and who plans to return thereafter to his/her former college or university. The student will not be required to submit a full transcript of credits, but must present a statement signed by the Graduate Director of his/ her institution indicating that the student is in good standing at that institution. 5. Combined Degree Programs. Doctor of Pharmacy students (P III, IV, V) may begin graduate study early with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies. Interested students should be referred to the Pharm.D. (with the B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences) / M.S. / Ph.D. program policies and procedures. These students may take only courses numbered 500 to 599.

Student Health Insurance Effective for the 2006 - 2007 academic year, Duquesne University will require all full time students to have health insurance. This requirement recognizes the increasing importance of health insurance to every individual. Those who do not otherwise have coverage will be required to purchase a policy offered by the University at the beginning of the academic year. This requirement, or Hard Waiver, will allow the University to offer as comprehensive and cost effective plan as possible to all full time students. Those students who demonstrate that they have coverage from any other source will not be required to purchase the University-sponsored plan.

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ASSISTANTSHIPS Teaching and research assistantships, which may include full remission of tuition and fees, are available to qualified applicants. Assistantships are normally awarded in the spring for the following academic year. Eligibility for assistantships is based on academic records, qualifications and financial need. These assistantships are granted in return for serving in the capacity of a laboratory teaching assistant and/or research assistant on a semester-to-semester basis. To be eligible for consideration for an assistantship, the student must complete the appropriate section on the official application. An international student seeking a teaching assistantship is advised that Duquesne University institutional policy and Pennsylvania state law requires that all instructional teaching assistants who are non-native speakers of English, be certified by the University as meeting acceptable standards of English language fluency. Candidates for teaching assistantships are required to submit TSE (Test of Spoken English) scores to the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Also, candidates must sit for on-campus language tests conducted for such certification. If results of the on-campus language testing for such certification indicate that the candidate requires assistance with the English language, that candidate will be responsible for the cost of providing assistance until that individual’s language proficiency improves to acceptable standards. Also, testing results may affect the nature and/or limits of the candidate’s assistantship and instructional duties.

Academic Policies and Procedures REGISTRATION Prior Advisement — After a student has been admitted to the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, the student must contact the faculty advisor within the discipline in which the student will be studying for advisement as to the exact program requirements. Written approval of the faculty advisor is required in advance for each registration for any course creditable toward a graduate degree. Official Registration — Registration is considered complete and official only when all charges are paid or when satisfactory arrangements have been


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

made with the Student Accounts Office of the University. Admission to any class is permitted only to those students who have officially registered for that class. Continuous Registration — All graduate students who are not registered for a course, but who are working toward a degree, must register each semester for Continuous Registration and pay the assigned fees. If the student is planning to receive a degree in August, the student must register for Continuous Registration during the summer session in which the degree completion is expected. Cross Registration — Full-time Duquesne University students may cross-register in the Graduate Schools (Carnegie Mellon University and The University of Pittsburgh) of the Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education (PCHE) on a space-available basis for one course per semester. Students should check with their faculty advisor concerning departmental cross-registration regulations. Duquesne University students who are participating in this program are charged by Duquesne University; however, students are responsible for paying any special course fees to the host institution. There is no cross-registration during the summer sessions. Cross-registration is subject to the approval of the appropriate officials of the institutions involved and must be recommended by the student’s faculty advisor and approved by the professor in charge of the course. Full credit and the grade will be posted on the student’s transcript; the academic regulations of the host institution will prevail. The cross-registration forms are available from the Graduate School Office. Degree Registration — Graduate students should register for their degree in the semester or summer session in which they expect to complete all of the degree requirements. If the degree is not completed in the intended semester or summer session, degree registration is required in the subsequent semesters or summer sessions until the degree requirements are completed.

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GRADING The following grading system is in effect in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences: A AB+ B BC F

Distinguished scholarly work

Normal progress toward degree

Warning: Student subject to faculty action! Failure: Course must be repeated; student subject to faculty action! I Incomplete: Grade is deferred because of incomplete work and must be removed within the required time frame of one academic year. W Official Withdrawal P Pass: Used in certain courses and is independent of the quality point system. N Not Passing: Used in courses graded on a Pass/ Fail basis and is independent of the quality point system. The above plus and minus grades may be used at the discretion of the instructor and with notification to students at the beginning of each course. ACADEMIC STANDARDS All graduate students must maintain a grade average not lower than B (3.00 Q.P.A.). Students failing to meet this standard may be subject to faculty action, including dismissal, for failure to maintain normal progress toward a degree. Decisions on student academic standing are made by the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Council, after an initial review and recommendation by the Director of Graduate Studies. Any student having less than 3.00 as a final grade average at the conclusion of course work will be ineligible for the granting of a graduate degree.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences QUALITY POINT SYSTEM The student’s overall academic quality point average (Q.P.A.) is calculated by dividing the total quality points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted.

Grade A AB+ B BC F

Points Per Credits Attempted 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.0 0.0

Courses in which grades P, I and W were given are not used in calculating the quality point average. SEMESTER GRADE REPORTS Every registered student may access grades through the University WebAdvisor soon after the close of each semester. TRANSCRIPTS Each student will receive an unofficial transcript at the close of each academic year. Students should examine their records carefully for accuracy and immediately report errors to the Registrar of the University and the Director of Graduate Studies. To obtain additional copies of their academic records, students must request transcripts from the Office of the University Registrar. All official transcripts issued by the Office of the Registrar bear the signature of the Registrar and are printed on secured paper. Whenever an official transcript is released directly to the student, it will also bear the stamped designation, Issued to Student. No transcript will be issued unless all financial obligations owed by the student to the University have been fulfilled. A fee is charged for the issuance of each transcript.

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CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS The University regards the student’s personal information and academic record as a matter of confidence between the student and the University. The contents of either may be revealed only in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-380, Section 438, as amended) and with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. A form outlining the policies and procedures of the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences in observance of the provisions of this law is available in the Graduate School Office. Each graduate student should complete one of these documents upon matriculation to the Graduate School. AUDITING COURSES To audit courses, a student must be officially registered and pay the same charges for courses that are taken for credit. Enrollment in a course for audit is subject to approval of the student’s faculty advisor. Registration in a course as auditor must be declared at registration and is irrevocable after the mid-term examination period. CANCELLATION OF COURSES The University makes every reasonable effort to offer courses as announced in the Semester Schedule of Courses and Summer Session Bulletin. It reserves the right to make changes or cancel courses in the academic schedule because of insufficient enrollment or for any other equally valid reason.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences CHANGE OF SCHEDULE Students requiring a Change-of-Class Schedule, to add or drop a class, are permitted to do so during the pre-registration period, the final registration period, and the first class week of the semester (late registration). Change of class schedule is not permitted after the last date for change of schedule as announced in the Semester Academic Calendar. All schedule changes must be approved by the graduate student’s faculty advisor and processed with the Graduate School and the Registrar. Schedule change requests processed with the Registrar during the first week of classes must have the approval of the instructors whose classes are being added or dropped. Students who tardily process change forms are not entitled to a refund for the course credits dropped. Courses dropped after the deadline for making schedule changes are classified as course withdrawals. WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE If a student wishes to withdraw from a course, the student may do so with the approval of the student‘s faculty advisor and by processing the proper form up to the day prior to final examinations. If a student wishes to withdraw from a course after that date, the student must present valid reasons and seek approval of the student’s faculty advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies. If approval is granted, the student then obtains and completes the appropriate forms. A student who is not granted approval of the request and withdraws from the course unofficially will receive an F grade for the course.

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Master of Science Degree Programs PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Courses — Master of Science degree programs in Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmaceutics, and Pharmacology/ Toxicology require a minimum of 30 post-baccalaureate semester hours. This includes 24 credits of course work, including 2 credits of seminar, and an additional 6 credits of thesis research. The M.S. in Pharmacy Administration, thesis option requires 27 credits of course work, including 2 credits of seminar and 9 credits of thesis research; non-thesis option, 33 credits of course work, including 2 credits of seminar. Core course requirements are listed for the various programs in the Pharmaceutical Sciences. Optional graduate courses in the Pharmaceutical Sciences or in other disciplines may be acceptable for credit, subject to faculty advisor approval. In conjunction with the Graduate School of Business Administration, a M.B.A./M.S. in Industrial Pharmacy is offered. This program is an 85credit (without course work waivers and advanced standing credits), nonthesis program, requiring concurrent graduate-level enrollment in the Graduate School of Business Administration and the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Fifty-seven credits in core graduate Business Administration course work and 28 credits of course work in the Pharmaceutical Sciences are required. A maximum of six credits of graduate course work completed (B or better grade) at other accredited academic institutions may be applied toward the partial fulfillment of requirements for the Master’s degree. The major advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies must approve any transfer credits applicable toward the M.S. degree. For all M.S. programs, any deficiencies in undergraduate course work must be resolved without the granting of graduate credit. Challenge examinations are not accepted for graduate credit by the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. All graduate students are required to maintain good academic standing, which is defined as a quality point average of 3.0 or better.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences Thesis — The student will select a major faculty advisor no later than the end of the second semester of full-time matriculation, and in conjunction with the advisor, will select a thesis committee. The purpose of the committee is to review periodically the progress of the research project and to make appropriate recommendations to the student. The student will submit a thesis proposal describing the proposed research to the Director of Graduate Studies, according to the guidelines published in the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Manual. Upon successful completion of the research, the candidate is required to prepare and defend a thesis on the approved topic before the faculty of the discipline, according to the guidelines set forth in the current Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Manual. Other requirements are outlined in the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Manual. RESIDENCY The candidate must spend at least two consecutive semesters in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences and must take a minimum of 18 approved credit hours in residence in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. The statue of limitations for the Master of Science degree is five years, M.S. in Pharmacy Administration four years, from the date of matriculation in the program. A leave of absence from a degree program must be obtained by a student who interrupts the course of study. On request by the student, such a leave will be reviewed and a decision rendered by the Director of Graduate Studies.

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PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS Medicinal Chemistry — The core curriculum required for the Master of Science degree in Medicinal Chemistry comprises the following courses: GPHSC 522 Spectral Methods 3 crs. GPHSC 513 Principles of Drug Action, Design, and Delivery 3 crs. Chem. 501 Biochemistry I 3 crs. Chem. 502 Biochemistry II 3 crs. GPHSC 527 Advanced Medicinal Chemistry 4 crs. Chem. 503 Advanced Organic Chemistry 3 crs. GPHSC 691, 692 Seminar 2 crs. GPHSC 700 Thesis 6 crs. Additional courses applicable to the M.S. degree program in Medicinal Chemistry include the following: GPHSC 528 Heterocycles 3 crs. GPHSC 623 Selected Topics in Medicinal Chemistry 3 crs.

Pharmaceutics — The core curriculum required for the Master of Science degree in Pharmaceutics consists of the following courses: GPHSC 513 Principles of Drug Action, Design, and Delivery 3 crs. Math 525 OR Applied Statistics 3 crs. Math 555 Biostatistics II 3 crs. GPHSC 501 Manufacturing Pharmacy 4 crs. GPHSC 502 Pharmaceutical Formulation & Development 4 crs. GPHSC 504 Regulatory Aspects of Industrial Practice 2 crs. GPHSC 507 Exploratory Data Analysis 3 crs. GPHSC 510 OR Errors and Assumptions in Pharmacokinetic/ Pharmacodynamic Data Analysis 3 crs. GPHSC 511 Compartmental Modeling of Pharmacokinetic/ Pharmacodynamic Data 3 crs. GPHSC 615 Advanced Pharmaceutics I 3 crs. GPHSC 691, 692 Seminar 2 crs. GPHSC 700 Thesis 6 crs. A minimum of 3 credits in analytical aspects of pharmaceutics is required for the M.S. degree in Pharmaceutics. Currently GPHSC 521 or 522 may be selected.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences M.B.A./M.S. In Industrial Pharmacy GPHSC 501 Manufacturing Pharmacy 4 crs. GPHSC 502 Pharmaceutical Formulation & Development 4 crs. GPHSC 504 Regulatory Aspects of Industrial Practice 2 crs. GPHSC 507 Exploratory Data Analysis 3 crs. GPHSC 510 Errors and Assumptions in Pharmacokinetic/ Pharmacodynamic Data Analysis 3 crs. GPHSC 511 Compartmental Modeling of Pharmacokinetic/ Pharmacodynamic Data 3 crs. GPHSC 522 OR Spectral Methods GPHSC 521 Analytical Separation Methods 3 crs. GPHSC 615 Advanced Pharmaceutics I 3 crs. GPHSC 616 Advanced Pharmaceutics II 3 crs. Part B - Graduate School of Business Administration Core IA Foundation Skills and Knowledge Courses 20 crs. Core IB Management-specific Knowledge Skills 22 crs. Core II Electives Courses 15 crs. (Including Regulatory Aspects of Industrial Practice 2 credits) The M.B.A./M.S. in Industrial Pharmacy program is an 85 credit (without course waivers and advanced standing credits), non-thesis program requiring concurrent graduate-level enrollment in the Graduate School of Business Administration and the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Pharmacology-Toxicology — The core curriculum required for the Master of Science degree in Pharmacology-Toxicology consists of the following courses: GPHSC 513 Principles of Drug Action, Design, and Delivery 3 crs. Chem. 501 Biochemistry I 3 crs. GPHSC 561 General Toxicology 3 crs. GPHSC 570 Drug Mechanisms 3 crs. GPHSC 572 Methods of Evaluation of Drug Action and Toxicity 4 crs. GPHSC 672 Advanced Pharmacology I 3 crs. GPHSC 673 Advanced Pharmacology II 3 crs. GPHSC 693, 694 Seminar 2 crs. GPHSC 700 Thesis 6 crs.

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See the Ph.D. in Pharmacology-Toxicology listing for recommended electives. Pharmacy Administration — The core curriculum for the Master of Science degree in Pharmacy Administration includes: GPHSC 584 Health Care Economics 3 crs. GPHSC 583 Marketing/ Customer Service 3 crs. GPHSC 586 Managed Care Principles and Policies 2 crs. GPHSC 588 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Pharmacy 3 crs. GPHSC 585 Health Care Financial Management 2 crs. GPHSC 589 Research Methods in Pharmacy Administration 3 crs. GREV 610 Educational Statistics II 3 crs. GPHSC 697, 698 Seminar 1 cr. Available elective courses are: Pharmacoeconomic Evaluations, PatientReported Health Outcomes, Regulatory Aspects of Industrial Practice, and graduate courses in Social and Public Policy, Communication, and Business Administration.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Programs PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Matriculation into Doctoral Programs — The disciplines within the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences will recommend to the Director of Graduate Studies and the Dean of the Graduate School, for the matriculation introdoctoral degree programs, those students who have satisfied requirements. Unless the student has previously earned a Master of Science degree from an approved program of study, the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination requirements must be met before the student can officially matriculate into the Ph.D. programs. Qualifying for Matriculation into Ph.D. programs — An examination is to be administered at a time determined by the faculty in the specific discipline, but not before twenty credit hours of approved course work has been completed. The intent of this examination is to test the student’s ability to apply


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

information, interpret and analyze data, to propose approaches to research problems, and general background understanding and knowledge in the area of the student’s major field of study. Alternatively, a student may be allowed to matriculate into the Ph.D. programs if (1) the student has earned an acceptable Master of Science degree, or (2) a student, who has taken 20 credit hours and has a minimum QPA of 3.50, petitions a Graduate School review committee to evaluate the student’s academic credentials. This committee will consist of the major advisor, one or two other faculty members within the discipline of study, and one outside reviewer. Upon review of the student’s credentials, the committee will make its recommendation for the student’s matriculation into the Ph.D. program to the Director of Graduate Studies and the Dean of the Graduate School. Courses — Students pursuing the Ph.D. are required to take a minimum of 60 post-baccalaureate semester hours, including 12 credits of dissertation research and 48 credits of course work, including core (required) courses, approved electives, and 4 credits of seminar. Each discipline requires the completion of specific Ph.D. core curriculum requirements. Core course requirements are listed for the various programs in the Pharmaceutical Sciences. All advanced standing for previous course work is at the discretion of the faculty within the discipline. The transfer of graduate course work completed (B or better grade) at other accredited academic institutions, which may be applicable toward the partial fulfillment of the doctoral degree requirements, is determined by Graduate School review committee action in each individual student case. The awarding of transfer credit for doctoral students must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. For all Ph.D. programs, any deficiencies in undergraduate course work must be resolved without the granting of graduate credit. Challenge examinations are not accepted for graduate credit by the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. All graduate students are required to maintain good academic standing, which is defined as a quality point average of 3.0 or better.

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EXAMINATION AND EVALUATIONS FOR THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE Comprehensive Evaluation — This three-part evaluation is intended to provide evidence that the student has attained a level of preparedness appropriate to the degree. The comprehensive evaluation process must begin after 24 credits of course work have been completed and at least twelve months prior to the expected date of graduation. The three components of the comprehensive evaluation process include: a) Comprehensive Examination for Ph.D. Candidacy — Purpose: The purpose of this examination is to test the student’s scientific approach to problem solving in their area of specialization. The primary intent of this examination is to test the student’s ability to apply information, interpret and analyze data, and propose approaches to research problems. The exam will require general background understanding and knowledge in the area of the student’s major field of study. Eligibility: After the student has taken a minimum of 24 credits of graduate courses toward the Ph.D., and no later than the end of the third year of the Ph.D. program. Offered: The examination will be offered by all disciplines at the same time during the third week in January and the first week of August. Students who wish to take the exam must complete and submit the comprehensive examination request form to the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences not less than two months prior to the examination. b) Research Proposal — Each candidate will be required to submit briefs to the faculty, within the specific discipline, on three topics of potential research, but not to include the topic chosen as the dissertation research. The faculty within the specific area will select one of the topics submitted to be developed by the student into a complete research proposal. The student will submit the written research proposal to the faculty of the specific area of study and will be required to defend the proposal in an oral presentation to faculty of the specific discipline and invited guests. A copy of the research proposal and the results of the faculty evaluation of the candidate will be forwarded to the Director of Graduate Studies. Successful completion of the Research Proposal must occur at least twelve months prior to the expected date of graduation. c) General Evaluation — The candidate’s overall performance will be evaluated annually by the Director of Graduate Studies based on faculty evaluations.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Language Examinations — If required by the discipline, each candidate must demonstrate the ability to read technical literature in at least one approved foreign language. No course taken to satisfy the language requirements may be counted toward the credits for the Ph.D. Degree. d) Oral Dissertation Examination — This examination is taken at the end of the doctoral program and essentially represents a defense of the dissertation research. DISSERTATION The student will select a major faculty advisor for the dissertation research project no later than the second semester of full time matriculation, and in conjunction with the advisor, will select a Dissertation Committee. The purpose of the committee is to periodically (at least two meetings per semester) review the progress of the Dissertation Research Project and to make appropriate written recommendations to the student. The student will submit an electronic dissertation proposal describing the intended research to the Director of Graduate Studies, according to the guidelines published in the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Manual. Upon successful completion of the approved research project, the candidate is required to prepare and defend a dissertation, according to the guidelines in the current Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Manual. Other requirements are outlined in the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Manual. The defense date for the dissertation should be confirmed one month before the defense. The document must be in committee members’ possession at least one week prior to the defense.

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RESIDENCY Candidates for the doctoral degree are expected to spend at least one full year of full-time residency in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. In addition, all candidates are required to take a minimum of 24 credit hours, 12 dissertation credits, and 4 seminar credits in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Unless a leave of absence from the graduate program is submitted to the Director of Graduate Studies, and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, continuous registration is required for each semester and summer session, if applicable, for all matriculating graduate students. The statute of limitations for the Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences is seven years following completion of the Ph.D. candidacy requirement (comprehensive examination). PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS Medicinal Chemistry — The core curriculum required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Medicinal Chemistry comprises the following courses: GPHSC 513 Principles of Drug Action, Design, and Delivery 3 crs. GPHSC 522 Spectral Methods 3 crs. Chem. 501 Biochemistry I 3 crs. Chem. 502 Biochemistry II 3 crs. GPHSC 527 Advanced Medicinal Chemistry 4 crs. Chem. 503 Advanced Organic Chemistry 3 crs. GPHSC 623 Selected Topics in Medicinal Chemistry 3 crs. GPHSC 691, 692 Seminar 4 crs. GPHSC 701 Dissertation 12 crs. In addition, the Ph.D. candidate will be required to complete 12 crs. in graduate level courses. Strongly recommended courses are: GPHSC 528 Heterocycles 3 crs.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Pharmaceutics — The core curriculum required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Pharmaceutics consists of the following courses: GPHSC 513 Principles of Drug Action, Design, and Delivery 3 crs. GPHSC 501 Manufacturing Pharmacy 4 crs. GPHSC 502 Pharmaceutical Formulation & Development 4 crs. GPHSC 504 Regulatory Aspects of Industrial Practice 2 crs. GPHSC 507 Exploratory Data Analysis 3 crs. GPHSC 510 Errors and Assumptions in Pharmacokinetic/ Pharmacodynamic Data Analysis 3 crs. GPHSC 511 Compartmental Modeling of Pharmacokinetic/ Pharmacodynamic Data 3 crs. GPHSC 615 Advanced Pharmaceutics 1 3 crs. GPHSC 616 Advanced Pharmaceutics II 3 crs. GPHSC 691, 692 Seminar 4 crs. GPHSC 701 Dissertation 12 crs. A minimum of 6 credits in analytical aspects of Pharmaceutics is required for the Ph.D. degree in Pharmaceutics. Currently, GPHSC 521 and 522 may be selected. Basic courses in Mathematics (through Math 215 Calculus III or its equivalent) and Experimental Design (through Math 555 or its equivalent) are required. The following courses are recommended electives: GPHSC 505 Cosmetic Science and Technology 2 crs. GPHSC 506 Cosmetic Science and Technology Lab 1 cr. GPHSC 509 Pharmaceutical Unit Operations - Solids 3 crs. GPHSC 512 Pharmaceutical Unit Operations - Liquids 3 crs. GPHSC 518 Fundamentals of Pharmaceutical Solids 3 crs. GPHSC 526 Chemometrics 3 crs. GPHSC 570 Drug Mechanisms 3 crs. Chem. 501 Biochemistry I 3 crs. Chem. 502 Biochemistry II 3 crs. Other graduate courses in Chemistry may be recommended as electives.

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Pharmacology-Toxicology — The core curriculum required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Pharmacology-Toxicology consists of the following courses: GPHSC 513 Principles of Drug Action, Design, and Delivery 3 crs. Chem. 501 Biochemistry I 3 crs. Chem. 502 Biochemistry II 3 crs. GPHSC 561 General Toxicology 3 crs. GPHSC 566 Clinical Toxicology 3 crs. GPHSC 570 Drug Mechanisms 3 crs. GPHSC 572 Methods of Evaluation of Drug Action and Toxicity 4 crs. GPHSC 672, 673 Advanced Pharmacology I and II 6 crs. GPHSC 693, 694 Seminar 4 crs. GPHSC 701 Dissertation 12 crs. With approval, GPHSC 667 or may be substituted for Clinical Toxicology. The following courses are recommended electives; other electives in Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Analytical Chemistry may also be appropriate. GPHSC 574 Neuronal Biochemistry 2 crs. GPHSC 667 Forensic Toxicology 3 crs. GPHSC 507 Exploratory Data Analysis 3 crs. GPHSC 521 Analytical Separation Methods 3 crs.

Course Descriptions 501. Manufacturing Pharmacy. 4 crs. A comprehensive course addressing the techniques and equipment utilized in the large scale processing of solids. Lectures and laboratory experience is provided in the processing of solids (such as tablets and hard gelatin capsules). Special emphasis is placed on methods of quality control, tablet tooling and manufacture and characterization, fluid-bed precessing, and sterile processing of parenteral medication. Student presentations on current topics of good manufacturing practices and current industry emphases are required. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences 502. Pharmaceutical Formulation and Development. 4 crs. A course designed to introduce and apply the principles of formulation and development of pharmaceutical products. Emphasis is on prolonged or controlled release of drugs. Independent student research projects are used to evaluate student research management and problem solving skills. Student presentations on current topics of drug delivery and formulation and development are required. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. 504. Regulatory Aspects of Industrial Practice. 2 crs. The principal foci of this course are the Federal government’s regulation of the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries research and development, manufacturing, approval, and marketing of drugs and drug products and, to a lesser extent, diagnostic agents and devices, cosmetic, and foods; the concept of intellectual property (i.e., patents, trade secrets, etc.) and its role in the pharmaceutical and related industries. Lecture, two hours. 505. Cosmetic Science and Technology. 2 crs. An overview of cosmetic products embracing their rationale, historical development and dermatologic aspects. Stress is placed on product formulation although methods of product evaluation are discussed as well. Lecture, two hours. 506. Cosmetic Science and Technology Laboratory. 1 cr. The focus of the laboratory is on the formulation and bench-scale preparation of cosmetic and dermatologic products using a wide range of adjuvants unique to the cosmetic industry. Product categories include makeup, eye shadow, mascara, and lipstick, as well as preparations for the skin and hair. Laboratory, four hours. 507. Exploratory Data Analysis. 3 crs. The course addresses in depth exploratory data analysis as a prelude to mathematical modeling with emphasis on data transformation and graphical or data visualization methodologies. Lecture, three hours 509. Pharmaceutical Unit Operations — Solids. 3 crs. A course designed to introduce the principles and concepts of pharmaceutical unit operations of solid dosage forms using a thermodynamic approach. Lecture materials will be supplemented by visual interactive computer simulations of pharmaceutical unit operations, guest lecturers from the pharmaceutical industry, and visits to pharmaceutical companies. Lecture-computer lab, three hours.

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510. Errors and Assumptions in Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Data Analysis. 3 crs. The fundamental concepts and assumptions that underpin biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics are explored in depth in this course and examined in terms of the errors that can be incurred when these concepts and assumptions are invalidated, inapplicable, or limited in their relevance. Lecture, three hours. 511. Compartmental Modeling of Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Data. 3 crs. This course encompasses the mathematical models that have been used to characterize systemic drug concentrations and effects as a function of time, along with the models’ corresponding biopharmaceutic and pharmacokinetic assumptions. The latter assumptions include the influence of drug dose, formulation, route of administration, and patient/volunteer characteristics on the model and its parameters. Lecture, three hours. 512. Pharmaceutical Unit Operations — Liquids. 3 crs. This course addresses unit operation principles in the manufacturing of liquids and semisolids. Emphasis is given to formulation parameters such as process, equipment, rheology, materials/excipients, and scale up. Course lectures will be supplemented by guest lecturers from the pharmaceutical industry and special projects. Lecture, three hours. 513. Principals of Drug Action, Design, and Delivery. 3 crs. This course addresses the basic theoretical background essential to the drug design and development processes and describes the interrelationships among the disciplines of the Pharmaceutical Sciences. Lecture, three hours 518. Fundamentals of Pharmaceutical Solids. 3 crs. The purpose of this course is to foster basic understanding of the solid state and relevant analytical techniques for its characterization. Theory will begin by addressing atomic solids, with an eventual emphasis on small molecular organic materials. Topics within this course include solidification, nucleation and growth, surface properties, diffusion processes and solid state reactions/reactivity, crystalline polymorphism, the amorphous solid state, deformation processes, and mechanical properties of consolidated bodies. Lecture, three hours.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

521. Analytical Separation Methods. 3 crs. A course concerned with basic theoretical principles and their application to chemical and pharmaceutical systems of chromatographic methods of analysis. Discussion is focused on the use of the various instruments according to the students’ past experience and pharmaceutical discipline. Lecture, three hours. 522. Spectral Methods. 3 crs. A course designed to introduce students to the molecules given the ultraviolet, infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectra data. Demonstration and laboratory practice of ultraviolet, infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry application is included. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. 526. Chemometrics. 3 crs. A course which introduces common chemometric routines used for evaluation of multivariate data and the application of these methods in the solution of practical chemical and spectroscopic problems arising from actual laboratory results. Lecturecomputer lab, three hours. 527. Advanced Medicinal Chemistry. 4 crs. This course applies the concepts covered in Principles of Drug Action, Design, and Delivery to issues concerning drug solubility, drug-receptor interactions, stereochemical aspects of drug action, and basic concepts in molecular modification (homolagation, fragmentation, molecular hybridization, isosteric substitutions). Advanced concepts discussed include: receptor interactioins, QSAR, approaches to the rational design of enzyme inhibitors, the relationship of drug metabolism to drug design, the design of prodrugs, the design, execution and analysis of combinational libraries. Recent advances in specific areas relating to molecular modeling as applied to the design of drugs, direct and indirect computer-aided ligand design, the pharmacophore concept and its use, the receptor-excluded and receptoressential volumes, solvation effects, and examples of 3D-pharmacophores and their use, will be presented. Lecture, four hours. 528. Heterocycles. 3 crs. This course presents the physical, chemical, and medicinal chemical aspects of aromatic heterocyclic compounds, based on a prior understanding of modern structure identification techniques and of mechanistic organic chemistry. An emphasis will be placed on nomenclature, organic chemistry, and relevance to drug action. Lecture, three hours.

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561. General Toxicology. 3 crs. A lecture and laboratory demonstration course dealing with the multidisciplinary aspects of toxicology with emphasis on the biological test methods for toxic substances and the general clinical and analytical procedures used by the toxicologist. Food and Drug Administration regulations and suggested tests are also considered. Lecture, three hours. Alternate years. 566. Clinical Toxicology. 3 crs. A course which outlines the basic principles of management of the poisoned patient. Emphasis is placed on the underlying mechanism of toxicity, toxicological changes, clinical manifestations, related laboratory tests and treatment of drugs and chemical toxicity. Prerequisites: Pharmacology or permission of the instructor. Lecture, three hours. 570. Drug Mechanisms. 3 crs. A course designed to introduce the molecular and biochemical basis of pharmacologic selectivity and drug actions. These principles will be discussed in areas such as receptor theory, receptor regulation and signal transduction, and receptor classification. Lecture, three hours. Alternate years. 572. Methods of Evaluation of Drug Action and Toxicity. 4 crs. A lecturelaboratory course, which encompasses the use of physiological and analytical methods, used in determining the site, mechanism of action, and toxicity of drugs and chemicals. The sequence of laboratory experiments involves an interdisciplinary approach incorporating the various areas of pharmacology and toxicology. This includes basic techniques used to monitor drug action and toxicity, in vitro biochemical methods used to determine pharmacologic and toxicologic actions, teratogenicity and reproductive toxicity. The analytical techniques include spectrophotometry, gas-liquid chromatography, GC-mass spectrometry, high-pressure liquid chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, immunoassays, gel electrophoresis, and tissue cell techniques. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Alternate years. 574. Neuronal Biochemistry. 2 crs. A course designed to examine the cellular and biochemical foundations of neuronal function. Emphasis is given to experimental paradigms of the membrane actions of drugs, transmitters, modulators, and trophic factors on neuronal biochemistry, anatomy and physiology. The study of neuronal signaling, receptor classification and interaction, second messenger function and metabolism will provide an understanding and appreciation for neuronal function at the cellular and subcellular level. Lecture, two hours.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences 583. Marketing and Customer Service. 3 crs. The course recognizes the unique differences, which arise from the intangible nature of services, in marketing and managing service operations. While general service operations will be considered, the primary focus will be on pharmacy and health related organizations. The perspective is marketing and managing services for a competitive marketing advantage. Lecture-discussion, three hours. 584. Health Care Economics. 3 crs. The course is designed to foster an understanding of the economic principles that drive the demand for and supply of health care in the United States. Course content will focus on the logic behind the decisions made by the physicians, hospitals, managed care organizations, and government and the choices made by consumers on individual and aggregate levels. Emphasis will be on economic theory, with the applications of the theory to real situations that have occurred and/or are predicted to occur. Lecture-discussion, three hours. 585. Health Care Financial Management. 2 crs. The course is designed to foster understanding of financial management and accounting principles as applied to pharmacy and health care. Financial concepts presented include financial statements, ratio analysis, cost of money, budgeting, the pricing of services, differential analysis, capital investment decisions, cost management and trends, business plan development for health care services, taxation, and cash flow. The topics covered will enhance the financial decision making abilities of health care practitioners. Lecture-discussion, two hours. 586. Managed Care Principles and Policies. 2 crs. The course presents an overview of the impact of managed care on the administration and delivery of health care services and pharmaceutical care. Course topics include Federal legislation, designing prescription drug benefits, medical policy and technology assessment and patient care management. Lectures will be delivered by practitioners who work in managed care organizations or consulting practices. Lecture-discussion, two hours. 587. Pharmacoeconomics. 2 crs. The purpose of the course is to support students’ development of competence in population-based, health care decisionmaking using an integrated assessment of economic, clinical, and humanistic outcomes. Students will learn through didactic lecture, critical analysis of applicable pharmacoeconomic literature, and the presentation of a group project that addresses a pertinent and contemporary pharmacoeconomic issue. Lecturediscussion, two hours.

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588. Social and Behavioral Aspects of Pharmacy. 3 crs. The focus will be on confronting issues, recognizing potential threats, and resolving problems facing practitioners’ practices at individual and professional levels. The course emphasizes current administrative topics in pharmacy management from a behavioral perspective. Various current and accepted models will be used to explain and predict behaviors of pharmacists, other health care practitioners, insurers, and consumers of drugs and pharmacy services. Lecture-discussion, three hours. 589. Research Methods in Pharmacy Administration. 3 crs. The course examines the issues and problems associated with research and seeks to develop research guidelines using the methods, design, and statistical analysis common to social and behavioral research. The preparation and defense of a thorough research proposal/project is a requirement for completion of the course. Lecturediscussion, three hours. 590. Pharmacoeconomic Evaluations. 3 crs. This course provides an overview of the role of economic evaluation in health care with a special emphasis on pharmacy-related issues. Specific areas covered include the need for economic evaluations, different types of economic analyses, sources of data, quality-of-life valuations, assessment of utility, and current approaches to pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research. Lecture, readings, participatory discussions, and student presentations, three hours. 591. Patient-Reported Health Outcomes. 3 crs. This course presents an overview of health outcomes research as reported in Patient-Reported Outcome (PROs) studies which evaluate the impact of disease, medical care and treatment from the patient’s perspective. The focus is on PROs which measure quality of life, self-reported health status, patient satisfaction, health state preferences, and adherence to therapy. Principles of measurement, reliability, validity, responsiveness, analysis and interpretation will be discussed using examples drawn from specific quality-of-life instruments and their applications. An appreciation of the measurement and evaluation of PROs and their importance in new drug applications and in drug labeling and advertising is stressed. Lecture, readings, participatory discussion, and presentations, three hours. 615. Advanced Pharmaceutics I. 3 crs. Topics of current interest in pharmaceutics are presented in depth. Currently, these include chemical and physical stability evaluation of pharmaceutical formulations and the theory and prediction of solubility. Lecture, three hours. 616. Advanced Pharmaceutics II. 3 crs. Topics of current interest in pharmaceutics are presented in depth. These include mass transport phenomena, with emphasis on diffusion in continual and multiphase system, physical and physiochemical test methods for drugs and drug delivery systems. Lecture, three hours.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences 623. Selected Topics in Medicinal Chemistry. 3 crs. Topics of current interest in the field of Medicinal Chemistry will be presented. The choice of subjects will vary from year to year, but may include such topics as CNS compounds, antitumor agents, cancer chemotherapy, carcinogenesis and carcinogenic compounds, mechanism of bio-organic reactions, drug design and modern theories of drug action. Lecture, three hours. 666. Special Projects in Toxicology. 3 crs. A special, minor research problem is assigned involving specialized equipment or a subject of current interest. A lecture or discussion period is provided each week during the course. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. 667. Forensic Toxicology. 3 crs. The drugs and chemicals of forensic interest are described in a “case presentation� format. Tissue distribution, metabolic fate and excretion of forensically important chemicals and the analytical methods for their determination are presented. The medico-legal implications of each group of toxicants are discussed. Lecture, three hours. Alternate years. 668. Special Problems in Pharmacology. 3 crs. A minor research problem is assigned, involving specialized equipment or a subject of current interest related to Pharmacology or Pharmacotherapy. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, eight hours. 672, 673. Advanced Pharmacology I and II. 6 crs. A course designed to present the student with a basic research-oriented understanding of the mechanism involved in the areas of autonomic cardiovascular, endocrine, and central nervous system pharmacology. This is accomplished by student-driven presentation and discussion of the topics assigned within each major area. Lecture, three hours each course. 689. Independent Study and Research. 1-3 crs. Independent Study and Research is structured to provide the student with an opportunity to pursue a meaningful academic experience beyond the required course work and specific thesis/ dissertation research of the graduate degree program. The course requires that the student demonstrate the capacity to analyze, judge, and discriminate in the solution of a scientific problem. 691, 692; 693, 694; 697, 698. Seminar. 1 cr. each. Oral presentation by graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers on topics of current research. Participation is required of all graduate students during each semester of matriculation.

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Directors and Officers* THE MEMBERSHIP OF THE DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY CORPORATION Very Rev. Jeffrey T. Duaime, C.S.Sp. .................................................................................. Chair Rev. Timothy J. Hickey, C.S.Sp. .................................................................................. Vice Chair Rev. John A. Sawicki, C.S.Sp. ....................................................................... Secretary/Treasurer Rev. Christopher H. McDermott, C.S.Sp. Rev. John P. Skaj, C.S.Sp. Rev. Freddy J. Washington, C.S.Sp.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Officers John J. Connelly ............................................................................................. Chair of the Board P. David Pappert ...................................................................................... Vice Chair of the Board Marie Milie Jones .................................................................................... Vice Chair of the Board Linda S. Drago ............................................................................................. University Secretary

TERM MEMBERS Gregory S. Babe John J. Connelly James N. Crutchfield Sr. Mary Dacey, S.S.J. Thomas R. Donahue Robert Z. Gussin Joseph C. Guyaux Rev. Francis X. Hanley, C.S.Sp. Marie Milie Jones Samuel P. Kamin Rev. Sean P. Kealy, C.S.Sp. William J. Lyons Glenn R. Mahone Edward G. O’Connor James F. O’Day P. David Pappert Patricia D. Yoder

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Most Rev. Paul Bradley Charles J. Dougherty, Ph.D. Very Rev. Jeffrey T. Duaime, C.S.Sp. Rev. Timothy J. Hickey, C.S.Sp. Shelley L. Kobuck Rev. John A. Sawicki, C.S.Sp.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences EMERITI MEMBERS Cynthia A. Baldwin Anthony L. Bucci John E. Connelly Joseph W. DeNardo John F. Donahue Floyd R. Ganassi Charles D. Horne Daniel R. Lackner Maurice V. Peconi John G. Rangos Arthur J. Rooney II William C. Springer John A. Staley IV Albert C. Van Dusen Sr. Linda Yankoski, CSFN

OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY Charles J. Dougherty, Ph.D. ....................................................................................... President Ralph L. Pearson, Ph.D. ............................... Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Stephen A. Schillo, M.S. ................................... Vice President for Management and Business Rev. Sean Hogan, C.S.Sp. ........................................ Executive Vice President for Student Life Linda S. Drago, J.D. ..................................................... General Counsel/University Secretary

*This information has been provided by the Office of the University Secretary.

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ADMINISTRATION J. DOUGLAS BRICKER, Ph.D., Dean Mylan School of Pharmacy and the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences DAVID A. JOHNSON, Ph.D., Director of Graduate Studies Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

THE FACULTY AND THEIR RESEARCH MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY ALEEM GANGJEE, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry; Mylan School of Pharmacy Distinguished Professor; Ph.D., Iowa. Synthetic medicinal chemistry, computer-assisted drug design, inhibitors of folate metabolizing enzymes, receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antimitotic agents, antitumor agents, antiopportunistic infection agents, heterocyclic chemistry and stereochemistry. PATRICK FLAHERTY, Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry; Ph.D., Iowa. Synthetic medicinal chemistry and rational drug design, emphasis on emerging biochemical targets relevant to human disease states, modern synthetic methodology, and iterative rounds of computation, synthesis, then biochemical analysis; general therapeutic areas of interest—CNS agents (CDK5 and alpha-synuclein) and anti-cancer agents. MARC W. HARROLD, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry; Ph.D., Ohio State. Development of computer-based educational tools, instructional strategies in medicinal chemistry, drug design. PHARMACEUTICS MOJI CHRISTIANAH ADEYEYE, Professor of Pharmaceutics; Ph.D., Georgia. Preformulation, development, stability and bioavailability evaluation of immediate and sustained release liquid, semi-solid, and solid dosage forms; excipient characterization; biopharmaceutical product technology; unit process optimization; anti-retroviral pediatric dosage forms.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences CARL A. ANDERSON, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Ph.D., Texas (Austin). Sensor technology for the study and control of pharmaceutical manufacturing, employing technologies such as acoustic and near-infrared spectroscopy processed by chemometric methods. LAWRENCE H. BLOCK, Professor of Pharmaceutics; Ph.D., Maryland. Theoretical aspects of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; controlled and modified release drug and cosmetic delivery system development; excipient characterization; pharmaceutic aspects of chitin, chitosan, and chitinosans; pharmaceutical engineering, especially scale-up of processing of non-parenteral liquids and semi-solids; and hydrophilic gels as drug delivery systems. JAMES K. DRENNEN III, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutics; Ph.D., Kentucky. Pharmaceutical and medical applications of near-infrared spectroscopy, process control, chemometrics, process analytical technology. PETER WILDFONG, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutics; Ph.D., Purdue. Pharmaceutical materials science, with current research projects exploring how specific physico-chemical and structural properties of pharmaceutically relevant materials impact large-scale manufacturing and final dosage form performance; emphasis on mechanically activated solid state phase transformations of APIs and excipients; investigating the potential of high-shear induction of polymorphism and amorphization.

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PHARMACOLOGY TOXICOLOGY J. DOUGLAS BRICKER, Associate Professor of Pharmacology-Toxicology; Ph.D., Duquesne. Effects of drugs, chemicals, and disease states on the regulation of calcium uptake mechanisms, development and screening of antidotal agents for clinical use, in vitro toxicity testing methods. VICKI L. DAVIS, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology; Ph.D., North Carolina. Effects of pharmaceutical, environmental, plant and natural estrogens exposure on the development of breast cancer and cataracts in women, with emphasis on using various techniques to determine potential methods of decreasing the risk factors. DAVID A. JOHNSON, Associate Professor of Pharmacology-Toxicology; Ph.D., Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences. Drugs which enhance the function of neuronal pathways involved with learning and memory, neuropathology and the treatment of eating disorders. WILSON S. MENG, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Pharmacology-Toxicology and Pharmaceutics); Ph.D., Southern California. Structure-based design of tumor reactive T-cell epitopes and development of particle-based DNA delivery systems. CHRISTOPHER K. SURRATT, Associate Professor of Pharmacology; Ph.D., Virginia. Structure-function studies on brain receptors that recognize psychostimulant and opiate drugs of abuse. PAULA A. WITT-ENDERBY, Associate Professor of Pharmacology-Toxicology; Ph.D., Arizona. Molecular pharmacology of melatonin receptors and its associated signaling cascades, with emphasis on the role of melatonin in stem cell differentiation.


Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences PHARMACEUTICAL ADMINISTRATION SHANE P. DESSELLE, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Administration; Ph.D., Louisiana-Monroe. Financial, economic, and human resources management of community pharmacies, prescription drug benefit design issues, direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising, Web-based pharmacy services, pharmacy education issues. VINCENT J. GIANNETTI, Professor of Pharmaceutical Administration; Ph.D., Pittsburgh. Prescription drug adherence, mental health, substance abuse, pharmacist counseling behaviors, health care policy and ethics, coping with medication errors. KHALID M. KAMAL, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Administration; Ph.D., West Virginia. Application of decision and cost-effectiveness analysis in health policy and medicine; heath outcomes assessment in chronic conditions as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. DAVID J. TIPTON, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Administration; Ph.D., St. Louis. Medication errors, services marketing, emotional intelligence.

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GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES 6 0 0 FORBES AVENUE PITTSBURGH, PA 15282


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2006-2007 w w w. d u q . e d u Pharmaceutical Sciences G R A D U A T E S C H O O L O F D u q u e s n e U n i v e r s i t y 6 0 0 F o r b e s...

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