Page 1


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By

Patricia Telesco

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BOOKS

NEW PAGE BOOKS

A division of The Career Press, Inc.

Franklin Lakes, NJ


Introduction................................................................... 11

Part 1: Goddess-Centered Thinking ................................ 15

Part 2: Goddess Gardens ................................................ 57

Amaterasu: Garden of the Sun ....................................... 62

Astarte: Celestial Garden ............................................... 66

Bast: Garden of Joyful Dancing ..................................... 69

Brigit: Threefold Goddess Garden .................................. 73

Cerridwen: Potion Garden ............................................. 77

Concordia: Garden of Peace .......................................... 81

Dana: Fairy Garden ....................................................... 84

Demeter: Gardener's Garden .......................................... 88

Ennoia: Thinking Place .................................................. 92

Flora: Garden of Edible Flowers .................................... 95

Fortuna: Garden of Serendipity ...................................... 99

Gaia: Earth Garden ..................................................... 102

Gauri: Garden of Compassion ..................................... 105

Hecate: Garden of Magick ........................................... 108

Hestia: Kitchen Garden ................................................ 111


Hina: Warrior Garden

114

Iris: Message Garden ...... ..

117

Isis: Dream Garden ..

120

Iwa-su-hime-no-Kami: Rock and Sand Gardens

124

Julunggul: Garden of Balance ...................................... 127

Juno: Marriage Garden ...... .

......................... 130

Kefa: Clock Garden ..................................................... 133

Kwan Yin: Family Garden ........................................... 137

Lakshmi: Money Garden ............................................. 140

Latiaran: Fire Garden ....

143

Marl: Moon Garden ...... ..

146

The Muses: Garden of Art, Laughter, and Mirth .......... 149

The Norns: Garden of Destiny Oto: Water Garden ...... ..

... 153

............ 156

Pali Kongju: Shamanic Garden .................................... 160

Psyche: Butterfly Garden .............................................. 164

Rati: Garden of Pleasures ............................................ 168

Rhiannon: Summerland Garden ................................... 171

Saga: Divination Garden .............................................. 174

Tara: Garden of Beauty ............................................... 177

Tatsuta-Hime: Garden of the Winds.

180

Venus: Garden of Love .......... .

183

Vila: Garden of Healing

186

White Buffalo Woman: Ritual Garden ......................... 189

Yemaja: Zodiac Garden ......................... ..................... 192

Zemyna: Garden of Fertility......................................... 196

Afterword ..................................................................... 199

Appendix: Theme Gardening ........................................ 201

Select Bibliography ........................................................ 213

Index ............................................................................ 217

About the Author .......................................................... 223


Hina: Warrior Garden

114

Iris: Message Garden .... .

117

Isis: Dream Garden .............. .

120

Iwa-su-hime-no-Kami: Rock and Sand Gardens ............ 124

127

Julunggul: Garden of Balance ...... .

.... 130

Juno: Marriage Garden Kefa: Clock Garden ...

............................... 133

Kwan Yin: Family Garden Lakshmi: Money Garden ........ .

137

....................... 140

Latiaran: Fire Garden ................... . Mari: Moon Garden

... 143

......... 146

The Muses: Garden of Art, Laughter, and Mirth .......... 149

The Noms: Garden of Destiny ..................................... 153

Oto: Water Garden ...................................................... 156

Pali Kongju: Shamanic Garden .................................... 160

Psyche: Butterfly Garden .............................................. 164

Rati: Garden of Pleasures ............................................ 168

Rhiannon: Summerland Garden ................................... 171

Saga: Divination Garden .............................................. 174

Tara: Garden of Beauty ............................................... 177

Tatsuta-Hime: Garden of the Winds ............................. 180

Venus: Garden of Love ................................................ 183

Vila: Garden of Healing

.. 186

White Buffalo Woman: Ritual Garden ........

189

Yemaja: Zodiac Garden ........ .

192

Zemyna: Garden of Fertility ........ .

........... 196

Afterword

.. .......................... 199

Appendix: Theme Gardening ........................................ 201

Select Bibliography ........................................................ 213

Index ............................................................................ 217

About the Author .......... .

.. .......... 223


If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. -Marcus Tullius Cicero

The wonder and adoration humans hold for natural things is nearly unquenchable. And who can really blame us? When we look at the earth with appreciative eyes, we're drawn in by its beauty, diversity, and many wonders. That's probably the reason why gardening is the most popular hobby in North America. People garden in order to enjoy the earth's loveli足 ness and variety on an intimate level-and hopefully to dig up the answers to a few ageless riddles in the process! Think of it this way: We live in right-brain, technological times filled with pollution, noise, metal, and an ever-increas足 ing sense of impersonalization. Everything is "by the num足 bers." However, the ancient art of gardening offers us a chance to change the way we cope with this reality and maybe even shake it up a bit! Whether you live in an apartment or a home, puttering with soil and seed, even just a little, is very healthy for one's mind and spirit. It provides a few moments of peace and a chance to ground ourselves in the Mother once more. Perhaps more importantly, gardening offers us an opportu足 nity to simply be, without anyone or anything else dictating that sense of being. An additional benefit of gardening is that it becomes a classroom. Here we learn directly from nature's textbook. Our ancestors felt strongly that working the land also worked the II


12

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soul. one hundred years ago people were still talking about how Naturc reflected God and was a means to better under­ standing that great mystery (of who or what God is). The more we lost sight of the human-nature-creator trinity, the more we abused our world and lost an appreciation for its lessons and the further we removed ourselves from important spiritual truths. A century later, we have begun to see how destructive that trend in humankind was becoming, for both the Earth and its inhabitants.

begin conscientiously re-establishing that awareness, our ties to this planet, and relationship with the ever-welcoming energy of the Goddess. Building on that foundation, Gardening with the God­ dess looks at the way we garden in a slightly different way: by bringing common metaphysical processes into our efforts, such as blessing the soil, energizing it with spell craft, following the moon's cycles, using crystals to enhance plant growth, and returning to natural methods of working the land. It is fairly safe to say that an organic gardener is also a good steward of the planet, and a spiritually minded organic gardener is a good co-creator with the Goddess! These ideas will be covered in detail in Part 1: Goddess-Centered Thinking. With the basic methods and ideology out of the way, the next logical step is creating some gardens. In Part 2: Goddess Gardens, I explore various theme gardens (both indoors and out). Here you'll discover a magickal garden dedicated to Hecate, the patroness of witches, a fairy garden dedicated to Dana, the mother of the Fey, and even a zen-styled rock and sand garden that honors the spirit of mental and spiritual liberation. And what exactly can you do with all these gardens? Quite a bit. They can become sacred spaces where you perform ritu­ als and spells, akin to a natural temple. Or, you can harvest magickally empowered flowers, fruits, herbs, and vegetables from here for use at home and in Circle. And, of course, you could simply sit here, meditate, and enjoy the view! Because there are literally thousands of goddesses depicted in the world's mythology, I can only cover a few here. This sampling should nonetheless inspire your imagination and help you find personal ways to honor the Goddess in your garden, no matter by what name you call Her! No matter the name, however, I hope that you find you enjoy gardening more by the end of this book, and appreciate the magick of those moments, both subtle and sublime.

So how do we go about bringing the Goddess and our gardening back together? A good part of this question is answered when we realize that the two were never really apart. Just because humans lose sight of a connection doesn't mean the Goddess does likewise! The Goddess is already firmly rooted our gardens. Many of the world's myths depict the Goddess at the Creatrix, and frequently Her names magnifY one or more of Nature's realms. For example, in Roman tradition Flora embodies all forms of blossoming and fertility. (We continue to use the wordjlora today to describe blossoming things.) In Canaanite tradition, Asherah's name means "upright" even as the trees that were thought to contain her energy. Greek tradi­ tion has Demeter (the "Earth Mother") as the goddess of Earth, groves, and all growing things. In fact, one would be hard-pressed to find any culture that didn't include the Goddess interacting with, protecting, facili­ tating, and monitoring nature on some level in the myths and lore of its people. The power of these myths should not be underestimated, as they still affect the way we think and com­ municate. After all, we still use the phrases "Mother Nature" and "Mother Earth" in conversation regularly. This indicates that thc connection between Earth and the Goddess remains very powerful-even if we don't always recognize that connec­ tion. Part of the goal of Gardening with the Goddess is to

(3


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soul. Even one hundred years ago people were still talking about how Nature reflected God and was a means to better under­ standing that great mystery (of who or what God is). The more we lost sight of the human-nature-creator trinity, the more we abused our world and lost an appreciation for its lessons and the further we removed ourselves from important spiritual truths. A century later, we have begun to see how destructive that trend in humankind was becoming, for both the Earth and its inhabitants. So how do we go about bringing the Goddess and our gardening back together? A good part of this question is answered when we realize that the two were never really apart. Just because humans lose sight of a connection doesn't mean the Goddess does likewise! The Goddess is already firmly rooted in our gardens. Many of the world's myths depict the Goddess at the Creatrix, and frequently Her names magnifY one or more of Nature's realms. For example, in Roman tradition Flora embodies all forms of blossoming and fertility. (VVe continue to use the word flora today to describe blossoming things.) In Canaanite tradition, Asherah's name means "upright" even as the trees that were thought to contain her energy. Greek tradi­ tion has Demeter (the "Earth Mother") as the goddess of Earth, groves, and all growing things. In fact, one would be hard-pressed to find any culture that didn't include the Goddess interacting with, protecting, facili­ tating, and monitoring nature on some level in the myths and lore of its people. The power of these myths should not be underestimated, as they still affect the way we think and com­ municate. After all, we still use the phrases "Mother Nature" and "Mother Earth" in conversation regularly. This indicates that the connection between Earth and the Goddess remains very powerful-even if we don't always recognize that connec­ tion. Part of the goal of Gardening with the Goddess is to

begin conscientiously re-establishing that awareness, our ties to this planet, and relationship with the ever-welcoming energy of the Goddess. Building on that foundation, Gardening with the God­ dess looks at the way we garden in a slightly different way: by bringing common metaphysical processes into our efforts, such as blessing the soil, energizing it with spellcraft, following the moon's cycles, using crystals to enhance plant growth, and returning to natural methods of working the land. It is fairly safe to say that an organic gardener is also a good steward of the planet, and a spiritually minded organic gardener is a good co-creator with the Goddess! These ideas will be covered in detail in Part 1: Goddess-Centered Thinking. With the basic methods and ideology out of the way, the next logical step is creating some gardens. In Part 2: Goddess Gardens, I explore various theme gardens (both indoors and out). Here you'll discover a magickal garden dedicated to Hecate, the patroness of witches, a fairy garden dedicated to Dana, the mother of the Fey, and even a zen-styled rock and sand garden that honors the spirit of mental and spiritual liberation. And what exactly can you do with all these gardens? Quite a bit. They can become sacred spaces where you perform ritu­ als and spells, akin to a natural temple. Or, you can harvest magickally empowered flowers, fruits, herbs, and vegetables from here for use at home and in Circle. And, of course, you could simply sit here, meditate, and enjoy the view! Because there are literally thousands of goddesses depicted in the world's mythology, I can only cover a few here. This sampling should nonetheless inspire your imagination and help you find personal ways to honor the Goddess in your garden, no matter by what name you call Her! No matter the name, however, I hope that you find you enjoy gardening more by the end of this book, and appreciate the magick of those moments, both subtle and sublime.

12


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With a little thoughtfulness and old-fashioned elbow grease, gardening and landscaping have the capacity to become a kind of spiritual therapy. Here, you consult with Nature, lay the worries of the day and other tensions neatly at the feet of the Mother, and then grow something beautiful in their place: a renewed sense of self, the planet, and Spirit.

cr-==' Qyl I: Goclcless-Ce""leyrecl ~k~""k..~""9

There's music in the sighing of a reed;

there's music in the gushing of a rill;

there's music in all things,

if men had ears.

-Lord Byron


14

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With a little thoughtfulness and old-fashioned elbow grease, gardening and landscaping have the capacity to become a kind of spiritual therapy. Here, you consult with Nature, lay the worries of the day and other tensions neatly at the feet of the Mother, and then grow something beautiful in their place: a renewed sense of self, the planet, and Spirit.

cr=' Q ...ll: Goc:lc:le$$-Ce~le-w-ec:l

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There's music in the sighing of a reed;

there's music in the gushing of a rill;

there's music in all things,

if men had ears.

-Lord Byron


As you've probably already gathered, I'm an avid gardener. In fact, my husband worries that some day he'll come home to find the entire lawn landscaped. (Truth be told, he just might!) How exactly did I get so enamored with playing in the dirt? Thinking back on my childhood I remember my neighbor having a huge garden from which she picked, cooked, and often canned fresh goods that were simply delicious. I also remember that whenever I wanted time to myself I'd go to Nature's supermarket and forage for berries in the nearby woods. There I would wander around skipping rocks and sing­ ing to the trees. Although these memories got lost for a while amid nor­ mal teenage angst and harried college activity, they returned after I gave birth to my first child. I wanted him to be able to savor the fresh taste of green beans and peas and to know the wonder of watching things that you've planted and tended with love grow. Sure, I made some mistakes in my first garden. Some of the things I started from seed way too late, others I overwatered, and others still were simply ill-suited to poorly drained city soil. Even so, we had wonderful tomatoes, onions, and a few car­ rots that year. To this day, I don't think anything has tasted quite so good as that first ripe cherry tomato. I was hooked. I also became involved with pleasure herba1ism-making oils, soaps, incense, brews, and the like. This hobby provided another list of things to try growing in my garden! Herbs also proved to have little idiosyncracies that I had to learn about by trial and error. For example, never grow mint unless you want a lot of it... and I do mean tons! It grows like crazy, often taking over the whole garden, and is very hard to weed out because of its root systems. Like my first attempt with veg­ etables, though, there was so much fun in the discovery pro­ cess that the mistakes seemed small by comparison.


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This book is the result of my adventures in gardening and landscaping, combined with my love of the Goddess and magickal living. It includes my failures and successes in the hopes that you can benefit from both. In this section in particu­ lar we'll look at some of the mundane considerations for gar­ dening, as well as some of the most common metaphysical compliments that help bring the Goddess more directly into your handiwork.

Goc:lc:less \\Jko? Who comprehends her? With whom can one consult concerning this great goddess? -Ludwig van Beethoven The idea of Goddess spirituality is fairly new to a lot of people, so I'd like to share a brief glimpse of what this approach to life is all about. Without a foundation in this epistemology, it's hard to understand and apply the rest of this book effec­ tively. In particular, this segue will be helpful to readers who have never considered the Goddess as a life partner (or never even thought about the feminine Divine at all). If we turn back the pages of time and look at early humankind, we find dozens of images of a female Creatrix. Because it is the women of our species who produce children, it makes sense that at least some of our ancestors perceived the original Sacred Parent as female. The names these goddesses bore varied from culture to culture and era to era, as did many of their attributes. Some goddesses governed the moon, others the land, others still human fertility and matters of the heart. In this manner, early people created an array of goddess mythos

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19

that could easily be applied to daily life and needs. It is in this mythos that Goddess spirituality finds its roots. Here, suddenly... and almost foreignly to our modern minds, God is a woman. She is full-breasted, pregnant, and ever-fertile. She is the First Source, providing life and nourish­ ment to all living things. She can be fiercely protective, impas­ sioned, or compassionate, depending on the situation. She is all, above all, below all, and within all. She is past, present, future, and eternal. She is as she is. That said, Goddess spirituality does not limit the image of the Divine to being only female. Just like the yin-yang im­ age, there is balance in all spiritual things. The reason for stress­ ing the female portion of the Divine has come about due to two millennia of male dominance in society and in many reli­ gions. This left women without strong sacred role models. It also left men without a guideline for integrating various traits that are traditionally considered "feminine" in alignment (such as sensitivity and nurturing). In effect, the Goddess movement helps swing the pendu­ lum in the other direction and offers us a chance to re-establish symmetry. It also provides a great intuitive balance to our very scientifically oriented world. Does this mean you can't honor the God in your garden? Of course not! It simply means that, in this book at least, we will be looking to various goddesses to guide, energize, and bless our proverbial green thumbs! There is absolutely no reason not to tweak the ideas presented here for masculine images of the Divine if you so choose-or better still, create matching god and goddess gardens! Here is a brieflist ofsome global goddesses and the plants they held sacred. This will be particularly useful in creating goddess-themed gardens for divine figures not covered in this book:


20

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Aphrodite Artemis Athena Bast Ceres BonDea Brigit Ceres Cybele Danu Demeter Diana Flora Freya Gaia Hecate Hera 10

Isis Iznagi Juno IKwan Yin ·.Lilith Min Persephone Rhea

Apple, beet, marjoram, myrtle, rose Daisy, willow Mulberry, oak Catnip Bay Myrtle Blackberry Poppy Ivy, pine Meadowsweet Bean, corn, poppy, rose, sunflower Apple, vervain, willow Hawthorn Daisy, primrose, strawberry Fruit (all) Dandelion, garlic, lavender, mint Apple, heather, iris Violet Heather, narcissus, rose Grape, peach Heather, Lily Tarragon Lettuce Parsley Oak, pine

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Cucumber Apple, cinnamon, marjoram, parsley, violet

For those of you who may not consider yourself terribly religious or deity-oriented, that need not limit your use of this book. You can, instead, think of Goddess spirituality as a phi­ losophy. This approach to life advocates the following: • Earth-responsible living (global awareness). • Intuitive, proactive approaches to problem-solving. • Progressive and creative spiritual pursuits. • An awareness of the sacredness and magick in all things. • A personal vision and self-awareness. • Thinking and living "out of the box." In this case, rather than using the specific names of the goddesses, simply consider each as a symbol of a vibration to which you're attuning the plants in your garden. Effectively, this attracts that specific energy into your greenery and, indeed, helps you cultivate that attribute or energy in your life!

1=' l"Qct:.~cQl QV\.c:l "VV\et:.Qf'kys~cQl C oV\.s~c:lel"QHoV\.s Gardening requires a lot of water-most of it the form of perspiration. -Lou Erickson The Goddess has always been a very practical woman. She understands all too well that not all of us have a lot of free


20

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Diana Flora Freya Gaia Hecate Hera 10 Isis Iznagi Juno \Kwan Yin "Lilith Min Persephone Rhea

Apple, beet, marjoram, myrtle, rose Daisy, willow Mulberry, oak Catnip Bay Myrtle Blackberry Poppy Ivy, pine Meadowsweet Bean, corn, poppy, rose, sunflower Apple, vervain, willow Hawthorn Daisy, primrose, strawberry Fruit (all) Dandelion, garlic, lavender, mint Apple, heather, iris Violet Heather, narcissus, rose Grape, peach Heather, lily Lily Tarragon Lettuce Parsley Oak, pine

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Cucumber Apple, cinnamon, marjoram, parsley, violet

For those of you who may not consider yourself terribly religious or deity-oriented, that need not limit your use of this book. You can, instead, think of Goddess spirituality as a phi­ losophy. This approach to life advocates the following: • Earth-responsible living (global awareness). • Intuitive, proactive approaches to problem-solving. pursuits. • Progressive and creative • An awareness of the sacredness and magick in

things.

• A personal vision and self-awareness. • Thinking and living "out of the box." In this case, rather than using the specific names of the goddesses, simply consider each as a symbol of a vibration to which you're attuning the plants in your garden. Effectively, this attracts that specific energy into your greenery and, indeed, helps you cultivate that attribute or energy in your life!

1='l"Qd:'LCQt Q"'d.. rvv\ et:.QPk.'YsLCQt C o",sLd..el"Qt:.i..o",s Gardening requires a lot of water-most of it in the form of perspiration. -Lou Erickson The Goddess has always been a very practical woman. She understands all too well that not all of us have a lot of free


22

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time, abundant open spaces, a good source of gardening know­ how and tools, or even good nurseries/ seed outlets from which to cultivate our spiritual gardens. She also knows that in order for any garden to be successful, we have to first consider all of these issues as they may affect our daily lives. I'm not going to fib and say that gardens don't take some time in order to achieve success. The smaller the effort, the less time involved. Be forewarned that even a small garden can be­ come quite addicting, and you may find yourself adding more, or spending more time working it, than you expected initially. To be honest, starting out small has numerous advantages. You can really get to know a few plant types, what they like, what they don't like, and how to handle their needs. You can also direct more energy into them because you're focusing on a confined space. Additionally, each type of greenery has magickal associations ascribed to it, so you can augment those associations through that focus if you choose. For those of you with little space, starting small is a ne­ cessity. (Because more and more of us live in urban environ­ ments with limited lawns, I include lots of hints for adjusting your gardening efforts to the space available.) Trust me when I say that there's a lot you can do with porch pots and window boxes, especially if you like tomatoes, flowers, and herbs. Both small and large gardens require a few good tools, many of which you may be able to make out of kitchen imple­ ments or buy inexpensively at secondhand and discount stores. There are also some niceties that you may find you want as you garden more. The basics are listed here. (More specific items are listed in Part II as they pertain to unique garden efforts.)

Go.t.t"",,,,-C,,"-t:e..,,.t ~ki......k..i......,!!

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this space is within the line of sight, all the better. Seeing the garden regularly reminds you to tend it and send good energy its wayan a regular basis. S=l.l

You can add some potting soil or topsoil, compost, or other fertilizers to yard dirt if it's leached of nutrients (see "Gaia's Built-in Helpers" later this chapter for ideas). Note: Always read up on the kind of soil your plants like. Some want rocky foundations for drainage, others like sand, others like loam. The better you prepare your soil to the plants chosen, the greater success you will have. Mt:!"-ct

c-r ==ts

A trowel, spade, or a sturdy spoon works for digging up small efforts. A good shovel will be necessary for yard work, and a sturdy garden rake is very helpful for landscaping and larger outdoor efforts. (Though not tools per se, garden gloves and knee pads save a lot of wear and tear on your hands and clothes, respectively.) ~ .."-d"-9

If you need to keep pets or children out of a garden (or if your yard is accessible to wandering animals), fencing is well worth considering. Fencing is sometimes necessary for certain types of climbing greenery, such as ivy and honeysuckle.

S ....cts. S ....cttl."-9s. ='1" Ptt:!"-ls Spt:!c:..

Whether it's a patch of yard or several window boxes and planters, you need room within which your plants can grow. If

Take your time and shop around for good sources. You want good quality young plants to achieve the best quality gar­ dens. (Although an accomplished gardener can often nurse


23

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time, abundant open spaces, a good source of gardening know­ how and tools, or even good nurseries/seed outlets from which to cultivate our spiritual gardens. She also knows that in order for any garden to be successful, we have to first consider all of these issues as they may affect our daily lives. I'm not going to fib and say that gardens don't take some time in order to achieve success. The smaller the effort, the less time involved. Be forewarned that even a small garden can be­ come quite addicting, and you may find yourself adding more, or spending more time working it, than you expected initially.

this space is within the line of sight, all the better. Seeing the garden regularly reminds you to tend it and send good energy its way on a regular basis.

22

To be honest, starting out small has numerous advantages. You can really get to know a few plant types, what they like, what they don't like, and how to handle their needs. You can also direct more energy into them because you're focusing on a confined space. Additionally, each type of greenery has magickal associations ascribed to it, so you can augment those associations through that focus if you choose. For those of you with little space, starting small is a ne­ cessity. (Because more and more of us live in urban environ­ ments with limited lawns, I include lots of hints for adjusting your gardening efforts to the space available.) Trust me when I say that there's a lot you can do with porch pots and window boxes, especially if you like tomatoes, flowers, and herbs. Both small and large gardens require a few good tools, many of which you may be able to make out of kitchen imple­ ments or buy inexpensively at secondhand and discount stores. There are also some niceties that you may find you want as you garden more. The basics are listed here. (More specific items are listed in Part II as they pertain to unique garden efforts.) SpQ<;e

Whether it's a patch of yard or several window boxes and planters, you need room within which your plants can grow. If

S=,-l

You can add some potting soil or topsoil, compost, or other fertilizers to yard dirt if it's leached of nutrients (see "Gaia's Built-in Helpers" later this chapter for ideas). Note: Always read up on the kind of soil your plants like. Some want rocky foundations for drainage, others like sand, others like loam. The better you prepare your soil to the plants chosen, the greater success you will have. ..J-lQ~cl ~f eels

A trowel, spade, or a sturdy spoon works for digging up small efforts. A good shovel will be necessary for yard work, and a sturdy garden rake is very helpful for landscaping and larger outdoor efforts. (Though not tools per se, garden gloves and knee pads save a lot of wear and tear on your hands and clothes, respectively.) ~e~CL~"

If you need to keep pets or children out of a garden (or if your yard is accessible to wandering animals), fencing is well worth considering. Fencing is sometimes necessary for certain types of climbing greenery, such as ivy and honeysuckle. Seecls. SeecllL~"s. c>y "Pla~t:.s

Take your time and shop around for good sources. You want good quality young plants to achieve the best quality gar­ dens. (Although an accomplished gardener can often nurse


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sickly plants back to health, it takes a lot of extra time and effort.) I suggest garden outlets (and nurserymen) in your area, where you can go and feel out the plants (not to mention sur­ vey their physical condition and the condition of the outlet), as a good source. Look for stores where the plants are set up in an orderly fashion, where the salespeople are knowledgeable, and where the plants look well-tended. A lot of wilted, browning, or pale plants are not signs of a good nursery. Avoid Internet purchases unless you know the source (or can confirm its quality). Remember that you won't see these plants in person until after they're paid for. That caution aside, I have had reasonable success getting plants at online auction houses from established buyers.

ers, or accent pieces. Wash these off and allow your intuition to guide you in their placement. If you think for a moment of large stone circles, such as Stonehenge and Callanish, this type of rock placement is quite traditional at sacred sites, which is what your garden is becoming. You're just doing it on a smaller scale.

2...:::j

1:)",cc>l"c::It:.Lv", ~ c>uck..,,,

I'm one of those people who has to tweak everything, including Nature. Mind you, decorative touches can be very utilitarian, such as a rabbit that disguises a watering device, a fountain to attract birds or butterflies, or a trellis for climbing flowers and vegetables. On the other hand, these touches can be purely whimsical, such as statuary and special edging that make the whole garden "pop." How much or little embellishing you do is completely up to you, but make sure these additions match the goddess theme you're trying to create. For example, when doing an Athenic garden, it makes sense to look into a statue of Athena as a centerpiece or accent point. Similarly, in a garden for Pax, the goddess of peace, it would be nice to have white stones and large pieces of amethyst to accent that harmonious energy. Another nice touch that honors your land is to keep any sizable stones you dig up and use them as borders, plant mark­

-r:2."'"C>Ul"C'" g",fC>l"""'-c::It:.Lc>'"

I strongly recommend getting at least two good garden encyclopedias or magazine subscriptions that cover the types of plants with which you want to work. Alternatively, take a little time surfing the net for garden-oriented sites. Don't be surprised to discover literally thousands of sites dedicated to gardening. Compare and contrast the ideas they offer. It may take a little diligence to weed through them, but I promise you'll pull up at least a handful that you'll want to return to again and again. Bookmark them! There are some wonderful "real life" resources out there, too, such as home and garden shows, garden clubs, arborariums, greenhouses, and so forth. Some of these resources offer free information for those baffling garden questions; others have some available at very low costs (in some cases, the entry fee to the home show). No matter your tact, having good resources will make your gardening efforts much more pleasant from the get-go because you can benefit from other people's mistakes and triumphs.

Gc:I~c:I's ~",a~-~Y\. ~elpel"s A prudent man does not make the goat his gardener. -Hungarian Proverb


2~

Gal"c:le",i.."'9 ""i..lk lke Gec:lc:less

sickly plants back to health, it takes a lot of extra time and effort.) I suggest garden outlets (and nurserymen) in your area, where you can go and feel out the plants (not to mention sur­ vey their physical condition and the condition of the outlet), as a good source. Look for stores where the plants are set up in an orderly fashion, where the salespeople are knowledgeable, and where the plants look well-tended. A lot of wilted, browning, or pale plants are not signs of a good nursery. Avoid Internet purchases unless you know the source (or can confirm its quality). Remember that you won't see these plants in person until after they're paid for. That caution aside, I have had reasonable success getting plants at online auction houses from established buyers. "Decel"ali..ve ~ e'-4ckes

I'm one of those people who has to tweak everything, including Nature. Mind you, decorative touches can be very utilitarian, such as a rabbit that disguises a watering device, a fountain to attract birds or butterflies, or a trellis for climbing flowers and vegetables. On the other hand, these touches can be purely whimsical, such as statuary and special edging that make the whole garden "pop." How much or little embellishing you do is completely up to you, but make sure these additions match the goddess theme you're trying to create. For example, when doing an Athenic garden, it makes sense to look into a statue of Athena as a centerpiece or accent point. Similarly, in a garden for Pax, the goddess of peace, it would be nice to have white stones and large pieces of amethyst to accent that harmonious energy. Another nice touch that honors your land is to keep any sizable stones you dig up and use them as borders, plant mark-

Go.t.te",,,-Ce~t;"'l'"e.t '""Jk;.....k..;.......,

25

ers, or accent pieces. Wash these off and allow your intuition to guide you in their placement. If you think for a moment of large stone circles, such as Stonehenge and Callanish, this type of rock placement is quite traditional at sacred sites, which is what your garden is becoming. You're just doing it on a smaller scale. --r::<..ese'-4l"ce C)",fel""",-ali..e",

I strongly recommend getting at least two good garden encyclopedias or magazine subscriptions that cover the types of plants with which you want to work. Alternatively, take a little time surfing the net for garden-oriented sites. Don't be surprised to discover literally thousands of sites dedicated to gardening. Compare and contrast the ideas they offer. It may take a little diligence to weed through them, but I promise you'll pull up at least a handful that you'll want to return to again and again. Bookmark them! There are some wonderful "real life" resources out there, too, such as horne and garden shows, garden dubs, arborariums, greenhouses, and so forth. Some of these resources offer free information for those baffling garden questions; others have some available at very low costs (in some cases, the entry fee to the horne show). No matter your tact, having good resources will make your gardening efforts much more pleasant from the get-go because you can benefit from other people's mistakes and triumphs.

GQi.Q \s ~~i.ll-i."," J-lelFeY';; A prudent man does not make the goat his gardener. -Hungarian Proverb


26

G"'.l.l.."'..-c.......t........l

Gc..·d.e"'~"'9 ""a.k lke Gcd.d.ess

If you talk to people living a metaphysical lifestyle, most will advocate natural foods and flowers rather than those that are treated. Chemicals don't necessarily mix well with magick. For one, we cannot be completely certain what type of ener­ gies these things bear when we blend them into our mixes. For another, anything that's consumed, buried, burned, or scattered to the winds will carry those chemicals back to the planet, which isn't really an Earth-friendly approach! Unfortunately, the soil in a lot of people's yards isn't al­ ways the best, and insects are certainly part of nature, even if we might wish otherwise. Rather than simply reach for an over­ the-counter preparation that may not be good for the planet or for spiritual pursuits, however, I feel it's important to consider alternatives. Many of these alternatives come to us from our ancestors who didn't have the advantage of man-made pest deterrents. CC",-pc:!",~c", Plc:!",l~"'9

Thankfully our ancestors left us a wealth of knowledge about Nature's little helpers: plants that help other plants grow, plants that deter specific types of bugs, and even plants that make for tastier vegetables! This approach is known as com­ panion planting. Let's first look at plants that enhance flavor. According to tradition one should plant basil with tomatoes, dill with cab­ bage, mustard with beans, and dandelion with apples. On the other hand, it's not recommended that sage and onion be grown in the same garden, nor cabbage and grapes. Similarly don't put blackberries, lilac, azalea, or rhododendrons anywhere near black walnut trees, anise near carrots, chives near peas, dill near tomatoes, garlic near beans, marigolds near beans, or mustard near turnips. Although this information hasn't been "proven," old-time gardeners swear by it!

c-n...i......k..i......'3

27

Next, consider the plants that are said to help other plants grow more fully and abundantly. Use this list in considering the way you plan the layout of your garden. Pair: Bean with mustard or rosemary. Carrot with chives or sage. Coriander with anise. Cucumber with chamomile. Lettuce with chrysanthemum. Marigold with tomato or rose. Onion with dill. Pepper with basil. Potato with horseradish or thyme. Rose with garlic or onion. Strawberry with onion or sage. Tomato with mint. Vegetables (general) with tarragon.

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

If you decide to try companion planting, you can approach it several ways. The first is to simply plant one tomato plant followed by a mint plant in a row, and then repeat. The second approach is to have one whole row of tomatoes with a row of mint adjacent. (With this particular combination, I'd recom­ mend the second approach because of mint's propensity to send out abundant root systems and take over space.) The third ap­ proach is to plant decoratively, such as two or three tomato plants surrounded in a circle of mint, which is quite pleasing to the eye and still serves the enrichment function. This last op­ tion is particularly nice for goddess gardens where one is try­ ing to build multisensual energy that reaches out to the mind and spirit at the same time.


26

G"'ctct..,.,.-C......t;..l"..ct

G",..d.e"''"'''9 ""a.k lke G=d.d.ess

If you talk to people living a metaphysical lifestyle, most will advocate natural foods and flowers rather than those that are treated. Chemicals don't necessarily mix well with magick. For one, we cannot be completely certain what type of ener­ gies these things bear when we blend them into our mixes. For another, anything that's consumed, buried, burned, or scattered to the winds will carry those chemicals back to the planet, which isn't really an Earth-friendly approach! Unfortunately, the soil in a lot of people's yards isn't al­ ways the best, and insects are certainly part of nature, even if we might wish otherwise. Rather than simply reach for an over­ the-counter preparation that may not be good for the planet or for spiritual pursuits, however, I feel it's important to consider alternatives. Many of these alternatives come to us from our ancestors who didn't have the advantage of man-made pest deterrents. C=""-P"'''''"=''' "Pl",,,,li."'9

Thankfully our ancestors left us a wealth of knowledge about Nature's little helpers: plants that help other plants grow, plants that deter specific types of bugs, and even plants that make for tastier vegetables! This approach is known as com­ panion planting. Let's first look at plants that enhance flavor. According to tradition one should plant basil with tomatoes, dill with cab­ bage, mustard with beans, and dandelion with apples. On the other hand, it's not recommended that sage and onion be grown in the same garden, nor cabbage and grapes. Similarly don't put blackberries, lilac, azalea, or rhododendrons anywhere near black walnut trees, anise near carrots, chives near peas, dill near tomatoes, garlic near beans, marigolds near beans, or mustard near turnips. Although this information hasn't been "proven," old-time gardeners swear by it!

~fk,.....k.''''-9

27

Next, consider the plants that are said to help other plants grow more fully and abundantly. Use this list in considering the way you plan the layout of your garden. Pair: Bean with mustard or rosemary. Carrot with chives or sage. Coriander with anise. Cucumber with chamomile. Lettuce with chrysanthemum. Marigold with tomato or rose. Onion with dill. Pepper with basil. Potato with horseradish or thyme. Rose with garlic or onion. Strawberry with onion or sage. Tomato with mint. Vegetables (general) with tarragon.

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

If you decide to try companion planting, you can approach it several ways. The first is to simply plant one tomato plant followed by a mint plant in a row, and then repeat. The second approach is to have one whole row of tomatoes with a row of mint adjacent. (With this particular combination, I'd recom­ mend the second approach because of mint's propensity to send out abundant root systems and take over space.) The third ap­ proach is to plant decoratively, such as two or three tomato plants surrounded in a circle of mint, which is quite pleasing to the eye and still serves the enrichment function. This last op­ tion is particularly nice for goddess gardens where one is try­ ing to build multisensual energy that reaches out to the mind and spirit at the same time.


e

28

Gc::.l"d.e"-~"-9 """a.k lke G=d.d.e:$$

'6"'9 ~epelte"-l:$ Similar to the way they pair plants so that they grow bet­ ter, old-time gardeners also used various bits of greenery to deter bugs. Here's a list of some of the plants used to keep specific insects away from the garden: Ant Aphids Asparagus beetle Beetle Cabbage butterfly Carrot fly Flea beetle Japanese beetle Nematode Potato beetle Peach aphid Slug Squash bug Whitefly

Mint, tansy Garlic Basil, tomato Parsley Southernwood Leek,rosemar~

sage Sage, tobacco, thyme Chive, garlic Marigold Tansy, catnip, nasturtium, marigold Catnip Wormwood Tansy Nasturtium

Note that some items even deter mice, rabbits, or moles, such as wormwood, garlic or marigold, and narcissus respec­ tively. If you're looking at this list and thinking it's impossible to plant everything necessary to keep your garden insect-free, there's an alternative. Get some fresh leaves and flowers from tomatoes, sage, wormwood, marigolds, and other pest repel­ lents and boil them in water. The stronger this mixture is, the better. (Just cover the plants with water and simmer until

' '''nl''''""* iiIl1~1'1~~"iOl"i,';I'!!m'!9H!fJ<20i£:H!£0.JJh."fL"&!b"<b

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oddess-Ce",l;e...",d

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29

it makes a strong tea.) Sprinkle this on your garden after every rain. The aromatics may not be as strong as having fresh­ growing items, but it saves space and provides some ongoing protection.

\i\c::.l"'l"c::.t ~ el"la~1el":$ One of the best natural fertilizers can be made by filling a household bucket with nettles, dandelions, valerian, yarrow, chamomile, and oak bark. Cover this with water and leave it in the sun for three weeks. Water your plants with this once a week. The residuals from this fertilizing tea can be easily turned into compost. Speaking of compost, this is an excellent way to recycle and enrich your soil at the same time. Coffee grounds, hair, vegetable ends and pieces, grass clippings, peanut shells, saw­ dust, egg shells, and fish are all compostable. Do, however, check local regulations about what type of container you need for compost so that you don't get fined or attract rodents. Finally, another way to improve the yield in your garden is to attract "good" bugs (those that pollinate your plants). Queen Anne's lace, flowering carrot, and fennel encourage these visitors. For those of you who don't have time to make your own fertilizers and repellents, many garden and nursery outlets now offer the organic alternatives. They tend to cost a little more, but they are certainly more reflective of everything we're try­ ing to honor and achieve in our goddess gardens. Two other alternatives exist too: mulch and weed block. Mulch comes in a variety of types, including cedar, pine, wormwood, and hardwood. Mulch gives a garden a nice, fin­ ished look. Some kinds of mulch deter insects (other than wood and all deter weed growth. Better still, mulch doesn't hurt


28

G"'l"cle~~~., "",~t:k t:ke Goclcless

~'-4" T-<.ef'eUe~t:s

Similar to the way they pair plants so that they grow bet­ ter, old-time gardeners also used various bits of greenery to deter bugs. Here's a list of some of the plants used to keep specific insects away from the garden: ~t ~int, tansy

Aphids Garlic

Asparagus beetle Basil, tomato

Beetle Parsley

Cabbage butterfly Southernwood

Carrot fly

Leek, rosemar~ sage Flea beetle Sage, tobacco, thyme Japanese beetle Chive, garlic Nematode ~arigold Potato beetle Tansy, catnip,

marigold

Peach aphid Catnip

Slug Wormwood

Squash bug Tansy

Whitefly Nasturtium Note that some items even deter mice, rabbits, or moles, such as wormwood, garlic or marigold, and narcissus respec­ tively. If you're looking at this list and thinking it's impossible to plant everything necessary to keep your garden insect-free, there's an alternative. Get some fresh leaves and flowers from tomatoes, sage, wormwood, marigolds, and other pest repel­ lents and boil them in water. The stronger this mixture is, the better. (Just cover the plants with water and simmer until

God.d.ess-Ce.....te..ed. c-fk~~k..t."'-'i1

29

it makes a strong tea.) Sprinkle this on your garden after every rain. The aromatics may not be as strong as having fresh­ growing items, but it saves space and provides some ongoing protection. 'V\",t:'-4l"d

F'" el"t:a~1el":S

One of the best natural fertilizers can be made by filling a household bucket with nettles, dandelions, valerian, yarrow, chamomile, and oak bark. Cover this with water and leave it in the sun for three weeks. Water your plants with this once a week. The residuals from this fertilizing tea can be easily turned into compost. Speaking of compost, this is an excellent way to recycle and enrich your soil at the same time. Coffee grounds, hair, vegetable ends and pieces, grass clippings, peanut shells, saw­ dust, egg shells, and fish are all compostable. Do, however, check local regulations about what type of container you need for compost so that you don't get fined or attract rodents. Finally, another way to improve the yield in your garden is to attract "good" bugs (those that pollinate your plants). Queen ~ne's lace, flowering carrot, and fennel encourage these visitors. For those of you who don't have time to make your own fertilizers and repellents, many garden and nursery outlets now offer the organic alternatives. They tend to cost a little more, they are certainly more reflective of everything we're try­ ing to honor and achieve in our goddess gardens. Two other alternatives exist too: mulch and weed block. ~ulch comes in a variety of types, including cedar, pine, wormwood, and hardwood. ~ulch gives a garden a nice, fin­ ished look. Some kinds of mulch deter insects (other than wood ants), and all deter weed growth. Better still, mulch doesn't hurt


30

Gc:n·c:le","~","'3 ""a.t.... It....e G=c:lc:le""

G"'clcl..",,,,-C....... l ..,,.. cl ""I1--.".....k..".....9

the soil in the least. You can simply turn it into the earth at the end of the season.

For example, consider the differences in light entering your home first thing in the morning during Spring and Summer versus Fall and Winter. How does that brightness change the way you feel? Extending that idea, how does the sun's bright­ ness change the way everything outside looks and feels? Doesn't everything seem more alive and vibrant when the sun is shin­ ing? Don't you often feel similarly revitalized when a lovely ray of sunlight greets the breakfast table? This very simple observation is an excellent example of how to begin reconnect­ ing with nature in very substantive ways. In particular the magickal gardener wants to be sensitive to weather changes and how these shifts affect plants and the energy they bear. For example, garlic is traditionally consid­ ered a Fire herb because of its pungent aroma and strong fla­ vor. But what about garlic that's been grown in a particularly rainy season? Might that garlic not be a little less Fire-oriented, and even perhaps blend the energies of Water and Fire together? Similarly, if you harvest garlic during a wind storm, could that timing bring the Element of Air into play? Sure it could. It's this kind of creative, intuitive insight that goddess gardening advocates. The goddess-centered gardener also wants to be able to recognize Earth's signals so that he or she can weed, plant, water, fertilize, and sow more effectively. You can use the grow­ ing guide that follows here as a "starter," but remember that gardening isn't a perfect art. We can't simply write up a stan­ dardized how-to that will suit every location, soil type, shifts in animal and insect habitats, and variations in the climate. By attuning yourself to your area and nature's harbingers from that area, you will become a proverbial "green thumb" (often befuddling neighbors and friends by growing things when everyone else is experiencing failure).

Weed block is a type of cloth that blocks sunlight but allows water through. Thus the soil continues to receive mois­ ture but any weeds beneath will not grow from the lack of sun. Typically something is placed on top of the weed block once it's laid around your plants, such as mulch or landscaping stone. I do not recommend using stone over weed block unless the plants are a fairly permanent choice, because moving the stone to replace plants is difficult and laborious. Additionally, white stone (which is the least expensive and most common) shows stains easily and looks dingy after a while. If you decide on stone, go with something that's got a variety of colors or begins with a brown tone for longer-lasting visual appeal.

GQl"d.e"'~"'9 Q"'d. l:.ke SeQso",s The seed waits for its garden or ground where it will be sown. -Zulu Proverb Few of us live close to the land any more. We get busy and before we know it entire years have passed by with little notice of the changing seasons and the Earth's cycles. To be a successful magickal gardener, however, you have to determine here and now to forestall this trend. Quite simply stated, it's nearly impossible to work with Earth's elements and energies when you're not paying attention to the Earth! This doesn't mean buying a house in the country and returning to an agrarian lifestyle. In fact, re-attuning yourself to natural cycles requires very few changes other than the way you look at the world (and how you interpret what you see).

31


30

Gcn·c:le",~",'3 ",,~H~ t:.ke Gc:oc:lc:les$

the soil in the least. You can simply turn it into the earth at the end of the season. Weed block is a type of cloth that blocks sunlight but . allows water through. Thus the soil continues to receive mois­ ture but any weeds beneath will not grow from the lack of sun. Typically something is placed on top of the weed block once it's laid around your plants, such as mulch or landscaping stone. I do not recommend using stone over weed block unless the plants are a fairly permanent choice, because moving the stone to replace plants is difficult and laborious. Additionally, white stone (which is the least expensive and most common) shows stains easily and looks dingy after a while. If you decide on stone, go with something that's got a variety of colors or begins with a brown tone for longer-lasting visual appeal. GQl"c:le",-i.."'-'9 Q",-c:l t:.k.e SeQse",-s

The seed waits for its garden or ground where it will be sown. -Zulu Proverb Few of us live close to the land any more. We get busy and before we know it entire years have passed by with little notice of the changing seasons and the Earth's cycles. To be a successful magickal gardener, however, you have to determine here and now to forestall this trend. Quite simply stated, it's nearly impossible to work with Earth's elements and energies when you're not paying attention to the Earth! This doesn't mean buying a house in the country and returning to an agrarian lifestyle. In fact, re-attuning yourself to natural cycles requires very few changes other than the way you look at the world (and how you interpret what you see).

Goc:lc:l.."s-C.......k",..c:l ""lkt.....ki......'9

31

For example, consider the differences in light entering your home first thing in the morning during Spring and Summer versus Fall and Winter. How does that brightness change the way you feel? Extending that idea, how does the sun's bright­ ness change the way everything outside looks and feels? Doesn't everything seem more alive and vibrant when the sun is shin­ ing? Don't you often feel similarly revitalized when a lovely ray of sunlight greets the breakfast table? This very simple observation is an excellent example of how to begin reconnect­ ing with nature in very substantive ways. In particular the magickal gardener wants to be sensitive to weather changes and how these shifts affect plants and the energy they bear. For example, garlic is traditionally consid­ ered a Fire herb because of its pungent aroma and strong fla­ vor. But what about garlic that's been grown in a particularly rainy season? Might that garlic not be a little less Fire-oriented, and even perhaps blend the energies of Water and Fire together? Similarly, if you harvest garlic during a wind storm, could that timing bring the Element of Air into play? Sure it could. It's this kind of creative, intuitive insight that goddess gardening advocates. The goddess-centered gardener also wants to be able to recognize Earth's signals so that he or she can weed, plant, water, fertilize, and sow more effectively. You can use the grow­ ing guide that follows here as a "starter," but remember that gardening isn't a perfect art. We can't simply write up a stan­ dardized how-to that will suit every location, soil type, shifts in animal and insect habitats, and variations in the climate. By attuning yourself to your area and nature's harbingers from that area, you will become a proverbial "green thumb" (often befuddling neighbors and friends by growing things when everyone else is experiencing failure).


32

Obbl"evl....t:.e.,( Gl"OVVl.",-'3 G

• • •

. •

"

.'

• • • • •

• •

• •

G.,.ld.ess-C"'''''t....e.l ""'Jk.."""-.. "-9

Gc;n-.,(e",-l.",-'3 vvak t:.ke Go.,(.,(ess

..."l..,(e

Alfalfa prefers damp, rich soil with sun/shade mix. Aloe grows in well-drained soil with a mingling of light and shade. Anise grows best in hilly areas with good drainage and sunlight. Asparagus prefers loamy soil laden with clay in partial sunlight. Basil requires rich soil and plenty of sun.

Transplant it only after the risk of frost passes.

Bay requires well-drained soil and partial sun. Sow

from cuttings.

Bayberry thrives with rhododendrons nearby,

especially in sandy soil.

Beans, though fairly hearty, cannot be planted

when there's a risk of below-the-soil-line frost.

Cabbage requires fertile soil, plenty of sun, and

regular watering to keep the roots damp.

Carnation likes sandy soil and partial sun.

Carrot prefers well-aerated soil with sun/shade

mixture. Celery thrives best in damp or wet soil.

Chamomile prefers dry or sandy soil with plentiful

sun.

Chive prefers rich soil with good drainage in full

sun.

Chrysanthemum grows well in open spaces,

especially when watered bi-weekly.

Daisy enjoys moist soil and requires a bed of straw

for winter.

Di111ikes moist, good soil with plentiful sun.

33

requires average soil with good drainage.

• Fennel Full sunlight is recommended.

• • l

• • • • • •

• • • •

Ginger requires good soil with good drainage and some shade. Horseradish needs good, moist soil with plentiful sun.

Jasmine needs a warm environment and loam-rich

soil.

Lavender likes well-aerated and drained soil with

plentiful sunlight and a bit of lime.

Lilac needs soil high in acid and plentiful space .

Magnolia fares best in warm climates where the soil is rich but the sunlight is not direct. Marigold tolerates a lot of conditions, as long as it's planted after the threat of frost. Marjoram needs well-drained, but damp, soil that isn't overly packed in partial sunlight. Mint likes rich, well-drained soil with partial shade. Nasturtium requires just average soil, but it needs to be well-drained and in full sunlight for best yield. Nettle thrives in a temperate climate and requires

little fuss.

Onion fares best north of the equator and can

tolerate a variety of soil/sun conditions. Oregano needs average soil with good drainage and plentiful sun. Pansy likes sandy soil out of the reach of direct sunlight.

Parsley needs good soil, good drainage, and partial

sunlight.


.32

Clbbl"ev~c<led.. Gl"O""'~""9 Gvid..e

• • • •

Alfalfa prefers damp, rich soil with sun!shade mix.

Aloe grows in well-drained soil with a mingling of

light and shade.

Anise grows best in hilly areas with good drainage

and sunlight. Asparagus prefers loamy soil laden with clay in partial sunlight. ¥' Basil requires rich soil and plenty of sun. Transplant it only after the risk of frost passes. Bay requires well-drained soil and partial sun. Sow from cuttings.

Bayberry thrives with rhododendrons nearby,

especially in sandy Beans, though fairly hearty, cannot be planted when there's a risk of below-the-soil-line frost. Cabbage requires fertile soil, plenty of sun, and

regular watering to keep the roots damp.

Carnation likes sandy soil and partial sun.

Carrot prefers well-aerated soil with sun!shade

mixture.

Celery thrives best in damp or wet soil.

Chamomile prefers dry or sandy soil with plentiful

sun.

Chive prefers soil with good drainage in

sun.

Chrysanthemum grows well in open spaces,

especially when watered bi-weekly. Daisy enjoys moist soil and requires a bed of straw for winter. Di11likes moist, good soil with plentiful sun.

• • • • • • • • • • •

G",.ld."ss-C"""t"y".l <="""-Tk~",,"k.~_'!1

GC<l"d..e""~""9 "",ak lke God..d..ess

• • • /f

• • • • • • •

• •

• •

.3.3

Fennel requires average soil with good drainage. Full sunlight is recommended. Ginger requires good soil with good drainage and some shade.

Horseradish needs good, moist soil with plentiful

sun.

Jasmine needs a warm environment and loam-rich

soil.

Lavender likes well-aerated and drained soil with

plentiful sunlight and a bit of lime. Lilac needs soil high in acid and plentiful space.

Magnolia fares best in warm climates where the

soil is rich but the sunlight is not direct.

Marigold tolerates a lot of conditions, as long as

it's planted after the threat of frost.

Marjoram needs well-drained, but damp, soil that

isn't overly packed in partial sunlight.

Mint likes rich, well-drained soil with partial

shade. Nasturtium requires just average soil, but it needs to be well-drained and in full sunlight for best yield. Nettle thrives in a temperate climate and requires little fuss. Onion fares best north of the equator and can tolerate a variety of soil!sun conditions. Oregano needs average soil with good drainage and plentiful sun. Pansy likes sandy soil out of the reach of direct sunlight. Parsley needs good soil, good drainage, and partial sunlight.


34

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Gcn.c:.leV'-i.V'-9 vva.k lke Gec:.lc:.less

Pumpkin prefers hot weather but can grow well in a variety of soil and sunlight levels. Radish likes warm weather. Radish is a good

window-box vegetable.

Raspberry prefers light, well-drained soil with humus mixed in. Rose thrives in partial clay soils, especially if

pruned in Spring.

Rosemary needs well-aerated, dry soil with good drainage and partial sunlight. Sage requires good soil that's well-drained in full sunlight. Savory likes lightweight, well-drained soil in full sunlight. Strawberry prefers cool climates and damp soil but fares in a variety of regions nonetheless. Tarragon likes sandy, drained soil in partial

sunlight.

Thyme prefers lightweight, drained, and chalky soil in partial sunlight. Tomato enjoys evenly watered soil with potash. Tomato is a very durable plant. Violet prefers rich soil with humus in partial sun. Watermelon likes warm weather and well­

fertilized soil that's watered regularly.

Willow thrives in cool climates in damp soil.

Besides learning about what specific plants like, there are other bits of ancient wisdom that we can use in timing our gardening efforts. For example, try harvesting your plants at dawn to encourage hope or a fresh beginning. Harvest at noon to empower Fire herbs and flowers, at dusk for plants being used in magick for closure, and at midnight to invoke the power of the witching hour.

G ..c:l..t.",,,,,,,-C,,,,,,,i;"l""..t. '"'7k"""ki..""9

35

Additionally, when working with indoor plants, you can sow or harvest according to the symbolism of each season. Spring inspires abundance, creativity, and steady progress. Sum­ mer planting or harvesting produces greenery filled with energy for prosperity, power, well-being, socialization, and hap­ piness. Moving your efforts into Fall attracts the vibrations of the harvest balanced against the need for pragmatic use of resources. Winter efforts energize plants with home and hearth energies, as well as those for protection and honoring one's traditions. It doesn't matter if you live in a four-season environment. You can still use this idea by following the calendar or by pay­ ing close attention to nature's signals. For example, when the early-year rainy season comes, that could be your Spring, no matter what month is showing on the calendar!

Goc:lc:le;;;;;; Lc;n~c:l "'Ble;;;;;;~""9;;; c;n'~c:l

'l=' yot:.ec:;t:.~o",,;;; Gardening is not a rational act. -Margaret Atwood The ground on which we walk is truly sacred, especially when we approach it with a mindful, worshipful attitude. God­ dess gardening encourages this gentle approach toward our window boxes and plots of land so that our plants and our lives might be fuller in every way. But beyond the way we think and behave while we're gardening or enjoying our greenery, what else can be done to bless and protect our efforts? The ancients left us clues to this when they erected stones along the Earth's energy lines and around vortexes. The stones not only marked the sacred spot but augmented it. They not


.:34

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

G

Cll"d.e"-i."-'3 ""at... It...e

G

ed.d.e,;;,;;

Pumpkin prefers hot weather but can grow well in a variety of soil and sunlight levels. Radish likes warm weather. Radish is a good

window-box vegetable.

Raspberry prefers light, well-drained soil with

humus mixed in.

Rose thrives in partial clay soils, especially if

pruned in Spring.

Rosemary needs well-aerated, dry soil with good drainage and partial sunlight. Sage requires good soil that's well-drained in full sunlight. Savory likes lightweight, well-drained soil in full sunlight. Strawberry prefers cool climates and damp soil but fares in a variety of regions nonetheless. Tarragon likes sandy, drained soil in partial

sunlight

Thyme prefers lightweight, drained, and chalky soil in partial sunlight. Tomato enjoys evenly watered soil with potash. Tomato is a very durable plant Violet prefers rich soil with humus in partial sun. Watermelon likes warm weather and well­

fertilized soil that's watered regularly.

Willow thrives in cool climates in damp soil.

Besides learning about what specific plants like, there are other bits of ancient wisdom that we can use in timing our gardening efforts. For example, try harvesting your plants at dawn to encourage hope or a fresh beginning. Harvest at noon to empower Fire herbs and flowers, at dusk for plants being used in magick for closure, and at midnight to invoke the power of the witching hour.

Ge":l.t..",,,,-C..,,,,I:...,.,,,.t

c-lk\'''''''-~''9

.:35

Additionally, when working with indoor plants, you can sow or harvest according to the symbolism of each season. Spring inspires abundance, creativity, and steady progress. Sum­ mer planting or harvesting produces greenery filled with energy for prosperity, power, well-being, socialization, and hap­ piness. Moving your efforts into Fall attracts the vibrations of the harvest balanced against the need for pragmatic use of resources. Winter efforts energize plants with home and hearth energies, as well as those for protection and honoring one's traditions. It doesn't matter if you live in a four-season environment You can still use this idea by following the calendar or by pay­ ing close attention to nature's signals. For example, when the early-year rainy season comes, that could be your Spring, no matter what month is showing on the calendar!

G cc::lc::less L c:n.,c::l "'B lessL"'9s 1=' Yct:.ect:.Lc",s

c::I",c::l

Gardening is not a rational act. -Margaret Atwood The ground on which we walk is truly sacred, especially when we approach it with a mindful, worshipful attitude. God­ dess gardening encourages this gentle approach toward our window boxes and plots of land so that our plants and our lives might be fuller in every way. But beyond the way we think and behave while we're gardening or enjoying our greenery, what else can be done to bless and protect our efforts? The ancients left us clues to this when they erected stones along the Earth's energy lines and around vortexes. The stones not only marked the sacred spot but augmented it. They not


36

G':'l"cl.e"-i."-9 ""i.lk lke Gecl.cl.es$

only adorned the land, but they brought people from near and far like a guiding beacon to the sources of power and transfor­ mation. Believe it or not, your garden can be like that. How? There are some approaches that I suggest. None take a tremendous amount of time, but each is designed to bless, energize, and sanctify the work of your hands. S':'C;l"ecl. Sle"-es

Do what the ancients did: Don't just toss aside those stones you dig up when working the land. Put them at the four cor­ ners of the garden to represent the watchtowers. Transplant them to the corners of your property to watch over and protect it. Use them as plant supports or decorative touches. Because these pieces of earth have been in your land for some time, they're already attuned to that region. This, in turn, helps them augment your magick (see also Crystal Goddess Techniques later in this chapter).

a

$",e l"9i."-9

Take a mixture of spring water and lemon juice (which has cleansing properties) and sprinkle it counterclockwise around the garden to banish unwanted energy. Then mix spring water with rose water and sprinkle it clockwise to attract posi­ tive energy. To this process you can add words of power (see "Words of Power," following) if you wish. Minimally, how­ ever, make sure you keep your mind fixed on your goal. Imag­ ine pure, white light saturating the soil as you move. If you feel like being really inventive, blend together the herbal insect repellent discussed earlier this chapter and use it for the banishing part of the asperging process. Note: This can be repeated each time you need to do a treatment.

G"'.t.L.",,-C..V\.I;..,....t

"'I"ki.V\.k..i.....'"

37

S"",- \Acl9 i. "-9 Native Americans use sage, cedar, and lavender bound together in a thick wand to purify and bless an area. This bundle is ignited and moved through the air either by walking the space or dispersing the smoke using a feather. This works very nicely for your garden too. Smudge sticks are frequently available at New Age stores and herb shops. If you can't find one, you can burn some dry culinary spices instead. Ginger, onion peel, dried orange rind, and bay are good for cleansing and energizing. To safely burn a blend like this you'll need a fireproof container filled with soil or sand and some self-lighting charcoal or another fire source. Sprinkle on a couple of pinches at a time as you move around the planned garden space and let the smoke rise through the air with your prayers. \A}el"cls ef

'P e""el"

Magicians and goddess-worshipers alike recognize the power of language. Whether they are simply thought with a purpose or spoken out loud, words carry energy. Adding prayers or incantations to the previously mentioned processes, there­ fore, can increase their overall effect. Additionally, hearing your goals as you work helps you focus more fully on them, which also improves the results. There are really no "carved in stone" prayers and incan­ tations for garden blessings. I'll provide an example of both here, but please be aware that as long as your words come from your heart and are supported by the will, you're doing just fine. Prayer. Stand in front of the garden space with your hands facing downward to channel energy to the land and say some­ thing such as:


36

Gc:lY'ctel"-Ll"-9 vvi..t:k t:ke Goctctes$

only adorned the land, but they brought people from near and far like a guiding beacon to the sources of power and transfor­ mation. Believe it or not, your garden can be like that. How? There are some approaches that I suggest. None take a tremendous amount of time, but each is designed to bless, energize, and sanctify the work of your hands. Sc:lC::Y'ect St:ol"-es

Do what the ancients did: Don't just toss aside those stones you dig up when working the land. Put them at the four cor­ ners of the garden to represent the watchtowers. Transplant them to the corners of your property to watch over and protect it. Use them as plant supports or decorative touches. Because these pieces of earth have been in your land for some time, they're already attuned to that region. This, in turn, helps them augment your magick (see also Crystal Goddess Techniques later in this chapter).

Clsp eY'9Ll"-9 Take a mixture of spring water and lemon juice (which has cleansing properties) and sprinkle it counterclockwise around the garden to banish unwanted energy. Then mix spring water with rose water and sprinkle it clockwise to attract posi­ tive energy. To this process you can add words of power (see "Words of Power," fOllowing) if you wish. Minimally, how­ ever, make sure you keep your mind fixed on your goal. Imag­ ine pure, white light saturating the soil as you move. If you feel like being really inventive, blend together the herbal insect repellent discussed earlier this chapter and use it for the banishing part of the asperging process. Note: This can be repeated each time you need to do a treatment.

G",d.d.e$$-Ce",-l:eY'ed. .::-n,.~",-k..~",-'3

3"7

Sw..Uct 9 Ll"-9

Native Americans use sage, cedar, and lavender bound together in a thick wand to purify and bless an area. This bundle is ignited and moved through the air either by walking the space or dispersing the smoke using a feather. This works very nicely for your garden too. Smudge sticks are frequently available at New Age stores and herb shops. If you can't find one, you can burn some dry culinary spices instead. Ginger, onion peel, dried orange rind, and bay are good for cleansing and energizing. To safely burn a blend like this you'll need a fireproof container filled with soil or sand and some self-lighting charcoal or another fire source. Sprinkle on a couple of pinches at a time as you move around the planned garden space and let the smoke rise through the air with your prayers. ~OY'cts of Povv"'Y'

Magicians and goddess-worshipers alike recognize the power of language. Whether they are simply thought with a purpose or spoken out loud, words carry energy. Adding prayers or incantations to the previously mentioned processes, there­ fore, can increase their overall effect. Additionally, hearing your goals as you work helps you focus more fully on them, which also improves the results. There are really no "carved in stone" prayers and incan­ tations for garden blessings. I'll provide an example of both here, but please be aware that as long as your words come from your heart and are supported by the will, you're doing just fine. Prayer. Stand in front of the garden space with your hands facing downward to channel energy to the land and say some­ thing such as:


38

GCI'I"4e"-""-9 "",a,k lke G044e$$

GODDESS OF EARTH AND ALL GOODNESS, TO YOU.

Q ..cL:l..,,"-c..""I:.......d. ""Jl..~"""-~""3

I

COME

HEAR MY PRAYER. TODAY I HAVE STARTED A GARDEN WITH HANDS AND HEART­ A GARDEN IN WHICH I WANT YOUR ENERGY TO GROW. BLESS THESE EFFORTS. LET YOUR SOILS BE RICH, YOUR PLANTS ABUNDANT, YOUR SUNLIGHT WARM, AND YOUR RAINS GENTLE. LET THE LAND AND MY SPIRIT FLOURISH

39

LClY""-9 0"- of .J--tCl"-4$

Traditionally under the dominion of healers, the laying on of hands represents a transfer of sacred energy. Now you, as a goddess gardener, are also a healer of the Earth, even if it's only your little potted plant! It's very simple to give the Earth positive energy just by sitting down, putting your hands on the soil (palm downward), and focusing your intentions. Most people find it helpful to visualize a blue-white light pouring into their third eye chakra and down through their hands. You will notice the palms of your hands feeling itchy or hot, which indicates you're doing it right. If you want, combine this pro­ cess with a prayer or incantation to improve the results.

WITH THE MAGICK CREATED HERE. SO MOTE IT BE.

Note that if you're making a specifically themed garden you can insert the name of the presiding goddess and change the wording to better reflect that theme. More examples of this will be shared in Part II of this book. Incantation. This incantation is for blessing the land, and begins at the Eastern point of the garden. I suggest doing this at dawn just as the sun's rays reach the land. Say: KISSED BY THE RAYS OF A RISING SUN BY MY WILL, THIS SPELL'S BEGUN. WHEN GIVEN TO A WAITING EARTH THE SEEDS OF MAGICK SHALL GIVE BIRTH. WITH THE GODDESS TO GUIDE HERE MY MAGICK ABIDES.

Repeat this incantation three times to stress the connec­ tion between body, mind, and spirit.

'BeCll~"-9 lke 'Bo","-~

This idea comes to us from Rome, where once a year people would walk their land, decorate the borders, and offer prayers as they moved. The decorations, and the sometimes leaping dances, acted as an offering and incantation to the spir­ its of nature so that crops would grow tall. See4 ble$$""-9$

In many areas, including China and Rome, a priest or priestess would proceed to make offerings to the gods so that the land and seeds would be blessed. Traditionally this was fol­ lowed by making nine furrows in the earth and sowing at least one symbolic seed for abundance. If you find that none of these approaches feels right to you, don't fret. They're not necessary. Any altar (as a "high place") is created or reached more by attitude than altitude! So long as you work gently and reverently with your garden-with purpose, determination, and focus-you can achieve the same kinds of results as through any of these processes.


36

GQ... cle~L""9 vvLt:.k l:ke Goclcle$$

GODDESS OF EARTH AND ALL GOODNESS, TO YOU.

G...l.l..ss-C""t....ed. "'jk~"k..t,,'!J

I

COME

HEAR MY PRAYER.

TODAY I HAVE STARTED A GARDEN WITH HANDS

AND HEART­ A GARDEN IN WHICH TO GROW.

I

WANT YOUR ENERGY

BLESS THESE EFFORTS.

LET YOUR SOILS BE RICH,

YOUR PLANTS ABUNDANT,

YOUR SUNLIGHT WARM,

AND YOUR RAINS GENTLE.

LET THE LAND AND MY SPIRIT FLOURISH

WITH THE MAGICK CREATED HERE.

SO MOTE IT BE.

Note that if you're making a specifically themed garden you can insert the name of the presiding goddess and change the wording to better reflect that theme. More examples of this will be shared in Part II of this book. Incantation. This incantation is for blessing the land, and begins at the Eastern point of the garden. I suggest doing this at dawn just as the sun's rays reach the land. Say: KISSED BY THE RAYS OF A RISING SUN

BY MY WILL, THIS SPELL'S BEGUN.

WHEN GIVEN TO A WAITING EARTH

THE SEEDS OF MAGICK SHALL GIVE BIRTH.

WITH THE GODDESS TO GUIDE

HERE MY MAGICK ABIDES.

Repeat this incantation three times to stress the connec­ tion between body, mind, and spirit.

39

LQ";"~" o~ of .J-.LQ~cl$

Traditionally under the dominion of healers, the laying on of hands represents a transfer of sacred energy. Now you, as a goddess gardener, are also a healer of the Earth, even if it's only your little potted plant! It's very simple to give the Earth positive energy just by sitting down, putting your hands on the soil (palm downward), and focusing your intentions. Most people find it helpful to visualize a blue-white light pouring into their third eye chakra and down through their hands. You will notice the palms of your hands feeling itchy or hot, which indicates you're doing it right. If you want, combine this pro­ cess with a prayer or incantation to improve the results. 'BeQl:L~" l:ke 'Bo,"~d.$

This idea comes to us from Rome, where once a year people would walk their land, decorate the borders, and offer prayers as they moved. The decorations, and the sometimes leaping dances, acted as an offering and incantation to the spir­ its of nature so that crops would grow tall. Seed. ble$$L~"$

In many areas, including China and Rome, a priest or priestess would proceed to make offerings to the gods so that the land and seeds would be blessed. Traditionally this was fol­ lowed by making nine furrows in the earth and sowing at least one symbolic seed for abundance. If you find that none of these approaches feels right to you, don't fret. They're not necessary. Any altar (as a "high place") is created or reached more by attitude than altitude! So long as you work gently and reverently with your garden-with purpose, determination, and focus-you can achieve the same kinds of results as through any of these processes.


~o

0"'.:1..:1..."..- 0......1:........:1.

Wen-d.e"''-'''9 vv'-U.. t:.k.e Wed.d.e55

~oo\'\. Goclcless Gc:n·cle\'\.~\'\.9

c--r ec:k\'\.~c::r'-'tes

The ancients believed that a Witch received power from the moon, which may be why many Wiccan calendars stress the lunar cycles so much even today. For the goddess gardener, however, the moon is also a symbol of the Lady herself. In literally hundreds of ancient settings, the moon was character­ ized as female, and Her names were many. They include Chia (Columbian), Hina (Polynesian), Luna (Roman), and Selene (Greek), to name just a few.

If you'd like to apply this concept in your own goddess gardens, here's a list that will help you: We:n-d.e"''-'''9 by '''''\ee'''5\.9'''5

Moon in Aries: Plant garlic and onions, but

nothing that requires really fertile soil.

~I

in Taurus: Plant potatoes, root crops, leafY

• Moon vegetables, and bulb-bearing items.

A garden is evidence of faith. It links us with all the misty figures of the past who also planted and were nourished by the fruits of their planting. -Gladys Taber

Beyond the potent symbolic value here, our ancestors felt that timing the planting, tending, or harvesting of one's plants could be more effective if we followed moonsigns and moon cycles. For example, when the moon was dark, it was time to plant underground vegetables. When the moon was waning, it was time to plant peas or other items that vine counterclock­ wise. According to most really talented gardeners that I know from the old school, this type of reverence toward nature's hints really works.

"'"7k~ ....k.i......,

Moon in Gemini: Weed and cultivate or harvest root crops.

Moon in Cancer: Graft, sow, transplant, and force

budding.

Moon in Leo: Focus on deterring bugs using

natural treatments and companion planting.

Harvest items.

Moon in Virgo: It's best not to do anything new in

the garden at this time other than planting

morning glory, honeysuckle, tulips, and endive.

Moon in Libra: Plant above-ground flowers and

vegetables.

Moon in Scorpio: Plant vining greenery, berries,

and grains.

Moon in Sagittarius: Plant onions. Transplant and

preserve your harvest.

Moon in Capricorn: Plant root crops and tubers.

Fertilize the soil.

Moon in Aquarius: Cultivate, weed, and turn the

soil.

Moon in Pisces: Work with plants that require

strong root growth, such as asparagus. Plant flowers.

Wen-d.e"''''''9 by VV\ee", Cycles

First Quarter. Plant annuals and vegetables that yield their fruit above ground (such as celery and lettuce). Green vegetables and herbs (such as cabbage and basil) seem to like this phase. Second Quarter. Plant any "roundish" flora and veg­ etables (such as tomato and melon) and any flowering vines.


~

Gc::n..d.e",~",'1J ""a,k lke God.d.es$

'VV\ooV\. Goc:lc:less Gc:n·c:leV\.1.V\.9

~ eck V\.l.Cfv.es A garden is evidence of faith. It links us with all the misty figures of the past who also planted and were nourished by the fruits of their planting. -Gladys Taber The ancients believed that a Witch received power from the moon, which may be why many Wiccan calendars stress the lunar cycles so much even today. For the goddess gardener, however, the moon is also a symbol of the Lady herself. In literally hundreds of ancient settings, the moon was character­ ized as female, and Her names were many. They include Chia (Columbian), Hina (Polynesian), Luna (Roman), and Selene (Greek), to name just a few. Beyond the potent symbolic value here, our ancestors felt that timing the planting, tending, or harvesting of one's plants could be more effective if we followed moonsigns and moon cycles. For example, when the moon was dark, it was time to plant underground vegetables. When the moon was waning, it was time to plant peas or other items that vine counterclock­ wise. According to most really talented gardeners that I know from the old school, this type of reverence toward nature's hints really works. If you'd like to apply this concept in your own goddess gardens, here's a list that will help you: GCll"d.e",~",'1J by 'VV\oo",s~'1J"'s

Moon in Aries: Plant garlic and onions, but

nothing that requires really fertile soil.

God.d.ess-Ce""t;eyed. '-'t..i.""ki."",=,

<41

in Taurus: Plant potatoes, root crops, leafy

• Moon vegetables, and bulb-bearing items. in Gemini: Weed and cultivate or harvest • Moon root crops.

Moon in Cancer: Graft, sow, transplant, and force

• budding.

Moon in Leo: Focus on deterring bugs using

• natural treatments and companion planting.

Harvest items.

Moon in Virgo: It's best not to do anything new in

the garden at this time other than planting

morning glory, honeysuckle, tulips, and endive.

Moon in Libra: Plant above-ground flowers and

vegetables.

Moon in Scorpio: Plant vining greenery, berries,

and grains.

Moon in Sagittarius: Plant onions. Transplant and

preserve your harvest.

Moon in Capricorn: Plant root crops and tubers.

Fertilize the soil.

Moon in Aquarius: Cultivate, weed, and turn the

soil.

Moon in Pisces: Work with plants that require

strong root growth, such as asparagus. Plant flowers. GQl"d.e",~",'1J by

'VV\oo",

Cycles

First Quarter. Plant annuals and vegetables that yield their fruit above ground (such as celery and lettuce). Green vegetables and herbs (such as cabbage and basil) seem to like this phase. Second Quarter. Plant any "roundish" flora and veg­ etables (such as tomato and melon) and any flowering vines.


....:;j2

Gcn.elelf'\."lf'\.~ vvtf;.k lke Goeleless

Third Quarter. Plant root crops and bulbs or anything that yields below ground (such as garlic). This Quarter is also good for fruit-bearing plants (such as strawberry and cherry) Fourth Quarter. Let the land rest. Weed your soil, and then turn and fertilize it. Note that these two systems (gardening by moonsign and gardening by moon phases) can work together nicely. For example, if the moon happens to be in Aquarius at the same time it's in the fourth quarter, this would double the effect of weeding and turning the soil. After the quarter passes, move forward with sowing knowing that the land is rejuvenated!

CT'~st:.QI Goddess GQT'de""~""43 ~ ec::k ""~c:r'\Aes More things grow in the garden than the gardener sows. -Spanish Proverb Stones, gems, minerals, and seashells have often appeared

on altars to the Goddess as adornment and gifts. All things of

beauty are under Her watchful eye, and crystals are certainly

no exception. For example, old-time lore tells us that carrying

a moss agate with you whenever you garden ensures an abun­

dant yield. Wear it on your right arm for the best results.

Likewise, moonstone and lodestone are both said to improve any type of plant growth. Moonstone should go into the soil; lodestone strung around the border of the garden. This last idea is particularly interesting because it effectively creates a kind of miniature ley-line around your sacred gardening space. Besides these ideas, there are several ways to use crystals to improve your goddess gardening methods, or simply make them more lovely. These include:

G ..clcle""-C ...... t ..,,...cl ""Jk~ ....k..~....'3

....:;j3

*Putting stones and crystals sacred to the goddess being honored in the soil or on the land as an offering and memorial to her. *Matching the stones and crystals you choose for the soil with the energies of the plants to which they sit adjacent. For example, lavender seems to like the vibrations of amethyst. Both of these items are known for their gentle, calming effect. Fol­ lowing is a basic reference for stones and plants. Gle"""elf'\.lal Cl"'jslal Co"""palf'\."olf'\. PIQlf'\.l"lf'\.~

This list matches the four Elemental energies of Earth, Air, Fire, and Water to common stones and plants that might go into an Elementally themed garden (or augment parts of a garden whose goddess has strong Elemental energies). Earth. Stones include green agate, cat's eye, coal, jet, malachite, salt, green tourmaline, and turquoise. Plants include alfalfa, beet, corn, ferns, honeysuckle, mugwort, patchouli, peas, potatoes, primrose, tulip, and vetivert. Air. Stones include aventurine, mixed-color jaspers, mica and pumice (or alternatively pale yellow or whitish stones). Plants include anise, beans, bergamot, caraway, clover, dande­ lion, endive, lavender, lily, marjoram, mint, mulberry, parsley, and sage. Fire. Stones include any red- or orange-colored crystals and rocks, dark agates, amber, onyx, obsidian, pipestone, car­ nelian, bloodstone, quartz, lava, garnets, tiger's eye, and topaz. Plants include allspice, basil, bay, cactus, carnation, celery, chry­ santhemum, dill, fig, garlic, holly, juniper, marigold, mustard, onion, pennyroyal, pepper, radish, rosemary, snapdragon, sun­ flower, woodruff, and yarrow. Water. Stones include blue or green crystals, lace agate, amethyst, aquamarine, coral, geodes, jade, lapis, moonstone, pearl, sodalite, sugiIite, blue tourmaline. Plants include aloe,


..:::.'12

Gal'c:le""L""" vvak tke G=c:lc:less

Third Quarter. Plant root crops and bulbs or anything that yields below ground (such as garlic). This Quarter is also good for fruit-bearing plants (such as strawberry and cherry) Fourth Quarter. Let the land rest. Weed your soil, and then turn and fertilize it. Note that these two systems (gardening by moonsign and gardening by moon phases) can work together nicely. For example, if the moon happens to be in Aquarius at the same time it's in the fourth quarter, this would double the effect of weeding and turning the soil. After the quarter passes, move forward with sowing knowing that the land is rejuvenated!

Cl""st:.c::J1 God..d..ess Gc::J1"d..e"-~"-9

e-rech. "-~c:r'-Aes

More things grow in the garden than the gardener sows.

-Spanish Proverb Stones, gems, minerals, and seashells have often appeared

on altars to the Goddess as adornment and gifts. All things of

beauty are under Her watchful eye, and crystals are certainly

no exception. For example, old-time lore tells us that carrying

a moss agate with you whenever you garden ensures an abun­

dant yield. Wear it on your right arm for the best results.

Likewise, moonstone and lodestone are both said to improve any type of plant growth. Moonstone should go into the soil; lodestone strung around the border of the garden. This last idea is particularly interesting because it effectively creates a kind of miniature ley-line around your sacred gardening space. Besides these ideas, there are several ways to use crystals to improve your goddess gardening methods, or simply make them more lovely. These include:

God.d...",,,,-C..,,,,l::eT'ed. "'Ikt"""-'.",,,=,

..:::.'13

*Putting stones and crystals sacred to the goddess being honored in the soil or on the land as an offering and memorial to her. *Matching the stones and crystals you choose for the soil with the energies of the plants to which they sit adjacent. For example, lavender seems to like the vibrations of amethyst. Both of these items are known for their gentle, calming effect. Fol­ lowing is a basic reference for stones and plants. Sle",-e""tal Cl'ystal C="'-F'Q""L="" Pla""tL"""

This list matches the four Elemental energies of Earth, Air, Fire, and Water to common stones and plants that might go into an Elementally themed garden (or augment parts of a garden whose goddess has strong Elemental energies). Earth. Stones include green agate, cat's eye, coal, jet, malachite, salt, green tourmaline, and turquoise. Plants include alfalfa, beet, corn, ferns, honeysuckle, mugwort, patchouli, peas, potatoes, primrose, tulip, and vetivert. Air. Stones include aventurine, mixed-color jaspers, mica and pumice (or alternatively pale yellow or whitish stones). Plants include anise, beans, bergamot, caraway, clover, dande­ lion, endive, lavender, lily, marjoram, mint, mulberry, parsley, and sage. Fire. Stones include any red- or orange-colored crystals and rocks, dark agates, amber, onyx, obsidian, pipestone, car­ nelian, bloodstone, quartz, lava, garnets, tiger's eye, and topaz. Plants include allspice, basil, bay, cactus, carnation, celery, chry­ santhemum, dill, fig, garlic, holly, juniper, marigold, mustard, onion, pennyroyal, pepper, radish, rosemary, snapdragon, sun­ flower, woodruff, and yarrow. Water. Stones include blue or green crystals, lace agate, amethyst, aquamarine, coral, geodes, jade, lapis, moonstone, pearl, sodalite, sugilite, blue tourmaline. Plants include aloe,


...::;j...::;j

G""l"cle_i_'3 '\NLH... lke Goclcle55

apple, birch, blackberry, cabbage, catnip, chamomile, crocus, cucumber, daisy, elm, foxglove, gardenia, grapes, gourds, iris, lettuce, lilac, morning glory, raspberry, rose, strawberry, tansy, thyme, violet, and willow. Putting this information together in one garden isn't diffi­ cult. Begin with a circular space. Sow Earth stones and plants in the North, Air stones and plants in the East, Fire stones and plants in the South, and Water stones and plants in the West. You now have an Elemental mandala and a sacred space, the center of which is perfectly suited to casting spells or meditating. 1='1",,_elc::ll"Y 1--2..~le1"5 c::I_cl Cl"Y5l",,1 Co",-pc::I_io_ 1='lc::l_lL_'3

Each item on the Earth was categorized by our ancestors as having a ruling planet. If you'd like to do a planetary-themed garden, or portion of a garden, the following information can act as a guide. Sun. Sun and stone plants are useful in magick that per­ tains to legalities, awareness, safety, wellness, the Fire Element, and vitality. Stones include amber, carnelian, sunstone, tiger­ eye, and topaz. Plants include carnation, chamomile, chrysan­ themum, juniper, marigold, peony, rosemary, and sunflower. Moon. Moon stones and plants may be applied in magick for improving divinatory ability, creativity, relationships, fer­ tility, and kindness. Stones include aquamarine, beryl, quartz (clear), moonstone, and selenite. Plants include cabbage, cucumber, gardenia, gourds, grapes, lettuce, lily, poppy, potato, and turnip. Mercury. The stones and plants from your Mercury gar­ den create energies for learning, applying knowledge, personal

G"'ddess-Ce""teYed '""7k~",k..i."""9

...::;j5

growth, communication, safe travel, and sensibility. Stones include agate, jasper, mica, and pumice. Plants include beans, celery, clover, dill, ferns, lavender, marjoram, mint, and savory. Venus. The stones and plants ruled by Venus bear the magick of joy, passion, fortune, devotion, and love. They also are excellent for deepening the meditative state. Stones include calcite, cat's-eye, coral, jade, lapis, sodalite, tourmaline, and turquoise. Plants include alfalfa, blackberry, catnip, crocus, daf­ fodil, daisy, geranium, iris, lilac, magnolia, pea, periwinkle, rose, tulip, and violet. Mars. Mars encourages bravery, boldness, sexual enjoy­ ment, safety, and protection. It also emphasizes the god as­ pect. Stones include bloodstone, garnet, lava, onyx, rhodocrosite, sardonyx, and red tourmaline. Plants include basil, cactus, carrot, coriander, garlic, holly, mustard, onion, peppers, radish, and thistle. Jupiter. Although not as many items are found under this planet's dominion, Jupiter promotes a high spiritual vibration and understanding. Stones include amethyst and sugilite. Plants include borage, dandelion, fig, honeysuckle, linden, maple, and sage. Saturn: Saturn is associated with magick for building strong foundations, protection, cleansing, and good fortune. Stones include coal, hematite, jet, obsidian, onyx, and salt. Plants include beet, elm, hemlock, ivy, morning glory, pansy, and yew. Neptune and Pluto are not included in this listing because these planets were not known to our ancestors. Some modern metaphysicians are working on updating correspondences with this knowledge in mind, but fixed meanings aren't fully devel­ oped or agreed upon yet. When you want to augment a plant's basic metaphysical correspondence with a crystal that matches that vibration, refer to the following information.


-'4-'4

G",..d.e"-~"-9 vvak t:.ke God.d.ess

apple, birch, blackberry, cabbage, catnip, chamomile, crocus, cucumber, daisy, elm, foxglove, gardenia, grapes, gourds, iris, lettuce, lilac, morning glory, raspberry, rose, strawberry, tansy, thyme, violet, and willow. Putting this information together in one garden isn't diffi­ cult. Begin with a circular space. Sow Earth stones and plants in the North, Air stones and plants in the East, Fire stones and plants in the South, and Water stones and plants in the West. You now have an Elemental mandala and a sacred space, the center of which is perfectly suited to casting spells or meditating. Pt","-et:.",..~ ~""te ..::; ","-d. C

..~st:.",t Co",p","-~o",

Pt","-t:.~"-9

Each item on the Earth was categorized by our ancestors as having a ruling planet. If you'd like to do a planetary-themed garden, or portion of a garden, the following information can act as a guide. Sun. Sun and stone plants are useful in magick that per­ tains to legalities, awareness, safety, wellness, the Fire Element, and vitality. Stones include amber, carnelian, suns tone, tiger­ eye, and topaz. Plants include carnation, chamomile, chrysan­ themum, juniper, marigold, peony, rosemary, and sunflower. Moon. Moon stones and plants may be applied in magick for improving divinatory ability, creativity, relationships, fer­ tility, and kindness. Stones include aquamarine, beryl, quartz (clear), moonstone, and selenite. Plants include cabbage, cucumber, gardenia, gourds, grapes, lettuce, lily, poppy, potato, and turnip. Mercury. The stones and plants from your Mercury gar­ den create energies for learning, applying knowledge, personal

G ...l.l.."''''-Ce''''t........l --'k~"k..i."9

-'45

growth, communication, safe travel, and sensibility. Stones include agate, jasper, mica, and pumice. Plants include beans, celery, clover, dill, ferns, lavender, marjoram, mint, and savory. Venus. The stones and plants ruled by Venus bear the magick of joy, passion, fortune, devotion, and love. They also are excellent for deepening the meditative state. Stones include calcite, cat's-eye, coral, jade, lapis, sodalite, tourmaline, and turquoise. Plants include alfalfa, blackberry, catnip, crocus, daf­ fodil, daisy, geranium, iris, lilac, magnolia, pea, periwinkle, rose, tulip, and violet. Mars. Mars encourages bravery, boldness, sexual enjoy­ ment, safety, and protection. It also emphasizes the god as­ pect. Stones include bloodstone, garnet, lava, onyx, rhodocrosite, sardonyx, and red tourmaline. Plants include basil, cactus, carrot, coriander, garlic, holly, mustard, onion, peppers, radish, and thistle. Jupiter. Although not as many items are found under this planet's dominion, Jupiter promotes a high spiritual vibration and understanding. Stones include amethyst and sugilite. Plants include borage, dandelion, fig, honeysuckle, linden, maple, and sage. Saturn: Saturn is associated with magick for building strong foundations, protection, cleansing, and good fortune. Stones include coal, hematite, jet, obsidian, onyx, and salt. Plants include beet, elm, hemlock, ivy, morning glory, pansy, and yew. Neptune and Pluto are not included in this listing because these planets were not known to our ancestors. Some modern metaphysicians are working on updating correspondences with this knowledge in mind, but fixed meanings aren't fully devel­ oped or agreed upon yet. When you want to augment a plant's basic metaphysical correspondence with a crystal that matches that vibration, refer to the following information.


46

G"'.lcLa"''''-C...... te......l "'Ik<................,

Gc::n,cle_i._9 ""i.t.:k. t.:k.e Gocld.ess

rvv\c::I9i.ck..c::Il COl"l"espo_cle_ce Cl"~st.:c::Il

Health (general)

CO,,"-Pc::l_i.o_ Plc::l_t.:i._ 9

Intention

Plants

Coml!anion Crysta1{s)

Poplar Quartz point Catnip Cat's-eye Borage Agate (eye) Peas Bloodstone Thyme Turquoise Chamomile Cleansing Aquamarine Horseradish Calcite Lavender Salt Rosemary Clear Quartz Thyme Garlic Onion Divinatory ability Dandelion Hematite Meadowsweet Jet Fig Moonstone Hibiscus Obsidian Marigold Dreams Amethyst Onion Azurite Rose Friendship Passion flower Turquoise Gardening Chamomile Moss agate Joy Catnip Amethyst Hyacinth Chrysoprase Lavender Lily of the valley Marjoram Morning glory Astral awareness Attractiveness Bravery

Love

Luck

Geranium Juniper Marjoram Tansy Thyme Basil Catnip Chamomile Daffodil Daisy Dill Gardenia Hyacinth Lavender Myrtle Peas Periwinkle Rose Rosemary Strawberry Thyme Tulip Violet Bluebell Cabbage Daffodil Ferns Heather Holly Moss

Agate Aventurine Bloodstone Coral Turquoise Agate Alexandrite Amber Amethyst Beryl Jade Lapis Malachite Moonstone Rhodocrosite Topaz Tourmaline Turquoise

Alexandrite Amber Apache tear Aventurine Chrysoprase Jet Olivine

47


..:::Ie

Gocl.wss-C","-t:",...",cl .:::-flM...... k..~ .....9

G a..c::le"-i."-C3 ""ak. lk.e Gc:.c::lc::less

'\IV\aC3i.ck..al Cc:.....espc:."-c::le"-ce C

.. ~slal

Health (general)

Cc:."",pa"-i.c:."- Pla"-li."-C3

Intention

Plants

ComJ!anion Crystal(s)

Poplar Quartz point Catnip Cat's-eye Borage Agate (eye) Peas Bloodstone Thyme Turquoise Cleansing Chamomile Aquamarine Horseradish Calcite Lavender Salt Rosemary Clear Quartz Thyme Garlic Onion Divinatory ability Dandelion Hematite Meadowsweet Jet Fig Moonstone Hibiscus Obsidian Marigold Dreams Amethyst Onion Azurite Rose Friendship Passion flower Turquoise Gardening Chamomile Moss agate Catnip Joy Amethyst Hyacinth Chrysoprase Lavender Lily of the valley Marjoram Morning glory Astral awareness Attractiveness Bravery

Love

Luck

Geranium Juniper MaIjoram Tansy Thyme Basil Catnip Chamomile Daffodil Daisy Dill Gardenia Hyacinth Lavender Myrtle Peas Periwinkle Rose Rosemary Strawberry Thyme Tulip Violet Bluebell Cabbage Daffodil Ferns Heather Holly Moss

Agate Aventurine Bloodstone

Coral Turquoise Agate Alexandrite Amber Amethyst Beryl Jade Lapis Malachite Moonstone Rhodocrosite Topaz Tourmaline Turquoise

Alexandrite Amber Apache tear Aventurine Chrysoprase Jet Olivine

..:::17


..:;'18

Gcn¡c!e"-L"-9 "",at... t::t...e Goc!c!ess

Mental keenness

Passion and performance

Poppy Sardonyx Rose Tigereye Strawberry Turquoise Violet Celery Aventurine Grape Fluorite Lily of the valley Mustard Periwinkle Rosemary Savory Beans Carnelian Oak Gardenia Lavender

Sunstone

Amethyst

Coral

Morning glory Malachite Pennyroyal Sodalite Protection/Safety Aloe Agate Birch Amber Cactus Apache tear Chrysanthemum Carnelian Dill Cat's-eye Garlic Citrine Heather Coral Ivy Quartz Lettuce Jade Marigold Jasper Mint Jet Peace

G.,d.d.......-C"""l:",."d. "'Il..i""k.t"'-9

Mustard Onion Peony Peppers Primrose Raspberry Rhubarb Tomato Woodruff Psychic awareness Celery Honeysuckle Marigold Rose Thyme Professional Clover success Lemon balm Sleep Chamomile Lavender Lettuce Rosemary Valerian Spirituality Gardenia Lotus Wisdom Dandelion Sage Violet

..:;'19

Malachite Obsidian Tigereye Tourmaline

Amethyst Beryl Citrine Lapis Moldavite Bloodstone Malachite Moonstone Tourmaline

Labradorite Sugilite Coral Jade Sugilite

Please note that this should be used as a guide only, not an edict. Each crystal and stone has a personality all its own


..:::ts

Gcn.ele"'~"'9 ....,..a k. t:.k.e Geeleless

Mental keenness

Passion and performance

Poppy Sardonyx Rose Tigereye Strawberry Turquoise Violet Celery Aventurine Grape Fluorite Lily of the valley Mustard Periwinkle Rosemary Savory Beans Carnelian Oak Gardenia Lavender

Suns tone Amethyst Coral Morning glory Malachite

Pennyroyal Sodalite

Protection/Safety Aloe

Agate Birch Amber Cactus Apache tear Chrysanthemum Carnelian Dill Cat's-eye Garlic Citrine Heather Coral Ivy Quartz Lettuce Jade Marigold Jasper Mint Jet Peace

Gecld",,,,,,,-C,,,v..l:.........d "'Iki.v..k...i.v..'3

Mustard Onion Peony Peppers Primrose Raspberry Rhubarb Tomato Woodruff Psychic awareness Celery Honeysuckle Marigold Rose Thyme Professional Clover success Lemon balm Sleep Chamomile Lavender Lettuce Rosemary Valerian Spirituality Gardenia Lotus Wisdom Dandelion Sage Violet

..:::t9

Malachite Obsidian Tigereye Tourmaline

Amethyst Beryl Citrine Lapis Moldavite Bloodstone Malachite Moonstone Tourmaline

Labradorite Sugilite Coral Jade Sugilite

Please note that this should be used as a guide only, not an edict. Each crystal and stone has a personality all its own


50

G~ ....d.e_i.",,'3 "",i.tk tke Gcod.d.ess

Gust as every plant does). If you feel that a particular stone should be matched with a plant that doesn't appear on this list, by all means trust your instincts. They will rarely steer you wrong.

c-rke Lc;rY\.9Yc:lge of "V\at.yvoe All nature wears one universal grin. -Henry Fielding The Victorians loved plants, especially flowers, so much so that they created little tussie-mussies (bouquets) that had special meanings. The Victorian Language of Flowers provided a source for the meanings of the different bouquets. In this manner, the ever-proper Victorian society could convey worlds of meaning without a word! For the goddess gardener, the Victorian Language of Flow­ ers provides another set of meanings that we can apply to our thematic gardens. Here's a list of symbolic values for your ref­ erence: Pl~""t "\!V\e~_i._'3s

Aloe Angelica Aster Azalia Balm Basil Chamomile Cabbage

Protection or health Inspiration Diversity Prudence, temperance Social interaction Fondness, good thoughts Dedication, wisdom Profit or prosperity

G ...lcle",,-C....... l ..,.....t

Carnation Cherry Chive Chrysanthemum Currants Daffodil Daisy Dandelion Dill Elder Endive Fennel Fern Fig Geranium Hawthorn Holly Hollyhock Honeysuckle Hyacinth Iris Ivy Jasmine Jonquil Juniper Lilac Lily of the valley Magnolia Maple Marjoram

<=Jk~..... k.~ ......,

Dignity, beauty Learning, education Serviceability Cheerfulness Pleasure Hope Youthful innocence Oracles Happiness, overcoming Compassion, kindness Economy Strength, tenacity Candor, sincerity Improvements Joy, expectations Marriage, hope Preparedness Fruitfulness Devoted love Playfulness Purity, bravery, messages Friendship Gracefulness Affection returned Safety or protection Love Happiness restored Greatness Restraint Contentment, happiness

51


so

Gc:lYde"-""-9 ""a.k t.ke G=ddess

(just as every plant does). If you feel that a particular stone should be matched with a plant that doesn't appear on this list, by all means trust your instincts. They will rarely steer you wrong.

CJk.e LCI"-9'-'tClge of "\i\Clt:.'-'tYe All nature wears one universal grin. -Henry Fielding The Victorians loved plants, especially flowers, so much so that they created little tussie-mussies (bouquets) that had special meanings. The Victorian Language of Flowers provided a source for the meanings of the different bouquets. In this manner, the ever-proper Victorian society could convey worlds of meaning without a word! For the goddess gardener, the Victorian Language of Flow­ ers provides another set of meanings that we can apply to our thematic gardens. Here's a list of symbolic values for your ref­ erence: Ptc:l"-t. ~ec:l"-""-9s

Aloe Angelica Aster Azalia Balm Basil Chamomile Cabbage

Protection or health Inspiration Diversity Prudence, temperance Social interaction Fondness, good thoughts Dedication, wisdom Profit or prosperity

G"'clcl..s$-C.......I::...... cl ~k\'..... k..\'......,

Carnation Cherry Chive Chrysanthemum Currants Daffodil Daisy Dandelion Dill Elder Endive Fennel Fern Fig Geranium Hawthorn Holly Hollyhock Honeysuckle Hyacinth Iris Ivy Jasmine Jonquil Juniper Lilac Lily of the valley Magnolia Maple Marjoram

Dignity, beauty Learning, education Serviceability Cheerfulness Pleasure Hope Youthful innocence Oracles Happiness, overcoming Compassion, kindness Economy Strength, tenacity Candor, sincerity Improvements Joy, expectations Marriage, hope Preparedness Fruitfulness Devoted love Playfulness Purity, bravery, messages Friendship Gracefulness Affection returned Safety or protection Love Happiness restored Greatness Restraint Contentment, happiness

51


5::2

Gc:>l"d.e",,-'-",,-':J "",,<.t:.k lke God.d.e55

Mint Morning glory Myrtle Oak Pansy Parsley Periwinkle Potato Rose Rhubarb Rosemary Sage Savory Sweet william Tarragon Thistle Thyme Tulip Tulip tree Turnip Violet Water lily Wisteria Zinnia

Virtue

Affection

Fruitfulness

Courage

Introspection

Pleasant occasions

Friendship, memories

Benevolence

Love

Counsel

Remember me

Longevity, wisdom, virtue Attention, curiosity Honor Devotion Independence Adventure, bravery Love or fame Renown Benevolence Humility, fidelity, faithfulness Communication Hospitality Thinking of you

Please note that some of these interpretive values vary from book to book, and some are even the opposite of those noted in other texts. What I've provided here are the most con­ sistent and positive symbolisms applied for similarly positive results. Besides the Victorian Language of Flowers, our ances­ tors left other figurative systems to consider in our gardening

Go.l.l",,,,,,-C ..,,t;,,,Ye.l "'"J"ki..",-k.i.,,'3

53

and in the way we use our harvests. The first of these systems is called the Doctrine of Signatures, which was set out by the Swiss alchemist Paracelsus in the 16th century. The Doctrine states that the patterns and colors in nature indicate how a plant should be used. For example, a red plant should be used to help with blood problems, and one shaped like a liver would be used to cure liver problems. Modern metaphysicians use this idea a little differently. In this case we take a heart-shaped stone or plant and use it in our "love garden" or incense, or potions, or whatever. Simi­ larly, we might use a deep red flower petal to inspire passion, because that color is magickally associated with those feelings. Effectively this gives you options to consider when the specific plant you're hoping to grow or harvest for rnagick isn't avail­ able or well-suited to your climate. This is where the Law of Similar, our second figurative language, comes in. The Law of Similars tells us that we can use anything of a corresponding shape, color, or texture in our spell as a substitute as long as meaning isn't lost. If there's no heather for beauty, then, just use another purplish flower. Just as the Doctrine of Signatures ties into the Law of Similars, the Law of Similars ties into what is commonly called Magickal Sympathy. This concept says that one part of life's network can affect another part even over vast distances through image magick, such as poppets. For example, if someone three states away tells you his child has jaundice, you might use a lemon to represent that child in a healing spell. The lemon mirrors the color of the problem (Law of Similars), it bears purifYing symbolism, and the energy you put into the lemon by the spell helps speed heal­ ing (Magickal Sympathy). The sympathy between the lemon and child would be improved by a personal object being bound to it as welL


52

Gc:ll'"d.e"-i."-9 ",,;.lh. lh.e G=d.d.e$$

Mint Morning glory Myrtle Oak Pansy Parsley Periwinkle Potato Rose Rhubarb Rosemary Sage Savory Sweet william Tarragon Thistle Thyme Tulip Tulip tree Turnip Violet Water lily Wisteria Zinnia

Virtue

Affection

Fruitfulness

Courage

Introspection

Pleasant occasions

Friendship, memories

Benevolence

Love

Counsel

Remember me Longevity, wisdom, virtue Attention, curiosity Honor Devotion Independence Adventure, bravery Love or fame Renown Benevolence Humility, fidelity, faithfulness Communication Hospitality Thinking of you

Please note that some of these interpretive values vary from book to book, and some are even the opposite of those noted in other texts. What I've provided here are the most con­ sistent and positive symbolisms applied for similarly positive results. Besides the Victorian Language of Flowers, our ances­ tors left other figurative systems to consider in our gardening

G

...l.l",ss-C",,,,,l:eye.l

""Ik,,"""-.......""

53

and in the way we use our harvests. The first of these systems is called the Doctrine of Signatures, which was set out by the Swiss alchemist Paracelsus in the 16th century. The Doctrine states that the patterns and colors in nature indicate how a plant should be used. For example, a red plant should be used to help with blood problems, and one shaped like a liver would be used to cure liver problems. Modern metaphysicians use this idea a little differently. In this case we take a heart-shaped stone or plant and use it in our "love garden" or incense, or potions, or whatever. Simi­ larly, we might use a deep red flower petal to inspire passion, because that color is magickally associated with those feelings. Effectively this gives you options to consider when the specific plant you're hoping to grow or harvest for magick isn't avail­ able or well-suited to your climate. This is where the Law of Similar, our second figurative language, comes in. The Law of Similars tells us that we can use anything of a corresponding shape, color, or texture in our spell as a substitute as long as meaning isn't lost. If there's no heather for beauty, then, just use another purplish flower. Just as the Doctrine of Signatures ties into the Law of Similars, the Law of Similars ties into what is commonly called Magickal Sympathy. This concept says that one part of life's network can affect another part even over vast distances through image magick, such as poppets. For example, if someone three states away tells you his child has jaundice, you might use a lemon to represent that child in a healing spell. The lemon mirrors the color of the problem (Law of Similars), it bears purifying symbolism, and the energy you put into the lemon by the spell helps speed heal­ ing (Magickal Sympathy). The sympathy between the lemon and child would be improved by a personal object being bound to it as welL


=:;~

Gc::I... d.eV\.~V\.9 \Nak lke Gc.d.d.ess

All this is a very long-winded way of saying listen and look. What is nature's classroom trying to teach you? How is the Spirit speaking through nature? How do these signals af­ fect the way you plan, plant, tend, and harvest your garden? As you answer these questions, your goddess gardening efforts are bound to get better and better.

~ ,."" ~e(ps CI""c:l ~~""t:.s ',i

Accept good advice gracefully-as long as it doesn't interfere with what you intended to do in the first place. -Gene Brown The goddess-oriented gardener gracefully takes ideas and advice from past and present "green thumbs" and then sensi­ tively applies it to his or her own efforts. To us, history repre­ sents a great wealth of Earth-friendly, people-friendly, and prac­ tical approaches to what we wish to accomplish, so why not make the best use of it? Here is some pragmatic advice for your consideration: •

Put corn doll scarecrows on smaU stakes around the garden, adorned with some bells to keep birds away. Corn dolls represent fertility and prosperity and act as a natural representation of any corn goddess. • Revitalize your fields by adding a blend of milk, honey, and olive oil to your soil and bless it. According to Roman custom, this will enrich the soil and bring life back to the land. • Grow a hawthorn hedge around your garden to protect the energy you place therein. • Grow and carry marjoram to keep ill-intended magick away from you and your home.

G ..clcl..""-C",Y\.I:..)",,,cl

"'"Ik~Y\.k..i:.Y\.'3

55

Harvest your above-ground crops between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., and root crops in the late afternoon, to preserve them. • Harvest herbs you plan to use for magick on Summer Solstice so they're more potent, according to ancient custom. • Save the ashes from your Yule log and mix them with the soil of your garden. These not only protect the home and attract good luck, but they are also said to improve plant growth. • Grow chamomile in your garden and sprinkle a chamomile tea over the earth. This is said to create a positive magickal atmosphere suited to any theme. As with anything in this book, you need not use all of this information. What is most important to your goddess garden is that there is meaning and joy in what you do.


5...::::,j

Gc:n·..le"'-~"'-9 vvak lke Gc..l..less

All this is a very long-winded way of saying listen and look. What is nature's classroom trying to teach you? How is the Spirit speaking through nature? How do these signals af­ fect the way you plan, plant, tend, and harvest your garden? As you answer these questions, your goddess gardening efforts are bound to get better and better.

G",.l.l..",,,,-C..,,,-~..l"".l

~ '-t"'- ..J-telp$ Q"'-c:t ..J-t,-",-t:$ Accept good advice gracefully-as long as it doesn't interfere with what you intended to do in the first place. -Gene Brown The goddess-oriented gardener gracefully takes ideas and advice from past and present "green thumbs" and then sensi­ tively applies it to his or her own efforts. To us, history repre­ sents a great wealth of Earth-friendly, people-friendly, and prac­ tical approaches to what we wish to accomplish, so why not make the best use of it? Here is some pragmatic advice for your consideration: •

Put corn doll scarecrows on smaIl stakes around the garden, adorned with some bells to keep birds away. Corn dolls represent fertility and prosperity and act as a natural representation of any corn goddess. • Revitalize your fields by adding a blend of milk, honey, and olive oil to your soil and bless it. According to Roman custom, this will enrich the soil and bring life back to the land. • Grow a hawthorn hedge around your garden to protect the energy you place therein. • Grow and carry marjoram to keep ill-intended magick away from you and your home.

"'"1"'-.."'-"".."'-'3

55

Harvest your above-ground crops between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., and root crops in the late afternoon, to preserve them. Harvest herbs you plan to use for magick on Summer Solstice so they're more potent, according to ancient custom. Save the ashes from your Yule log and mix them with the soil of your garden. These not only protect the home and attract good luck, but they are also said to improve plant growth. Grow chamomile in your garden and sprinkle a chamomile tea over the earth. This is said to create a positive magickal atmosphere suited to any theme.

As with anything in this book, you need not use all of this information. What is most important to your goddess garden is that there is meaning and joy in what you do.


Pleasure for one hour, a bottle of wine.

Pleasure for one year a marriage;

but pleasure for a lifetime, a garden.

-Chinese Proverb


If your mind is spinning with ideas and your hands are itching to get dirty, then you're in the right part of this book. I've assembled more than 40 different goddess~themed gardens for your playful consideration. Each garden includes the fol­ lowing information:

This helps you place that goddess in her appropriate set­ ting and often inspires ideas for personal adaptations on the garden's layout, decorations, and/or plants. Many goddesses had dominion over more than one area of life, and you may find yourself attracted to a different energy in the goddess than I was. Always listen to your inner voice! "Plcm.l:.s

If the goddess has any special plants that she holds sacred, they are noted here. Otherwise, the plants suggested are those whose metaphysical correspondences mirror that goddess's energy, and the overall theme of the garden.

In magick, patterns are power (that'S why so many reli­ gious traditions use ritual to raise energy). For some gardens, the pattern comes from the garden's function (take the clock garden, for example). For others, patterns come out of geomantic symbolism. One example would be using a square garden for the "Earth" garden because traditionally a square represents the four corners of creation, the four directions, and the four winds. Alternatively, a circle is certainly apt because we live on a globe.


60

G~l"c{e"'-L"'-9 "",ak lke GClc{c{ess

SlCl",-es, \lV\L",-el"~l:;;, Cl"~Sl~l:;;. ~",-c{ SkeUs

For the purpose of economy, I've limited these sugges­ tions to those items that aren't overly expensive (meaning that I haven't included gemstones unless inexpensive cuts are avail­ able). As with the plants for the garden, the stones suggested be those that honor the goddess or augment the garden's energy. They can be put into the soil, hung above a window sill, or placed on top of a firm dirt surface to sustain magickal energy. CClt.":>l"

Every color has a specific vibration. That vibration har­ monizes with a variety of magickal goals. The more intense the color is, the more potent it is. For example, adding a deep red rose to a love garden symbolically deepens the love being grown there. Consequently, when a goddess does not have sa­ cred plants, or when you don't like the plants suggested for a garden, there is nothing wrong with using color to reflect your theme and goals.

'D eCCll"~lL ve """1" CI",cke:;; Gardening stores have so many nifty products now, from statuary to reflection balls, that it gives the goddess gardener completely new ways to express his or her magick. The things I suggest here are limited to those I have actually seen for sale at stores or on the Internet so you're not driving yourself crazy looking for something that mayor may not exist. Warning: Decorative touches can become addictive and hazardous to one's budget!

'D Ll"eclLCI"'­ In both magick and feng shui, each direction has a special function that can support and increase the energy of your

G",.td.ess G"'....t........s

61

garden when used effectively. To this end, you can face the garden toward a specific direction, place a potted plant or window garden in a specific quarter of your horne, or put a larger effort in a particular quarter of the yard. You can also use this information to determine where to put specific plants or deco­ rative items to further accentuate your goals for the garden. C-l c{~pl~lLCI"'-:;;

Specifically for those with limited space, this section pro­ vides ideas on how to honor each goddess and her powers in a window box, hanging planter, via potted plants, topiary, and so forth. C-lflel"-..J-t ~l"vesl C-lpplLC~lLCI"'-:;;

With all that good energy growing, it would be a shame not to use some of it! This section will give you recipes and instructions on using the plants you've grown for everything from incense and potions to magickally charged meals! Why put the gardens together this way rather than pro­ viding step-by-step diagrams and details? Quite simply, this is more fun and gives you far more elbow room for personal insights. I have found that people tend to look to books as "ex­ perts" and directions as if they were carved in stone. Goddess­ oriented people aren't quite as susceptible to that as some, but we still grow up in a world of black-and-white outlines that we're always told to stay within. This book, by comparison, begs you to go outside the lines, at least in this one corner of your reality. It is my sincere hope that as you begin reading and trying different ideas, you'll enjoy not only the gardening process more, but get to know the Goddess in all her facets a little better through the explora­ tion. Her ancient face is right before you in every tree and stone-dare to look. Dare to try. Dare to believe. May your green thumb grow even greener!


60

GQ.,...!e"'~"'9 vvak lke Ge.!.!ess

Sle",es, /-'V\"~",e""Qls, C.,..yslQls, Q"'.! SkeUs

For the purpose of economy, I've limited these sugges­ tions to those items that aren't overly expensive (meaning that I haven't included gemstones unless inexpensive cuts are avail­ able). As with the plants for the garden, the stones suggested will be those that honor the goddess or augment the garden's energy. They can be put into the soil, hung above a window sill, or placed on top of a firm dirt surface to sustain magickal energy. Cele.,..

Every color has a specific vibration. That vibration har­ monizes with a variety of magickal goals. The more intense the color is, the more potent it is. For example, adding a deep red rose to a love garden symbolically deepens the love being grown there. Consequently, when a goddess does not have sa­ cred plants, or when you don't like the plants suggested for a garden, there is nothing wrong with using color to reflect your theme and goals. -oec;e""Ql~ve """leuc;kes

Gardening stores have so many nifty products now, from statuary to reflection balls, that it gives the goddess gardener completely new ways to express his or her magick. The things I suggest here are limited to those I have actually seen for sale at stores or on the Internet so you're not driving yourself crazy looking for something that mayor may not exist. Warning: Decorative touches can become addictive and hazardous to one's budget! -o~.,..ec;l~",

In both magick and feng shui, each direction has a special function that can support and increase the energy of your

G",d.d.ess G

..,.d.e""s

61

garden when used effectively. To this end, you can face the garden toward a specific direction, place a potted plant or window garden in a specific quarter of your home, or put a larger effort in a particular quarter of the yard. You can also use this information to determine where to put specific plants or deco­ rative items to further accentuate your goals for the garden. a

.!Qf'lQl~e",s

Specifically for those with limited space, this section pro­ vides ideas on how to honor each goddess and her powers in a window box, hanging planter, via potted plants, topiary, and so forth. a

fle.,..- .J--tQ.,..vesl af'f'l~c;Ql~e",s

With all that good energy growing, it would be a shame not to use some of it! This section will give you recipes and instructions on using the plants you've grown for everything from incense and potions to magickally charged meals! Why put the gardens together this way rather than pro­ viding step-by-step diagrams and details? Quite simply, this is more fun and gives you far more elbow room for personal insights. I have found that people tend to look to books as "ex­ perts" and directions as if they were carved in stone. Goddess­ oriented people aren't quite as susceptible to that as some, but we still grow up in a world of black-and-white outlines that we're always told to stay within. This book, by comparison, begs you to go outside the lines, at least in this one corner of your reality. It is my sincere hope that as you begin reading and trying different ideas, you'll enjoy not only the gardening process more, but get to know the Goddess in all her facets a little better through the explora­ tion. Her ancient face is right before you in every tree and stone-dare to look. Dare to try. Dare to believe. May your green thumb grow even greener!


62

Gc.yd.e"t.YIo.9 vvak tke God.d.ess

Cl ",-ClleY'ClS"':

GClY'c:le"V\.. of lke 5","V\..

G",.t.tess G ......te,",,-s

63

Amaterasu's magickal attributes include love, fertility, kindness, blessings, education, family or tribal unity, wisdom, peace, and charity. Plc."ts

Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn. -John Muir

As a sun goddess, Arnaterasu's plants may be aligned with the sun's vibrant power. These include carnation, chamomile, chrysanthemum, juniper, marigold, rosemary, and sunflower. Bear in mind if you use sunflowers that they're very tall. These are best put toward the back of your garden where they won't block your view or create too much shade for the sun-loving plants surrounding them .

.J-It.st,=-C",lt",yc.l (}"foY-.-.c.tt.o"

Amaterasu comes to us from Japan, specifically the Shinto Buddhist tradition. Her name means shining heaven. She rules all other gods and goddesses and protects and unifies the people of Japan. Not surprisingly, her emblem is a rising sun (as it appears on Japanese flags). At one point in her mythological cycle, Arnaterasu hid herself in a cave (this may have been a symbol of Winter or perhaps an eclipse), feeling that the world had become too cruel and barbaric. All the gods and goddesses begged her to return with life-giving light, but Amaterasu was not about to be swayed-at least not until Uzume (the goddess of merriment), knowing how serious things had become across the Earth, went to Amaterasu's cave and began to dance humorously, shouting all manner ofthings to coax Amaterasu out. U zume succeeded with the help of a mirror that showed Amaterasu the beauty she was keeping from the planet. Amaterasu emerged, Winter was banished, and the light returned. With this story in mind, we turn to Amaterasu to make a garden of sunshine. In many traditions the sun represents on-going blessings, something we can all use more of!

If you wish, you can include a few lunar plants too (Amaterasu was the sister of a moon god). Another alternative for an Amaterasu garden is to dedicate the land to growing edible items, because she taught humans how to cultivate food.


62

Gal"c:le"-L"-'3 vvi.tk tke Gcoc:lc:less

a

",-alel'"as'U!

Gal'"c:le"- of lke s~"-

Geclcless G

..,.cl"'....."

63

Amaterasu's rnagickal attributes include love, fertility, kindness, blessings, education, family or tribal unity, wisdom, peace, and charity. "Pla"-ts

Climb the mountains and get their good tidings. Nature's peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their own freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop away from you like the leaves of Autumn. -John Muir

As a sun goddess, Amaterasu's plants may be aligned with the sun's vibrant power. These include carnation, chamomile, chrysanthemum, juniper, marigold, rosemary, and sunflower. Bear in mind if you use sunflowers that they're very tall. These are best put toward the back of your garden where they won't block your view or create too much shade for the sun-loving plants surrounding them .

..J--lLstco-C-ult-ul"al <::J"-fCOl"""atLCO"-

Amaterasu comes to us from Japan, specifically the Shinto Buddhist tradition. Her name means shining heaven. She rules all other gods and goddesses and protects and unifies the people of Japan. Not surprisingly, her emblem is a rising sun (as it appears on Japanese flags). At one point in her mythological cycle, Amaterasu hid herself in a cave (this may have been a symbol of Winter or perhaps an eclipse), feeling that the world had become too cruel and barbaric. All the gods and goddesses begged her to return with life-giving light, but Amaterasu was not about to be swayed-at least not until Uzume (the goddess of merriment), knowing how serious things had become across the Earth, went to Amaterasu's cave and began to dance humorously, shouting all manner ofthings to coax Amaterasu out. U zume succeeded with the help of a mirror that showed Amaterasu the beauty she was keeping from the planet. Amaterasu emerged, Winter was banished, and the light returned. With this story in mind, we turn to Amaterasu to make a garden of sunshine. In many traditions the sun represents on-going blessings, something we can all use more of!

If you wish, you can include a few lunar plants too (Amaterasu was the sister of a moon god). Another alternative for an Amaterasu garden is to dedicate the land to growing edible items, because she taught humans how to cultivate food.


6...:::1

65

Gc:n.c:le"-~"-,=, '\N~I::."- I::."-e G<:>c:lc:less

Gc::":ld.,,,ss Ga,-d.",,,,-s

1='o:>l::.l::.el""-s

what aspects of the goddess you want to stress. Look to the East for family unit; to the West for fertility; to the South and Southwest for love, passion, and energy; and to the Northeast to nurture learning.

A simple circle has been used to symbolize the sun for ages. If you feel a little more creative, make the image of a sun in splendor (that is, with arms reaching out clockwise to create positive energy). The border for this garden can be easily cre­ ated with fist-sized rocks or another decorative edging. Alternative patterns to consider for designing your garden include a kite or an arrow, both of which are Amaterasu's emblems. The kite can be fashioned pretty simply by making a diamond shaped border.

Cl c:lo:>pl::.o:>l::.~<:>"-$

Roundish planters set or hung in sunny windows welcome Amaterasu's warm embrace. Add some sun catchers nearby to literally "capture" and distribute her positive energy. Marigold is a good choice for plants, as it's very hearty and comes in both yellow and orange.

SI::.<:>"-es, rvv\~"-el"o:>ts, Cl"ysl::.o:>ts, o:>"-c:l S"-eUs

Amber, carnelian, plain quartz, sunstone, tigereye. A neat idea is to pile some of these stones into a cairn-like structure to recount Amaterasu's story. C<:>t<:>l"S

The sun's colors are also those associated with the Fire Element, namely yellow, yellow gold, red, and orange. Any plants, stones, or borders with these colors make suitable sub­ stitutes for those mentioned. "Dec;;<:>l"o:>l::.~ve

c-f <:> ...c;;"-e$

Consider a mirror or mirrored wind chimes (to create dancing music), woven fabric items such as small flags (because Amaterasu wove garments for the gods), or an iron garden spike topped with a glass sun or a votive-styled candle holder (the flame honors the goddess). "D~l"ec;;I::.~<:>"-

In magick, the sun's direction is that of the South, where her power is most noticeable. In feng shui much depends on

Clfl::.el"-J--tO:>l"vesl::. Clppt~c;;o:>l::.~<:>"-$

Items from Amaterasu's garden are best harvested in August, the month associated with her. Marigold is an edible flower that can be tossed into salads, soup, and wine. It yields a tangy flavor and brings a smile to most faces. Chrysanthemum and carnation can be added to this blend for a solar-flower medley suited to a Solstice observance. One third of a cup of each of these flowers dried and powdered, blended with a pinch of rosemary, makes a wonderful incense for honoring the Sun, the Fire Element, or for celebrating any solar festival. Simi­ larly, you could steep a few of each flower's petals in chamo­ mile tea to be used for an energizing potion or a suitable liba­ tion to Amaterasu.


64

GCIl..d.e"'~"'9 ""a;,k lke Gc::od.d.ess

"P CllleY'",;; A simple circle has been used to symbolize the sun for ages. If you feel a little more creative, make the image of a sun in splendor (that is, with arms reaching out clockwise to create positive energy). The border for this garden can be easily cre.. ated with fist-sized rocks or another decorative edging. Alternative patterns to consider for designing your garden include a kite or an arrow, both of which are Amaterasu's emblems. The kite can be fashioned pretty simply by making a diamond shaped border.

Goclcle:;;:;; G

....cl"''''-s

65

what aspects of the goddess you want to stress. Look to the East for family unit; to the West for fertility; to the South and Southwest for love, passion, and energy; and to the Northeast to nurture learning. ad.ClplCll~c::o",;;

Roundish planters set or hung in sunny windows welcome Amaterasu's warm embrace. Add some sun catchers nearby to literally "capture" and distribute her positive energy. Marigold is a good choice for plants, as it's very hearty and comes in both yellow and orange.

Slc::o",e;;.'VY\~",eY'ClI;;. CY'y:;lClls, CI",d. Skells

Amber, carnelian, plain quartz, sunstone, tigereye. A neat idea is to pile some of these stones into a cairn-like structure to recount Amaterasu's story. Cc::olc::oY':;

The sun's colors are also those associated with the Fire Element, namely yellow, yellow gold, red, and orange. Any plants, stones, or borders with these colors make suitable sub足 stitutes for those mentioned. "De""'Y'Clli:.ve ~ c::o ....."kes

Consider a mirror or mirrored wind chimes (to create dancing music), woven fabric items such as small flags (because Amaterasu wove garments for the gods), or an iron garden spike topped with a glass sun or a votive-styled candle holder (the flame honors the goddess). "D ~Y'ecl~c::o",

In magick, the sun's direction is that of the South, where her power is most noticeable. In feng shui much depends on

afleY'-J-tClY've;;l appl~"Cll~c::o",s

Items from Amaterasu's garden are best harvested in August, the month associated with her. Marigold is an edible flower that can be tossed into salads, soup, and wine. It yields a tangy flavor and brings a smile to most faces. Chrysanthemum and carnation can be added to this blend for a solar-flower medley suited to a Solstice observance. One third of a cup of each of these flowers dried and powdered, blended with a pinch of rosemary, makes a wonderful incense for honoring the Sun, the Fire Element, or for celebrating any solar festival. Simi足 larly, you could steep a few of each flower's petals in chamo足 mile tea to be used for an energizing potion or a suitable liba足 tion to Amaterasu.


66

Gc:n·d.e~"~'3 vvLlk lke God."less

Goclcless G"..·cle",-s

67

IIII

Qslc:::n..le: Celesl~c:::1l Gc:::1yc::le"­ Ideals are like stars: you will not succeed in touching them with your hands, but like the seafaring man on the ocean desert of waters, you choose them as your guides, and following them, you reach your destiny. -Carl Schurz ~"slo-C""lh-tl",,,l CJ~fol"",-",l"o~

Astarte appears in the near East as the Queen of Heaven, goddess of the moon and night, and goddess of the evening star. She also embodies our passions. Astarte's myths tell of her descending from heaven to find her lost love. Much to human and animal distress, however, this absence caused a tem­ porary halt of all reproductive activity on Earth (likely allud­ ing to another seasonal myth). Astarte's name is seen in Syria, but she appears in Babylon as Istar and in the Old Testament as Asthoreth. In these set­ tings she presided over love and fertility. When she moved into Egypt, she became a protectress who bore a spear or arrow. She is said to safeguard sailors and oversee equity in legal matters. Interestingly, many historians believe many of Astarte's priests and priestesses were trained in the art of astrology, per­ haps worshipping her indirectly as they studied the skies. To­ day we look to Astarte to reconnect us to the stars, our wishes and dreams, and our heritage as inhabitants of a very large universe. Astarte's magickal attributes include warrior energy, pro­ ductivity, fecundity, justice, passion or sexuality, and success. 1='1",~ls

If acacia or lotus will grow in your climate, these are her favored plants. Alternatively, look to plants that appear as stars

(aster comes to mind) or that have associations with the moon (such as camellia, gardenia, cucumber, honesty, and willows). 1=' ",llel"~s

One pattern used to honor Astarte is that of a crescent moon, which isn't too difficult to make with small areas of land. I've also seen crescent-shaped containers for sale at garden shops. Two alternatives exist. The first would be to design a star-shaped garden (perhaps using a number of points that you consider "lucky") or designing a garden that's pat­ terned after an astrological figure. Slo~es. "\IV\"~el"",ls. Cl"ysl",ls. ",~d. SkeUs

Agate was favored in Syria as protective stone, so there's no reason not to include a few in your garden to safeguard its magick. Because Astarte is a lunar goddess, look to moonstone as an alternative. Additionally the moon rules the sea, so sea­ shells (which make good fertilizer if they're ground up) and a starfish would both be appropriate. Colol"s

Red and white are sacred to this Astarte (the alternative to white is silver, which could come through decorative touches, fencing, etc.). '"Decol"",l"ve

c-r o,,"ckes

Statues of horses, doves, or lions, all of which were sacred animals to her, are appropriate. She is also often shown with a mirror, so reflective items (such as a silvery reflection ball) would be suited to Astarte's garden.


66

G",yd.e""~""9 "",a.k lke God.d.ess

Clslc::n..l e : Celesl~c::Il

Gc::Il"'c:le"­

Ideals are like stars: you wiII not succeed in touching them with your hands, but like the seafaring man on the ocean desert of waters, you choose them as your guides, and foIIowing them, you reach your destiny. -Carl Schurz

.J--t ~sb~- C:;'\...lb..y",l

q""foY",-",l~o ""

Astarte appears in the near East as the Queen of Heaven, goddess of the moon and night, and goddess of the evening star. She also embodies our passions. Astarte's myths tell of her descending from heaven to find her lost love. Much to human and animal distress, however, this absence caused a tem­ porary halt of all reproductive activity on Earth (likely allud­ ing to another seasonal myth). Astarte's name is seen in Syria, but she appears in Babylon as Istar and in the Old Testament as Asthoreth. In these set­ tings she presided over love and fertility. When she moved into Egypt, she became a protectress who bore a spear or arrow. She is said to safeguard sailors and oversee equity in legal matters. Interestingly, many historians believe many of Astarte's priests and priestesses were trained in the art of astrology, per­ haps worshipping her indirectly as they studied the skies. To­ day we look to Astarte to reconnect us to the stars, our wishes and dreams, and our heritage as inhabitants of a very large universe. Astarte's magickal attributes include warrior energy, pro­ ductivity, fecundity, justice, passion or sexuality, and success.

'-I 'I",""l" If acacia or lotus will grow in your climate, these are her favored plants. Alternatively, look to plants that appear as stars

G",d.d.ess G

.....d.e",-s

67

(aster comes to mind) or that have associations with the moon (such as camellia, gardenia, cucumber, honesty, and willows). Cf ) ",lleY""s

One pattern used to honor Astarte is that of a crescent moon, which isn't too difficult to make with small areas of land. I've also seen crescent-shaped containers for sale at garden shops. Two alternatives exist. The first would be to design a star-shaped garden (perhaps using a number of points that you consider "lucky") or designing a garden that's pat­ terned after an astrological figure. Slo""es. /VV\~""eY",ls. CY\1sl",ls. ",,,,,d. Skells

Agate was favored in Syria as protective stone, so there's no reason not to include a few in your garden to safeguard its magick. Because Astarte is a lunar goddess, look to moonstone as an alternative. Additionally the moon rules the sea, so sea­ shells (which make good fertilizer if they're ground up) and a starfish would both be appropriate. Coloys

Red and white are sacred to this Astarte (the alternative to white is silver, which could come through decorative touches, fencing, etc.). '"Dec;;=y",l"ve ~ ouc;;kes

Statues of horses, doves, or lions, all of which were sacred animals to her, are appropriate. She is also often shown with a mirror, so reflective items (such as a silvery reflection ball) would be suited to Astarte's garden.


68

Gal"cle~i.~9 "",ak lke Goclcless

Go.:!..:!..,,,,, G"'.. ..:!.........

'Oi.l"ec;li.o~

"B ~sb G ~l"'c:le"," of ~ oyf",l 'D ~","ci."'"9

Magickally, the moon resides in the West with the Ele足 ment of Water. In feng shui many of Astarte's attributes reside in the South (along with the color red), but her color ofwhite I silver is in the West. This might lead to considering a comer garden in the Southwest that's split along the axis with red and white flowers.

a

claplali.o~s

Watch to see which window in your home gets moonlight the most often, or where you can see the most stars (placing a planter beneath a skylight might prove ideal if it doesn't impede traffic). ORel"-..)-tal"vesl Oppti.c;aHo~s

When you peel the cucumbers leave five thin lines of green skin on them (equal distances apart). When cut, the slices resemble a pentagram. Mix these with a vinaigrette dressing and fresh dill for a passion-inspiring snack. Dry and bum the aromatics from your garden when you're learning to read astrological charts, or when you want more insights into your birth sign and its influence on your life. Or, carry acacia or lotus with you when entering a legal situation to invoke Astarte's assistance.

69

Dance is the hidden language of the soul. -Martha Graham ..)-ti.slo- C

",(l "'l"at

C}~fol"","aHo~

Bast is a cat-faced goddess who comes to us from the Nile's Delta region. All of Egypt honored her as a solar deity who was filled with fertile energy. More than this, however, Bast was known as a joyful goddess whose followers took great plea足 sure in dancing, singing, music, and playfulness. The historian Herodotus recounted how many of her rituals were accompa足 nied with a sort of street fair, complete with merchants, mas足 querades, and all manner of entertainers. Local lore stated that taking part in this celebration ensured the participants of good health for another year. The importance of Bast and her cats is quite evident in Egyptian customs. It was a crime worthy of a death sentence most of Egypt to kill a cat. Additionally, thousands of cats have been found mummified in tombs, taking their rightful place near loving owners as greatly honored creatures. The Bast theme is ideal for anyone who would like an ongoing visual pick-me-up. The daily grind can often rob us of the pure, childlike joy in living and experiencing every moment fully. Bast restores that joy in her garden. Bast's magickal attributes include happiness, kindness, socialability, playfulness, humor, sacred dance, inspiring music, protection, wellness, sex appeal, and fertility.


68

G"'l"clev..~v..9 "",a:k t::.ke Gc>clcless

'O~l"ect::.~c>v..

Magickally, the moon resides in the West with the Ele足 ment of Water. In feng shui many of Astarte's attributes reside the South (along with the color red), but her color ofwhite I silver is in the West. This might lead to considering a corner garden in the Southwest that's split along the axis with red and white flowers. a

cl"'pt::.",t::.l.c>v..s

Watch to see which window in your home gets moonlight the most often, or where you can see the most stars (placing a planter beneath a skylight might prove ideal if it doesn't impede traffic). aRel"-.J-t"'l"vest::. appll.C<:It::.~c>v..;;

When you peel the cucumbers leave five thin lines of green skin on them (equal distances apart). When cut, the slices resemble a pentagram. Mix these with a vinaigrette dressing and fresh dill for a passion-inspiring snack. Dry and burn the aromatics from your garden when you're learning to read astrological charts, or when you want more insights into your birth sign and its influence on your life. Or, carry acacia or lotus with you when entering a legal situation to invoke Astarte's assistance.

Goc:lc:l...... G ..,.c:l.."""

69

'Basb GaY"c:le"," of ~ oyf""l 'D a","c~"'"9 Dance is the hidden language of the soul. -Martha Graham .J-t~;;t::.c>-C"lh"l"",l CJv..fc>l"",,"'t::.l.c>v..

Bast is a cat-faced goddess who comes to us from the Nile's Delta region. All of Egypt honored her as a solar deity who was filled with fertile energy. More than this, however, Bast was known as a joyful goddess whose followers took great plea足 sure in dancing, singing, music, and playfulness. The historian Herodotus recounted how many of her rituals were accompa足 nied with a sort of street fair, complete with merchants, mas足 querades, and all manner of entertainers. Local lore stated that taking part in this celebration ensured the participants of good health for another year. The importance of Bast and her cats is quite evident in Egyptian customs. It was a crime worthy of a death sentence in most of Egypt to kill a cat. Additionally, thousands of cats have been found mummified in tombs, taking their rightful place near loving owners as greatly honored creatures. The Bast theme is ideal for anyone who would like an ongoing visual pick-me-up. The daily grind can often rob us of the pure, childlike joy in living and experiencing every moment fully. Bast restores that joy in her garden. Bast's magickal attributes include happiness, kindness, socialability, playfulness, humor, sacred dance, inspiring music, protection, wellness, sex appeal, and fertility.


70

71

Gc:n·cle",,~vo...9 '\Nak f:.ke Goclcless

G ...l.l""" G",...l"","s

Pla""f:.s

'DeCOl"af:.~ve ~'o,,~ckes

Catnip and/or valerian are necessary in Bast's garden because cats adore these two herbs so much, and they inspire such whimsy in these creatures. Other plants believed to attract joy include hyacinth, hawthorn, lavender, lily of the valley, marjoram, and morning glory. By the way, asperging your garden with a little wine is a good idea for your land blessing or protective rite. Wine was the favored beverage during Bast's festivals and was often accompanied by light-hearted flute music and rhythmic clapping.

Images of lions or cats (especially those made in black stone), her sacred creature, are ideal for this garden. If you fmd an image of Bast, drape it in a rich, green cloth. 'D~l"ecHovo...

Magickally, East best represents Bast with hopefulness and renewal, and South symbolizes her more passionate/sexual aspect. Feng shui seems to agree, placing health, new begin­ nings, and positive energy in the East, along with the color green.

Paf:.f:;ervo...s

A solar circle is one idea, but whatever your choice, try to make room inside the garden or around its perimeter for ritual dancing. Move clockwise when you want to draw positive, happy energies into your life, and counterclockwise to banish the blues. Many of Bast's worshippers often celebrated skyclad (naked) because they felt the body was worthy of rejoicing, so if you live on a large tract of land or in a rural area you may want to do the same. Sf:.o""es. V'V\~""erals. Cr\fsf:.als. avo...cl Skells

Stones under the dominion of Leo are an option (honor­ ing Bast's Lion aspect). These include amber and carnelian. For joy, amethyst and chrysoprase are traditional.

Clclaf'f:.af:.~o""s

Bast is sometimes depicted carrying a woven basket, so look for something of this nature to house your indoor plants. If you add some feline decorations, that would be ideal! Alter­ natively, make four smaller potted plants to mark the four quar­ ters of your sacred space and dance in the middle of them. Catnip is best-suited for the West!Water, and lavender or mar­ joram for the East! Air quarter. Choose the other two direc­

Colors

Black (cat images only), green, gold, and yellow are all appropriate.


710

71

Gc:n.d.e"-L"-" vvLt:.k lke Ged.d.ess

G",.t.tess G"'.. ..te"""s

'Pla"-ls

'OeceY'alLve ~ e,"ckes

Catnip and/or valerian are necessary in Bast's garden because cats adore these two herbs so much, and they inspire such whimsy in these creatures. Other plants believed to attract joy include hyacinth, hawthorn, lavender, lily of the valley, marjoram, and morning glory. By the way, asperging your garden with a little wine is a good idea for your land blessing or protective rite. Wine was the favored beverage during Bast's festivals and was often accompanied by light-hearted flute music and rhythmic clapping.

Images of lions or cats (especially those made in black stone), her sacred creature, are ideal for this garden. If you find an image of Bast, drape it in a rich, green cloth. 'OLY'eclLe"-

Magickally, East best represents Bast with hopefulness and renewal, and South symbolizes her more passionate/sexual aspect. Feng shui seems to agree, placing health, new begin­ nings, and positive energy in the East, along with the color green.

' PalleY'"-s

A solar circle is one idea, but whatever your choice, try to make room inside the garden or around its perimeter for ritual dancing. Move clockwise when you want to draw positive, happy energies into your life, and counterclockwise to banish the blues. Many of Bast's worshippers often celebrated skyclad (naked) because they felt the body was worthy of rejoicing, so if you live on a large tract of land or in a rural area you may want to do the same. Sle"-es, /-YY'\L"-eY'als, CY'yslals, a"-d. SkeUs

Stones under the dominion of Leo are an option (honor­ ing Bast's Lion aspect). These include amber and carnelian. For joy, amethyst and chrysoprase are traditional.

Dd.aplalLe"-s

Bast is sometimes depicted carrying a woven basket, so look for something of this nature to house your indoor plants. If you add some feline decorations, that would be ideal! Alter­ natively, make four smaller potted plants to mark the four quar­ ters of your sacred space and dance in the middle of them. Catnip is best-suited for the West/Water, and lavender or mar­ joram for the East!Air quarter. Choose the other two direc­

CeleY's

Black (cat images only), green, gold, and yellow are all appropriate.

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tional accoutrements according to the aspect of Bast you most want to venerate combined with the plant's Elemental corre­ spondence.

--s Yl.9l.b

73

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C1 fi:el"-.J--l al"vesl C1 pplLcalLo"-s Lavender has so many applications that it's one of my favorite plants. Dry it and add it to any incense where you want to lift heavy feelings out of a house or room. Make it into a tea and internalize self-appreciation. Steep it in warm oil with which which you scent soap, or add it to your baths and satu­ rate your aura with all of Bast's wonderful energies. By the way, scenting soap isn't difficult. Just take a cotton or linen cloth and lay it in a box that has an airtight cover (such as food storage containers, but use one that you won't want to use for food again as the aroma will stay). Dab the cloth with the lavender oil until the aroma is fairly strong, then lay the unwrapped soap on top. Close this up and leave it for several weeks. Soap is porous and will slowly absorb the scent. If you can do this from the first day of a full moon until the next full moon, all the better symbolically for magickal "fullness."

Brigid, excellent woman, sudden flame,

may the bright fiery sun take us to the lasting kingdom.

-Ancient Irish song .J--lLslo- C

",ll"'l"al C)"-fol"",-alLo"­

Throughout the world's religious traditions we find god­ desses who have more than one face. If we compare this to the Christian concept of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit being one Being yet separate personalities or aspects of that Being, the mystical equivalent for the Goddess becomes the Maiden, Mother, and Crone. Wiccans frequently represent the three­ fold goddess on our altars with a cauldron with three legs. The cauldron itself is creation's womb, and the legs provide sup­ port for nurturing that creation. Additionally, the triune God­ dess represents the main stages in our lives and the personality or attributes of the goddess change depending on her form/ stage. In Ireland, and many other parts of Celtic Europe, Brigit provides us with an excellent example of just such a triune deity. As the Maiden she invented whistling to call to her friends (and it is said that Witches can still whistle up a wind). As the Mother she invented keening upon the death of her son. She also presided over smithcraft, likely as the Crone, because the elder goddess cares for the ancient mysteries among which metalcraft was counted as quite sacred. According to old bardic song, Brigit the poetess had two "sisters": one who healed and one who watched over the smith's fires. This is an allusion to the trinity that Christianity kept


72

Oc:l...cle.....i......9 ""ak tke Ooclcless

tional accoutrements according to the aspect of Bast you most want to venerate combined with the plant's Elemental corre­ spondence.

0",,..1.,,,,,-,,

'"'B.. .~9~b ~kl"'eefolc:l G oc:lc:less G

73

c.....c:le'""

ClRe...-.J-{c:I...vest Clppli.cc:lti.o.....s

Lavender has so many applications that it's one of my favorite plants. Dry it and add it to any incense where you want to lift heavy feelings out of a house or room. Make it into a tea and internalize self-appreciation. Steep it in warm oil with which which you scent soap, or add it to your baths and satu­ rate your aura with all of Bast's wonderful energies. By the way, scenting soap isn't difficult. Just take a cotton or linen cloth and lay it in a box that has an airtight cover (such as food storage containers, but use one that you won't want to use for food again as the aroma will stay). Dab the cloth with the lavender oil until the aroma is fairly strong, then lay the unwrapped soap on top. Close this up and leave it for several weeks. Soap is porous and will slowly absorb the scent. If you can do this from the first day of a full moon until the next moon, all the better symbolically for magickal "fullness."

Brigid, excellent woman, sudden flame,

may the bright fiery sun take us to the lasting kingdom.

-Ancient Irish song .J-{i.sto-C....lb.....c:I(

g .....fo ...""'c:lt..o.....

Throughout the world's religious traditions we find god­ desses who have more than one face. If we compare this to the Christian concept of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit being one Being yet separate personalities or aspects of that Being, the mystical equivalent for the Goddess becomes the Maiden, Mother, and Crone. Wiccans frequently represent the three­ fold goddess on our altars with a cauldron with three legs. The cauldron itself is creation's womb, and the legs provide sup­ port for nurturing that creation. Additionally, the triune God­ dess represents the main stages in our lives and the personality or attributes of the goddess change depending on her form/ stage. In Ireland, and many other parts of Celtic Europe, Brigit provides us with an excellent example of just such a triune deity. As the Maiden she invented whistling to call to her friends (and it is said that Witches can still whistle up a wind). As the Mother she invented keening upon the death of her son. She also presided over smithcraft, likely as the Crone, because the elder goddess cares for the ancient mysteries among which metalcraft was counted as quite sacred. According to old bardic song, Brigit the poetess had two "sisters": one who healed and one who watched over the smith's fires. This is an allusion to the trinity that Christianity kept


74

75

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Q ...l.l""" Q""...le",-"

when Christians made Brigit a saint. In Christian tradition, Brigit was prayed to for health and inspiration, two attributes also seen in the earlier goddess figure. February 1, Brigit's Day, continues to be a sacred obser­ vance on many magickal and Christian calendars. This is a fes­ tival of light, representing purity (namely the Maiden). August 1 (Lammas) is another time when Brigit is celebrated in her fertile aspect (or the Mother goddess). No matter the date, how­ ever, this garden is a wonderful choice for people wishing to reconnect with the feminine, or yin, powers of the universe. Brigit's magickal attributes include leadership, inspiration, health, fire, the Fire Element, protecting children, handcrafts, compassion, and sustenance.

made from straw or com husk to represent her, and then hung to protect a house and its occupants from eviL Indirectly this also brings us back to Brigit's solar IFire aspect, as the cross represents the center of the sun and the turning of time on that aXIS.

By the way, Brigit's temples always had 19 priestesses because this number represented the Celtic great cycle. You may want to integrate this number into your garden somehow (sections, number of plants, etc.). Sb:>",-es, 'VV\i..",-eY"Clts, CY",:/slClts. Q"'-c:l SkeUs

Coal (as part of the ever-burning sacred fires of the heart or Circle) is a good choice. Alternatively, use any three-pointed crystal to honor the threefold goddess or three stones (one shiny and new white stone, one pink or red and slightly worn stone, and one brown and old stone). Cotors

Generally speaking, white or pale pastels represent the Maiden aspect, bright-vibrant colors such as red (for life and fertility) represent the Mother, and dark colors such as brown and black are those of the Crone. "Ptc:l",-b

Beans were sacred to many of the goddesses of ancient Europe, so they are an option. For my Brigit garden, I have looked to her attributes in choosing the plants. Specifically, I have a beech tree for creativity, ferns and juniper for health, dill and garlic to protect children, and alfalfa for providence. "PQlleY"",-s

This goddess's name means shining arrow, so an arrow is a logical choice. Alternatively, choose a cross, which was often

"Decorc:lli..ve ~ o'Uckes

A small tended hedge around your garden would be very appropriate as hedges often surrounded Brigit's sanctuaries. If you can find a brass-colored shoe, this is one of her sacred relics. Many wells throughout Europe are named after "Brid" (her Irish designation) so a small wishing well might make a lovely centerpiece, as would any statuary of oxen, a boar, or a ram (all sacred animals to this goddess).


7~

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when Christians made Brigit a saint. In Christian tradition, Brigit was prayed to for health and inspiration, two attributes also seen in the earlier goddess figure. February 1, Brigit's Day, continues to be a sacred obser­ vance on many magickal and Christian calendars. This is a fes­ tival of light, representing purity (namely the Maiden). August 1 (Lammas) is another time when Brigit is celebrated in her fertile aspect (or the Mother goddess). No matter the date, how­ ever, this garden is a wonderful choice for people wishing to reconnect with the feminine, or yin, powers of the universe. Brigit's magickal attributes include leadership, inspiration, health, fire, the Fire Element, protecting children, handcrafts, compassion, and sustenance.

..,.d.. ,,5

75

made from straw or corn husk to represent her, and then hung to protect a house and its occupants from eviL Indirectly this also brings us back to Brigit's solar/Fire aspect, as the cross represents the center of the sun and the turning of time on that axis. By the way, Brigit's temples always had 19 priestesses because this number represented the Celtic great cycle. You may want to integrate this number into your garden somehow (sections, number of plants, etc.). St=""es, '\IY\~""el"Qls, Cl",:/st:.Qls, """"d. SkeUs;

Coal (as part of the ever-burning sacred fires of the heart or Circle) is a good choice. Alternatively, use any three-pointed crystal to honor the threefold goddess or three stones (one shiny and new white stone, one pink or red and slightly worn stone, and one brown and old stone). C=lol"s

Generally speaking, white or pale pastels represent the Maiden aspect, bright-vibrant colors such as red (for life and fertility) represent the Mother, and dark colors such as brown and black are those of the Crone. PlQ""t:.s "Dec:;ol"Qt:.~ve ~ =...,.c:;kes

Beans were sacred to many of the goddesses of ancient Europe, so they are an option. For my Brigit garden, I have looked to her attributes in choosing the plants. Specifically, I have a beech tree for creativity, ferns and juniper for health, and garlic to protect children, and alfalfa for providence. P

A small tended hedge around your garden would be very appropriate as hedges often surrounded Brigit's sanctuaries. If you can find a brass-colored shoe, this is one of her sacred relics. Many wells throughout Europe are named after "Brid" (her Irish designation) so a small wishing well might make a lovely centerpiece, as would any statuary of oxen, a boar, or a ram (all sacred animals to this goddess).

Qt:.t:.el"""S

This goddess's name means shining arrow, so an arrow is a logical choice. Alternatively, choose a cross, which was often

f

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76

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Geclcless G"",.cle\"\.s

'D ~Ye,;:t::~=",-

C

Because we're dealing with three different aspects of one, directions become convoluted. One idea here would be a circu足 lar garden or planter that's divided into three equal sections, perhaps so they form a peace sign (Maiden at the top right, Mother at the bottom, and Crone at the top left) or three parts one of which faces east and the other west (east is the Maiden, west the Crone).

P

el"l"l.c:lvve",:

olLo", GQl"c:le",

Double, double, toil and trouble, fire burn and cauldron bubble -Shakespeare

Cl ,*c:I"t::c:lt::~=",-s

..I-l~t::=- C

For complete flexibility, choose a planter of a suitable size to the space you have, then put three coins in the bottom of the soil so your prosperity can grow with Brigit's blessings. C1ft::el"-..I-lc:ll"vest::

77

"th'l"c:lt q",-f=l"""-c:lt::~=,,,-

Although Shakespeare is known as the source of this quote, Cerridwen had the idea for making potions in a caul足 dron long before he was ever born! According to lore, Cerridwen lived on an island in Lake Tegid, where she was diligently brew足 ing a very powerful potion for her son. This potion was filled with all the ingredients to make him wise, creative, and knowl足 edgeable. Unfortunately, a young mortal by the name of Gwion accidentally partook of a few drops of the elixir,and received all of its benefits. Cerridwen was angered by this and followed Gwion unceasingly. During the chase, the two tried to fool each other with shapeshifting magick. At last, Cerridwen caught and consumed Gwion in the form of a grain of wheat from which a child would grow. This child became the greatest bard of Welsh legend, none other than Taliesin. Talk about the power of making good out of a bad situation! This has always been a favorite story of mine because I love music and tall-tales. As a writer I often turn to Cerridwen when I'm experiencing a creative blockage. For artists and dreamers in all walks of life, Cerridwen offers hope and renewal-both of which blossom in her garden just waiting for us to pluck!

C1""I~cc:lt::~=",-s

The best days to harvest the Brigit garden are the 20th of any month, as that was when Brigit tended the sacred fires of her temples. Anything from Brigit's garden would be lovely to decorate a goddess altar, especially one for Drawing Down the Moon rituals. For those of you unfamiliar with this process, the idea is to take on the role of the goddess and allow her energy to fiU you completely during important rituals.

~

I


76

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G",ddess QQ.-de",-"

"O\....ecli.o"­

Cerriclvve"-:

Because we're dealing with three different aspects of one, directions become convoluted. One idea here would be a circu­ lar garden or planter that's divided into three equal sections, perhaps so they form a peace sign (Maiden at the top right, Mother at the bottom, and Crone at the top left) or three parts one of which faces east and the other west (east is the Maiden, west the Crone).

P

olio"- Gc::trcle"­

Double, double, toil and trouble, fire burn and cauldron bubble -Shakespeare

Qclaplali.o"-s

.J-ti.slo-Cullu...al CJ"-fo..."",ali.o"­

For complete flexibility, choose a planter of a suitable size to the space you have, then put three coins in the bottom of the soil so your prosperity can grow with Brigit's blessings. QRe...- .J-ta...vesl Q

77

Although Shakespeare is known as the source of this

quote, Cerridwen had the idea for making potions in a caul­

dron long before he was ever born! According to lore, Cerridwen

lived on an island in Lake Tegid, where she was diligently brew­

ing a very powerful potion for her son. This potion was filled

with all the ingredients to make him wise, creative, and knowl­

edgeable. Unfortunately, a young mortal by the name of Gwion accidentally partook of a few drops of the elixir,and received all of its benefits. Cerridwen was angered by this and followed Gwion unceasingly. During the chase, the two tried to fool each other with shape shifting magick. At last, Cerddwen caught and consumed Gwion in the form of a grain of wheat from which a child would grow. This child became the greatest bard of Welsh legend, none other than Taliesin. Talk about the power of making good out of a bad situation! This has always been a favorite story of mine because I love music and tall-tales. As a writer I often turn to Cerridwen when I'm experiencing a creative blockage. For artists and dreamers in all walks of life, Cerridwen offers hope and renewal-both of which blossom in her garden just waiting for us to pluck!

ppti.cal\.o"-:5

The best days to harvest the Brigit garden are the 20th of any month, as that was when Brigit tended the sacred fires of her temples. Anything from Brigit's garden would be lovely to decorate a goddess altar, especially one for Drawing Down the Moon rituals. For those of you unfamiliar with this process, the idea is to take on the role of the goddess and allow her energy to fill you completely during important rituals.

,

.

\


79

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Cerridwen's magickal attributes include wisdom, inspira­ tion, the moon, the muse, Nature, spellcraft, learning, herbal arts, potions, shapeshifting, and glamoury.

ary of these creatures would be nice for the garden. The hawk might go in the East for Air, the otter in the West for Water, the hen in the North for Earth, and the greyhound in the South for Fire because of its speed. Also, don't overlook the possibility of putting a large caul­ dron somewhere in your garden. You can let it collect rainwa­ ter with which to asperge your sacred spaces!

78

Plc:a",t.s

Cerridwen was also known as the White Lady, any white plants are suited to Cerridwen's garden. Second to this, look for plants that you personally use regularly in potions. In par­ ticular I would recommend white roses, lily, white lilac, and white heather as having potential. In preparing your garden, make an offering of cakes and wine to Cerridwen (traditional to her rituals), breaking and pouring these into the land to enrich it with her power.

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Anything that integrates the number six (six segments, six points, etc.) is appropriate, because there were six ingredients in Cerridwen's potion. Alternatively, you might shape the garden like a crescent moon, because Cerridwen has strong lunar associations.

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To stress Cerridwen's knowledge and learning aspects, use aventurine and fluorite. For creativity, use egg-shaped stones or green quartz.

In magick, East is the direction from which creative winds come to motivate and inspire us. In feng shui, Northeast is the direction of learning, Southeast the area for inventiveness, and West the direction for the color white.

Cele..s

Clclc:aF't.c:at.~e",s

White is the color best suited to this garden. "DeceY'c:at.~ve

White heather seems to fare pretty well indoors, and you can snip this in such a way so that has six distinct segments. Place this pot in a window that receives moonlight or an East­ ern-facing window to increase Cerridwen's energy in the plant.

c-r e ...ckes

The four animals Cerridwen became in her pursuit of Gwion were a greyhound, otter, hawk, and hen, so any statu­

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79

ary of these creatures would be nice for the garden. The hawk might go in the East for Air, the otter in the West for Water, the hen in the North for Earth, and the greyhound in the South for Fire because of its speed. Also, don't overlook the possibility of putting a large caul­ dron somewhere in your garden. You can let it collect rainwa­ ter with which to asperge your sacred spaces!

Cerridwen's magickal attributes include wisdom, inspira­ tion, the moon, the muse, Nature, spellcraft, learning, herbal arts, potions, shapeshifting, and glamoury. Plo"-t.s

Cerridwen was also known as the White Lady, any white plants are suited to Cerridwen's garden. Second to this, look for plants that you personally use regularly in potions. In par­ ticular I would recommend white roses, lily, white lilac, and white heather as having potential. In preparing your garden, make an offering of cakes and wine to Cerridwen (traditional to her rituals), breaking and pouring these into the land to enrich it with her power.

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Anything that integrates the number six (six segments, six points, etc.) is appropriate, because there were six ingredients in Cerridwen's potion. Alternatively, you might shape the garden like a crescent moon, because Cerridwen has strong lunar associations.

. :.

. .:.

"Oi.,.ec:t.Lo"­ St.o"-e5, "YV\i."-e,.ols, C"'Y5t.e>l5, o"-c:t SkeU5

To stress Cerridwen's knowledge and learning aspects, use aventurine and fluorite. For creativity, use egg-shaped stones or green quartz.

In magick, East is the direction from which creative winds

come to motivate and inspire us. In feng shui, Northeast is the

direction of learning, Southeast the area for inventiveness, and

West the direction for the color white.

Colo,.s

c:::::t c:topt.e>t.i.o"-s White heather seems to fare pretty well indoors, and you

can snip this in such a way so that has six distinct segments.

Place this pot in a window that receives moonlight or an East­

ern-facing window to increase Cerridwen's energy in the plant.

White is the color best suited to this garden. "Oec:o,.ot.i.ve ~J o-..c:kes

The four animals Cerridwen became in her pursuit of Gwion were a greyhound, otter, hawk, and hen, so any statu­

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Make potions, of course! The type of potion depends much on your goal, but if possible use six ingredients to honor Cerridwen. Bear in mind that ingredients should be edible if you plan to consume the potion. The basic recipe for most tea­ like potions is one teaspoon fresh herb to one cup of water steeped. If you're using six different ingredients, I suggest decreasing the overall amount of herb used to about one-half teaspoon each and increasing the water to two cups so that the final flavor isn't overwhelming. Note: You may also steep herbs and flowers in wine as an alternative base.

Co~coycl~a: Gaycle~ of Peace There is no need to go to India or anywhere else to find peace. You will find that deep place of silence right in your room, your garden or even your bathtub. -Elisabeth Kubler-Ross .J----li..st:.o-C ",lt:."'Y'",l

CJ",- foY'",-"'t:.i..o",-

Concordia comes to us form Rome where she is often portrayed as matronly in stature. In one hand she bears a cor­ nucopia, implying plenty, and in the other she has the olive branch of peace. Spots where civil arguments were settled often became sited for one of her temples. Quite literally this goddess embodied the concept of honorable resolution and har­ mony between peoples . Considering the times of upheaval and unrest in which we live, I would personally like to turn the whole world into Concordia's playground. But for now, building small gardens will help to foster her gentle, healing energy in this world and in your home. Concordia's magickal attributes include unity, harmony, peace, reconciliation, serenity, and accord. 1='l",,,,-t:.s

Harmonious plants include gardenia, lavender, morning glory, myrtle, pennyroyal, and violet. Dispersed evenly among and around your choices of these I would include plenty of white flowers (any variety you like). This way, the color of peace is mixed agreeably with the plants of peace!

:1


so

Gc;n·d.e",-L",-'3 "",Llk. lk.e God.d.ess

a

G""..d...",,,

H.eY'- HaY'vesl apptL<:::alLo",-s

SI

CO~COy-c:lL~: G~y-c:le~ of

Make potions, of course! The type of potion depends much on your goal, but if possible use six ingredients to honor Cerridwen. Bear in mind that ingredients should be edible if you plan to consume the potion. The basic recipe for most tea­ like potions is one teaspoon fresh herb to one cup of water steeped. If you're using six different ingredients, I suggest decreasing the overall amount of herb used to about one-half teaspoon each and increasing the water to two cups so that the final flavor isn't overwhelming. Note: You may also steep herbs and flowers in wine as an alternative base.

Pe~ce There is no need to go to India or anywhere else to find peace. You will find that deep place of silence right in your room, your or even your bathtub. -Elisabeth Kubler-Ross HLSlo-C'-tll'-tY'al CJ",-foY'",-alLo",-

Concordia comes to us form Rome where she is often portrayed as matronly in stature. In one hand she bears a cor­ nucopia, implying plenty, and in the other she has the olive branch of peace. Spots where civil arguments were settled often became sited for one of her temples. Quite literally this goddess embodied the concept of honorable resolution and har­ mony between peoples. Considering the times of upheaval and umest in which we live, I would personally like to turn the whole world into Concordia's playground. But for now, building small gardens will help to foster her gentle, healing energy in this world and in your home. Concordia's magickal attributes include unity, harmony, peace, reconciliation, serenity, and accord. Pta",-ls

Harmonious plants include gardenia, lavender, morning glory, myrtle, pennyroyal, and violet. Dispersed evenly among and around your choices of these I would include plenty of white flowers (any variety you like). This way, the color of peace is )llixed agreeably with the plants of peace!

I

Iii


82

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PQHe....""s

83

sent the parts of your life to which you wish to bring peace and understanding.

As Sixties-ish as it might seem, laying out your garden in such a way as to create a peace sign seems quite suited to this goddess's energy. Create the lines of the peace sign using deco­ rative pavers, which serve the secondary function of holding any weed block or mulch neatly in place! Sl=""es, ~~""e""Qls, C

...1..1..."" G"'ycl......"

"D ~ .... ecl~=""

Magickally I'd suggest West, because Water has a tran­ quil, healing quality. For feng shui, the direction of Southwest stimulates contentment, and due West is the center for harmony.

....yslQls , Q""d. SkeUs Od.QplQl~=""s

The Roman art that portrays Concordia sometimes shows her standing on coins. With this in mind, the "metals" for this garden might be aptly made from a mixture of pocket change. Alternatively, use crystals whose energies augment the quest for peace, such as amethyst, aventurine, coral, obsidian, and sodalite.

Another tool often shown in this goddess' hands is a deco­ rative bowl (those used for offerings). With this in mind, large bowls (especially white or silver ones) could become your plant­ ers. To fill the bowl, look to violets, which certainly take well to indoor gardening.

C=l=....s

Ofle....-J-!Q....vesl Oppl~CQl~=""s

White and pale blue are good choices for this garden.

Whenever the tension in your home has built up to a point where something must be done, Concordia's garden is the place to harvest renewed peace. Go to the plants and whisper a word of thanks to them for their gifts. Gently take a gOOd-sized hand­ ful of flower petals from a variety of plants (just tearing them off haphazardly doesn't reflect the cause of peace!). Walk clock­ wise around your residence slowly, releasing the petals to the wind with an incantation for renewed peace and harmony directed to the Goddess, such as: CONCORDIA BE WELCOME, CONCORDIA BRlNG PEACE, CONCORDIA INSPIRE HARMONY,

"Dec=....Ql~ve c-I ="",,ckes

LET HOSTILITY CEASE!

Because olive will not grow outside the Mediterranean region, I'd suggest looking for a pottery cornucopia to use at the center of your garden. Fill this with emblems that repre­

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sent the parts of your life to which you wish to bring peace and understanding.

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As Sixties-ish as it might seem, laying out your garden in such a way as to create a peace sign seems quite suited to this goddess's energy. Create the lines of the peace sign using deco­ rative pavers, which serve the secondary function of holding any weed block or mulch neatly in place!

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Magickally I'd suggest West, because Water has a tran­ quil, healing quality. For feng shui, the direction of Southwest stimulates contentment, and due West is the center for harmony.

kells ac:lClplCll~o""s

The Roman art that portrays Concordia sometimes shows her standing on coins. With this in mind, the "metals" for this garden might be aptly made from a mixture of pocket change. Alternatively, use crystals whose energies augment the quest for peace, such as amethyst, aventurine, coral, obsidian, and sodalite.

Another tool often shown in this goddess' hands is a deco­ rative bowl (those used for offerings). With this in mind, large bowls (especially white or silver ones) could become your plant­ ers. To fill the bowl, look to violets, which certainly take well to indoor gardening.

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a

White and pale blue are good choices for this garden.

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ppl~cCll~o""s

Whenever the tension in your home has built up to a point where something must be done, Concordia's garden is the place to harvest renewed peace. Go to the plants and whisper a word of thanks to them for their gifts. Gently take a good-sized hand­ ful of flower petals from a variety of plants (just tearing them off haphazardly doesn't reflect the cause of peace!). Walk clock­ wise around your residence slowly, releasing the petals to the wind with an incantation for renewed peace and harmony directed to the Goddess, such as: CONCORDIA BE WELCOME, CONCORDIA BRING PEACE, CONCORDiA INSPiRE HARMONY,

1:)eco"Cll~ve ~J ouckes

LET HOSTILITY CEASE!

Because olive will not grow outside the Mediterranean region, I'd suggest looking for a pottery cornucopia to use at the center of your garden. Fill this with emblems that repre­

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things moved, and for the sound of laughter or bells while you work. These are signs that your fairy guests are just waiting to inhabit the new home you're making for them. Dana's magickal attributes include communing with fairies, understanding devic forces, and knowledge of the mysteries .

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There are fairies at the bottom of our garden. -Rose Fyleman

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In ancient Irish mythology Dana ruled over the Tuatha de Danaan, the magickally powerful entities known as fairies. Her name translates as "knowledge," but it is a special knowl­ edge: the knowledge of things that go beyond surface reality. She is also said to be the mother of the gods, giving her a strong matriarchal overtone.

For this garden sow plants to which fairies are attracted. These include foxglove, lily of the valley, hawthorn, oak, ash, rose, primrose, mushrooms, and clover. When planting your garden use straw, which fairies are said to like, as a weed deterrent.

This motherly capacity combined with a similarity in names indicates that the stories of Dana might be connected with Danae. Danae was an earlier grain goddess who protected the matriarchal structure. For our purposes, however, we will focus on Dana as a fairy queen and mother.

"P ",llel""'''' You could just let your imagination run wild (fairies love playful humans), but a lot of fairy lore seems to point to a circle as being a favorite fairy pattern. Mushrooms growing in circles, trees growing in circles, and circular mounds were often believed to house fairies so the same pattern is perfectly appro­ priate for Dana's pleasure. Sl=",e"" ~VV\~",el"",ls, Cl"~sl",ts. ",,,,d. SkeUs

Fairy crosses and fairy tears are two good options. Alter­ natively choose stones that enhance psychic awareness so you can know when company arrives! These include amethyst, beryl, holy stones, and lapis. C=Ic:>l"S

The brighter and more varied, the better. One note, how­ ever: Some stories indicate that the color red keeps fairies away (but these are usually malevolent sorts that you wouldn't want anyway!).

Perhaps one of the most whimsical gardens one can create, fairy gardens are tremendous fun for the child in all of us. But be prepared to have tiny items disappearing, to have

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things moved, and for the sound of laughter or bells while you work. These are signs that your fairy guests are just waiting to inhabit the new home you're making for them. Dana's magickal attributes include communing with fairies, understanding devic forces, and knowledge of the mysteries .

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There are fairies at the bottom of our garden. -Rose Fyleman .J----4.ist.o-C ...lt...~l"c:lt CJ">'-fol"",-c:lt.io">'­

Plc:l">,-t.s

In ancient Irish mythology Dana ruled over the Tuatha de Danaan, the magickally powerful entities known as fairies. Her name translates as "knowledge," but it is a special knowl­ edge: the knowledge of things that go beyond surface reality. She is also said to be the mother of the gods, giving her a strong matriarchal overtone.

For this garden sow plants to which fairies are attracted. These include foxglove, lily of the valley, hawthorn, oak, ash, rose, primrose, mushrooms, and clover. When planting your garden use straw, which fairies are said to like, as a weed deterrent.

This motherly capacity combined with a similarity in names indicates that the stories of Dana might be connected with Danae. Danae was an earlier grain goddess who protected the matriarchal structure. For our purposes, however, we will focus on Dana as a fairy queen and mother.

"r at.t.el"">,-s You could just let your imagination run wild (fairies love playful humans), but a lot of fairy lore seems to point to a circle as being a favorite fairy pattern. Mushrooms growing in circles, trees growing in circles, and circular mounds were often believed to house fairies so the same pattern is perfectly appro­ priate for Dana's pleasure. 5t.o">'-eso ~i">'-el"als, Cl"~st.c:lls, c:l">'-d.. 5keUs

Fairy crosses and fairy tears are two good options. Alter­ natively choose stones that enhance psychic awareness so you can know when company arrives! These include amethyst, beryl, holy stones, and lapis. Colol"S

The brighter and more varied, the better. One note, how­ ever: Some stories indicate that the color red keeps fairies away (but these are usually malevolent sorts that you wouldn't want anyway!).

Perhaps one of the most whimsical gardens one can create, fairy gardens are tremendous fun for the child in all of us. But be prepared to have tiny items disappearing, to have

It


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mind. To encourage visits further, leave a little cream or sweet bread, two favorite fairy treats, in the doll house on May Day.

Hang tiny, sweet-sounding bells from hooks in your garden. Fairies Jove music. You can also treat some doll furni­ ture with water sealant and leave your guests some chairs, tables, or other creature comforts.

a "D~l"ect;~o",

Shamanic traditions tell us that the Elemental world has much to teach us, and therefore encourages ongoing commun­ ion with each type of Elemental spirit. Using some ofthe items from your fairy garden to honor the devas is one good step in this process. You can leave some on your altar, make some into incense, or scatter some to the winds just prior to ritual or medi­ tations with this intent. Additionally, if your garden is large enough, go there to meditate and commune with the fairy folk so you can get insights into their knowledge of flowers and plants.

In magick, each direction has its own type of fairy, so what you choose here depends of what you hope to attract. The Eastern region houses Sylphs (the winged fairies). Sylphs are perhaps the most whimsical of the fey, having a very light­ hearted demeanor. The South houses Salamanders of Fire. Salamanders are full of passion. The West houses Undines (merpeople), who have strong emotions, and the North houses Gnomes, who are very helpful sorts if you're not a lazy human! a

c:lc:lpt;c:lHo",s

Small pots of clover are probably the best bet for success­ ful indoor gardening. These could then be placed on a table surrounding a doll house designed with your fairy friends in

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mind. To encourage visits further, leave a little cream or sweet bread, two favorite fairy treats, in the doll house on May Day.

1C:)eco~al;'ve ~o~ck.es

Hang tiny, sweet-sounding bells from hooks in your garden. Fairies love music. You can also treat some doll furni­ ture with water sealant and leave your guests some chairs, tables, or other creature comforts.

Cl ft:.e~- .J-lc:>~vesl Cl ppltcali.o","s 1C:);'~eG:lto","

Shamanic traditions tell us that the Elemental world has much to teach us, and therefore encourages ongoing commun­ ion with each type of Elemental spirit. Using some ofthe items from your fairy garden to honor the devas is one good step in this process. You can leave some on your altar, make some into incense, or scatter some to the winds just prior to ritual or medi­ tations with this intent. Additionally, if your garden is large enough, go there to meditate and commune with the fairy folk so you can get insights into their knowledge of flowers and plants.

In magick, each direction has its own type of fairy, so what you choose here depends of what you hope to attract. The Eastern region houses Sylphs (the winged fairies). Sylphs are perhaps the most whimsical of the fey, having a very light­ hearted demeanor. The South houses Salamanders of Fire. Salamanders are full of passion. The West houses Undines (merpeople), who have strong emotions, and the North houses Gnomes, who are very helpful sorts if you're not a lazy human! Clelaplc:>l,"o","s

Small pots of clover are probably the best bet for success­ ful indoor gardening. These could then be placed on a table surrounding a doll house designed with your fairy friends in

1

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Demeter were never burned, but given as they came from Nature's storehouse, so anything you gather here might be best used fresh or raw. Demeter's magickal attributes include agriculture and gar­ dening, arts, protecting women, renewal, nurturing, devotion, legal matters, cultural growth and understanding, and abun­ dance.

Ql"'c::leV\..

The trouble with gardening is that it does not remain an avocation, it becomes an obsession. -Phyllis McGinley

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Consider planning your Demeter garden between Febru­ ary 1 and 3, and harvesting from it from September 23 until October 1, both festival times honoring this goddess. Grapes are one of the fruits often offered to Demeter, so if you have space to grow some, by all means add them to your Demeter garden. Chamomile, as a "gardener's friend," is also apt. Some plants specifically associated with this goddess include cypress, poppies, and sunflowers. Beyond that, your Demeter garden should reflect your personality as a gardener and what you most enjoy seeing grow from the earth. Use a little mead and raw grain to bless your soil (mead was a common libation to Demeter). Sow on Wednesdays or Fridays, especially on the 12th day of a waxing moon, for best results.

According to Greek legend, Demeter searched the world for her beautiful daughter Persephone. She was so upset by the girl's disappearance that she tore her blue-green cloak apart, turning the pieces into cornflowers. The sadder Demeter became, the more the Earth suffered: Grasses browned and leaves and flowers died. It was not until Persephone was restored to Demeter from Hades's hands that Spring returned to the Earth.

P""llel""""

Section the garden into three parts, as some historians see Demeter as a threefold goddess, and the number three appears in many of her stories. Slo""es.-vv\~""el"""I", Cl",:!sl",t". ",,,,,d. S~eUs

Cat's eye and silver are associated with Demeter. Moss agate is another good choice, especially for gardeners wishing to develop more of a green thumb.

Demeter's name means either Earth Mother or Cereal Mother, alluding to her food sustaining nature. Offerings to

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Demeter were never burned, but given as they came from Nature's storehouse, so anything you gather here might be best used fresh or raw. Demeter's magickal attributes include agriculture and gar­ dening, arts, protecting women, renewal, nurturing, devotion, legal matters, cultural growth and understanding, and abun­ dance.

'C> e",-ef:.ey: G Qyc:leY\.ey 5 G Qyc:leY\. "l

The trouble with gardening is that it does not remain an avocation, it becomes an obsession. -Phyllis McGinley

PI..,.",!:.s ..J-ft",f;e-C....tf;'"Y'...

q-fOY'.........f;i.o_

Consider planning your Demeter garden between Febru­ ary 1 and 3, and harvesting from it from September 23 until October 1, both festival times honoring this goddess. Grapes are one of the fruits often offered to Demeter, so if you have space to grow some, by all means add them to your Demeter garden. Chamomile, as a "gardener's friend," is also apt. Some plants specifically associated with this goddess include cypress, poppies, and sunflowers. Beyond that, your Demeter garden should reflect your personality as a gardener and what you most enjoy seeing grow from the earth. Use a little mead and raw grain to bless your soil (mead was a common libation to Demeter). Sow on Wednesdays or Fridays, especially on the 12th day of a waxing moon, for best results.

According to Greek legend, Demeter searched the world for her beautiful daughter Persephone. She was so upset by the girl's disappearance that she tore her blue-green cloak apart, turning the pieces into cornflowers. The sadder Demeter became, the more the Earth suffered: Grasses browned and leaves and flowers died. It was not until Persephone was restored to Demeter from Hades's hands that Spring returned to the Earth.

"r=-~ ..,.lle.,.",.s

Section the garden into three parts, as some historians see Demeter as a threefold goddess, and the number three appears in many of her stories. S l..",es. \iV\"",e.,...,.ls, C.,.ysl..,.ls. ..,.",cl Skell.s

Cat's eye and silver are associated with Demeter. Moss agate is another good choice, especially for gardeners wishing to develop more of a green thumb.

Demeter's name means either Earth Mother or Cereal Mother, alluding to her food sustaining nature. Offerings to

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window box or for plant pots, but really anything that you will enjoy and care for diligently will please this goddess.

Coloys

Grain-colored yellow (the color of her hair) and green and green blue (the color of her robes) are appropriate colors to use in your Demeter garden.

Dft:e'l"- .J-l",yvest: DppiLc",Uo",-s

At the end of the season, the best way to honor Demeter is to turn the remnants of the garden back into the land to enrich it over the Winter months. This also symbolically turns all the magickal energy you've sown there back into your soil, where it can germinate until you work the land again the fol足 lowing Spring.

1::>eCOy",t:Lve ~ o,"ckes

A basket or bowl of pine cones is one choice, often being found in Demeter's temples, and horse figurines are also good as one of her sacred animals.

1::>Lyect:Lo",足

In the sacred circle, North is the direction associated with Earth, over which Demeter watches with a keen eye. In feng shui, the Northeast has a predominant Earth Element govern足 ing any of Demeter's more "conscious" attributes (such as law or cultural learning). The Southwest is also Earth, but applied to relationship matters.

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Demeter rejoices in any work of your hands, especially gardening-no matter how large or small. I would suggest look足 ing to yellow, bhe, or green as a predominant theme for the

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Grain-colored yellow (the color of her hair) and green and green blue (the color of her robes) are appropriate colors to use in your Demeter garden.

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window box or for plant pots, but really anything that you will enjoy and care for diligently will please this goddess. Ofler-Marve5l Opplic:alio"-s

At the end of the season, the best way to honor Demeter is to turn the remnants of the garden back into the land to enrich it over the Winter months. This also symbolically turns all the magickal energy you've sown there back into your soil, where it can germinate until you work the land again the fol足 lowing Spring.

"Dec:oralive ~ o",c:kes

A basket or bowl of pine cones is one choice, often being found in Demeter's temples, and horse figurines are also good as one of her sacred animals.

:

"Di rec:lio"足

In the sacred circle, North is the direction associated with Earth, over which Demeter watches with a keen eye. In feng shui, the Northeast has a predominant Earth Element govern足 ing any of Demeter's more "conscious" attributes (such as law or cultural learning). The Southwest is also Earth, but applied to relationship matters. Od.aplalio"-s

Demeter rejoices in any work of your hands, especially gardening-no matter how large or small. I would suggest look足 ing to yellow, bhe, or green as a predominant theme for the

if


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P c::olle,-""s The first thing that comes to mind is the image of an open eye, because this is what lets us see, know, and understand.

The ancestor of every action is a thought. -Ralph Waldo Emerson .J.--li.sl;::.- C

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In Gnostic tradition this goddess embodies thought, spe­ cifically thought with intention behind it. Gnostic mythos places her as the creator of angels. The great mage Simon Magus said he received teaching directly from her in the magickal arts and in communicating with angelic beings. From a magickal perspective Ennoia is very important, for it is our intention, our will, that drives magick forward toward its goal. Additionally, I believe that we don't spend nearly enough time pondering and internalizing spiritual lessons. Ennoia's garden is the perfect spot to do just that: to stop for a moment and quietly collect our thoughts and rediscover the power of ideas.

Sl;::.""es. VV\i.""e,-c::ols. C,-yslc::ols, c::o""c:l SkeUs

Stones for strengthening the mind include aventurine and fluorite. Meditative stones include geodes and sodalite. Finally, those for magickal awareness include amethyst, quartz, holey stones, and lapis. C;::.(;::.,-s

Ennoia's magickal attributes include meditation, contem­ plation, willpower, idea-generation, and sound judgement.

Yellow is considered by some to be an optimum color for learning. By comparison, meditative and contemplative colors generally run in the dark blue and deep purple range. Blue encourages peace about one's thoughts, and purple augments spiritual musings.

Plc::o""ls

Ennoia's garden is filled with plants that support the con­ scious mind so that we can think clearly. Some of these choices include celery, caraway, grape, lily of the valley, mustard, peri­ winkle, rosemary, spearmint, and summer savory. Alternatively you might sow plants that will help with acquiring magickal sensitivity, such as celery, honeysuckle, marigold, mint, rose, and thyme. In either case, make room in the center of your garden for a chair so that you can gaze upon your garden during quiet times.

"Dec;::.,-c::oli.ve

c--r;::.uckes

Spirals, mandalas, and labyrinths are excellent designs to use for meditation because they lead the eye to a point, a cen­ tral nucleus, that often deepens the meditative state. Note that you could produce this effect with border stones that move to a central object or grouping of plants or by finding an item that has such a pattern imprinted on it (a large stone, for example).

11


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The first thing that comes to mind is the image of an open eye, because this is what lets us see, know, and understand.

The ancestor of every action is a thought. -Ralph Waldo Emerson

.J-l i.sl=- C \Alh.....al C)""f=...,.-.at.i.="" In Gnostic tradition this goddess embodies thought, spe­ cifically thought with intention behind it. Gnostic mythos places her as the creator of angels. The great mage Simon Magus said he received teaching directly from her in the magickal arts and in communicating with angelic beings. From a magickal perspective Bnnoia is very important, for it is our intention, our will, that drives magick forward toward its goal. Additionally, I believe that we don't spend nearly enough time pondering and internalizing spiritual lessons. Bnnoia's garden is the perfect spot to do just that: to stop for a moment and quietly collect our thoughts and rediscover the power of ideas. Bnnoia's magickal attributes include meditation, contem­ plation, willpower, idea-generation, and sound judgement.

S l=""es, vV\. i.""e...als, C l"oyslals, a"".,l Skell:$l Stones for strengthening the mind include aventurine and fluorite. Meditative stones include geodes and sodalite. Finally, those for magickal awareness include amethyst, quartz, holey stones, and lapis. Cel=..."

Yellow is considered by some to be an optimum color for learning. By comparison, meditative and contemplative colors generally run in the dark blue and deep purple range. Blue encourages peace about one's thoughts, and purple augments spiritual musings.

'Pla""ls

Bnnoia's garden is filled with plants that support the con­ scious mind so that we can think clearly. Some of these choices include celery, caraway, grape, lily of the valley, mustard, peri­ winkle, rosemary, spearmint, and summer savory. Alternatively you might sow plants that will help with acquiring magickal sensitivity, such as celery, honeysuckle, marigold, mint, rose, and thyme. In either case, make room in the center of your garden for a chair so that you can gaze upon your garden during quiet times.

'"Dece...e>li.ve ~·=\Acke"

Spirals, mandalas, and labyrinths are excellent designs to use for meditation because they lead the eye to a point, a cen­ tral nucleus, that often deepens the meditative state. Note that you could produce this effect with border stones that move to a central object or grouping of plants or by finding an item that has such a pattern imprinted on it (a large stone, for example). i\

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Wiccans consider the East to be the center of thought and learning. This blends nicely with feng shui, which places the seat of learning in the Northeast.

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If there's a part of your home in which you prefer to medi­ tate, that's the region to look at for potted plants. Of the plants listed previously, summer savory and mint are probably your best bets for successful indoor fostering.

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Take a snippet from your garden on days when you know you'll need to focus firmly on the issues at hand. Stick it in your pocket, purse, or wallet where you can reach it easily when you feel your mind straying. Rub the leaf or bundle with your fingers to release a little oil. The smell will refresh your mind. (This is especially true for rosemary.)

The breath of flowers if far sweeter in the air (where it comes and goes like the warbling of music) than in the hand. -Lord Bacon

,4

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This goddess's name literally embodies the flourishing Earth and all that blossoms. Her festival days in Rome were April 28-May 3, followed by one just for the queen of flow­ ers-the rose-on May 23rd. These are excellent dates to pre­ pare your garden and invoke Flora's blessings on the effort.

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The timing of Flora's festivals comes near the beginning of Spring, specifically as a way of banishing the cold and bar­ renness of Winter. They were filled with unbridled revelry and all the shenanigans we associate with May Day even in mod­ ern times. Additionally, they were believed to ensure fertile lands

,


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Wiccans consider the East to be the center of thought and learning. This blends nicely with feng shui, which places the seat of learning in the Northeast.

of &c::l,-bte ~lovvel'"s

Clc:lQFlC'll~e",s

The breath of flowers if far sweeter in the air (where it comes and goes like the warbling of music) than in the hand. -Lord Bacon

If there's a part of your home in which you prefer to medi­ tate, that's the region to look at for potted plants. Of the plants listed previously, summer savory and mint are probably your best bets for successful indoor fostering.

.J-t~..le-C~ll~l"C'll q"'fel".....".C'll~e'"

This goddess's name literally embodies the flourishing Earth and all that blossoms. Her festival days in Rome were April 28-May 3, followed by one just for the queen of flow­ ers-the rose-on May 23rd. These are excellent dates to pre­ pare your garden and invoke Flora's blessings on the effort.

Clflel"-.J-tC'll"vesl ClFFl~'::C'll~e",s

Take a snippet from your garden on days when you know you'll need to focus firmly on the issues at hand. Stick it in your pocket, purse, or wallet where you can reach it easily when you feel your mind straying. Rub the leaf or bundle with your fingers to release a little oil. The smell will refresh your mind. (This is especially true for rosemary.)

:*-;, "

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The timing of Flora's festivals comes near the beginning of Spring, specifically as a way of banishing the cold and bar­ renness of Winter. They were filled with unbridled revelry and all the shenanigans we associate with May Day even in mod­ ern times. Additionally, they were believed to ensure fertile lands

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Gcn·d.e"''""'9 """lk lke God.d.ess

G",.l.less G""·.le,,,-s

and people. For our purposes, however, we will honor Flora with a plethora of edible flowers that can, in turn, be used for kitchen magick! Flora's magickal attributes include abundance, fertility, gardening (especially flowers), new beginnings, and opulence.

"D ecoY'c:ll..ve

97

-=-1o,.ckes

Someone said once that the groves were the gods's first temples, and in this case I agree that less might be better. The beauty of flowers needs very little in the way of adornment. Let Flora shine through her handiwork (Nature).

Plc:l",ls

Although this garden should be filled with edible flowers (a list follows) another good plant to include is beans, which were scattered at Flora's festivals as a kind of fertility blessing. Vines and fruit trees were also sacred to her. Commonly available edible flowers include: carnation, chrysanthemum, clover, cowslip, daisy, dandelion, geranium, gladiolus, heather, honeysuckle, hyacinth, jasmine, jonquil, lav­ ender, lilac, lily, marigold, nasturtium, nettle, pansy, primrose, rhododendron, rose, sunflower, tansy, tulip, and violet. "D,"Y'ecl..o",

"P c:llleY'",s To stay with the theme, I'd suggest a multipetal layout (either rounded or peaked petals) around a central point so that the garden looks like an open flower.

Magickally, North is the direction associated with Earth, but East is the direction of Spring, Flora's traditional season. This secondary direction corresponds with feng shui in its des­ ignation of the season.

Slo",es. VV\"",eY'c:lls. CY'yslc:lls, c:I",d. SkeUs

Cld.c:lplc:ll<.o",s

Jade, lodestone, and moss agate (general gardener's friends) are appropriate, as are bloodstone and coral (to increase number of flowers).

A lot of these flowers fare well in indoor locations. If you have allergies, use silk flower arrangements instead. Bear in mind that symbolism is very powerful in magick and goddess traditions. The thought and intent behind your arrangement is just as important as of what it is made of. Additionally, by using silk flowers, you're not "killing" a living blossom from Flora's garden, which is a good way to honor her.

ColoY's

colors in nature are sacred to Flora!

If


96

GCll"d.el"-~l"-9 "",a.k lke God.d.ess

Gocl.c1.ess G",... c1.e"",s

and people. For our purposes, however, we will honor Flora with a plethora of edible flowers that can, in turn, be used for kitchen magick! Flora's magickal attributes include abundance, fertility, gardening (especially flowers), new beginnings, and opulence.

"DecC:>l"Clll.ve

97

=-r o,""ckes

Someone said once that the groves were the gods's first temples, and in this case I agree that less might be better. The beauty of flowers needs very little in the way of adornment. Let Flora shine through her handiwork (Nature).

"r='lCll"-ls

Although this garden should be filled with edible flowers (a list follows) another good plant to include is beans, which were scattered at Flora's festivals as a kind of fertility blessing. Vines and fruit trees were also sacred to her. Commonly available edible flowers include: carnation, chrysanthemum, clover, cowslip, daisy, dandelion, geranium, gladiolus, heather, honeysuckle, hyacinth, jasmine, jonquil, lav­ ender, lilac, lily, marigold, nasturtium, nettle, pansy, primrose, rhododendron, rose, sunflower, tansy, tulip, and violet. "Dl.l"ecli..c:>l"-

"P Clllel"l"-s To stay with the theme, I'd suggest a multipetallayout (either rounded or peaked petals) around a central point so that the garden looks like an open flower.

Magickally, North is the direction associated with Earth, but East is the direction of Spring, Flora's traditional season. This secondary direction corresponds with feng shui in its des­ ignation of the season.

Sb:>l"-es,\!V\l.l"-el"Clls, Cl"yslClls. Cll"-d. SkeUs

Od.ClplClll.ol"-s

Jade, lodestone, and moss agate (general gardener'S friends) are appropriate, as are bloodstone and coral (to increase number of flowers).

A lot of these flowers fare well in indoor locations. If you have allergies, use silk flower arrangements instead. Bear in mind that symbolism is very powerful in magick and goddess traditions. The thought and intent behind your arrangement is just as important as of what it is made of. Additionally, by using silk flowers, you're not "killing" a living blossom from Flora's garden, which is a good way to honor her.

Colol"s

All colors in nature are sacred to Flora!

~j


96

0C!"41"d.e"'~"'9 vvit"k l:.ke O=d.d.es",

Goeleless Ga.,.ele~s

99

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Ofl:.el"-.J-!C!"4l"vesl:. Oppt~c:;C!"4l:.~=",s

,

\=- -= oyl",V\...Q:

~:

If you have early blooming flowers on May Day, go a-maying to bring an unexpected smile to someone's face, and decorate your maypole with an abundance of blossoms as Romans did.

t

GQyd..eV\... of 5eyeV\...d..'-p;'ly

,a !I

One of the healthiest ways to gamble is with a spade and a package of garden seeds. -Dan Bennett

f

To internalize the power of your flowers, you can make them into teas, jams, sandwiches, salads, and soups. You can even put petals into gelatin! Although this may sound a bit odd to us, up to 100 years ago cooking with flowers was very common. They're also high in vitamins, offering a viable supple足 ment to vegetarians. (The Kitchen Witch's Cookbook, one of my books, has several recipes with edible flowers should you want to try some. Another good resource is Cathy Wilkinson's Edible Flowers from Garden to Palate).

:,

I ~j

~I

One of my favorite recipes is for flower water. Quite simply, steep freshly picked edible flower petals in warm water, covering the petals completely. When the flowers turn pale, remove them and squeeze the excess water from them. Repeat this step with fresh petals until you get an aroma you like. Store the flower water in a dark container in the refrigerator and use it in cakes, cookies, and waffles for a pleasing flavor and aroma.

~~,

~, ~

'I.

(

t

.J-!~",l:.=-C'Ytl:.'Yl"C!"4t C)",f=l"",C!"4H=",

Although most of us think of Fortuna as "lady luck," she

was much more to the people of Italy. Here Fortuna presided

over each individual's destiny. She brought fertility to couples,

she determined how long children would live, she blessed gar足

dens with abundance, and she even drove the fate of entire com足 munities. Better still for those of you with little luck in garden足 ing, Fortuna guarantees us of bumper crops! According to myths, Fortuna was Jupiter's nurse, the patroness of matrons, and the ruler of the bath house. Rulers often kept gold statues of her nearby to ensure the well-being of their reigns. This would be a little difficult for most of us to manage without a healthy amount of gold paint, but that doesn't mean that we can't invite Fortuna into our garden and her luck into our lives using plants that accent fortunate energy. Fortuna's magickal attributes include fate, chance, luck, destiny, futuretelling, oracles, kismet, and providence.

~

, 'I

i

~ j

PtC!"4"'l:.",

'1

First think of the plants that you associate with luck (most people think immediately of clover). In magickal traditions, some fortunate plants include cabbage, fern, heather, rose, strawberry, and violet.

~

J


'I

98

G ...c:lc:le"" G ..... c:le"'-"

G c:ll"d..e",i."'9 vvak lke G od..d..ess

CtHel"-~c:ll"vesl Ctppli.cc:lli.o",s

If you have early blooming flowers on May Day, go a-maying to bring an unexpected smile to someone's face, and decorate your maypole with an abundance of blossoms as Romans did. To internalize the power of your flowers, you can make them into teas, jams, sandwiches, salads, and soups. You can even put petals into gelatin! Although this may sound a bit odd to us, up to 100 years ago cooking with flowers was very common. They're also high in vitamins, offering a viable supple­ ment to vegetarians. (The Kitchen Witch's Cookbook, one of my books, has several recipes with edible flowers should you want to try some. Another good resource is Cathy Wilkinson's Edible Flowers from Garden to Palate). One of my favorite recipes is for flower water. Quite simply, steep freshly picked edible flower petals in warm water, covering the petals completely. When the flowers turn pale, remove them and squeeze the excess water from them. Repeat this step with fresh petals until you get an aroma you like. Store the flower water in a dark container in the refrigerator and use it in cakes, cookies, and waffles for a pleasing flavor and aroma.

99

J

~ Oyt:.u"-Q:

f

GQyc::le"- of 5eYe"-c::lip'.t:.y

f:

,~

:~:

ii-\­ ,)

~;

I

One of the healthiest ways to gamble is

with a spade and a package of garden seeds.

-Dan Bennett

{'

\:

!

1

~

t

~i.slc:>_C"lh~l"c:ll C)",fOl""""c:lli.o,,,

Although most of us think of Fortuna as "lady luck," she

was much more to the people of Italy. Here Fortuna presided

over each individual's destiny. She brought fertility to couples,

she determined how long children would live, she blessed gar­

dens with abundance, and she even drove the fate of entire com­

munities. Better still for those of you with little luck in garden­

ing, Fortuna guarantees us of bumper crops!

According to myths, Fortuna was Jupiter's nurse, the

patroness of matrons, and the ruler of the bath house. Rulers

often kept gold statues of her nearby to ensure the well-being

of their reigns. This would be a little difficult for most of us to

manage without a healthy amount of gold paint, but that doesn't

mean that we can't invite Fortuna into our garden and her luck

into our lives using plants that accent fortunate energy.

Fortuna's magickal attributes include fate, chance, luck,

destiny, futuretelling, oracles, kismet, and providence.

Plc:l",b

l';~

~

I :~i

IJ

First think of the plants that you associate with luck (most

people think immediately of clover). In magickal traditions,

some fortunate plants include cabbage, fern, heather, rose,

strawberry, and violet.

i\


101

G~,...J.e"-1."-9 ""l.t;k lk", GoJ.J.",ss

God.d.e"" G"'.. .d."...."

~ c:lll.n""-s

OR"'....-...)-tc:l.... vesl Oppll."'c:lll..,"-s

Wheels and spheres are very common in depictions of Fortuna, and they're fairly easy to layout on the ground.

Make fortune sachets out of any of the plants from Fortuna's garden, adding a coin that bears the year of your birth, and wrapping all in gold cloth. Carry this with you to attract luck no matter where you may be. Fashion these during a waxing moon so that luck grows. Consider adding other ingredients that accentuate the area of your life in which luck is desired to the bundle. For example, if you want luck with love, you could add a little cutout heart to the blend.

100

Slo"-es,VV\l."-"""c:lls, C

.... y sb;'1ls, c:I"-J. SkeUs

Traditional luck stones include alexandrite, apache tear, aventurine, jet, sardonyx, tigereye, and turquoise. Colo....s

Gold and bright yellow are good choices for this garden. "D"''''o.... c:ll~v..

c-r o",,,,k..s

Any image of a winged woman can act as a Fortuna fig­ ure, as she often has wings in ancient art. Beyond this, Fortuna bears a cornucopia, which would make a good center point. Another alternative is an old-style boat, the prow or rudder of which Fortuna steers carefully through life's waters. "Dl......."'ll.o"­

I personally associate luck with the East because that is also the direction of hope and new beginnings. In feng shui, children's luck is ruled in the West, personal renown is in the South, and prosperity resides in the Southeast. OJ.c:lplc:lll.o"-s

One fun adaptation would be that of creating a bathtub planter. In certain parts of Rome, women who wanted more luck (especially with childbearing) would invade the men's public baths, because that's where Fortuna Virillis (that is, virility) presided.

~

\


100

G"J,J,e"" G

GC:Il"d.e"'-'-"'-9 ""a.k l:.ke God.d.ess

.....J,e"'-s

101

PQU.e...'\<\..s

Dfl:.e...- ..J-{Q ...vesl:. Dppl'-cQl:.i.o'\<\..s

Wheels and spheres are very common in depictions of Fortuna, and they're fairly easy to layout on the ground.

Make fortune sachets out of any of the plants from Fortuna's garden, adding a coin that bears the year of your birth, and wrapping all in gold cloth. Carry this with you to attract luck no matter where you may be. Fashion these during a waxing moon so that luck grows. Consider adding other ingredients that accentuate the area of your life in which luck is desired to the bundle. For example, if you want luck with love, you could add a little cutout heart to the blend.

Sl:.o",-es. \f\!\'-'\<\..e...Q(s. C

...ysl:.Q(s. Q'\<\..d. Skells

Traditional luck stones include alexandrite, apache tear, aventurine, jet, sardonyx, tigereye, and turquoise. Colo...s

Gold and bright yellow are good choices for this garden. "Deco.....l:.'-ve

c--r o....ckes

Any image of a winged woman can act as a Fortuna fig­ ure, as she often has wings in ancient art. Beyond this, Fortuna bears a cornucopia, which would make a good center point. Another alternative is an old-style boat, the prow or rudder of which Fortuna steers carefully through life's waters. "D'-...ecl:.'-o",­

I personally associate luck with the East because that is also the direction of hope and new beginnings. In feng shui, children's luck is ruled in the West, personal renown is in the South, and prosperity resides in the Southeast.

i'

Dd.QPl:...l:.'-o",-s

One fun adaptation would be that of creating a bathtub planter. In certain parts of Rome, women who wanted more luck (especially with childbearing) would invade the men's public baths, because that's where Fortuna Virillis (that is, virility) presided.

W

">


102

God.d.ess G

G.::lrd.e",""''!.'1 ""ak lke God.d.ess

..",d.",,,,-s

103

strong foundations, practicality, nourishment, and steady growth. We may also turn to her as a teacher of such arts as geomancy and the reading of Nature's omens and signs. Gaia's magickal attributes include oath-making and oath­ keeping, Earth magick, and divination.

Gc::ILc::I: E ·/-:'c::Il'"lk Gc::Il'"c:te", After one look at this planet any visitor from

outer space would say "I want to see the manager."

-William S. Burroughs

"t==)l.::l"'t:,,,

.J-l "slo- C

Prepare your land with an offering of barley and honeycakes, as was traditional on this goddess's altar. All plants are sacred to Gaia (as a personification of the Earth itself) but in particular fruit-bearing greenery and grains were esteemed.

~l h. r.::ll C)'"for",-.::ll"o",

Gaia was present at the beginning of all things. Known to the Greeks as "deep breasted" (a sign of both fertility and provi­ dence), she even gave birth to time itself. But this accomplish­ ment was not enough for Gaia. She was lonely, so she made a son, with whom other wonders were also born into being, including the animals and mythological creatures. Throughout the Greek empire, any area where the earth opened was considered Gaia's mouth. Here, prophets came to receive wisdom. Such places eventually inspired the renown Greek oracles such as those at Delphi.

1=' .::lller",,,, A truly diligent gardener might go so far as to pattern the garden so it looks like the Earth from space, or minimally one or two of the continents. Alternatively, just use a circle. St:o",es.\!V\i",e,...::lls. C

,..~sl.::ll", . .::l",d. SkeUs

Stones associated with the Earth Element include green agate, coal, brownjasper,jet, and green tourmaline. Also, plain rocks that come from your soil are certainly suitable. Colo,..s

Green, brown, and black (the color of lush vegetation and rich soil) are appropriate for this garden. I}'

I,'

( /'

"

Today, we turn to Gaia to support the Earth's healing and to connect with the Earth Element, which supplies us with

~ f

, ~

'Decor.::lt:"ve ~ o,tckes

A cornucopia (sometimes pictured with Gaia) or a globe each work as a centerpiece.

\


102

103

Gal"d.eV\."V\.'3 '\Na.k lke God.d.ess

G ...t.t",ss G ..l".t",,,,-,,

GQiQ: ~QY'lk GQY'c::le~

strong foundations, practicality, nourishment, and steady

growth. We may also turn to her as a teacher of such arts as

geomancy and the reading of Nature's omens and signs.

Gaia's magickal attributes include oath-making and oath­

keeping, Earth magick, and divination.

After one look at this planet any visitor from

outer space would say "I want to see the manager."

- William S. Burroughs

"PlaV\.ls

.J-.l "slo-C-ull-ul"at

Prepare your land with an offering of barley and

honeycakes, as was traditional on this goddess's altar. All plants

are sacred to Gaia (as a personification of the Earth itself) but

in particular fruit-bearing greenery and grains were esteemed.

qV\.fol"~alLoV\.

Gaia was present at the beginning of all things. Known to the Greeks as "deep breasted" (a sign of both fertility and provi­ dence), she even gave birth to time itself. But this accomplish­ ment was not enough for Gaia. She was lonely, so she made a son, with whom other wonders were also born into being, including the animals and mythological creatures. Throughout the Greek empire, any area where the earth opened was considered Gaia's mouth. Here, prophets came to receive wisdom. Such places eventually inspired the renown Greek oracles such as those at Delphi.

"Pallel"V\.s

A truly diligent gardener might go so far as to pattern the

garden so it looks like the Earth from space, or minimally one

or two of the continents. Alternatively, just use a circle.

SloV\.es. ~"V\.el"als. Cl"yslals. aV\.d. Skells

Stones associated with the Earth Element include green

agate, coal, brown jasper, jet, and green tourmaline. Also, plain

rocks that come from your soil are certainly suitable.

Colcl"s

Green, brown, and black (the color of lush vegetation and

rich soil) are appropriate for this garden.

f'I.

~

I Today, we turn to Gaia to support the Earth's healing and to connect with the Earth Element, which supplies us with

I

J

"'D ecol"al"ve

~ o-uckes

A cornucopia (sometimes pictured with Gaia) or a globe

each work as a centerpiece.

\


10'""*

a.,4e~'~. ~lk lk.=.~~~~~'···-----·

r-"

")

God.d..."" G ....d...""

105

I', 1~

"D"yecl..o",

Ga"Y"~:

magick the direction for the Earth Element is North. In feng shui much will depend on your focus. If you're work­ ing for Earth's renewal I'd suggest East. To learn more about the Earth Element look to the Northeast, and to make peace in your relationship with the planet look to the Southwest.

GaY"d.e"- of CO""f'ass~"-

t

. Make no judgements where you have no compassion. -Anne McCaffrey

Cl c:laplal..o",s

Friends of mine had an old globe that they sliced in half and planted with vines and other greens to symbolize a revital­ ized Earth. The effect was quite nice. To get the globe to sit properly place it in a circular stand.

J-t"slo-C"ll"yal C)",foy""-al;'o,,,

I. ~1

Clfley-J-tayvesl Clppl..cal'-o",s

Harvest the items from Gaia's garden in Fall, when the Earth itself signals the harvest. Use them to internalize the quali­ ties from Earth that you need or in spells and rituals aimed at helping you connect with Earth Elementals (Gnomes). You may also use these in spells and rituals focused on Earth healing. You can make an effective divination tool out of a small herb bundle or even a few flower petals from Gaia's garden. Tie your chosen plant parts together at the top tightly, and let the rest hang down freely. Leave enough string loose at the top so you can hold it in your hand while dousing. Steady the bundle, ask your questions, and watch for movements. Up-down movements are a positive response, left-right are negative, and circles indicate no definite answer is available right now.

.~

J

l

In Hindu writings Gauri is known as the golden one, and her name is sometimes translated as "brilliant." This title

reflected Gauri's incredible beauty, as well as her designation

as the sky virgin. She lives in the heavens watching diligently

over newlyweds and offering her blessings to those in need of a

little compassion . In looking to your Gauri garden, think "random acts of

kindness." Specifically, what can you grow here to use in gift­

giving or as donations to food pantries? Charity and good deeds

warm this goddess's heart and often bring the same back to

you threefold.

Gauri's magickal attributes include mantai blIss, new

beginnings, grace, kindness, sympathy, fertility, and abundance.

I if

'.f;

~

i

I f

~

~

'l='la",ls

Prepare the land with an offering of any gold-colored liqueur and honey, both of which were traditional offerings for this goddess. Any type of balsam is sacred to her. Beyond that

I would look to food crops (vegetables) or items you use regu­

larly in crafts with present-making in mind.


10...:::1

G",..d...",,,

Gc:I...de"-i."-9 vvi.l:.k l:.ke Geddess

"Di....ecl:.i.e"­

magick the direction for the Earth Element is North. In feng shui much will depend on your focus. If you're work­ ing for Earth's renewal I'd suggest East. To learn more about the Earth Element look to the Northeast, and to make peace in your relationship with the planet look to the Southwest.

D

GQ"'....i.: ;~

1

GQ....c::leV\. of CO"'-PQssi.oV\.

'i

'"~

~i-

. Make no judgements where you have no compassion. -Anne McCaffrey

dc:lfOl:.c:ll:.i.e"-s

Friends of mine had an old globe that they sliced in half and planted with vines and other greens to symbolize a revital­ ized Earth. The effect was quite nice. To get the globe to sit properly place it in a circular stand.

D

105

.J..-ti.sl:.e-C "'lb,....ClI C)"-fe..."",c:ll:.i.e"­ i'·

]

ft:.e...- .J..-tc:l...vesl:. DfOfOli.cc:ll:.i.e"-s

Harvest the items from Gaia's garden in Fall, when the Earth itself signals the harvest. Use them to internalize the quali­ ties from Earth that you need or in spells and rituals aimed at helping you connect with Earth Elementals (Gnomes). You may also use these in spells and rituals focused on Earth healing. You can make an effective divination tool out of a small herb bundle or even a few flower petals from Gaia's garden. Tie your chosen plant parts together at the top tightly, and let the rest hang down freely. Leave enough string loose at the top so you can hold it in your hand while dousing. Steady the bundle, ask your questions, and watch for movements. Up-down movements are a positive response, left-right are negative, and circles indicate no definite answer is available right now.

~ !

i$,

In Hindu writings Gauri is known as the golden one, and her name is sometimes translated as "brilliant." This title reflected Gauri's incredible beauty, as well as her designation as the sky virgin. She lives in the heavens watching diligently over newlyweds and offering her blessings to those in need of a little compassion. In looking to your Gauri garden, think "random acts of kindness." Specifically, what can you grow here to use in gift­ giving or as donations to food pantries? Charity and good deeds warm this goddess's heart and often bring the same back to you threefold. Gauri's magickal attributes include marital bliss, new beginnings, grace, kindness, sympathy, fertility. and abundance. PICl"-l:.S

j:'

~

Prepare the land with an offering of any gold-colored liqueur and honey, both of which were traditional offerings for this goddess. Any type of balsam is sacred to her. Beyond that I would look to food crops (vegetables) or items you use regu­ larly in crafts with present-making in mind.

\


106

Gal"c::le"-L"-'3 ""Llk lke Goc::lc::less

Go.!.!""" G""·.!"",,,

107

... "DeCOl"alLVe ~ o~ckes

This is purely personal. If charity and kindness could be rolled into a statue or decorative item, what would it be to you? Some people use solar images, because the sun is associated with blessings. "DLl"eclLo"­

,.i· ~.

I

I visualize kindness and charity as an outward-moving spiral that never really ends, because we often cannot see everyone it touches. You can create this pattern using pavers or stones as borders that slowly disappear into the ground at the largest end so that the opening (from where Gauri's grace flows) visually looks like it continues into the earth!

Dflel"-.J--lal"vesl DpplLcalLo"-s

Slo"-es. "VV\L"-el"als. Cl"yslals. a"-c::l SkeUs

t

~ ~~

;.

Colol"s

Choose yellow, gold, and white (with small accents of blue to highlight the goddess's sky aspect) for this garden.

Dc::laplalLo"-s

Garden balsam grows quite nicely indoors because it doesn't require a deep root bed. Choose the yellow variety to stay with the golden theme. Put this in a sunny window to encourage benevolence in the home.

"'P allel""-s

All yellow and gold-toned stones are perfect, as are sea­ shells, to represent an ongoing eddy of generous energy.

I consider gentle kindness as having strong Water over­ tones, so magickally I'd suggest West. For feng shui the direc­ tion of service and charity is Northwest.

~" ! 'I".

"

,

~ )

J

If possible, harvest your compassion components in August, the month when Gauri's festivals were traditionally held. Bless them and bundle them up, leaving them anony­ mously for those in need. When you feel a little beat up by life, carry a snippet from Gauri's garden close to your heart to help heal your emotional wounds.

,


106

Gc:lY'c:le""~""9 "",a.k lke Goc:lc:less

Goclcl""" G"'.,.cle......"

10'7

i

~\

'DeceY'c:ll~ve ~ o,"ckes

If;·

This is purely personal. If charity and kindness could be rolled into a statue or decorative item, what would it be to you? Some people use solar images, because the sun is associated with blessings. 'D~Y'ecl~o""

1­:) ~

-to

t

I consider gentle kindness as having strong Water over­ tones, so magickaUy I'd suggest West. For feng shui the direc­ tion of service and charity is Northwest. Clc:lc:lplc:ll~e""s

Garden balsam grows quite nicely indoors because it doesn't require a deep root bed. Choose the yellow variety to stay with the golden theme. Put this in a sunny window to encourage benevolence in the home.

Pc:llleY'''''s

I visualize kindness and charity as an outward-moving spiral that never really ends, because we often cannot see everyone it touches. You can create this pattern using pavers or stones as borders that slowly disappear into the ground at the largest end so that the opening (from where Gauri's grace flows) visually looks like it continues into the earth!

ClHeY'-J-tc:lY'vesl ClpplLCc:llLO""S

Sle""es. VV\~""eY'c:lls. CY'~slc:lls. c:I""c:l Skells

All yellow and gold-toned stones are perfect, as are sea­ shells, to represent an ongoing eddy of generous energy.

l

if· J.t

CetoY's

If possible, harvest your compassion components in August, the month when Gaun's festivals were traditionally held. Bless them and bundle them up, leaving them anony­ mously for those in need. When you feel a little beat up by life, carry a snippet from Gauri's garden close to your heart to help heal your emotional wounds.

;

Choose yellow, gold, and white (with small accents of blue to highlight the goddess's sky aspect) for this garden.

J

,


lOS

G""... c:le."'~"'9 vvak tke. Goc:lc:le.$$

0.,.:1.:1.."" O",,..:1e~s

.J-teCQt:.e: GQycle"- of-vY\ Q9~ck...

Pl""",b

o lovely Sisters! Is it true,

That they are all inspired by you!

And write by inward magic charm'd, And high enthusiasm warm'd. -Joanna Baillie ..)-t~::;to-C,"lt," ...""l C)",fo...""-""ti..o,,,

An elderly woman stands in the dark at a deserted cross足 road. She bears a torch, and dog companions heel at the ready. This mysterious crone is none other than Hecate, the patroness of witches and goddess of the dark moon. Some scholars believe Hecate originated in Thracian cul足 ture, where she was the great goddess of the hunt and a mother image. In Greece, Hecate resided in the dark moon, or in the Earth, where she rules the spirits of the dead and presides over regeneration. It was often customary for Greek women to implore her for protection when they left home. Additionally the image of Hecate when placed on a door or near a house was said to deter wandering, malevolent spirits. For goddess gardeners Hecate's glen represents a way of tapping into our own special magick and learning to use it effectively. Alternatively, this garden is an excellent opportu足 nity to learn about the magick of Earth's greenery and how to apply it for the greatest good. Hecate's magickal attributes include eloquence (especially for ritual or spellcraft), magick, transformation, spirit commu足 nication, the mysteries, and decision-making.

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109

Prepare the soil with an offering of honey, which wascommon on Hecate's altars. Aloe, dandelion, garlic, hazel, hemlock, henna, lavender, mugwort, poppy, and willow are all plants associated with this goddess and her rites. Additionally, plants used to increase personal power could be sown into Hecate's garden. These traditionally include carnation, club moss, and rowan . "1='''''He....'''s

Anything with a three-part motif is appropriate because this goddess could look in three directions at once (this alludes to a threefold goddess figure and the ability to see past, present, and future consecutively). In particular, the image of a key with three parts to the handle or head would be appropriate, as this is one of Hecate's emblems.

A simpler approach would be to lay the garden out in an equidistant cross with an image of Hecate in the center, or a cauldron, which is a generic designation for the threefold lady. Sto",e.$,~~",e. ...""l$, C

...yst""ls, """,c:l Ske.Us

Use moonstone and silver in this garden. Colo...s

All darker colors, particularly black, midnight blue, and deep purple suit Hecate's garden.


108

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109

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arc:leV\.. of

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a lovely Sisters! Is it true, That they are all inspired by you! And write by inward magic charm'd, And high enthusiasm warm'd. -Joanna Baillie

"Pt.::l"l",

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Prepare the soil with an offering of honey, which wascommon on Hecate's altars. Aloe, dandelion, garlic, hazel, hemlock, henna, lavender, mugwort, poppy, and willow are all plants associated with this goddess and her rites. Additionally, plants used to increase personal power could be sown into Hecate's garden. These traditionally include carnation, club moss, and rowan .

.)-ti.slc:.-C,"thtr.::lt C)"fc:.r",-.::Ili.c:."

"P.::Iller"",

An elderly woman stands in the dark at a deserted cross­ road. She bears a torch, and dog companions heel at the ready. This mysterious crone is none other than Hecate, the patroness of witches and goddess of the dark moon. Some scholars believe Hecate originated in Thracian cul­ ture, where she was the great goddess of the hunt and a mother image.

Anything with a three-part motif is appropriate because this goddess could look in three directions at once (this alludes to a threefold goddess figure and the ability to see past, present, and future consecutively). In particular, the image of a key with three parts to the handle or head would be appropriate, as this is one of Hecate's emblems.

In Greece, Hecate resided in the dark moon, or in the Earth, where she rules the spirits of the dead and presides over regeneration. It was often customary for Greek women to implore her for protection when they left home. Additionally the image of Hecate when placed on a door or near a house was said to deter wandering, malevolent spirits. For goddess gardeners Hecate's glen represents a way of tapping into our own special magick and learning to use it effectively. Alternatively, this garden is an excellent opportu­ nity to learn about the magick of Earth's greenery and how to apply it for the greatest good. Hecate's magickal attributes include eloquence (especially for ritual or spellcraft), magick, transformation, spirit commu­ nication, the mysteries, and decision-making.

A simpler approach would be to lay the garden out in an equidistant cross with an image of Hecate in the center, or a cauldron, which is a generic designation for the threefold lady. Slc:."es, /·VV\i."er.::lls, Crysl.::lb.. .::I"c:l Sh.eU",

Use moonstone and silver in this garden. Cc:.lc:.rs

All darker colors, particularly black, midnight blue, and deep purple suit Hecate's garden.


110

G"'l"c:le""t.",,'!1 -.-va.k lke Gec:lc:less

"Decel"",lt.ve ~euckes

Images of serpents, horses, or dogs, her three sacred ani­ mals, or a central cauldron filled with soil and some of Hecate's sacred plants, are appropriate. "D t.l"eclt.e""

This depends on your perspective. The center of the sacred circle is a type of crossroad where all magick comes together. But North is the point of "midnight" or the witching hour, which also would certainly honor Hecate's magick. For feng shui I've turned to the sector known for creative applica­ tion of one's knowledge and skill: the Southeast, which bears the colors of dark blue and green. Clc:l"'pl",lt.e""s

My indoor Hecate garden consists of an aloe plant posi­ tioned in a small iron cauldron with an old skeleton key in the front (to unlock the mysteries of magick). When I have a par­ ticularly difficult spell or ritual in mind, I break off a bit of the aloe and rub the gel on my third eye and heart chakara to encourage working with insight and perfect love.

G ...clcl",ss G",..cl",",s

111

J-lesl'-et: K'-ld",eV'\. Getyd..eV'\. Cooking is at once child's play and adult joy.

And cooking done with care is an act of love.

-Craig Claiborne ..J-lt.sle-Culh"l"d CJ""fel"l""-",lt.e",,

The idea of a kitchen garden comes to us from the Victo­ rian era. During this time people kept small, manageable gar­ dens just outside the home (often near the kitchen). These little plots were filled with culinary spices, fruits, and vegetables so that fresh flavors and foods could be served when things were in season. It also saved the thrifty homemaker time and money, as she would not have to go to town and buy goods; she could pick them fresh and continue with other tasks instead.

Clflel"-..J-l "'l"vesl Clpplic",lt.e""s

Oddly, even though Hecate is represented by the dark moon, her rituals often took place on the eve of the full moon, which might prove to be an ideal time for harvesting magickal plants so their filled "full" with energy. Use Hecate's harvest any time you want to increase a spell's energy or your spiritual focus. Scatter her herbs and flow­ ers around the ritual space to bless, energize, and protect it, or soak in a bath with them to fill your aura with wondrous magick. (Note: I've found this last application particularly useful for improving the results from glamoury visualizations and spells.)

Following in this tradition, we will turn to Hestia for bless­ ings. In Greek tradition she was the goddess of the hearth fire, which is also the heart of a home and the symbol of family togetherness. One would never go puttering in another person's hearth without permission for fear of angering Hestia, who was considered hospitable and helpful to those she favored.

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"DI2Ce'l"t:lt:.l.VI2 ~eU~l2s

J-lesl'-c.: K'-lckeV\.. G~l"c:leV\..

Images of serpents, horses, or dogs, her three sacred ani­ mals, or a central cauldron filled with soil and some of Hecate's sacred plants, are appropriate.

Cooking is at once child's play and adult joy. And cooking done with care is an act of love. -Craig Claiborne

"Di.'I"l2ct:.l.e"­

This depends on your perspective. The center of the sacred circle is a type of crossroad where all magick comes together. But North is the point of "midnight" or the witching hour, which also would certainly honor Hecate's magick. For feng shui I've turned to the sector known for creative applica­ tion of one's knowledge and skill: the Southeast, which bears the colors of dark blue and green. Oc:lt:lpt:.t:lt:.l.eV\.s

My indoor Hecate garden consists of an aloe plant posi­ tioned in a small iron cauldron with an old skeleton key in the front (to unlock the mysteries of magick). When I have a par­ ticularly difficult spell or ritual in mind, I break off a bit of the aloe and rub the gel on my third eye and heart chakara to encourage working with insight and perfect love.

Ml.st:.e-C,~lt:.u'l"c:>l C)"-fe'l"t:.""c:>t:.i.eV\.

il

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r

The idea of a kitchen garden comes to us from the Victo­ rian era. During this time people kept small, manageable gar­ dens just outside the horne (often near the kitchen). These little plots were filled with culinary spices, fruits, and vegetables so that fresh flavors and foods could be served when things were in season. It also saved the thrifty homemaker time and money, as she would not have to go to town and buy goods; she could pick them fresh and continue with other tasks instead.

Oft:.I2'1"-Mt:I'I"Vl2st:. Oppli.ct:lt:.i.eV\.s

Oddly, even though Hecate is represented by the dark moon, her rituals often took place on the eve of the full moon, which might prove to be an ideal time for harvesting magickal plants so their filled "full" with energy. Use Hecate's harvest any time you want to increase a spell's energy or your spiritual focus. Scatter her herbs and flow­ ers around the ritual space to bless, energize, and protect it, or soak in a bath with them to fill your aura with wondrous magick. (Note: I've found this last application particularly useful for improving the results from glamoury visualizations and spells.)

Following in this tradition, we will turn to Hestia for bless­ ings. In Greek tradition she was the goddess of the hearth fire, which is also the heart of a horne and the symbol of family togetherness. One would never go puttering in another person's hearth withoutperrnission for fear of angering Hestia, who was considered hospitable and helpful to those she favored.


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112

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God.d.ess Gc:n·d.e",-s

113

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Speaking of hospitality, Hestia also ruled over public hearths-those used by bakers or those created for festivals. From this fire she could reach out and bring unity to whole communities.

"Dee"'l"",l~ve

~

Hestia's magickal attributes include home, family accord,

unity, love, emotional warmth, frugality, and domestic success.

~~

c--r ",,,,ekes

Hang lanterns or secure fire-safe torches in the middle of or around the borders of Hestia's garden. The fire within rep­ resents the goddess, and also acts to invoke her protection on your home and handiwork. "D~l"ecl~","-

Pl","-ls

Before sowing your garden, make a small offering to the

soil from your own dinner table. If you can burn the offering

beforehand, all the better. It was traditional to place a little some­

thing in Hestia's fires to invoke her blessing on the home, and

this extends that concept to your garden.

Magickally, South is the direction of Fire in all its forms. For feng shui, however, the direction for family unity is East, and the direction to nurture loving relationships is Southwest.

As for what you should plant, think edible! What spices do you use most often? What vegetables would you like to pick fresh and bring into the home for meals-or, for that matter, to eat raw? My kitchen garden traditionally contains beans, peas, cucumbers, celery, cherry tomatoes, beefsteak tomatoes, and green onions.

Within the home I would suggest using a self-enclosed candle near your kitchen range to represent Hestia. Dab this with some olive oil (something used in cooking) to bless it. Whenever possible, burn the first pinch of bread and other sus­ taining foods in the flame from this candle to invoke Hestia's presence and positive energy.

P

",llel""-s

An upward pointing triangle, a symbol for fire in a variety of settings (likely taking its shape from volcanoes) is suitable.

a

I

t

I I,

"

Sl","-es, '\tV\~"-el"",ls, Cl"'jsl",ls, ","-cl Skells

For reconciliation in the home use selenite. Otherwise look to Fire stones such as bloodstone, carnelian, lava stone, obsid­ ian, quartz, and red agate. C",l",l"s

Red, orange, yellow, and some blue are all appropriate choices. Basically, think of any colors in a well-tended fire.

~

cl",pl",l~","-s

aRel"-~"'l"vesl appl~e",l~","-s

Many fruits and vegetables make wonderful natural col­ orings for candle wax. Beets are a great example. Take a little of the juice and add it to the candle wax before molding. Then burn this in the kitchen to honor Hestia.


112

Gc:lY'd.e",-'-"'-'3 vvi.lk lke God.d.ess

Go..l.L.s" G",.....leV\.$

Speaking of hospitality, Hestia also ruled over public hearths-those used by bakers or those created for festivals. From this fire she could reach out and bring unity to whole communities.

'CecoY'c:lli.ve

f,

Hestia's magickal attributes include home, family accord, unity, love, emotional warmth, frugality, and domestic success.

Hang lanterns or secure fire-safe torches in the middle of or around the borders of Hestia's garden. The fire within rep­ resents the goddess, and also acts to invoke her protection on your home and handiwork.

Magickally, South is the direction of Fire in all its forms. For feng shui, however, the direction for family unity is East, and the direction to nurture loving relationships is Southwest.

Before sowing your garden, make a small offering to the soil from your own dinner table. If you can burn the offering beforehand, all the better. It was traditional to place a little some­ thing in Hestia's fires to invoke her blessing on the home, and this extends that concept to your garden. As for what you should plant, think edible! What spices do you use most often? What vegetables would you like to pick fresh and bring into the home for meals-or, for that matter, to eat raw? My kitchen garden traditionally contains beans, peas, cucumbers, celery, cherry tomatoes, beefsteak tomatoes, and green onions. c:llleY''''-s

c-r ouckes

"D i.yecl,-o",-

"Pl",,,,-ls

P

113

C-ld."'pl",li.o",-s

Within the home I would suggest using a self-enclosed candle near your kitchen range to represent Hestia. Dab this with some olive oil (something used in cooking) to bless it. Whenever possible, burn the first pinch of bread and other sus­ taining foods in the flame from this candle to invoke Hestia's presence and positive energy. \

~.

..

An upward pointing triangle, a symbol for fire in a variety of settings (likely taking its shape from volcanoes) is suitable.

C-l ReY'- J--..tc:lY'vesl C-lppli.c"'li.o",-s

Many fruits and vegetables make wonderful natural col­ orings for candle wax. Beets are a great example. Take a little of the juice and add it to the candle wax before molding. Then burn this in the kitchen to honor Hestia.

Slo",-es. ~i.",-eY'c:lls, CY'yslc:lls. c:l",-d. Skelts

For reconciliation in the home use selenite. Otherwise look to Fire stones such as bloodstone, carnelian, lava stone, obsid­ ian, quartz, and red agate. ColoY's

Red, orange, yellow, and some blue are all appropriate choices. Basically, think of any colors in a well-tended fire.

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11-4

G"'l"de"-;:v~..g vvi.U" lke Geddess

It

Goctcte"s G",rct"....."

115

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.J-t\.~CI:

~ Cll"l"\.Ol"

G

Cll"c::le~

"Pl","-ls

For this garden we'll seek out plants whose energies

foster courage and strength. These include borage, mullein,

sweetpea, thyme, carnation, mulberry, and pennyroyal. Alter足

natively, if you live in a warm-weather environment, go with

traditional tropical.

I am a warrior in the time of women warriors; the longing for justice is the sword I carry. -Sonia Johnson .J---lLsle- C

'P allel""-s

'4lh4l"",l CJ"-fel"""-,,,li.e"足

There is a time to remain silent and a time to take a stand. Our lives bring many situations to bear that make us face this kind of decision between action and inaction, between still足 ness and combat, nearly every day. To help us act wisely in such moments, we can turn to the goddess Hina. Hina appears as one of the great goddesses of Polynesian legends. Her attributes were many, including ruling over the moon, guiding the dead, and being a fierce protectress of women. She is generally considered a maiden and the first woman to whom many royal families in Polynesia trace their family lineage.

1~.

Any pattern with two distinct sides, as Hina had two faces (one in front and one in back), is suitable.

~f "'.:"

~'

i

;t t

Sle"-es.\tV\ i. "-el"",ls,

C

l"~sl",ls, ","-d Sh..ells

As with plants, choose crystals whose energies support

the qualities of a good warrior, such as sound defenses and

bravery. These include agate, amethyst, beryl, bloodstone, car足

nelian, eye agate, garnet, lapis, lava, onyx, tigereye, and turqoise. Celel"s

Red is the main hue for both Hina's warrior energy and

her aspect as a Creatrix, because she formed the first man from

red clay. To balance all this fire, add in some predominantly

white flowers so that the warrior has wisdom and inner peace

as an ally.

'DeCel"",lLVe ~1 e'-4ch..es

In one legend Hina reaches the moon by way of a canoe.

She found she enjoyed the journey so much that she remained

to live there. She used the moon as a suitable location from

which to guide wandering souls who were lost in life, or after

death. Alternatively, a wave-generating fountain would be a

lovely touch, for it was to the welcome embrace of ocean waves

that Hina returned to restore her beauty.

Hina's magickal attributes include vital force (creation), safety, spirit communication, moon magick, renewal, beauty, lineage, and heritage. ~

~

\


1I..:::;j

Gt;n·d.e_~_9 "",a,k lke God.d.ess

G".l.l"'S$ G",,..l,,,,,,

lIS

\ ';'}

~"

ti' 1

f

..J---t~"-C4: ~ C4l"l"~Ol" GC4l"d.e"­

1='1.c._ls

For this garden we'll seek out plants whose energies

foster courage and strength. These include borage, mullein,

sweetpea, thyme, carnation, mulberry, and pennyroyaL Alter­

natively, if you live in a warm-weather environment, go with

traditional tropical.

I am a warrior in the time of women warriors; the longing for justice is the sword I carry. -Sonia Johnson ..l-I~slo-C,tlh.y.c.l C)_foy",-.c.Uo_

~Qlley_s

There is a time to remain silent and a time to take a stand. Our lives bring many situations to bear that make us face this kind of decision between action and inaction, between ness and combat, nearly every day. To help us act wisely in such moments, we can turn to the goddess Hina. Hina appears as one of the great goddesses of Polynesian legends. Her attributes were many, including ruling over the moon, guiding the dead, and being a fierce protectress of women. She is generally considered a maiden and the first woman to whom many royal families in Polynesia trace their family lineage.

Any pattern with two distinct sides, as Hina had two faces

(one in front and one in back), is suitable.

.,:1 I,

i1 "

t,

Slo_es, "VV\~_ey.c.ls, CYyst:..c.ts, .c._d. SkeUs

As with plants, choose crystals whose energies support

the qualities of a good warrior, such as sound defenses and

bravery. These include agate, amethyst, beryl, bloodstone, car­

nelian, eye agate, garnet, lapis, lava, onyx, tigereye, and turqoise. Coloys

~,

,.

Red is the main hue for both Hina's warrior energy and

her aspect as a Creatrix, because she formed the first man from

red clay. To balance all this fire, add in some predominantly

white flowers so that the warrior has wisdom and inner peace

as an ally.

1C:)ecoy.c.t:.~ve ~o~cke$

Hina's magickal attributes include vital force (creation), safety, spirit communication, moon magick, renewal, beauty, lineage, and heritage.

l' .i

"

~

In one legend Hina reaches the moon by way of a canoe.

She found she enjoyed the journey so much that she remained

to live there. She used the moon as a suitable location from

which to guide wandering souls who were lost in life, or after

death. Alternatively, a wave-generating fountain would be a

lovely touch, for it was to the welcome embrace of ocean waves

that Hina returned to restore her beauty.


116

Gc::n.c:le"'-~"'-9 vvak I;ke G=c:lc:less

G"clcless

"D ~yec::I;~=",-

gl"'~S: ~essc:::I~

In magick, warrior energy resides in the South with Fire. This seems to correlate strongly with feng shui, which places energy and power in the South.

It might be nice to have a fountain with floating red flow­

ers or candles to honor Hina's energy. I also found a nice foun­ tain that had room for small growing plants. Because thyme doesn't need a great deal of root space, growing it is an ideal way to foster mettle and personal "backbone." Rey- .J--.layvesl; Q

G

117

al"'d.e""

I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled

[poets] to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or

inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who

deliver all their sublime messages without knowing

in the least what they mean.

-Socrates

Qc:laF'l;al;~=",-s

Q

G .. ycle,,"s

J-t~sl;=-C ~lbAl'Cll C}",-f=y","al;~=",-

Iris is one of my favorite goddesses. She's shown in art as glistening with winged beauty, using a rainbow to mark her passage through the sky. It is by this path that she diligently conveys messages from humankind to the divine halls. Iris was assigned to serve Zeus, who often gave her mis­ sives for other immortals and people. She also aets as a hand servant to Hera, showing tremendous devotion-even to the point of never sleeping or taking off her shoes! This dedication to completing a task is the main attribute around which Iris's garden is fashioned. Here we will place all the blossoms whose aromas improve our communication skills and that motivate us to execute our messages to each other expediently, lovingly, and wisely. Iris's magickal attributes include oaths, promises, prayer, communication, and generous service.

F'F'lU,;al;~=",-s

Carnation, mullein, thyme, and the other edible plants from your garden might do the most good if made into a tea, wine, or liqueur. The eating and drinking of anything made from plants allows you to "internalize" the spirit of that plant and all of its magickal attributes. Additionally, scatter a few fresh petals or leaves from your garden around your living space any time you feel like you might be under psychic attack to conjure Hina's protective powers.

1='la",-l;s

Prepare your garden with the traditional offering of dried figs and honey or crumbled wheat cakes. Into this, sow an abundance of yellow-colored flowers, as yellow is the color of .~

U


116

117

Gc:n.cle"-L"-'3 ""Llk t:ke G",clcless

G",.t.tess G"'....t"'"-s

"D L"'eCt:L"'"­

CJl"l.S: '\IV\essc:u3e G~l"c::leV'\..

,

In magick, warrior energy resides in the South with Fire. This seems to correlate strongly with feng shui, which places energy and power in the South.

,! .~,

aclQ".t:QU",,,,S

It might be nice to have a fountain with floating red flow­ ers or candles to honor Hina's energy. I also found a nice foun­ tain that had room for small growing plants. Because thyme doesn't need a great deal of root space, growing it is an ideal way to foster mettle and personal "backbone." a

I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled Ipoets] to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who

deliver all their sublime messages without knowing

in the least what they mean.

-Socrates .J-l LSt:",- C

,.lh.....Ql CJ",f"''''",-Qt:L'''"­

Iris is one of my favorite goddesses. She's shown in art as glistening with winged beauty, using a rainbow to mark her passage through the sky. It is by this path that she diligently conveys messages from humankind to the divine halls. Iris was assigned to serve Zeus, who often gave her mis­ sives for other immortals and people. She also aets as a handservant to Hera, showing tremendous devotion-even to the point of never sleeping or taking off her shoes! This dedication to completing a task is the main attribute around which Iris's garden is fashioned. Here we will place the blossoms whose aromas improve our communication skills and that motivate us to execute our messages to each other expediently, lovingly, and wisely. Iris's magickal attributes include oaths, promises, prayer, communication, and generous service.

ft:e ...- .J-lQ...vest: a".".lLCQt:L","-S

Carnation, mullein, thyme, and the other edible plants from your garden might do the most good if made into a tea, wine, or liqueur. The eating and drinking of anything made from plants allows you to "internalize" the spirit of that plant and all of its magickal attributes. Additionally, scatter a few fresh petals or leaves from your garden around your living space any time you feel like you might be under psychic attack to conjure Hina's protective powers.

1='lQ",b

Prepare your garden with the traditional offering of dried figs and honey or crumbled wheat cakes. Into this, sow an abundance of yellow-colored flowers, as yellow is the color of j;

~


liS

G""y.!e",-L"'-9 VVLU.. i:ke Go.!.!ess

messages. And, of course, don't forget at least a few irises, the flowers that bear her name!

G ......l...",-"

119

'DeCOy""i:Lve ~ ouckes

A water catcher is perfect. Iris would fetch water to use in sacred oaths. A caduceus is another option, because Iris is often depicted carrying one. 'DLyeci:Lo",­

magick, the Eastern Quarter, which also governs the winds, rules over our ability to speak and be understood. In feng shui we discover the Northwest being beneficial for Iris's helpful aspect, especially for serving others with a joyful heart.

CI .!""pi:""i:LO"'-S

"P ""l:i:ey",-s I can think of no more lovely pattern to use for this garden than that of the rainbow. Note that you don't have to curve the garden to achieve this result. Simply create straight lines of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple plants. 8i:o",-es, /¡VV\L",-ey""ls. CYysl:""ts, """'-.! SkeUs

Aventurine, carnelian, mottled jasper, and sardonyx are four stones that have strong associations with communication and the Air Element. Alternatively, place seven stones, each one of which bears one color of the rainbow in it, in the ground. An alternative here might be to use a reflection ball, which often creates rainbows on the surface. Coloys

Use yellow gold of a rainbow.

the color of her wings) and the hues

My indoor Iris garden consisted of yellow pot marigolds in a golden container placed in a stained glass window that shined Iris's rainbows throughout the house. I also found a soft sculpture rainbow that I hung above the planter as part of the window valance. Clfley-J-t""yvesi: ClppILc""i:Lo",-s

you use edible yellow flowers (carnation, dandelion, marigold, sunflower, etc.) you can pluck one petal just prior to an important discussion. Place this under your tongue for a few minutes or nibble on it to endow your speech with Iris's persuasive powers. Alternatively, to get a message to someone you love, pick seven petals (one of each color of the rainbow). Whisper your message into the petals while visualizing this person, and then release them to the winds or moving water so Iris can convey the communique. Finally, if you're tired of waiting for the phone to ring, keep a clipping from Iris's garden under the cradle. (Just remember to remove it after you get the call you wanted or the phone will be ringing a lot.)


G"'Y'd.ev...i.v...'3 "",ak t:.ke God.d.ess

Oo.l.l.."" Oal".l..V\.s

messages. And, of course, don't forget at least a few irises, the flowers that bear her name!

1[:)ecol"",t:.i.ve ~louckes

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119

A water catcher is perfect. Iris would fetch water to use in sacred oaths. A caduceus is another option, because Iris is often depicted carrying one. 1[:)i.Y'ect:.i.ov...

In magick, the Eastern Quarter, which also governs the winds, rules over our ability to speak and be understood. In feng shui we discover the Northwest being beneficial for Iris's helpful aspect, especially for serving others with a joyful heart. Dd."'pt:.",t:.Lov...s

P",HeY'v...s

I can think of no more lovely pattern to use for this garden than that of the rainbow. Note that you don't have to curve the garden to achieve this result. Simply create straight lines of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple plants. St:.ov...es, ~V\i.v...eY'",ls, CY'~St:.",t5, ",v...d. SkeUs

Aventurine, carnelian, mottled jasper, and sardonyx are four stones that have strong associations with communication and the Air Element. Alternatively, place seven stones, each one of which bears one color of the rainbow in it, in the ground. An alternative here might be to use a reflection ball, which often creates rainbows on the surface. ColoY's

Use yellow gold (like the color of her wings) and the hues of a rainbow.

My indoor Iris garden consisted of yellow pot marigolds in a golden container placed in a stained glass window that shined Iris's rainbows throughout the house. I also found a soft sculpture rainbow that I hung above the planter as part of the window valance. DReY'- .J---t"'Y'vest:. DpptLc",t:.i.ov...s

If you use edible yellow flowers (carnation, dandelion, marigold, sunflower, etc.) you can pluck one petal just prior to an important discussion. Place this under your tongue for a few minutes or nibble on it to endow your speech with Iris's persuasive powers. Alternatively, to get a message to someone you love, pick seven petals (one of each color of the rainbow). Whisper your message into the petals while visualizing this person, and then release them to the winds or moving water so Iris can convey the communique. Finally, if you're tired of waiting for the phone to ring, keep a clipping from Iris's garden under the cradle. (Just remember to remove it after you get the call you wanted or the phone will be ringing a lot.)

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CJsi.:s: ~l"'eQ"" GQl"'d..e", All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them. - Walt Disney

J.--l ~$t:o- C v.lhtl"c>l C)V'-fOl"w...c>t:~o V'­ Born of the sky goddess Nut and the earth god Geb, Isis became one of the most well-rounded and written about god­ desses in world history. Portrayed in Egyptian stories as a kindly goddess with a soft heart for humankind, she is credited with teaching people how to spin, weave, and develop other cultural occupations. She also taught women how to handle their rela­ tionships more effectively.

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giver? In ancient times the Egyptians went to her temples to practice incubation. This was basically a predetermined amount of time during which people slept in the temples awaiting a dream (often one of a curative nature) from the goddess. Consider planning your Isis garden on January 9 or Feb­ ruary 5, preparing the soil on March 20, sowing on May 14, weeding and fertilizing on June 24, and harvesting on August 27; all of these are festival days for this goddess. Alternatively bless the work of your hands on the first or forth day of a waxing moon (especially if either falls on Wednesday or Fri­ day). Isis's magickal attributes include marriage (relationships), fertility, spellcraft, reincarnation, victory, health, arts, divina­ tion (by dreams), and wisdom. Plc>V'-t:s

Turn hair clippings into your soil to invoke Isis's presence before sowing your garden.(Her priestesses often loosened hair to increase a spell's power or used it in spellcraft). Other items associated specifically with Isis include amaranth, clover, cypress, geranium, ivy, lily, lotus, narcissus, snowdrop, and all water plants. Plants that inspire dreams include jasmine, mari­ gold, onion, and rose.

Isis's powers were so diversified that she received the des­ ignation: Lady of Ten Thousand Names. Under her wise eye, love could flourish, fate would improve, and the land was enriched. So how does she come by the reputation as a dream

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A star might be a nice touch, because one of Isis's names was Star of the Sea (and the star also represents the night and a place where we "hitch" our wishes).


120

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All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them. - Walt Disney J-li.slo-C ...R ......~l g""fo... ""~li.o""

Born of the sky goddess Nut and the earth god Geb, Isis became one of the most well-rounded and written about god­ desses in world history. Portrayed in Egyptian stories as a kindly goddess with a soft heart for humankind, she is credited with teaching people how to spin, weave, and develop other cultural occupations. She also taught women how to handle their rela­ tionships more effectively.

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giver? In ancient times the Egyptians went to her temples to practice incubation. This was basically a predetermined amount of time during which people slept in the temples awaiting a dream (often one of a curative nature) from the goddess. Consider planning your Isis garden on January 9 or Feb­ ruary 5, preparing the soil on March 20, sowing on May 14, weeding and fertilizing on June 24, and harvesting on August 27; all of these are festival days for this goddess. Alternatively bless the work of your hands on the first or forth day of a waxing moon (especially if either falls on Wednesday or Fri­ day). Isis's magickal attributes include marriage (relationships), fertility, spellcraft, reincarnation, victory, health, arts, divina­ tion (by dreams), and wisdom. Pl~""b

Turn hair clippings into your soil to invoke Isis's presence before sowing your garden. (Her priestesses often loosened hair to increase a spell's power or used it in spellcraft). Other items associated specifically with Isis include amaranth, clover, cypress, geranium, ivy, lily, lotus, narcissus, snowdrop, and all water plants. Plants that inspire dreams include jasmine, mari­ gold, onion, and rose.

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I ~. Isis's powers were so diversified that she received the des­ ignation: Lady of Ten Thousand Names. Under her wise eye, love could flourish, fate would improve, and the land was enriched. So how does she come by the reputation as a dream

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A star might be a nice touch, because one of Isis's names was Star of the Sea (and the star also represents the night and a place where we "hitch" our wishes).


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Amethyst, beryl, quartz, and turquoise often appeared on Isis's altars. Amethyst is additionally a good dreaming stone. Cote...s

Gold and yellow are suitable, as is blue (the color of her eyes). --oec;o"'c:ll~ve ~ e""c;kes

Any source of flowing water, which can symbolize the richness of the Nile, is appropriate. Alternatively, look for her honored animals, which include snake, eagle, cow, lion, owl, and ram. A third option is a knotted rope, as the art of magickal knot making was purportedly created by Isis. (Don't forget to bind your wishes inside, and release one knot when you need that energy most!) --o;....ec;l~e'"

For Isis's watery nature, West is best. For dreams, I'd say North, the direction of midnight. In feng shui Southwest emphasizes Isis's blessings on relationships and Southeast seems to encourage the creative energy for dreaming. ad.c:lplc:ll;'e",s

A boat-shaped planter would be ideal, because Isis pro­ tected sailors and is frequently depicted as steering a boat down the Nile. a

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Dry flowers and leaves and use them in a special dream pillow. You can make it any size you desire. For comfort, wrap

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the herbs in cotton bunting inside a pillow, and then place it near your head on those nights when you hope to receive important spiritual insights, prophetic dreams, or visions that you may need for the days ahead. To empower the pillow fur­ ther, add an incantation such as: ISIS, YOUR POWER WRAPPED WITHIN THIS SEAM BRING TO ME A NIGHT OF DREAMS!


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Amethyst, beryl, quartz, and turquoise often appeared on Isis's altars. Amethyst is additionally a good dreaming stone. Colel"S

Gold and yellow are suitable, as is blue (the color of her eyes). 'Decol"at,"ve

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Any source of flowing water, which can symbolize the richness of the Nile, is appropriate. Alternatively, look for her honored animals, which include snake, eagle, cow, lion, owl, and ram. A third option is a knotted rope, as the art of magickal knot making was purportedly created by Isis. (Don't forget to bind your wishes inside, and release one knot when you need that energy most!) 'D,"l"ect..o""

For Isis's watery nature, West is best. For dreams, I'd say North, the direction of midnight. In feng shui Southwest emphasizes Isis's blessings on relationships and Southeast seems to encourage the creative energy for dreaming. Cl.!c:lptc:lti.o""s

A boat-shaped planter would be ideal, because Isis pro­ tected sailors and is frequently depicted as steering a boat down the Nile. Clftel"-.J-4al"ve:st Clppli.cc:lti.e"-:s

Dry flowers and leaves and use them in a special dream pillow. You can make it any size you desire. For comfort, wrap

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the herbs in cotton bunting inside a pillow, and then place it near your head on those nights when you hope to receive important spiritual insights, prophetic dreams, or visions that you may need for the days ahead. To empower the pillow fur­ ther, add an incantation such as: ISIS, YOUR POWER WRAPPED WITHIN THIS SEAM BRING TO ME A NIGHT OF DREAMS!

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Talk of mysteries!

Think of our life in Nature-daily to be shown matter,

To come in contact with it- rocks, trees, wind on our cheeks.

The solid earth!

-Henry David Thoreau

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Fluid and flexible patterns make the most sense here. Try not to get caught in any static mode, but find a way that your borders and interior can shift like the sands from which they're made. An alternative for folks who prefer some type of sym­ metry is a mandala pattern to which you're personally drawn. This should, however, create only the borders of the sand and rock garden; it shouldn't designate the middle specifically, because you'll want to change this part regularly. St:.=v..es, VV\i.v..el'e>ls. Cl'~st:.e>ls. e>v..~ SkeUs

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This goddess comes to us from Japan, where her name means rock nest princess. She is also called the goddess of sand, so who better to help us fashion our rock and sand gardens? As an interesting aside, Iwa-su-hime-no-Kami's sister was Konon­ Hana-Sakuya-Hime, the cherry tree goddess who makes the trees blossom with such beauty. From an Eastern viewpoint, the sand and rock garden provides the owner with a meditative space that can change and adapt with one's thoughts and vision. If you look at some of these scapes in Japan, they almost appear as flowing water made out of sand with the periodic rock jetty surging through. This is part of the wonder of rock and sand gardens-the abil­ ity to create beauty out of plainness. Iwa-su-hime-no-Kami's magickal attributes include the Earth Element, specifically metal, stone, and mineral spirits.

Keep shells tiny so they blend well with the sand. Stones can really be of any size, but vary the size and shapes so that the design can be altered with your whims and perhaps even with the theme of your meditations. l f

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Neutral tones are best. Magick and energy is neither good nor evil, but wholly impartiaL Its application is what deter­ mines the positive or negative "charge."

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If you have the space to add a cherry tree somewhere near the border of your garden, it would make a lovely and aro­ matic addition. Note that weeping cherries do quite well in multiclimate environments and don't take up as much space as traditional cherry trees.

Ple>v..t:.s --oi.l'ect:.~=v..

In rock and sand gardens, plants are secondary. Use low border flowers or bushes and leave the central area open for your rocks and/or sand.

The direction of Earth in the sacred circle is North. This is also where the Earth spirits are said to reside. Feng shui agrees at least in part, placing the Earth in the Northeastern Quarter. j

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Fluid and flexible patterns make the most sense here. Try not to get caught in any static mode, but find a way that your borders and interior can shift: like the sands from which they're made. An alternative for folks who prefer some type of sym­ metry is a mandala pattern to which you're personally drawn. This should, however, create only the borders of the sand and rock garden; it shouldn't designate the middle specifically, because you'll want to change this part regularly.

Ql"'d.e"-s

Talk of mysteries!

Think of our life in Nature-daily to be shown matter,

To come in contact with it- rocks, trees, wind on our cheeks.

The solid earth!

-Henry David Thoreau

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This goddess comes to us from Japan, where her name means rock nest princess. She is also called the goddess of sand, so who better to help us fashion our rock and sand gardens? As an interesting aside, Iwa-su-hime-no-Kami's sister was Konon­ Hana-Sakuya-Hime, the cherry tree goddess who makes the trees blossom with such beauty. From an Eastern viewpoint, the sand and rock garden provides the owner with a meditative space that can change and adapt with one's thoughts and vision. If you look at some of these scapes in Japan, they almost appear as flowing water made out of sand with the periodic rock jetty surging through. This is part of the wonder of rock and sand gardens-the abil­ ity to create beauty out of plainness. Iwa-su-hime-no-Kami's magickal attributes inclUde the Earth Element, specifically metal, stone, and mineral spirits.

125

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Keep shells tiny so they blend well with the sand. Stones can really be of any size, but vary the size and shapes so that the design can be altered with your whims and perhaps even with the theme of your meditations. C=l=...s

Neutral tones are best. Magick and energy is neither good nor evil, but wholly impartial. Its application is what deter­ mines the positive or negative "charge." 'Oec=...""li..ve ~ ='-'4ckes

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If you have the space to add a cherry tree somewhere near the border of your garden, it would make a lovely and aro­ matic addition. Note that weeping cherries do quite well in multiclimate environments and don't take up as much space as traditional cherry trees.

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In rock and sand gardens, plants are secondary. Use low border flowers or bushes and leave the central area open for your rocks and/or sand.

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The direction of Earth in the sacred circle is North. This is also where the Earth spirits are said to reside. Feng shui agrees at least in part, placing the Earth in the Northeastern Quarter.


126

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Several Eastern import shops now sell small sandboxes with rakes to which you can add a few tumbled crystals and points to create whatever effect you desire. If you'd like some­ thing saturated with more personal energy, start with an open­ top wooden box (solid wood, not slatted) and fill it with play sand. Add specially chosen stones to this, and then let your fingers do the designing! (Warning: Do not leave either of these items in any room that cats frequent. They will use it as a litter pan!) Cl fi:.e'l"- ..J--!CI'I"vest:. Clppti.c;Ql::io~s

Because most of us don't harvest stones or sand, I'd rec­ ommend gathering a crystal or a pinch of sand during those times when you want to feel more grounded or when you're doing special rituals to honor the metal, stone, and mineral spirits. In this former case, carry the stone as close to your feet as possible (to keep one foot on the ground). For the latter, take the sand or mineral with you to the sacred space to welcome the devic energies. Another good application for sand from Iwa-su-hime-no­ Kami's garden is to help with sleep magick. Sprinkle a little on the floor around your bed to ensure a good night's rest.

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"Bata~ce Happiness is not a matter of intensity but

of balance and order and rhythm and harmony.

- Thomas Merton ..J--!i.st:.o-C",tt:."'l"Qt q~fOl"""""Qt:.i.o~

Another of my favorite goddesses, this lady is none other than the rainbow snake of Australia. Julunggul lived in any ocean or waterfall, in beautiful crystals and pearls, and in deep pools. What's most interesting about this goddess is her ability to appear as a man, a woman, or a wholly androgenous being at will. Julunggul presided over many aspects of a person's spiri­ tuallife. In our garden, however, we will be looking to her to teach us the valuable lesson of balance in all things, especially within ourselves. Through this goddess we can discover our masculine and feminine selves, and the symmetry between the two. We can rediscover harmony between the spiritual and tem­ poral worlds. At that sacred point of balance between sounds and silence, between breaths, between day and darkness, is magick! Julunggul'a magickal attributes include cycles, initiation, balance, creation, culture, rites of passage, rain and water magick, shamanic training, and the dreamtime. <:PlQ~b

Whatever you choose for your garden, make sure to use equal numbers of traditionally male (basil, bean, cactus,

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126

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acl~pl~ll.o""s

Several Eastern import shops now sell small sandboxes with rakes to which you can add a few tumbled crystals and points to create whatever effect you desire. If you'd like some­ thing saturated with more personal energy, start with an open­ top wooden box (solid wood, not slatted) and fill it with play sand. Add specially chosen stones to this, and then let your fingers do the designing! (Warning: Do not leave either of these items in any room that cats frequent. They will use it as a litter pan!) a f l e...-.}---I~ ...vesl appll.<:;~ll.o""s

Because most of us don't harvest stones or sand, I'd rec­ ommend gathering a crystal or a pinch of sand during those times when you want to feel more grounded or when you're doing special rituals to honor the metal, stone, and mineral spirits. In this former case, carry the stone as close to your feet as possible (to keep one foot on the ground). For the latter, take the sand or mineral with you to the sacred space to welcome the devic energies. Another good application for sand from Iwa-su-hime-no­ Kami's garden is to help with sleep magick. Sprinkle a little on the floor around your bed to ensure a good night's rest.

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127

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Happiness is not a matter of intensity but

of balance and order and rhythm and harmony.

- Thomas Merton .}---Il.slo-C'-4ll'-4...~1 q""fo",",,~ll.o""

Another of my favorite goddesses, this lady is none other than the rainbow snake of Australia. Julunggul lived in any ocean or waterfall, in beautiful crystals and pearls, and in deep pools. What's most interesting about this goddess is her ability to appear as a man, a woman, or a wholly androgenous being at will. Julunggul presided over many aspects of a person's spiri­ tual life. In our garden, however, we will be looking to her to teach us the valuable lesson of balance in all things, especially within ourselves. Through this goddess we can discover our masculine and feminine selves, and the symmetry between the two. We can rediscover harmony between the spiritual and tem­ poral worlds. At that sacred point of balance between sounds and silence, between breaths, between day and darkness, is magick! Julunggul'a magickal attributes include cycles, initiation, balance, creation, culture, rites of passage, rain and water magick, shamanic training, and the dreamtime. Pl~""ls

Whatever you choose for your garden, make sure to use equal numbers of traditionally male (basil, bean, cactus,

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128

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carrot, celery, clover, dandelion, garlic, hops, lavender, mari­ gold, mint, etc.) and female plants (amaranth, aster, lemon balm, blackberry, cabbage, gardenia, hyacinth, lily, myrtle, peri­ winkle, rose, etc.). Alternatively, use equal numbers of Elemen­ tal plants (Earth, Air, Fire, Water). (For a partial list of plants by their predominant Element, refer to pages 41-42.) This approach maintains the balance of overall energy in the gar­ den so it can radiate into your life.

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129

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Two-faced statues, two-sided items, and two-toned items all come to mind. The key is that the visual effect of this garden needs to be as symmetrical as the goddess herself. "D~ T'eeHo",-

Magickally speaking, the center of the circle is where all magick takes place and where all the Elements dance together in equity to create that special energy. In feng shui, West is the direction of harmony.

P",HeT''''-s

Although it comes from another culture, a yin-yang pat­ tern certainly embodies the spirit of this goddess. Another figure used to represent equality and balance is an equidistant cross. Finally, you could lay this garden out in the image of a snake out of rainbow-colored flowers.

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c:l"'pl",li.o",-s

It might be really fun (and somewhat challenging) to see if you can adapt a set of scales into a planter. This illustrates the goddess's balancing energies, while also symbolically help­ ing that energy "grow" through the plants you've chosen.

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On those days when life seems topsy-turvy and you need to regain a sense of stability, take two petals each from one male and one female plant. Place one of each in your shoes so that balance walks with you.

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Shells from the ocean, water-worn stones, and any crys­ tals are the best choices. Two-toned flourite might be ideaL CotOT'S

Balance ocre red, which represents life's blood, with white to maintain symmetry.

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carrot, celery, clover, dandelion, garlic, hops, lavender, mari­ gold, mint, etc.) and female plants (amaranth, aster, lemon balm, blackberry, cabbage, gardenia, hyacinth, lily, myrtle, peri­ winkle, rose, etc.). Alternatively, use equal numbers of Elemen­ tal plants (Earth, Air, Fire, Water). (For a partial list of plants by their predominant Element, refer to pages 41-42.) This approach maintains the balance of overall energy in the gar­ den so it can radiate into your life.

Two-faced statues, two-sided items, and two-toned items all come to mind. The key is that the visual effect of this garden needs to be as symmetrical as the goddess herself. ' D ~ ....ecl~=""

Magickally speaking, the center of the circle is where all magick takes place and where all the Elements dance together in equity to create that special energy. In feng shui, West is the direction of harmony.

~ Cllle....""5

Although it comes from another culture, a yin-yang pat­ tern certainly embodies the spirit of this goddess. Another figure used to represent equality and balance is an equidistant cross. Finally, you could lay this garden out in the image of a snake out of rainbow-colored flowers.

a

d.",pl",l~CI""S

It might be really fun (and somewhat challenging) to see

if you can adapt a set of scales into a planter. This illustrates the goddess's balancing energies, while also symbolically help­ ing that energy "grow" through the plants you've chosen. afle.... -~"' .... vesl appl~c",l~CI""s

On those days when life seems topsy-turvy and you need to regain a sense of stability, take two petals each from one male and one female plant. Place one of each in your shoes so that balance walks with you.

Sl=""es,\IV\~""e ....",ts, C

. . \jsl"'ts, ",,,,,d. SkeUs

Shells from the ocean, water-worn stones, and any crys­ tals are the best choices. Two-toned flourite might be ideal. Cot=.... s

Balance ocre red, which represents life's blood, with white to maintain symmetry.

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~"'~o: 'VV\QYY~Qge GQyd.e~ Keep your eyes wide open before marriage, and half-shut afterwards. -Benjamin Franklin

turn the soil on November 13. All of these dates commemo­ rate festivals for Juno. Plants associated with Juno include fig tree, iris, lily, lotus, and lettuce. Other plants associated with marriage include clover, lavender, myrtle, orange and lemon blossoms, rose, and rosemary.

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"P""Hel""'s

In Roman mythology Juno was the faithful and wise wife to Jupiter. Throughout the empire Juno was honored as the protectress of marital bliss, especially for women. She also had several other aspects. These include Pronuba (who presents the bride to the groom), Lucina (a birth goddess who stands at the gates of life to assist the newborn), Juno Regina (the protec­ tress of Rome), and Moneta (the goddess of memories or warn­ ings, depending on whose translation you read). actually originated in Etruscan tradition. Her Greek counterpart is Hera. The month of June still bears her name and was the traditional month for happy marriages in ancient Rome. (It's interesting to note that June continues to be the most popular month for marriage even today.) Today's goddess gardener can turn to Juno to strengthen his or her relationships with a "significant other." Marriages face a lot of pressures today, and we can certainly use Juno's wisdom and help to make the path smoother. Juno's magickal attributes include lunar magick, protec­ tion (especially for women and children), marriage, kinship, and fertility. ~Pl""v..ls

Plan your garden on February 1 or 2, choose seeds on March 7, sow on June 1 or 2, weed and tend on July 7 or 8, and

A pattern of three interlocking circles, representing you, your partner, and the unity between you that creates the sacred "we," is appropriate. It also dramatically shows that individu­ ality is not lost in a union. Rather, two individuals create some­ thing greater than themselves! Slo",es.\IV\t.v..el"""ls, Cl"ysl""ls, """,d. Skells

Coins are one option, because an ancient coin mint was part of Moneta's temple. In fact, the designation Moneta came to mean "coin" after a while. Sardonyx is another option, because of its association with marital happiness. Colol"s

This is purely personal. What is the color of your love? "Dec:ol"""lLve ~ o""c:kes

Eagle, goose, or peacock statuary would please Juno, as all three animals were sacred to her (particularly goose and peacock). "Dtl"ec:lto",

Magickally, South is the center of warm emotions and love. In feng shui East represents "family" and Southwest is the center for loving relationships.


130

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Keep your eyes wide open before marriage, and half-shut afterwards. -Benjamin Franklin

turn the soil on November 13. All of these dates commemo­ rate festivals for Juno. Plants associated with Juno include fig tree, iris, lotus, and lettuce. Other plants associated with marriage include clover, lavender, myrtle, orange and lemon blossoms, rose, and rosemary.

.}-t~sl:o-C",ll:"'l"Cll q\o'\.fo""""Cll:~o\o'\.

"P C'll:l:el"\o'\.s

In Roman mythology Juno was the faithful and wise wife to Jupiter. Throughout the empire Juno was honored as the protectress of marital bliss, especially for women. She also had several other aspects. These include Pronuba (who presents the bride to the groom), Lucina (a birth goddess who stands at the gates of life to assist the newborn), Juno Regina (the protec­ tress of Rome), and Moneta (the goddess of memories or warn­ ings, depending on whose translation you read). Juno actually originated in Etruscan tradition. Her Greek counterpart is Hera. The month of June still bears her name and was the traditional month for happy marriages in ancient Rome. (It's interesting to note that June continues to be the most popular month for marriage even today.) Today's goddess gardener can turn to Juno to strengthen his or her relationships with a "significant other." Marriages face a lot of pressures today, and we can certainly use Juno's wisdom and help to make the path smoother. Juno's magickal attributes include lunar magick, protec­ tion (especially for women and children), marriage, kinship, and fertility.

pattern of three interlocking circles, representing you, your partner, and the unity between you that creates the sacred "we," is appropriate. It also dramatically shows that individu­ ality is not lost in a union. Rather, two individuals create some­ thing greater than themselves! Sl:o\o'\.es, ~~",el"Clls, Cl"ysl:Clls. CI",cl SkeUs

Coins are one option, because an ancient coin mint was part of Moneta's temple. In fact, the designation Moneta came to mean "coin" after a while. Sardonyx is another option, because of its association with marital happiness. C=lol"s

This is purely personal. What is the color of your love? 1C:>ec=l"Cll:~ve ~f=",ckes

Eagle, goose, or peacock statuary would please Juno, as all three animals were sacred to her (particularly goose and peacock).

"P lCl'" l:s

1C:> ~l"ecl:~=",

Plan your garden on February 1 or 2, choose seeds on March 7, sow on June 1 or 2, weed and tend on Julv 7 or 8, and

Magickally, South is the center of warm emotions and love. In feng shui East represents "family" and Southwest is the center for loving relationships.


132

G ...t.tess 0",,..1...,,,,

Gen·c:le",-~",-'3 ",,~I:.k I:.ke Gec:lc:less

CI c:lClpt:..:'1I:.i.e",-s

KefQ: Clock..

If you've got the space, put a potted decorative fig tree near your heart so that the image of Juno is always warm, just as you wish the emotions in your marriage to remain warm and tender. Alternatively, find a planter onto which you can affix a picture of you and your partner. Plant tea roses in this container and keep it near your hearth, which is the heart of a home. (The kitchen stove is an appropriate substitute if you don't have a fireplace.)

133

Gc::;n..c:leV\..

Steady as a clock, busy as a bee, and cheerful as a cricket. -Martha Washington ..)-.I i.sl:.e- C

",II:.",l"ClI C)"'-f el""""ClI:.~e "'­

In Egypt, Kefa is the mother of all time and is represented by the constellation Ursa Major. How appropriate! She rotates on the North Star, with its tail pointing due East at the begin­ ning of Spring, South come Summer, West by Fall, and North in Winter. This is the ever-turning wheel, the one that Kefa set in motion at the beginning.

CI fl:.el"- ..)-.ICll"vesl:. CI ppli.GClI:.i.e",-s Harvest Juno's blessings on the first day of any month, during a new moon, or during your cycle (if you're a woman) to invoke her presence and power. Include these items on the altar in vow-renewal rituals, forgiveness rituals, and spells and rituals for family harmony.

~

"

I

We call on Kefa now to bless our handiwork as we try to re-create a visual image of time's movement in growing plants. The Victorians were quite adept at this art, which is where many of the ideas presented in this section come from. By setting up our garden in a special way, we can literally "mark time" and honor its passage instead of letting those wonderful moments slip away and be forgotten. Kefa's magickal attributes include time, cycles, succession, and creation.


132

GGrcle"'-~"'-*3 'lNa",- t"'-e Geclcless

OclGPt.:.:It~e",-s

If you've got the space, put a potted decorative fig tree near your heart so that the image of Juno is always warm, just as you wish the emotions in your marriage to remain warm and tender. Alternatively, find a planter onto which you can affix a picture of you and your partner. Plant tea roses in this container and keep it near your hearth, which is the heart of a home. (The kitchen stove is an appropriate substitute if you don't have a fireplace.) Ofter-..)-IGrvest Oppl~cGt~e",-s

Harvest Juno's blessings on the first day of any month, during a new moon, or during your cycle (if you're a woman) to invoke her presence and power. Include these items on the altar in vow-renewal rituals, forgiveness rituals, and spells and rituals for family harmony.

G ...,l.,less G .. ,..,le.....s

133

Kefc::a: Clock.. Gc::a....c:le"'­ Steady as a clock, busy as a bee, and cheerful as a cricket. -Martha Washington ..)-I~ste- C

,,,It,,,rGl C)",-fer","Gt~e",-

In Egypt, Kefa is the mother of all time and is represented by the constellation Ursa Major. How appropriate! She rotates on the North Star, with its tail pointing due East at the begin­ ning of Spring, South come Summer, West by Fall, and North in Winter. This is the ever-turning wheel, the one that Kefa set in motion at the beginning.

We call on Kefa now to bless our handiwork as we try to re-create a visual image of time's movement in growing plants. The Victorians were quite adept at this art, which is where many of the ideas presented in this section come from. By setting up our garden in a special way, we can literally "mark time" and honor its passage instead of letting those wonderful moments slip away and be forgotten. Kefa's magickal attributes include time, cycles, succession, and creation.


GClY'c:le",-~",-., ""ak lke Goc:lc:less

Goclcless G"...·cle.....s

"PlCl",-ls

"P CllleY''''-s

Arrange your flowers according to the hours they open and/or close. The morning follows this pattern:

A clock face (round or square, but with distinct sections for the hours in the day) or anything with a theme of seven (Ursa Major is made up of seven stars) is suitable.

134

• • • • • • •

Goat's beard opens around 3 a.m. Dandelion, hawkweed, and wild succory open at 4 a.m. Day lily, poppy, and sowthistle open at 5 a.m. Cat's-ear opens at 6 a.m. Lettuce, marigold, and water lily open at 7 a.m. Pink opens at 8 a.m. Chickweed, field marigold, and mallow open at 9 a.m.

135

Slo",-es. ~\~",-eY'Clls. CY'~SlClls, CI",-c:l SkeUs

I would use 12 stones, one for each astrological sign (which represents a full cycle too). ColoY's

is flexible to your tastes.

Afternoon and evening hours follow this pattern: • • • • • • • • • •

'DecoY'Cllive ~Jo",<::kes

Hawk's beard, succory, mallow, and poppy open at noon. Pinks open at 1 p.m. Sandwort opens at 2 p.m. Field marigold opens at 3 p.m. Cat's-ear and bindweed open at 4 p.m. Water lily opens at 5 p.m. Poppy and day lily open at 7 p.m. Goat's beard opens at 9 p.m. Chickweed and lettuce open at 10 p.m. Sowthistle opens at 11 p.m.

To my thinking nothing suits this garden better than a sun­ dial. That way, even when your plants aren't perfect, the sun can still notch off the hours to commemorate Kefa.

.:,

For those areas where there aren't plants, fill in with things like low-ferns and evergreens. The medieval people did this a slightly different way. They simply had flowers that represented specific hours of the day. On this clock a budding rose was the first hour, followed by heliotrope, white rose, hyacinth, lemon, lotus, lupin, orange, olive, poplar, marigold, and pansy or violet.

'DLY'e<::lLo",­

t ~:

In metaphysical traditions, magick works outside of time and within all time, so the entirety of the sacred circle and beyond is its direction. In feng shui the point of the mandala (the center of the space) is probably the best choice.


t3..::;;j

GC:Il-o:le_i.._9 vvi..t:J•• lke G=o:lo:le:a;:a;

0001.01..."" 0"''''01. ......."

135

\ '""

"

"Pl",,_ls

"P""He.._s

Arrange your flowers according to the hours they open and/or close. The morning follows this pattern:

A clock face (round or square, but with distinct sections for the hours in the day) or anything with a theme of seven (Ursa Major is made up of seven stars) is suitable.

• • • • • • •

Goat's beard opens around 3 a.m. Dandelion, hawkweed, and wild succory open at 4 a.m. Day lily, poppy, and sowthistle open at 5 a.m. Cat's-ear opens at 6 a.m. Lettuce, marigold, and water lily open at 7 a.m. Pink opens at 8 a.m. Chickweed, field marigold, and mallow open at 9 a.m.

Sl=_e:a;, ~\i.._e..""ls. C

..ysl""ls, ",,_o:l SkeUs

I would use 12 stones, one for each astrological sign (which represents a full cycle too). C=l=..s

This is flexible to your tastes.

Afternoon and evening hours follow • • • • • • • • • •

pattern: Hawk's beard, succory, mallow, and poppy open at noon. Pinks open at I p.m. Sandwort opens at 2 p.m. Field marigold opens at 3 p.m. Cat's-ear and bindweed open at 4 p.m. Water lily opens at 5 p.m. Poppy and day lily open at 7 p.m. Goat's beard opens at 9 p.m. Chickweed and lettuce open at 10 p.m. Sowthistle opens at 11 p.m.

'Dec=..c:ali..ve ~ =",ckes

To my thinking nothing suits this garden better than a sun­ dial. That way, even when your plants aren't perfect, the sun can still notch off the hours to commemorate Kefa.

For those areas where there aren't plants, fill in with things like low-ferns and evergreens. The medieval people did this a slightly different way. They simply had flowers that represented specific hours of the day. On this clock a budding rose was the first hour, followed by heliotrope, white rose, hyacinth, lemon, lotus, lupin, orange, olive, poplar, marigold, and pansy or violet.

'Di....ecli..=_

In metaphysical traditions, magick works outside of time and within all time, so the entirety of the sacred circle and beyond is its direction. In feng shui the point of the mandala (the center of the space) is probably the best choice.


136

GaT'd.e'"-L'"-'3 "",ak lke God.d.ess

Dd.aplalLo,"-s

It is very hard to re-create a clock garden indoors. The best idea is to look for a flower planter that includes a sundial and then make sure to place it where the sun can reach the dial throughout the day. DReT'-.}-IaT'vesl DpptLcalLO,"-s

Want to stay on schedule? Need to be more mindful of how you manage your time? Kefa is the goddess who can help. Gather a petal from her garden and place it under a noticeable clock or your watch. You may want to add an invocation, such as: KEFA, LADY OF TIME, MARK THE DAYS AND MARK THE HOURS.

MARK THE MINUTES AND KEEP ME KEEN LET YOUR TIME BE EVER SEEN!

Gociciess G

..,.cieV\.s

137

Kvva¥\.. --:Y)\.¥\..:

po a",",-a'J

GaY'c:le¥\..

Call it a clan, call it a network, call it a tribe, call it a family.

Whatever you call it, whoever you are, you need one.

-Jane Howard .}-ILslo-CV\lh,wal CJ,"-foT'"",alLo,"-

Kwan Yin is to Eastern mysticism what Mary is to Chris­ tianity. She is a very compassionate goddess concerned with humankind's development and happiness, In fact, her name means she who hears the world weeping. Some stories say that Kwan Yin gave up living in the immortal realms so that she could stay on earth and help humans obtain enlightenment. In Kwan Yin's spirit, her servants were dedicated to acts of mercy and lived peaceful lives, never eating meat so that animals would be given similar kindness as humans. The art of the far East is, not surprisingly, filled with beau­ tiful depictions of this kindly woman. She wears beautiful gar­ ments and gold necklaces, holds jewels and willow branches, and is often accompanied by a male child and a dragon girl. Many people continue to use her name and her statue as a focus for meditations directed toward the goals of harmony, happiness, and kinship. Kwan Yin's magickal attributes include fertility, healing, family, home, kindness, compassion, magickallearning, prayer, and enlightenment. "Pla'"-ts

Willow trees are sacred to Kwan Yin. Beyond this, look to plants that inspire harmony, such as gardenia, lavender, loos­ estrife, meadowsweet, myrtle, morning glory, mint, and violet.


136

Gc:lrc:lev-.~v-.9 ""a,h. lh.e Gcoc:lc:les$

G ...l..l.e99 G ......l."''''-9

Clc:lc:lplc:llLCOv-.$

It is very hard to re-create a clock garden indoors. The best idea is to look for a flower planter that includes a sundial and then make sure to place it where the sun can reach the dial throughout the day. ClRer- J-lc:lrvesl ClpptLCc:llLCOv-.$

Want to stay on schedule? Need to be more mindful of how you manage your time? Kefa is the goddess who can help. Gather a petal from her garden and place it under a noticeable clock or your watch. You may want to add an invocation, such as: LADY or TIME, MARK THE DAYS AND MARK THE HOURS. MARK THE MINUTES AND KEEP ME KEEN LET YOUR TIME BE EVER

KVVQ"-

p

137

~L"-:

Q"'-Liy GQ1"'cle"­

Call it a clan, call it a network, call it a tribe, call it a family.

Whatever you call it, whoever you are, you need one.

-Jane Howard J-lLsb:.-C",th'(rc:ll C)v-.fcor........c:llLcov-.

Kwan Yin is to Eastern mysticism what Mary is to Chris­ tianity. She is a very compassionate goddess concerned with humankind's development and happiness. In fact, her name means she who hears the world weeping. Some stories say that Kwan Yin gave up living in the immortal realms so that she could stay on earth and help humans obtain enlightenment. In Kwan Yin's spirit, her servants were dedicated to acts of mercy and lived peaceful lives, never eating meat so that animals would be given similar kindness as humans. The art of the far East is, not surprisingly, filled with beau­ tiful depictions of this kindly woman. She wears beautiful gar­ ments and gold necklaces, holds jewels and willow branches, and is often accompanied by a male child and a dragon girl. Many people continue to use her name and her statue as a focus for meditations directed toward the goals of harmony, happiness, and kinship. Kwan Yin's magickal attributes include fertility, healing, family, home, kindness, compassion, magickallearning, prayer, and enlightenment. 'Plc:lv-.ls

Willow trees are sacred to Kwan Yin. Beyond this, look to plants that inspire harmony, such as gardenia, lavender, loos­ estrife, meadowsweet, myrtle, morning glory, mint, and violet.


139

G.::n..d.e"-t."-9 vvt.lk lke Ged.d.e$$

God.d.e$$ G",,.d.e,,,,,,

Pallel""-$

1:)i.l"ecUe"-

A lotus pattern, on which she is often seated, is a good choice.

Kwan Yin's fertile, healing nature has strong lunar over足 tones, placing her magickally in the West with Water. In feng shui, the family garden should feature a family portrait (sym足 bolic or literal) in the East or be situated in that direction to best support the energy you're creating.

138

Sle"-e$. "V\t."-el"al$, C'1J$lal$. a"-d. Sketls

Similar to the plants in Kwan Yin's garden, the crystals should encourage peace and wisdom in our relations. Some options include amethyst, aventurine, carnelian, coral, obsid足 ian, rhodonite, sodalite, jade and sugilite.

Dd.aplalt.e"-s

Put together any type of window box or plant pot you desire and place it neatly under a rainbow sun catcher (one story tells of Kwan Yin visiting heaven by a rainbow).

Celel"s

White and gold are two colors sacred to Kwan Yin, likely alluding to peace. However, any hues that represent harmony and accord to you can also be used.

1:)ecel"alt.ve

Dflel"-J----lal"vesl Dpplt.calt.e"-$

Take blends of items from the garden, dry them, and powder them finely. Mix one tablespoon of the powder with one-quarter cup of cornstarch and sprinkle this on your car足 pets. Let it absorb all negativity, and then vacuum it neatly away!

e-r eucke$

A statue of a lion (Kwan Yin is sometimes shown riding a lion) or a child (which she often carries in her arms) would be suitable. Oddly enough, many statues of Mary bear a striking resemblance to Kwan Yin but for facial features.

,~

I

It, I


139

Gc:ayd..e",i."'9 'lNa.k lke God..d..e$$

Go..l..le$$ G",,...le....,,

1=' c:alleY",$

'Di.Yec1:.i.o",

A lotus pattern, on which she is often seated, is a good choice.

Kwan Yin's fertile, healing nature has strong lunar over足 tones, placing her magickally in the West with Water. In feng shui, the family garden should feature a family portrait (sym足 bolic or literal) in the East or be situated in that direction to best support the energy you're creating.

138

Slo",es. V'Vli.",e..c:als. C"'\1$lc:a($. c:a",d.. SkeUs

Similar to the plants in Kwan Yin's garden, the crystals should encourage peace and wisdom in our relations. Some options include amethyst, aventurine, carnelian, coral, obsid足 ian, rhodonite, sodalite, jade and sugilite. Coloys

White and gold are two colors sacred to Kwan Yin, likely alluding to peace. However, any hues that represent harmony and accord to you can also be used.

'Decoyc:ali.ve

e-r o'-tckes

A statue of a lion (Kwan Yin is sometimes shown riding a lion) or a child (which she often carries in her arms) would be suitable. Oddly enough, many statues of Mary bear a striking resemblance to Kwan Yin but for facial features.

Dd..c:aplc:ali.o",$

Put together any type of window box or plant pot you desire and place it neatly under a rainbow sun catcher (one story tells of Kwan Yin visiting heaven by a rainbow). Df1:.ey- )-tc:ayvesl Dppi.cc:ali.o",$

Take blends of items from the garden, dry them, and powder them finely. Mix one tablespoon of the powder with one-quarter cup of cornstarch and sprinkle this on your car足 pets. Let it absorb all negativity, and then vacuum it neatly away!


1~1

GCll"d.e"';''''9 ""ak t:.ke God.d.ess

G....I.el..S5 G.n·el..""",

LQk.sk",,~: ~o"-ey GQycle"­

chamomile, dill, clover, fern, grape, honesty, jasmine, kelp (which might be used as a soil nutrient), marjoram, mint, onion, pine, poppy, sesame, and vervain.

I~O

All money is a matter of belief. -Adam Smith .J-i;'st:.o-C""lt:.""l"ClI q",fol"",-Clt:.;.o",

Lakshmi is a preeminent goddess from India who per­ sonifies abundance and wealth in all its forms. All things plush, beautiful, lavish, sumptuous, costly, and extravagant are under her dominion. Perhaps even more importantly to magick, Lakshmi is an active force for change. Vishnu's abilities remain passive unless Lakshmi motivates his powers. Although on the surface it may seem that the quest for spirituality is very different than one focused on prosperity, in Lakshmi's garden the two can grow together. For one thing, though money may not buy happiness, it certainly makes many situations in life much easier to bear. Additionally, if you're not always worried about paying the bills you can focus more fully on other parts of your life that you want to develop, such as your relationship with the goddess. Bear in mind that the Divine rarely gives out gifts without some honest effort on our part. But when your heart is in the right place, and your hands willing to work, the goddess can meet-and even exceed-our needs. This creates a partnership between you and the universe, where-with Lakshmi's guid­ ance-you can achieve your goals in karmically wise ways. Lakshmi's magickal attributes include luck, success, money, beauty, and abundance. PlCl"'t:.s

Ivy, lily, lotus, and willow are sacred to Lakshmi. Other plants associated with monetary gains include alfalfa, basil,

P

Clt:.b"l""'S

A lotus pattern (a flower on which this goddess is often shown sitting) is a good choice. Alternatively, anything with a lO-sided motif. (Ten is the number of Vishnu's incarnations in which Lakshmi was his sister, wife, or mother.) St:.o",es,VV\;'",el"Clls. Cl"'Yst:.Clls, CI",d. SkeUs

Seashells are sacred to Lakshmi, as some stories tell of her being born of sea foam. Beyond this, wealth-attracting stones include aventurine, bloodstone, cat's-eye, coal, jade, and tourmaline. Colol"s

Gold and yellow are well-suited to this garden. 'Oecol"Clt:.i.ve

c--r o""ckes

Lakshmi's festivals are light-filled celebrations, so some type of lamp or candle stand would be a nice touch. Alterna­ tively, look for statues or other items that depict cows, her sa­ cred animal. 'Oi.l"ect:.i.o",

In magick, North is the direction of prosperity being associated with earthly goods. Feng shui places it at the South­ east along with abundance.


r~o

r~r

GQl"J.e",L",'3 vvak tke GoJ.J.ess

Ooc:lc:l"",,,, O .....c:l"_,,

LQk-sk.""-l.: ~o",-ey GQl"c::le",­

chamomile, dill, clover, fern, grape, honesty, jasmine, kelp (which might be used as a soil nutrient), marjoram, mint, onion, pine, poppy, sesame, and vervain.

All money is a matter of belief. -Adam Smith

"PQHel""'s

.J.--iLsto-C""lh-tl"QI CI",fol"",-QtLO'"

A lotus pattern (a flower on which this goddess is often shown sitting) is a good choice. Alternatively, anything with a IO-sided motif. (Ten is the number of Vishnu's incarnations in which Lakshmi was his sister, wife, or mother.)

Lakshmi is a preeminent goddess from India who per­ sonifies abundance and wealth in all its forms. All things plush, beautiful, lavish, sumptuous, costly, and extravagant are under her dominion. Perhaps even more importantly to magick, Lakshmi is an active force for change. Vishnu's abilities remain passive unless Lakshmi motivates his powers. Although on the surface it may seem that the quest for spirituality is very different than one focused on prosperity, in Lakshmi's garden the two can grow together. For one thing, though money may not buy happiness, it certainly makes many situations in life much easier to bear. Additionally, if you're not always worried about paying the bills you can focus more fully on other parts of your life that you want to develop, such as your relationship with the goddess. Bear in mind that the Divine rarely gives out gifts without some honest effort on our part. But when your heart is in the right place, and your hands willing to work, the goddess can meet-and even exceed-our needs. This creates a partnership between you and the universe, where-with Lakshmi's guid­ ance-you can achieve your goals in karmically wise ways. Lakshmi's magickal attributes include luck, success, money, beauty, and abundance. PIQ",ts

Ivy, lily, lotus, and willow are sacred to Lakshmi. Other plants associated with monetary gains include alfalfa, basil,

Sto",es,\IV\L",el"Clls, Cl"ystClls, Cl",J. Skells

Seashells are sacred to Lakshmi, as some stories tell of her being born of sea foam. Beyond this, wealth-attracting stones include aventurine, bloodstone, cat's-eye, coal, jade, and tourmaline. Colel"s

Gold and yellow are well-suited to this garden. 1C:)e~el"Qt~ve ~fe",,~kes

Lakshmi's festivals are light-filled celebrations, so some type of lamp or candle stand would be a nice touch. Alterna­ tively, look for statues or other items that depict cows, her sa­ cred animal. 1C:)Ll"e~t,-e",

In magick, North is the direction of prosperity being associated with earthly goods. Feng shui places it at the South­ east along with abundance.


1-42

Gc:;n.c!e"-~"-9 vvLlk l:ke Gec!c!es$

G ..J.J.",ss G ..Y"J.","-s

Clc!QPl:Ql:~e"-$

LCll~c:::n"c::n''': ~ l.ye GClyc:le""

Find a large seashell and use it as a planter for clover, dill, mint, and other small root-system items. Add a yellow or gold candle to this planter and light it whenever you need Lakshmi's attention quickly to help with a pressing financial matter.

CI fl:el"- J-t Ql"vesl:

Clppt~C:;Ql:~="-$

September is the best time to harvest Lakshmi's garden, especially if you can have a celebratory dance, too. This was the traditional time when her festival was held. After the harvest, carry leaves or petals as prosperity charms or steep edible herbs in hot water to internalize abun­ dance. I also like to tuck fresh or dried items into my purse, wallet, and checkbook to keep money where it belongs. While doing so, I add an incantation such as this one: LAKSHIMI WHERE THIS FLOWER LAYS LET MY MONEY SAFELY

1-43

By labor fire is got out of stone. -Dutch Proverb J-t~$l:=-C~tl:~l"Ql g"-f=l"",,-Ql:~="-

The power and symbolism of the Elements comes to bear in both magickal and goddess traditions. In this garden we'll honor and commune with the Element of Fire, known for its warmth, emotion, passion, energy, light, strength, vitality, and purifYing ability. Beware, however, as Fire is a two-edged sword that can also burn when left untended or misused. This dualis­ tic nature is common among the Elements, which means we must use them wisely and respectfully. We turn to Latiaran to help us in this task. Although early versions of this Irish goddess may have been seasonal in nature, her two sisters-whose names translate as "yellow­ haired girl" and "flame"-indicate something quite different, or minimally another aspect connected to the hearth and fire. Stories tell us that Latiaran presided over the harvest season, before the sun's power dwindled. It was she who brought the seed of fire each morning to the sacred forge, never being harmed by its flame. The custom of bringing fire from a matron's heart to light other fires, especially ritual ones, is still reflected in a variety of European folk dances and celebrations. Latiaran's magickal attributes include abundance, the har­ vest, smithery, the Fire Element, and safety (from fire). Pla"-l:$

Plants aligned with the Fire Element include amaranth, angelica, basil, cactus, carnation, carrot, celery, chrysanthe­ mum, dill, fennel, garlic, hawthorn, holly, marigold, mustard,


1-42

GQrd.e"'"~"'9 'W~t"" t""e God.d.ess

a

d.QptQt~o",s

1-43

G",.l.l"",,,, G"'l'.l,,"-$

Lc::Il:.ic:::n°c::l"'-:

~ i'V"e G

c::I'V"d.e",­

Find a large seashell and use it as a planter for clover, dill, mint, and other small root-system items. Add a yellow or gold candle to this planter and light it whenever you need Lakshmi's attention quickly to help with pressing financial matter.

By labor fire is got out of stone. -Dutch Proverb

after-.J-tQrvest applLe<:ItLo","s

.J-tLsto-C ...lt...rQI Cj",for",-QtLo",

September is the best time to harvest Lakshmi's garden, especially if you can have a celebratory dance, too. This was the traditional time when her festival was held. After the harvest, carry leaves or petals as prosperity charms or steep edible herbs in hot water to internalize abun­ dance. I also like to tuck fresh or dried items into my purse, wallet, and checkbook to keep money where it belongs. While doing so, I add an incantation such as this one:

The power and symbolism of the Elements comes to bear in both magickal and goddess traditions. In this garden we'll honor and commune with the Element of Fire, known for its warmth, emotion, passion, energy, light, strength, vitality, and purifying ability. Beware, however, as Fire is a two-edged sword that can also burn when left untended or mIsused. This dualis­ tic nature is common among the Elements, which means we must use them wisely and respectfully. We turn to Latiaran to help us in this task. Although early versions of this Irish goddess may have been seasonal in nature, her two sisters-whose names translate as "yellow­ haired girl" and "flame"-indicate something quite different, or minimally another aspect connected to the hearth and fire. Stories tell us that Latiaran presided over the harvest season, before the sun's power dwindled. It was she who brought the seed of fire each morning to the sacred forge, never being harmed by its flame. The custom of bringing fire from a matron's heart to light other fires, especially ritual ones, is still reflected in a variety of European folk dances and celebrations. Latiaran's magickal attributes include abundance, the har­ vest, smithery, the Fire Element, and safety (from fire).

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. Plants aligned with the Fire Element include amaranth, angelica, basil, cactus, carnation, carrot, celery, chrysanthe­ mum, dill, fennel, garlic, hawthorn, holly, marigold, mustard,


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oak, onion, pepper, rosemary, sesame, sunflower, thistle, and witch hazel. Alternatively, sow your garden with plants whose colors reflect those seen in a fire.

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This garden looks quite striking if you can pattern it to look like a tongue of flame with red and orange border flow­ ers. An upward pointing triangle is another traditional emblem for fire. St:e"-es,\IV\~"-el""'(s. Cl"~st:",(s, ","-cl SkeUs

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As with plants, these can be stones that bear a bright red, orange or yellow color, or they can be those aligned with Fire, including agate, amber, obsidian, onyx, rhodocrosite, blood­ stone, carnelian, citrine, hematite, lava, sunstone, and water­ melon tourmaline. Celel"s

Red, orange, yellow, and pale blue are all good choices. 'Decel"",t:\.ve

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Find a way to bring fire into your garden either through lanterns, incense burners, braziers, or perhaps even a cauldron into which burning items can go safely. When the fire is lit, Latiaran is present. (This is an ideal time to ask for blessings, empower your plants, and so on.) 'D~l"ecHe"-

Magickally, South is the direction of Fire. This idea is mirrored in feng shui, where South's color is red, its Element is Fire, and it's filled with energy.

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I often use small planters as alternative holders for stick or cone incense. The soil catches the ashes neatly. While the incense burns, Latiaran and her fires can purify my living space, re-energize me, and improve the overall emotional warmth in the house. Alternatively, you can use the soil to hold a candle that you can light to welcome the goddess when you need her. Use a red, orange, or yellow candle for best results. aft:el"-)-l"'l"vest: appl~c",He"-:s

The harvest from Latiaran's garden is ideal for consecrat­ ing ritual fires or for using as the base components in incense, libations, and cakes/ ale for fire festivals. As one might expect, many fire festivals take place during the Spring and Summer when the sun is at its height. Examples include BeItane and Summer Solstice. To better invoke the energy from Latiaran's harvest, dab some oil made from any of the plants on a candle and leap over the flame. This represents the power of overcoming and a potent transformation from one type of life to another.


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oak, onion, pepper, rosemary, sesame, sunflower, thistle, and witch hazel. Alternatively, sow your garden with plants whose colors reflect those seen in a fire.

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This garden looks quite striking if you can pattern it to look like a tongue of flame with red and orange border flow足 ers. An upward pointing triangle is another traditional emblem for fire. Slo::o~es,\V\t.~eY'",ls, CY''Ysl",ls, ",~c:l SkeUs

As with plants, these can be stones that bear a bright red, orange or yellow color, or they can be those aligned with Fire, including agate, amber, obsidian, onyx, rhodocrosite, blood足 stone, carnelian, citrine, hematite, lava, sunstone, and water足 melon tourmaline. Co::olo::oY's

Red, orange, yellow, and pale blue are all good choices. 'DecO::OY'",lt.ve

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Find a way to bring fire into your garden either through lanterns, incense burners, braziers, or perhaps even a cauldron into which burning items can go safely. When the fire is lit, Latiaran is present. (This is an ideal time to ask for blessings, empower your plants, and so on.) 'Dt.Y'eclt.o::o~

Magickally, South is the direction of Fire. This idea is mirrored in feng shui, where South's color is red, its Element is Fire, and it's filled with energy.

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I often use small planters as alternative holders for stick or cone incense. The soil catches the ashes neatly. While the incense burns, Latiaran and her fires can purify my living space, re-energize me, and improve the overall emotional warmth in the house. Alternatively, you can use the soil to hold a candle that you can light to welcome the goddess when you need her. Use a red, orange, or yellow candle for best results. CltleY'-..J--4"'Y'vesl Clppl~c",l~o~s

The harvest from Latiaran's garden is ideal for consecrat足 ing ritual fires or for using as the base components in incense, libations, and cakes/ ale for fire festivals. As one might expect, many fire festivals take place during the Spring and Summer when the sun is at its height. Examples include Beltane and Summer Solstice. To better invoke the energy from Latiaran's harvest, dab some oil made from any of the plants on a candle and leap over the flame. This represents the power of overcoming and a potent transformation from one type of life to another.


1-46

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VV\c:n..l.: VV\OO"" G~l"'c::le"" The moon is the first milestone on the road to the stars. -Arthur C. Clarke .J--t~st:.c-C\..lh.Y"e<l g~fcY"",-e<l:~c~

If you look at the oral and written history about magick, it's obvious that the lunar sphere plays a key role in our meth­ ods. From timing magick by the moon's phases and signs to Drawing Down the Moon Rituals that bring goddess and human into a unique oneness, there is no metaphysical tradi­ tion that doesn't include the moon in some way. Mari is but one moon goddess who comes to us from Basque tradition. Each night she emerges from the Earth's womb and crosses the dark sky along with her husband. She rides a horse-driven cart or ball of fire, carrying a burning sickle. What's even more interesting is that Mari was a patroness of Witches, giving even more credence to the old beliefs that a Witch's magickal power comes from the moon. In making and tending your garden, bear in mind that Mari expects much from her followers. She desires honesty, humility, and responsibility, all fantastic qualities to sow in your land, in magick, and in life. Mari's magickal attributes include divination, Witchcraft, magick, and lunar energy.

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Lunar plants include aloe, cabbage, cucumber, gardenia, gourd, grape, honesty, jasmine, lettuce, lily, moonwort, poppy, potato, and turnip. 1='e<t:.t:.eY"~s

Aside from a crescent moon or circle, Mari is sometimes represented by a tree or a rainbow, both of which make ser­ viceable patterns for your garden (or decorative touches for it). The circle pattern, particularly, is said to act as a protective talisman for one's home and grounds. Alternatively, anything with a seven-point motif is an option, because seven was her sacred number. St:.c~es. /VV\~~eY"e<ls. CY"yst:.e<ls. &I~d. SkeUs

Moonstone, of course, is ideal. Also, red-toned shells (the moon is associated with the Water Element), aquamarine, beryl, and selenite are appropriate. CclcY"s

Red is your best choice. "D eccy"&ll:~ ve

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The ladybird was often thought to be Mari's messenger, so a figurine of that-or any other bird figurine-would be suitable. Other sacred animal figurines include that of a goat, ram, horse, cow, crow, and raven.

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Friday is a good day to consider planting your garden, as in Basque tradition this is the moon's day. Alternatively, plant on Monday, which is named after the moon. Fertilize your soil with wool snippets, as wool was a favored fabric of the goddess.

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The moon's direction is due West with Water in magick. In feng shui Mari might be associated with the South, whose color is red, or the West where chi energy resides.


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The moon is the first milestone on the road to the stars. -Arthur C. Clarke

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If you look at the oral and written history about magick, it's obvious that the lunar sphere plays a key role in our meth­ ods. From timing magick by the moon's phases and signs to Drawing Down the Moon Rituals that bring goddess and human into a unique oneness, there is no metaphysical tradi­ tion that doesn't include the moon in some way. Mari is but one moon goddess who comes to us from Basque tradition. Each night she emerges from the Earth's womb and crosses the dark sky along with her husband. She rides a horse-driven cart or ball of fire, carrying a burning sickle. What's even more interesting is that Mari was a patroness of Witches, giving even more credence to the old beliefs that a Witch's magickal power comes from the moon. In making and tending your garden, bear in mind that Mari expects much from her followers. She desires honesty, humility, and responsibility, all fantastic qualities to sow in your land, in magick, and in life. Mari's magickal attributes include divination, Witchcraft, magick, and lunar energy.

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Lunar plants include aloe, cabbage, cucumber, gardenia, gourd, grape, honesty, jasmine, lettuce, lily, moonwort, poppy, potato, and turnip. 1='Cll:.I:.e,-"-s

Aside from a crescent moon or circle, Marl is sometimes represented by a tree or a rainbow, both of which make ser­ viceable patterns for your garden (or decorative touches for it). The circle pattern, particularly, is said to act as a protective talisman for one's home and grounds. Alternatively, anything with a seven-point motif is an option, because seven was her sacred number. Sb:~"-es. \tV\i.."-e'-Clls. C,-ysl:.c:lts. c:I"-c:l SkeUs

Moonstone, of course, is ideal. Also, red-toned shells (the moon is associated with the Water Element), aquamarine, beryl, and selenite are appropriate. Colo,-s

Red is your best choice. "Decc'-ClI:.i..ve ~ ouckes

The ladybird was often thought to be Mari's messenger, so a figurine of that-or any other bird figurine-would be suitable. Other sacred animal figurines include that of a goat, ram, horse, cow, crow, and raven.

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Friday is a good day to consider planting your garden, as in Basque tradition this is the moon's day. Alternatively, plant on Monday, which is named after the moon. Fertilize your soil with wool snippets, as wool was a favored fabric of the goddess.

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The moon's direction is due West with Water in magick. In feng shui Mari might be associated with the South, whose color is red, or the West where chi energy resides.


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Find a planter that has red and silver highlights in it to honor both Mari and the sheen of moonlight. Sow your chosen plants in it, and keep it in a window that receives the moon's rays.

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are the best cures in the doctor's book.

-Irish Proverb

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Reap Marl's garden when the moon is full for the fulfill­ ment of all of Marl's best attributes. Use these on the altar durlng lunar rituals or as part of beverages and foods aimed at strengthening your lunar characteristics. Alternatively, place some of the snippings from the garden into a tea ball or gauze bag and put them in a hot tub. Soak in the tub to absorb Marl's attributes into your aura, espe­ cially as part of preritual preparation.

In Greek mythology the Muses were the daughters of Zeus. Early stories talk about only three goddesses of practic­ ing, remembering, and singing. The later tales (which were much more popular tales) number the Muses at nine. First comes Clio, the muse of history, who is depicted with a trumpet, scroll, and/or open book where all important events get recorded. Her name means fame giver. Second is Euterpe is the goddess of the flute and, by extension, sweet­ sounding music that inspires joy in all who here it. Thalia is the third muse, a goddess of humor and comedy shown wear­ ing an amusing mask. Her name means festive. Fourth, Melpomene is the goddess of great tragic stories who wears the tragedy mask (frowning) and whose sacred plant is the vine. Fifth, Terpsichore governs lyrical poetry and dance with a magickallyre. Erato, the sixth muse, guides erotic poets to pen and pad. Just by reading her words, one's desires are said to be awakened! The seventh muse, Polyhymnia, is a goddess of mime and hymns who is portrayed asking for silence by a finger to her lips. Urania, the eighth muse, oversees astronomi­ cal arts using a globe of the heavens and a compass. The ninth


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Find a planter that has red and silver highlights in it to honor both Mari and the sheen of moonlight. Sow your chosen plants in it, and keep it in a window that receives the moon's rays.

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-Irish Proverb

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Reap Mari's garden when the moon is full for the fulfill­ ment of all of Mari's best attributes. Use these on the altar during lunar rituals or as part of beverages and foods aimed at strengthening your lunar characteristics. Alternatively, place some of the snippings from the garden into a tea ball or gauze bag and put them in a hot tub. Soak in the tub to absorb Mari's attributes into your aura, espe­ cially as part of preritual preparation.

In Greek mythology the Muses were the daughters of Zeus. Early stories talk about only three goddesses of practic­ ing, remembering, and singing. The later tales (which were much more popular tales) number the Muses at nine. First comes Clio, the muse of history, who is depicted with a trumpet, scroll, and!or open book where all important events get recorded. Her name means fame giver. Second is Euterpe is the goddess of the flute and, by extension, sweet­ sounding music that inspires joy in all who here it. Thalia is the third muse, a goddess of humor and comedy shown wear­ ing an amusing mask. Her name means festive. Fourth, Melpomene is the goddess of great tragic stories who wears the tragedy mask (frowning) and whose sacred plant is the vine. Fifth, Terpsichore governs lyrical poetry and dance with a magickallyre. Erato, the sixth muse, guides erotic poets to pen and pad. Just by reading her words, one's desires are said to be awakened! The seventh muse, Polyhymnia, is a goddess of mime and hymns who is portrayed asking for silence by a finger to her lips. Urania, the eighth muse, oversees astronomi­ cal arts using a globe of the heavens and a compass. The ninth


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muse, Calliope, is another poetess who inspires epics. She also helps in the area of eloquent communications. Her tools are tablets and a stylus. Though each of these sisters had an important role to play in the Greek tradition, Calliope seemed more favored. Overall we look to these nine sisters to bring more beauty and pleasure into our somewhat concrete world. For artists of any sort, a muse garden can help inspire and motivate real ge足 nius and unique works. And even those who may not consider themselves creative can be touched by the encouraging nature of muse energy that reaches out and shows us how to enjoy the arts, and even develop our own artistic voice where none existed before. The goddess's magickal attributes include creativity, inspiration, motivation, the arts, and artistic expression.

creative flow. Those associated with Air (such as aventurine, mica, and pumice) often bear all the right energy to help gener足 ate fresh ideas.

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Any bee-attracting flower is one option, as honey was believed to bear creative energy especially when used in brew足 ing. Other plants noted for inspiring properties include ash tree and lotus flower. P

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This is definitely the garden where your imagination should be allowed to run wild. Don't think in static terms, but look at your garden as an ongoing creative outlet that you can tweak and hone as the Muses strike! 5lo"-es. "\IV\'-"-e..Clls. C

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Stones and crystals associated with the Water Element (such as amethyst, coral, and moonstone) often improve

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Magickally speaking, yellow is the color of creativity and inspiration. 'Oe(;o..""l'-ve C:-Io",,(;kes

A central decorative willow would be a wonderful touch, as willow wands were sometimes used to invoke the Muses. Beyond that look to all the tools of the Muses as possibilities to accent your garden. I also strongly suggest making a spot for yourself to sit and enjoy this special place, leaving enough room to work on whatever art inspires you the most. This honors the Muses and gives them a chance to bless your work. 'O,-..",(;l'-o"足

West is the direction to release a wave of pure creativity; East is the direction in which the winds of change can gently manifest new concepts in your art. In feng shui the direction for inventiveness is Southeast. However, if you would like to be recognized for your art, a better choice is the South.

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Take a large planter filled with vines and add some small goddess images to it (nine if possible). Put these around the edges of the planter with one representing Calliope in the middle to direct beneficial cosmic melodies into your living space.


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muse, Calliope, is another poetess who inspires epics. She also helps in the area of eloquent communications. Her tools are tablets and a stylus. Though each of these sisters had an important role to play in the Greek tradition, Calliope seemed more favored. Overall we look to these nine sisters to bring more beauty and pleasure into our somewhat concrete world. For artists of any sort, a muse garden can help inspire and motivate real ge­ nius and unique works. And even those who may not consider themselves creative can be touched by the encouraging nature of muse energy that reaches out and shows us how to enjoy the arts, and even develop our own artistic voice where none existed before. The goddess's magickal attributes include creativity, inspiration, motivation, the arts, and artistic expression.

creative flow. Those associated with Air (such as aventurine, mica, and pumice) often bear all the right energy to help gener­ ate fresh ideas.

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Any bee-attracting flower is one option, as honey was believed to bear creative energy especially when used in brew­ ing. Other plants noted for inspiring properties include ash tree and lotus flower. 1=' ~ttel"""5

This is definitely the garden where your imagination should be allowed to run wild. Don't think in static terms, but look at your garden as an ongoing creative outlet that you can tweak and hone as the Muses strike! St<::>""e5,\IV\i.""el"~l5. Cl"y5t~t5, ~""c:l SkeU5

Stones and crystals associated with the Water Element (such as amethyst, coral, and moonstone) often improve

<8 <::>l<::>l"5 Magickally speaking, yellow is the color of creativity and inspiration. 'Oec<::>l"~ti.ve

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A central decorative willow would be a wonderful touch, as willow wands were sometimes used to invoke the Muses. Beyond that look to all the tools of the Muses as possibilities to accent your garden. I also strongly suggest making a spot for yourself to sit and enjoy this special place, leaving enough room to work on whatever art inspires you the most. This honors the Muses and gives them a chance to bless your work.

' 0 ~l"ect~<::>", West is the direction to release a wave of pure creativity; East is the direction in which the winds of change can gently manifest new concepts in your art. In feng shui the direction for inventiveness is Southeast. However, if you would like to be recognized for your art, a better choice is the South.

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Take a large planter filled with vines and add some small goddess images to it (nine if possible). Put these around the edges of the planter with one representing Calliope in the middle to direct beneficial cosmic melodies into your living space.


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Destiny is not a matter of chance; it is a matter of choice.

It is not a thing to he waited for; it is a thing to be achieved.

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Bring a fresh bundle of plants gathered from your garden into the house any time you need a fresh outlook on some­ thing. Note that this doesn't have to just be an art. Inventive­ ness extends to creative problem-solving, too! Leave some of these near the area where you most need the Muses's inspiration (like at an artist's table). Dab oils made from the flowers on a candle and light it each time you need to light up some ideas. This seems to help a lot with creative block­ age as a combination spell and aroma therapy method.

In a land far across time's veil, beneath the World Tree, one may find three Scandinavian goddesses. They are sisters whose power is not to be questioned even by other gods. Their names were Urd, Verdandi, and Skuld. Every morning the Norn sisters watered the World Tree from Urd's well. Never was too much or too little given, for this tree's roots nourish the world. Though the task of tending the World Tree would seem important enough, these goddesses's duties did not end there. In their charge was each person's destiny: when one was born, how long they lived, how fortunate and talented they were, and when life's thread was finally cut. By extension, they also presided over the past (Urd), present (Verdandi), and future (Skuld) of all things. For those of us looking to improve our fate, then, pleas­ ing the Norns might be a lovely way of doing it! The best time to plan your garden is on New Year's (be that the mundane New Year of January 1 or the magickal one of Halloween). This was their traditional festival date, which is why to this day so many customs exist about changing the fate for the corning year. The Norns's magickal attributes include fate, kismit, birth, death, fortune,.serendipity, skill, and achievement.


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c--rke ~oy",-s: a~yc:le",- of ~est.: ...",-y Destiny is not a matter of chance; it is a matter of choice.

It is not a thing to he waited for; it is a thing to be achieved.

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Bring a fresh bundle of plants gathered from your garden into the house any time you need a fresh outlook on some足 thing. Note that this doesn't have to just be an art. Inventive足 ness extends to creative problem-solving, too! Leave some of these near the area where you most need the Muses's inspiration (like at an artist's table). Dab oils made from the flowers on a candle and light it each time you need to light up some ideas. This seems to help a lot with creative block足 age as a combination spell and aromatherapy method.

In a land far across time's veil, beneath the World Tree, one may find three Scandinavian goddesses. They are sisters whose power is not to be questioned even by other gods. Their names were Urd, Verdandi, and Skuld. Every morning the Nom sisters watered the World Tree from Urd's well. Never was too much or too little given, for this tree's roots nourish the world. Though the task of tending the World Tree would seem important enough, these goddesses's duties did not end there. In their charge was each person's destiny: when one was born, how long they lived, how fortunate and talented they were, and when life's thread was finally cut. By extension, they also presided over the past (Urd) , present (Verdandi), and future (Skuld) of all things. For those of us looking to improve our fate, then, pleas足 ing the Noms might be a lovely way of doing it! The best time to plan your garden is on New Year's (be that the mundane New Year of January 1 or the magickal one of Halloween). was their traditional festival date, which is why to this day so many customs exist about changing the fate for the coming year. The Noms's magickal attributes include fate, kismit, birth, death, fortune, serendipity, skill, and achievement.


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Consider those plants that represent the area of your life where you most wish the Norn sisters's assistance. For example, if you're longing for a lifemate, plant the flowers of love so that fate may bring the right person your way.

Magicka1ly speaking I'd place "fate" at the center of the circle or even beyond its normal boundaries. In feng shui a child's destiny resides in the West, renown in the South, and prosperity in the Southeast.

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Because this goddess has three aspects, any tri-foil motif would be apt. Make sure that this garden has a good symmetry so none of the sisters feels overshadowed. One such symbol integrates three triangles joined in the center at their points, which is often used to represent fate. A third image associated with the sisters is a downward pointing triangle with three circles (one at each side). St:.e""es.'VV\~""el"""s. Cl"yst:.",ls. ",,,,,c:l St....eUs

Match your stones to the theme of your plants for best results. Alternatively look to things that speak of the aeons, such as geodes and holy stones. Cel.:>l"s

This is totally flexible. I recommend a blend so that the garden is as diversified as life itself! 1C:)ec':>l"",t:.~ve ~.:>~ct....es

Any woven items to represent fate's thread and how it touches on so many things we do not see are suitable. Alterna­ tively, have a wishing well or a tree as the central point in your garden, representing Urd's well and the World Tree where the Norns live.

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Find a three-legged container and sow it with your pre­ ferred plant. Add a small web affixed to a long skewer stick to this (to look like a spider web in the middle of the greenery). The web is a good symbol for fate and its movements. a

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I am one not to tempt fate by asking for too much, except when extreme situations arise. Beyond that it might be best to let your garden grow and turn back into the soil with time's ever-moving wheel. When real problems manifest, take a few small pieces from the garden and hold them while concentrat­ ing on your need. Thank the Norns and your garden spirits for any help they can provide, and put those clippings in a safe place. Watch expectantly while making as many concrete efforts toward your goal as possible. Your effort opens the door through which the Norn's energy can work. When the prob­ lem resolves itself, return the clippings to the earth with a thank­ ful heart.


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G",c:lc:l",ss G"'...c:l"'.....s

166

Pl",,,,I::...

"D"l"ecl::."o",

Consider those plants that represent the area of your life where you most wish the Nom sisters's assistance. For example, if you're longing for a lifemate, plant the flowers of love so that fate may bring the right person your way.

Magickally speaking I'd place "fate" at the center of the circle or even beyond its normal boundaries. In feng shui a child's destiny resides in the West, renown in the South, and prosperity in the Southeast.

P

",l::.l::.el""'''

Because this goddess has three aspects, any tri-foil motif would be apt. Make sure that this garden has a good symmetry so none of the sisters feels overshadowed. One such symbol integrates three triangles joined in the center at their points, which is often used to represent fate. A third image associated with the sisters is a downward pointing triangle with three circles (one at each side). 51::.0",e... '-·VV\"",el"",l... Cl"y..l::.",b. "''''..! 5keU..

Match your stones to the theme of your plants for best results. Alternatively look to things that speak of the aeons, such as geodes and holy stones. Colol""

This is totally flexible. I recommend a blend so that the garden is as diversified as life itself! "Decol"",I::."ve ~T o'Ucke..

Any woven items to represent fate's thread and how it touches on so many things we do not see are suitable. Alterna­ tively, have a wishing well or a tree as the central point in your garden, representing Urd's well and the World Tree where the Noms live.

D..!",pl::.",I::."o",s

Find a three-legged container and sow it with your pre­ ferred plant. Add a small web affixed to a long skewer stick to this (to look like a spider web in the middle of the greenery). The web is a good symbol for fate and its movements. Dfl::.el"-J--t"'l"vesl::. Dppl"c",I::.'-o"'$

I am one not to tempt fate by asking for too much, except when extreme situations arise. Beyond that it might be best to let your garden grow and turn back into the soil with time's ever-moving wheel. When real problems manifest, take a few small pieces from the garden and hold them while concentrat­ ing on your need. Thank the Noms and your garden spirits for any help they can provide, and put those clippings in a safe place. Watch expectantly while making as many concrete efforts toward your goal as possible. Your effort opens the door through which the Nom's energy can work. When the prob­ lem resolves itself, return the clippings to the earth with a thank­ ful heart.


156

G".l.l..ss G

GClyd.ev..t.v..'3 "",ak lJ...e Ged.d.ess

Olo: '\\J aleY' GaY'c:le",

..l'.l.. ~"

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Choose any plant(s) aligned with the Water Element of water, such as aloe, aster, blackberry, catnip, chamomile, daisy, gardenia, grape, lettuce, morning glory, pansy, periwinkle, tansy, and tomato. Additionally, choose plants that thrive in a damp, watery environment, such as water lily.

A great ship asks for deep waters. -Romanian Proverb ..J-tt.sle-C....n..... yCll gv..fey"'"Cll~ev..

This Japanese goddess's story closely matches that of Niamh of Ireland. Being a sea goddess, she took a young hand­ some fisherman to her palace deep below the waves. When he began to wish for life on the land again, she returned him to the earth bearing a box that he could not open. Unfortunately for the lad, time in the magickal realm of the sea is much different than on land. Hundreds of years passed and all that he knew and loved was long gone. He sat down on the beach in despair and rummaged through his goods. With­ out thinking, he opened the forbidden box. Here Oto had stored his years with her, so the young man quickly aged and died, returning his body to Oto's seas. This type of story is classical and gently reminds us that the magickal realm is not to be toyed with unless one is wise, responsible, and cautious. More important to our theme gar­ dening, however, is Oto's connection to water. Because of water's cycle, some of the drops that fell on the land in the time of the dinosaurs and the time of Moses still falls on the land today. This cycle of renewal, of immortality, is part of water's power. We invoke an understanding of our own cycles and the Element of Water in sowing Oto's garden. Oto's magickal attributes include the Water Element, time, immortality, cycles, the seas, and beauty.

P

Cllleyv..s

Very fluid patterns (no square or angular edges) so the garden flows like a wave are ideal. Slev..es, 'VV\~v..eYClls, CyyslClls, Clv..d. SkeUs

Use lots of seashells-the bigger, the better! Additionally, any stones that bear the colors of the sea or are aligned with the Water Element, including aquamarine, coral, holey stones, lapis, sodalite, and waterworn beach pebbles are good choices.

II


156

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01:.0: ·~~I:.ey G~yc::leV\. A great ship asks for deep waters. -Romanian Proverb

G

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Choose any plant(s) aligned with the Water Element of water, such as aloe, aster, blackberry, catnip, chamomile, daisy, gardenia, grape, lettuce, morning glory, pansy, periwinkle, tansy, and tomato. Additionally, choose plants that thrive in a damp, watery environment, such as water lily.

.J---4(.st:;c:o-C ",(t:;", ..",( CJ",-fc:o..","",t:;\.c:o",­

This Japanese goddess's story closely matches that of Niamh of Ireland. Being a sea goddess, she took a young hand­ some fisherman to her palace deep below the waves. When he began to wish for life on the land again, she returned him to the earth bearing a box that he could not open. Unfortunately for the lad, time in the magickal realm of the sea is much different than on land. Hundreds of years passed and all that he knew and loved was long gone. He sat down on the beach in despair and rummaged through his goods. With­ out thinking, he opened the forbidden box. Here Oto had stored his years with her, so the young man quickly aged and died, returning his body to Oto's seas. This type of story is classical and gently reminds us that the magickal realm is not to be toyed with unless one is wise, responsible, and cautious. More important to our theme gar­ dening, however, is Oto's connection to water. Because of water's cycle, some of the drops that fell on the land in the time of the dinosaurs and the time of Moses still falls on the land today. This cycle of renewal, of immortality, is part of water's power. We invoke an understanding of our own cycles and the Element of Water in sowing Oto's garden. Oto's magickal attributes include the Water Element, time, immortality, cycles, the seas, and beauty.

1=' ",t:;t:;e.. ",-s Very fluid patterns (no square or angular edges) so the garden flows like a wave are ideal. St:;c:o",-es, /·YV\(.",-e .. ",ls, C

..ysb:..ls, ",,,,,cl SkeHs

Use lots of seashells-the bigger, the better! Additionally, any stones that bear the colors of the sea or are aligned with the Water Element, including aquamarine, coral, holey stones, lapis, sodalite, and waterworn beach pebbles are good choices.


158

Gcn·c:le"'-~"'-9 ""a.k t:.ke Goc:lc:less

Colol"s

Sea green and blue are well-suited to this garden. "D ecol"c:lt:.~ ve t:.o'Uckes

A statue of a goddess standing on or backed by a large shell would be one idea. Alternatively, how about a castle carv­ ing to represent Oto's underwater dwelling place. Whatever you place here, make sure you include some water catchers and something like a fountain that has moving water, which repre­ sents Oto's life-giving power. "D~l"ect:.~o",-

The magickal Quarter associated with Water is West. In feng shui the ebb and flow of life sits in the North, and time resides in the Southeast. ac:lc:lpt:.c:lt:.~o",-s

Within the house the art of aquarium gardens is experi­ encing a wonderful rebirth. Here, rather than housing fish, the aquarium tank becomes a garden of delightful underwater plants mingled with stones and shells to please even Oto's dis­ cerning eye. Most Web sites that are dedicated to aquarium care include information on water plants and their care. aRel"-Mc:ll"vest:. af'Pl~Cc:lt:.~o",-s

Plants from Oto's garden are excellent for rituals and spells aimed at slow, steady progress. Just as water slowly wears away stone, so Oto's harvest can begin manifesting changes. If you have a project to which you wish to bring longev­ ity, bind a symbol of that project together with some dried plants

God.d.e~~ G"n·d.e","~

159

from Oto's garden. Make sure the bundle is visually pretty, as this pleases the goddess. Keep this someplace where it will not be disturbed to protect your efforts over the long-haul. In par­ ticular keeping it near your fireplace or stove is a good idea, because the flame here represents constancy.


158

GC:Il.c:teY\.~Y\.9 '-'Val... f:;ke Goc:tc:tess

Coloys

Sea green and blue are well-suited to this garden. 'DecoYc:lHve f:;o,"ckes

A statue of a goddess standing on or backed by a large shell would be one idea. Alternatively, how about a castle carv­ ing to represent Oto's underwater dwelling place. Whatever you place here, make sure you include some water catchers and something like a fountain that has moving water, which repre­ sents Oto's life-giving power. 'D~yecf:;~oy\'

The magickal Quarter associated with Water is West. In feng shui the ebb and flow of life sits in the North, and time resides in the Southeast. Clc:tc:lpf:;c:lf:;~oy\'s

Within the house the art of aquarium gardens is experi­ encing a wonderful rebirth. Here, rather than housing fish, the aquarium tank becomes a garden of delightful underwater plants mingled with stones and shells to please even Oto's dis­ cerning eye. Most Web sites that are dedicated to aquarium care include information on water plants and their care. Clfley-.J-lc:lyvesf:; Clppl~cc:lf:;~oY\.5

Plants from Oto's garden are excellent for rituals and spells aimed at slow, steady progress. Just as water slowly wears away stone, so Oto's harvest can begin manifesting changes. If you have a project to which you wish to bring longev­ ity, bind a symbol of that project together with some dried plants

God.d.ess G""·d.e.....s

159

from Oto's garden. Make sure the bundle is visually pretty, as this pleases the goddess. Keep this someplace where it will not be disturbed to protect your efforts over the long-haul. In par­ ticular keeping it near your fireplace or stove is a good idea, because the flame here represents constancy.


160

G

....... d.e",~",'3 vvak t.ke G=d.d.ess

P

Clll. KO"-9~'-'t:

5kCl"'-Cl"-l.c GClyc::le"­ Don't tell me about your visions unless they grow corn. -Sun Bear J-t~st.=-C",lh........l g",f=...."""... t.~=,,,

In Korean stories, Pali Kongju was the first of all sha­ mans. It is her blood that runs in each shaman's veins. The tale begins with Pali's father, who did not want another female child. He tossed her to the seas, where golden turtles rescued the god­ dess and brought her to shore to live with simple peasants. From the moment Pali Kongju arrived, the peasant couple and Pali experienced improved fortune. When she grew older, a desperate duty fell upon Pali Kongju: that of fetching medicine water from the West to heal her birth parents. It did not please Pali, but she felt she had to go. She donned iron shoes and took up an iron staff and began to travel. Her journey took her by the Northern and Southern Stars and past the farming mistress and laundress of heaven, both of whom made her do chores before proceeding further! Finally Pali Kongju reached the Western shore and met the god who protected the healing waters. This god asked her to marry him and bear him seven sons before he would release the water into her keeping. Sadly, by the time she returned home, her birth parents had already died. Nonetheless, she sprinkled the sacred waters on their bodies and they returned miracu­ lously to life. Needless to say, Pali Kongju's parents were exceedingly grateful and proud-and saddened by the way they treated her at birth. Rather than try to keep her near, they wished her well and blessed her return to the otherworld where she could continue to help those in need. Pali Kongju's magickal

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161

attributes include healing, life, vitality, incantations, inspira­ tion, Shamanic arts, and service to others. P l...",t.s

All healthful plants are sacred to this goddess. Examples common in Shamanic traditions include alfalfa, aloe, aspen, beech, birch, black-eyed Susan, cabbage, catnip, celery seed, chicory, dandelion, juniper, mint, nettle, onion, parsley, pump­ kin, raspberry, sage, strawberry, sunflower, thyme, and willow.

P

...t.t.e....",s

Anything with a seven-point motif (to represent Pali Kongju's seven sons) is one option. Alternatively the outline of a turtle done with gold-painted stones would be apt.


160

Gc:lY'd.e",L",'3 VVLU,.. lke Gc:>d.d.e:s:s

1='Qlt.. Kc:r~'\..9t"': 5kQ","-Q"-t..c GQY'c:le"­ Don't tell me about your visions unless they grow corn. -Sun Bear

..J-t i.slc:>- C:;\.. .lbuY'c:ll C)",fC:>Y'""c:lli.c:>'" In Korean stories, Pali Kongju was the first of all sha­ mans. It is her blood that runs in each shaman's veins. The tale begins with Pati's father, who did not want another female child. He tossed her to the seas, where golden turtles rescued the god­ dess and brought her to shore to live with simple peasants. From the moment Pali Kongju arrived, the peasant couple and Pali experienced improved fortune. When she grew older, a desperate duty fell upon Pali Kongju: that of fetching medicine water from the West to heal her birth parents. It did not please Pali, but she felt she had to go. She donned iron shoes and took up an iron staff and began to travel. Her journey took her by the Northern and Southern Stars and past the farming mistress and laundress of heaven, both of whom made her do chores before proceeding further! Finally Pali Kongju reached the Western shore and met the god who protected the healing waters. This god asked her to marry him and bear him seven sons before he would release the water into her keeping. Sadly, by the time she returned home, her birth parents had already died. Nonetheless, she sprinkled the sacred waters on their bodies and they returned miracu­ lously to life. Needless to say, Pali Kongju's parents were exceedingly grateful and proud-and saddened by the way they treated her at birth. Rather than try to keep her near, they wished her well and blessed her return to the otherworld where she could continue to help those in need. Pali Kongju's magickal

Goc:lc:l..",,,, G

..."..c:le",-s

161

attributes include healing, life, vitality, incantations, inspira­ tion, Shamanic arts, and service to others. "'Plc:l"'ls

All healthful plants are sacred to this goddess. Examples common in Shamanic traditions include alfalfa, aloe, aspen, beech, birch, black-eyed Susan, cabbage, catnip, celery seed, chicory, dandelion, juniper, mint, nettle, onion, parsley, pump­ kin, raspberry, sage, strawberry, sunflower, thyme, and willow.

"'Pc:llleY''''s

Anything with a seven-point motif (to represent Pali Kongju's seven sons) is one option. Alternatively the outline of a turtle done with gold-painted stones would be apt.


162

G':n·d.e..... ~ ..... 9 "",a,h. t:h.e God.d.ess

St:o..... es,\IV\~ .....eY'c::Ils. CY''jst:c::Ils. c::I.....d. Sh.eUs

Seashells are ideal. ColoY's

Gold and yellow tones are appropriate for this garden.

C

ec;oY'c::It:~ ve

c-r O"\Ac;h.es

Anything that holds water, to represent the container in which the goddess bore her healing draught back to her par­ ents, is suitable. Alternatively, add an ornate box (which, according to lore, protected her from the sea until the turtles found her) to your garden.

C

~Y'ec;t:io .....

Pali Kongju returned to her home in the West, which is also the magickal region of Water so it's quite appropriate. In Shamanism this direction is also where the Ancestors tradi­ tionally reside. Feng shui sees things a little differently, putting Pali Kongju's healing attributes in the East and her gentle ser­ vice in the Northwest. a

d.c::Ipt:c::It:~o .....s

Returning to the idea of a decorative box, look for some­ thing that's hinged (with a lid) but large enough to house what­ ever plants you've chosen. Put this in a West-facing window to invoke Pali Kongju's blessings. a

ft:eY'- ..J--tc::lY'vest: appl~c;c::It:~o .....s

Use the plants grown in your garden in charms, spells, and rituals aimed at awakening your own healing gifts or

Q",olol.."" Q

..,-ol..",,,

163

improving Shamanic awareness of self, Earth, and tribe. I make mine into an anointing oil that I dab on my chakaras before doing energy work for anyone else. This helps attune me to Pali Kongju's healing energies, the person with whom I'm working, and the Sacred for improved results.


Gcn·cle"-~"-'3 ""ak l:.ke Goclcless

God.d...ss G""·d...,,,s

Sl:.o"-es, ~~"-el'als, Cl'~sl:.als, a"-cl SkeUs

improving Shamanic awareness of self, Earth, and tribe. I make mine into an anointing oil that I dab on my chakaras before doing energy work for anyone else. This helps attune me to Pali Kongju's healing energies, the person with whom I'm working, and the Sacred for improved results.

162

Seashells are ideal. Colol's

Gold and yellow tones are appropriate for this garden. "Decol'al:.~ve

c--r o'Uckes

Anything that holds water, to represent the container in which the goddess bore her healing draught back to her par­ ents, is suitable. Alternatively, add an ornate box (which, according to lore, protected her from the sea until the turtles found her) to your garden. "D ~l'ecl:.~o"-

Pali Kongju returned to her home in the West, which is also the magickal region of Water so it's quite appropriate. In Shamanism this direction is also where the Ancestors tradi­ tionally reside. Feng shui sees things a little differently, putting Pali Kongju's healing attributes in the East and her gentle ser­ vice in the Northwest. aclapl:.al:.~o"-s

Returning to the idea of a decorative box, look for some­ thing that's hinged (with a lid) but large enough to house what­ ever plants you've chosen. Put this in a West-facing window to invoke Pali Kongju's blessings. Clfl:.el'-J-tal'vesl:. Clppl~cal:.~o"-s

Use the plants grown in your garden in charms, spells, and rituals aimed at awakening your own healing gifts or

163


16..::;;j

P

G""Y.le"'~"'9 "",a.k lke G=.l.less

syc:ke: ~~~lertly Gc:n-cle"­ The butterfly counts not months

but moments, and has time enough.

-Rabindranath Tagore .J..-1~sl=-C"~ll""Y",,l g",f=Y""""l~=",

In the Greek language Psyche's name means soul, and the butterfly has long been a symbol for this powerful spiritual aspect in humans. As the legend goes, Psyche lived alone by day and made love with her husband only in the dark, never seeing him. Year after year this continued until finally Psyche could not restrain her curiosity and brought a lantern into her bedroom. The glow revealed the body of the handsome, winged Eos, who instantly flew away. The moral of this story, in the eyes of the Greeks, was that romantic love only remains until reality comes to bear on the relationship. Psyche was mortified by what happened and committed herself to numerous tasks to regain her love. Among them was sorting seeds, claiming the sun-sheep's fleece, and even going to the underworld to get beautifYing ointment. Eventually this effort reunited her with Eos in heaven, with whom she bore the children Love and Delight. In this manner, like the butter­ fly transformed, the diligence of the soul found eternal happi­ ness. Psyche's magickal attritbutes include self-awareness, trans­ formation, diligence, duty, devotion, and steadfastness. 'Pl""",ls

For this garden we turn to plants known to attract butter­ flies. In particular, choose flowers that are composite-shaped

G ...I."l.",,,,, 0 ......1."'....."

16S

(such as daisy), that have clusters of petals on one stem, or that have flat tops. These all make good landing fields for your winged guests. Additionally, strong aromatics and flowers that produce plentiful nectar (such as bee balm, black-eyed Susan, butterfly bush, coneflower, and zinnia) are appropriate. To attract moths instead you'll want to turn to night­ blooming flowers, such as night-blooming jasmine and four o'clock. Additionally, a successful butterfly garden requires plenty of sunshine, wind breaks, a location safe from preda­ tors, and water sources. feed caterpillars you'll require host plants, where but­ terflies wi11lay their eggs. Choices here include hollyhock, dill, clover, parsley, and milkweed.

'P""lleY",s

A butterfly is, of course, ideal!

Sl=",es, ~~",eY""ls, C"~5l""ls, """,.l SkeUs

I suggest something such as clear quartz, which bears a resemblance to the clear chrysalis cocoon for monarch but­ terflies.


Ie"""

P

Ged.d...ss G",,.d...,,,,,,,

G",Y.le"'~"'9 "",a,k lke Go.l.less

(such as daisy), that have clusters of petals on one stem, or that have flat tops. These all make good landing fields for your winged guests. Additionally, strong aromatics and flowers that produce plentiful nectar (such as bee balm, black-eyed Susan, butterfly bush, coneflower, and zinnia) are appropriate. To attract moths instead you'll want to turn to night­ blooming flowers, such as night-blooming jasmine and four o'clock. Additionally, a successful butterfly garden requires plenty of sunshine, wind breaks, a location safe from preda­ tors, and water sources. To feed caterpillars you'll require host plants, where but­ terflies will lay their eggs. Choices here include hollyhock, dill, clover, parsley, and milkweed.

sycke: ~~llerlly Gc:n"c:le",­ The butterfly counts not months

but moments, and has time enough.

-Rabindranath Tagore .J-l~slo-C,"ll,"Y",1 g",foY""",l~o",

In the Greek language Psyche's name means soul, and the butterfly has long been a symbol for this powerful spiritual aspect in humans. As the legend goes, Psyche lived alone by day and made love with her husband only in the dark, never seeing him. Year after year this continued until finally Psyche could not restrain her curiosity and brought a lantern into her bedroom. The glow revealed the body of the handsome, winged Eos, who instantly flew away. The moral of this story, in the eyes of the Greeks, was that romantic love only remains until reality comes to bear on the relationship. Psyche was mortified by what happened and committed herself to numerous tasks to regain her love. Among them was sorting seeds, claiming the sun-sheep's fleece, and even going to the underworld to get beautifying ointment. Eventually this effort reunited her with Eos in heaven, with whom she bore the children Love and Delight. In this manner, like the butter­ fly transformed, the diligence of the soul found eternal happi­ ness. Psyche's magickal attritbutes include self-awareness, trans­ formation, diligence, duty, devotion, and steadfastness.

,

Pl",,,,ls

1

t

P",lley",,,,

A butterfly is, of course, ideal!

~

~

~,

'I

For this garden we turn to plants known to attract butter­ flies. In particular, choose flowers that are composite-shaped

16ES

'

Slo",es. ryV\~",eY",ls. CY'Ysl",I"" ",,,,.l Skells

I suggest something such as clear quartz, which bears a resemblance to the clear chrysalis cocoon for monarch but­ terflies.


lee

le7

G a... ..t.e"'-~"'-9 ""~u.,,, t;ke G=..t...t.ess

Goclcl.."s G",,.cl..,,,-,,

C=I=...s

flies on it in an East-facing window. Beneath this you could grow a plant known to attract butterflies to attract Psyche's energy.

Studies show that butterflies seem to be attracted to orange, yellow, and purple flowers.

a

Re...- J..-ta...vest; af'pl~c::aH=",-s

Magick is to bend and change, and Psyche is an ideal god­ dess to teach us this lesson. When you require more transfor­ mative or adaptive power, use the components from her garden to support your magickal efforts. In particular, the aro­ matic flowers would be ideal to make into incense or potpourri for meditative purposes, especially meditations aimed at inte­ grating and accepting change gracefully.

"Dec::=... at;~ve ~ =,"c::kes

A statue of Eos, butterfly-shaped garden stakes, and water catchers or fountains are all good choices. "D~ ... ec::t;~=",-

The energy of transformation seems to place this garden in the Eastern Quarter in both magick and feng shui. This direction stimulates, inspires, and provides winds upon which one's soul (or the butterflies) may fly!

a

..t.af't;at;~=",-s

Butterfly gardens can't be done indoors, but a nice sym­ bolic alternative would be putting a wind chime with butter­


166

167

GQrc:l.n"i.~., ""at.. t.t..e Goc:lc:le$$

Gedd..s!> G"'".d.......,.

Color$

flies on it in an East-facing window. Beneath this you could grow a plant known to attract butterflies to attract Psyche's energy.

Studies show that butterflies seem to be attracted to orange, yellow, and purple flowers.

Clft.er-MgrVe5t. Clppl;'cgt.i.o~s

Magick is to bend and change, and Psyche is an ideal god­ dess to teach us this lesson. When you require more transfor­ mative or adaptive power, use the components from her garden to support your magickal efforts. In particular, the aro­ matic flowers would be ideal to make into incense or potpourri for meditative purposes, especially meditations aimed at inte­ grating and accepting change gracefully.

1:)ecorQt.i.ve

e--r

o'-<ct..e$

A statue of Eos, butterfly-shaped garden stakes, and water catchers or fountains are all good choices. 1:);'rect.i.o~

The energy of transformation seems to place this garden in the Eastern Quarter in both magick and feng shui. This direction stimulates, inspires, and provides winds upon which one's soul (or the butterflies) may fly! Clc:lQpt.gt.i.o~5

Butterfly gardens can't be done indoors, but a nice sym­ bolic alternative would be putting a wind chime with butter­


les

lee

Gc:l1"d.e",i"'9 vviU~. lke God.d.e""

a",.L.L",,,,, a"n".L",~"

'1=<':.ali.: Gal"c:leV\.. of Pleas'-'tl"es

Ptc:l",l"

All the things I really like to do are either immoral, illegal, or fattening. -Alexander Woollcott

As one might expect, Rati's garden is fIlled with plants that somehow inspire happiness and bliss. To discover this state with a man, sow gardenia, jasmine, or lavender. To discover it with a woman, sow patchouli, vetivert, and violet. For overall energy with one's bed partner, sow beans, cohosh, ferns, heather, and pansy.

.J-.-l i"lo- C

uth-41"c:lt C)",fo1"","-c:llio",

What would life be without pleasure? Be it the warm wel­ come of sunshine on your face after a long winter or a sensual exchange with a lover, pleasure is a necessity to healthy human living. To help bring more pleasure into our lives, or to release our sense of self consciousness, we turn to Rati for assistance. In Hindu tradition Rati was the passionate wife of the love god Kama. In her stories Rati is fruitful and giving. Though her energy often embodied sexual encounters, she also sym­ bolized the pleasure of enlightenment coming to fruition in the human soul. Rati's magickal attributes include magickal arts, sensual­ ity, pleasure, happiness, fulfillment, and enlightenment

P

c:llle1""'"

This is a personal choice. What pattern does your plea­ sure take? From where do you derive great joy? Use that imag~ ery in this garden to attract Rati's attentions. Slo",e", --vv\i",e1"c:lt", C1"y"lc:lt,:;, c:I",d. Sketb.

To build an air of beauty in the garden use amber, cat's­ eye, and jasper. For overall happiness use amethyst. For pas­ sion use carnelian. Colo1""

Pink and red are generally regarded as highly passionate colors, but if you have another hue that wakes up your plea­ sure-center, by all means use it. "Deco1"c:llive ~ oucke"

Think bawdy-as a Victorian bedroom might appear if it had been set up outdoors! A statue of lovers entwined in an embrace might be ideal. "Di 1"eclio",

MagickaUy speaking, passion is a Fire-oriented energy and comes to us from the South. In feng shui, however, stimulation comes from the East.


les

lee

Gc:n-d.""';''''9 yvak tk.. Gc::od.d. .. ss

Ge.l.less G.,.....l.."'s

"'R~lL: G~l"'cle,",- of Pte~s'-"l"'es

Pla",ts

All the things I really like to do are either immoral, illegal, or fattening. -Alexander Woollcott

As one might expect, Rati's garden is filled with plants that somehow inspire happiness and bliss. To discover this state with a man, sow gardenia, jasmine, or lavender. To discover it with a woman, sow patchouli, vetivert, and violet. For overall energy with one's bed partner, sow beans, cohosh, ferns, heather, and pansy.

.J-I ;'stc::o- C,..I t,.. yal C)'" fc::oy"""at~c::o,,, What would life be without pleasure? Be it the warm wel­ come of sunshine on your face after a long winter or a sensual exchange with a lover, pleasure is a necessity to healthy human living. To help bring more pleasure into our lives, or to release our sense of self consciousness, we turn to Rati for assistance. In Hindu tradition Rati was the passionate wife of the love god Kama. In her stories Rati is fruitful and giving. Though her energy often embodied sexual encounters, she also sym­ bolized the pleasure of enlightenment coming to fruition in the human soul. Rati's magickal attributes include magickal arts, sensual­ ity, pleasure, happiness, fulfillment, and enlightenment

P

att.. y",S

This is a personal choice. What pattern does your plea­ sure take? From where do you derive great joy? Use that imag­ ery in this garden to attract Rati's attentions. Stc::o",..s.\IV\;'",.. yals. Cy~tals. a",d. 5 k..lls

To build an air of beauty in the garden use amber, cat's­ eye, and jasper. For overall happiness use amethyst. For pas­ sion use carnelian. Cc::olc::oys

Pink and red are generally regarded as highly passionate colors, but if you have another hue that wakes up your plea­ sure-center, by all means use it. 1C:> .. cc::oyat;.v.. ~o~ck.. s

Think bawdy-as a Victorian bedroom might appear if it had been set up outdoors! A statue of lovers entwined in an embrace might be ideal. 1C:>;'y..ct;.c::o",

MagickaUy speaking, passion is a Fire-oriented energy and comes to us from the South. In feng shui, however, stimulation comes from the East.


170

171

Gell·d.e",,"''''''=' '\Nat... It...e God.d.ess

O...,l.le"" 0"'1"......."

Cld.Clpb"Ho""s

"R.. k.i.Q"'-"'-0"'-: S '""'"V'\"-eY'lQ"'-c:l G QY'c:le",­

Find a really sexy planter and fill it with an aromatic plant that you find personally pleasing (or one that arouses your mate). Keep this in the bedroom. Clflel"-.J-tCll"vesl Clppli..cClli..o""s

Jasmine, lavender, heather, and pansy are all edible flow­ ers. Decant a handful of each in a liter of vodka, steeping until the petals turn translucent. Strain and add one cup of water, in which a half-cup of honey has been dissolved. Sip this expect­ antly with your significant other and take great pleasure in your time together! .

As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well spent brings happy death. - Leonardo da Vinci .J-t"'slo-C~l'VIl"d C)""fol"",ClHo""

As the saying goes, nothing lasts forever. Humans face mortality issues every day, and not always as wisely and grace­ fully as we might wish. No matter how deep our faith, death is a difficult crossroad with which to cope, especially when it hits close to home. The idea behind creating a summerland garden is to honor death in a new way: as a part of life's wheeL In this lovely place you will find space to express your feelings about those who have passed over and to commemorate everything those individuals represent. I've chosen Rhiannon for this garden because in Wales she is an underworld goddess who wakes the dead as she rides the summerland on her horse, accompanied by birds. Rhiannon never tires of riding, nor of her duties, which she undertakes joyfully. Some believe her white horse is a symbol of the moon. Her name translates as "great queen" (in this case presiding over the land of spirits). In this case we will call upon her birds to gently sing to those souls whose presence we miss and allow them to periodically come visit in our garden. Rhiannon's magickal attributes include death, cycles, joy, travel, and lunar energy. PlCl""l;s

Funerary plants and herbs are appropriate, including basil, anaconite, periwinkle, violet, and yew. In addition to this,


170

GII:Il"cle"-i"-9 ""i..t::k tke Gcoclcless

Gocld.e5s G ..,..d.e.....s

Clclll:lpl:lI:Il:ico"-s

1-<" ki.cn-"V'\.OV'\.:

Find a really sexy planter and fill it with an aromatic plant that you find personally pleasing (or one that arouses your mate). Keep this in the bedroom. Clfl:el"- .J.--lII:Il"vesl: Clppli.cII:Il:ico"-s

Jasmine, lavender, heather, and pansy are all edible flow足 ers. Decant a handful of each in a liter of vodka, steeping until the petals turn translucent. Strain and add one cup of water, in which a half-cup of honey has been dissolved. Sip this expect足 antly with your significant other and take great pleasure in your time together!

S","","",ertQV'\.c:l G

171

Ql'"c:leV'\.

As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well spent brings happy death. - Leonardo da Vinci .J.--lisl:co-C",ll:"'l"d C)"-fcol"","-II:IHco"足

As the saying goes, nothing lasts forever. Humans face mortality issues every day, and not always as wisely and grace足 fully as we might wish. No matter how deep our faith, death is a difficult crossroad with which to cope, especially when it hits close to home. The idea behind creating a summerland garden is to honor death in a new way: as a part of life's wheel. In this lovely place you will find space to express your feelings about those who have passed over and to commemorate everything those individuals represent. I've chosen Rhiannon for this garden because in Wales she is an underworld goddess who wakes the dead as she rides the summerland on her horse, accompanied by birds. Rhiannon never tires of riding, nor of her duties, which she undertakes joyfully. Some believe her white horse is a symbol of the moon. Her name translates as "great queen" (in this case presiding over the land of spirits). In this case we will call upon her birds to gently sing to those souls whose presence we miss and allow them to periodically come visit in our garden. Rhiannon's magickal attributes include death, cycles, joy, travel, and lunar energy. PlII:I"-l:s

Funerary plants and herbs are appropriate, including basil, anaconite, periwinkle, violet, and yew. In addition to this,


172

G~rcle"-~"-9 ""ak t:.ke Goclcless

G",.l.le"'$ G ..,..le,,-'"

be sure to include any plants of which the deceased was (or were) particularly fond.

--oecorc:lt:.~ve ~f ouckes

173

To welcome Rhiannon place statues of a galloping horse or birds on wing in the garden. Adjacent to these put images of the person or people that the garden commemorates. (Make sure to have a housing for the images that's weatherproof.) --o~recUo"-

Because we return to the earth upon our death, the magickal Quarter is North. That having been said, I might con足 sider Northeast even more appropriate, because the wheel of time and life continues to move forward. Shamanism places the ancestors in the West, and feng shui puts family in the East and recognition/honor in the South. P~t:.t:.er"-s

acl~pt:.c:lt:.~o"-s

A summerland garden might be patterned after a wheel or an outward-moving spiral to represent life's ongoing move足 ment and the immortal nature of the human soul. Because you will be honoring the spirits of the departed here, it also encour足 ages their progression in the next incarnation.

Within the house a horse- or bird-shaped planter filled with violets might be a nice touch on your altar, along with images of the person or people you wish to hold close to heart and mind.

St:.o"-es, /\IV'~"-er~ls, Cr'Yst:.~ls, ~"-cl Skelts

aft:.er-J--l~rvest:. appl~cc:lUo"-s

Jet was the traditional Victorian stone of mourning. Obsidian is also appropriate, as it will collect sadness and nega足 tivity to itself and ground those feelings out as needed.

The summerland garden can symbolically help you with any type of ending, not just a physical one. What cycles in your life do you wish would stop? What relationships are no longer healthy? Use Rhiannon's harvest as spell and ritual components to help you cope effectively with these kinds of issues and achieve closure.

Colors

Contrary to mourning, the colors of this garden should be cheerful and bright. The idea is to celebrate the life and memories of this person or persons.


r72

G",d.d.",,,,, G"',.d.e....."

Gc.l"d.e",l.",'3 ""a.k lke God.d.e:ss

be sure to include any plants of which the deceased was (or were) particularly fond.

"Decol"c.li.ve

173

c-r o",cke:s

To welcome Rhiannon place statues of a galloping horse or birds on wing in the garden. Adjacent to these put images of the person or people that the garden commemorates. (Make sure to have a housing for the images that's weatherproof.) "Di.l"ecli.o",

Because we return to the earth upon our death, the magickal Quarter is North. That having been said, I might con足 sider Northeast even more appropriate, because the wheel of time and life continues to move forward. Shamanism places the ancestors in the West, and feng shui puts family in the East and recognition/honor in the South.

"P c.llel"",s Od.c.plc.l:.i.o",s

A summerland garden might be patterned after a wheel or an outward-moving spiral to represent life's ongoing move足 ment and the immortal nature of the human soul. Because you will be honoring the spirits of the departed here, it also encour足 ages their progression in the next incarnation.

Within the house a horse- or bird-shaped planter filled with violets might be a nice touch on your altar, along with images of the person or people you wish to hold close to heart and mind.

Slo",es. ~"'V\i.",el"c.l:s. Cl"yslc.l:s. c.",d. SkeUs

Oflel"-,}---tc.l"vesl Oppli.cc.li.o",s

Jet was the traditional Victorian stone of mourning. Obsidian is also appropriate, as it will collect sadness and nega足 tivity to itself and ground those feelings out as needed.

The summerland garden can symbolically help you with any type of ending, not just a physical one. What cycles in your life do you wish would stop? What relationships are no longer healthy? Use Rhiannon's harvest as spell and ritual components to help you cope effectively with these kinds of issues and achieve closure.

Colol"S

l

Contrary to mourning, the colors of this garden should be cheerful and bright. The idea is to celebrate the life and memories of this person or persons.

!

j

t c

j

1


174

G""l"cle""i",,'3 ""a.k t:.ke Gc:>clcless

SC: 3c::t: "Dl.vl."-c::tll.o"- Gc::tl"cle"­ U

Let it be discovered by divination. -Hittite prayer

G",c:lc:l.. "" G

175

..,..c:l.._"

' P""t:.t:.el"""s

The Teutons associated Saga with the astrological sign of Pisces, so the image of a fish or a pair of fish is one good pos­ sibility. (It's not difficult to turn the line drawing for Pisces into a garden outline as the following depicts.) Another appropriate shape would be that of an open eye.

J-tist:.c:>-C '-'tlhtl"c:.l C)""fC:>l""",-""t:.ic:>""

In Teutonic tradition Saga is a faithful attendant of Frigg, whose name means seeress or all-knowing one. Some histori­ ans believe it is more likely that Saga was actually an aspect of Frigg whose position altered with history and bardic tradition. According to the sacred writings of the Eddas, Saga lived at Sinking Beach, which was a waterfall where she offered all her guests a drink from a golden cup. Saga is a teacher, but she is also a student of the Universe. She is often depicted with a long Viking braid, an emblem of womanhood and honor. Later, her name was applied to the sacred heroic texts of the Scandanavian people. With this in mind, it seems appropriate to use Saga as the energy signature around which to form one's visionary garden. Not only can Saga provide us with divinatory ability, but also the capacity to communicate what we see in an effec­ tive, constructive manner! Saga's magickal attributes include future-telling, fate, cre­ ativity, learning, wisdom, womanhood, devotion, and priest­ ess energy.

Bt:.c:>""es. rv¥\i""erc:.ls. Cl"yst:.c:.ls

&

Bkells

Make a bed of crystals and stones (as drainage) for your garden out of rocks that support psychic awareness. Options include amethyst, aquamarine, azurite, beryl, quartz, lapis, cit­ rine, hematite, jet, moonstone, and tigereye. Cc:>lc:>rs

Traditionally, divination is associated with the color yellow.

'Pl""",,t:.s

Any plant that has been used for divinatory arts will please this goddess. Included in this list we find bay, bean, broom, cherry, dandelion, fig, grape, marigold, meadowsweet, mint, oak, rowan, and yarrow, just to name a few.

--0 e(;C:>l"""t:.i.ve

~1 c:>'-'t(;kes

You could get really creative here. For example, have a reflective ball as the center point (looking much like a scrying stone). You could also enclose some tarot cards in protective


174

Gc:n·d.e~~~9 ",ak lke G=d.d.e$$

5C19C1:

~i.vi:\''-Cll:i.o"- GCll"'c:le"­

Let it be discovered by divination. -Ht'ttt'te prayer

Goclcl",;,; G

....cl" .....'"

17"E5

PClHe"~$

The Teutons associated Saga with the astrological sign of Pisces, so the image of a fish or a pair of fish is one good pos­ sibility. (It's not difficult to turn the line drawing for Pisces into a garden outline as the following depicts.) Another appropriate shape would be that of an open eye.

.J-.-!~$l=-Cullu"ClI g",-f=",,""Cll~=~

In Teutonic tradition Saga is a faithful attendant of Frigg, whose name means seeress or all-knowing one. Some histori­ ans believe it is more likely that Saga was actually an aspect of Frigg whose position altered with history and bardic tradition. According to the sacred writings of the Eddas, Saga lived at Sinking Beach, which was a waterfall where she offered all her guests a drink from a golden cup. Saga is a teacher, but she is also a student of the Universe. She is often depicted with a long Viking braid, an emblem of womanhood and honor. Later, her name was applied to the sacred heroic texts of the Scandanavian people. With this in mind, it seems appropriate to use Saga as the energy signature around which to form one's visionary garden. Not only can Saga provide us with divinatory ability, but also the capacity to communicate what we see in an effec­ tive, constructive manner! Saga's magickal attributes include future-telling, fate, cre­ ativity, learning, wisdom, womanhood, devotion, and priest­ ess energy.

Sl=~es,\tV\~~e,.""ls. C,.ysl""l$ & SkeU$

Make a bed of crystals and stones (as drainage) for your garden out of rocks that support psychic awareness. Options include amethyst, aquamarine, azurite, beryl, quartz, lapis, cit­ rine, hematite, jet, moonstone, and tigereye. C=l="$

Traditionally, divination is associated with the color yellow.

PlCl"'-i:s

Any plant that has been used for divinatory arts will please this goddess. Included in this list we find bay, bean, broom, cherry, dandelion, fig, grape, marigold, meadowsweet, mint, oak, rowan, and yarrow, just to name a few.

"Oec=,.""live CJ =ucke$

You could get really creative here. For example, have a reflective ball as the center point (looking much like a scrying stone). You could also enclose some tarot cards in protective


177

Gc::lY'd.e"-i."-C3 '\Ni.lk lke Gcd.d.ess

Q ..olol",,,s Q",..ol",.,.5

covering and plant them around the edges of the garden so they look to be growing out of the border work.

~ Qya GQyc:leV\. of 'SeQ"'!:.Y

"Oi.Y'ecli.c"-

A beautiful thing is never perfect. -Egyptian Proverb

176

Magickally speaking, divination often resides in the East with the Wind, as the ancient oracles in Greece often used the wind as the bearer of divine missives. In feng shui I'd opt for the Northwest, the center of service to others. ad.c::lplc::lli.c"-s

Keep a planter filled with Saga's greenery in the room where you enact any divinatory process to inspire accuracy and improved insights. I recently even found a planter shaped like the astrological sign of Pisces! afleY'-.J----t c::lY'vesl appl\.c:;c::lli.c"-s

Watching your garden's messages in itself can be quite an experience. Because you've invited Saga to live among the flow­ ers, don't be surprised if you start getting messages from those plants long before harvesting. Divination by natural omens and signs is among the oldest arts for seers! You can bundle any of the flowers and plants from Saga's garden into a pendulum structure and use them as tools. Alter­ natively, dry and burn the items and observe the behavior of the flame for interpretive values. If you need a good book that discusses how to interpret different divination methods, try FutureTelling (Crossing Press).

.J-li.slc-C"-tll"-tY'c::ll CJ"-fcY'.,....,..c::lli.c"­

Our world is a very superficial place sometimes, yet what would life be without some semblance of true beauty therein? The key here is not focusing so much on cursory details and thus missing the loveliness of simplicity and inner comeliness. Tara is the ideal goddess to help us see those wonderful things that we all too often miss. Tara comes to us from Hindu lore as having been born from Avalokitesvara's tears. (He oversees all matters of com­ passion and "light.") It is no wonder, then, that she is repre­ sented as a beautiful burning star-burning with desire to grow, to change, to transform even as the human spirit and soul. The attributes of self control, spiritual mastery, and mystical profi­ ciency are under her guidance. Her name means she who delivers or star, both of which indicate a kind of guidance to those of us who have lost site of our true self. Tara's magickal attributes include Sun and Moon Magick, beauty, attractiveness, compassion, overcoming, and protection. Plc::l"-ls

If you can have 21 varieties of plants in the garden, that's Tara's number, because 21 forms of her have been discovered. Some of the flowers and herbs you might want to include are those known to promote beauty, including avocado, catnip, maidenhair, and heather. Beyond this, gather dew on May Day and transfer it into your garden. This water is said to have strong magickal abilities to make anything more lovely.


176

covering and plant them around the edges of the garden so they look to be growing out of the border work. --Dl....ecl.l.ol"

Magickally speaking, divination often resides in the East with the Wind, as the ancient oracles in Greece often used the wind as the bearer of divine missives. In feng shui I'd opt for the Northwest, the center of service to others. Od.c:tpl.c:tl.l.Ol"S

Keep a planter filled with Saga's greenery in the room where you enact any divinatory process to inspire accuracy and improved insights. I recently even found a planter shaped like the astrological sign of Pisces! Ofl.e...-.J--lc:t.....'esl. Oppll.cc:tHol"s

Watching your garden's messages in itself can be quite an experience. Because you've invited Saga to live among the flow­ ers, don't be surprised if you start getting messages from those plants long before harvesting. Divination by natural omens and signs is among the oldest arts for seers! You can bundle any of the flowers and plants from Saga's garden into a pendulum structure and use them as tools. Alter­ natively, dry and burn the items and observe the behavior of the flame for interpretive values. If you need a good book that discusses how to interpret different divination methods, try FutureTelling (Crossing Press).

177

G ..clcl.."" G",,..cl,,,,,,,,

Gc:t...d.el"l.l"9 vvak l.ke God.d.ess

c--r

c::n"Q! Gc::n"c:le:"- of

~eQ"l'J

A beautiful thing is never perfect. -Egyptian Proverb .J--ll.sl.o-Cull.\A...c:t1 C}l"fo...,,"-c:tl.l.Ol"

Our world is a very superficial place sometimes, yet what would life be without some semblance of true beauty therein? The key here is not focusing so much on cursory details and thus missing the loveliness of simplicity and inner comeliness. Tara is the ideal goddess to help us see those wonderful things that we all too often miss. Tara comes to us from Hindu lore as having been born from Avalokitesvara's tears. (He oversees all matters of com­ passion and "light.") It is no wonder, then, that she is repre­ sented as a beautiful burning star-burning with desire to grow, to change, to transform even as the human spirit and soul. The attributes of self control, spiritual mastery, and mystical profi­ ciency are under her guidance. Her name means she who delivers or star, both of which indicate a kind of guidance to those of us who have lost site of our true self. Tara's magickal attributes include Sun and Moon Magick, beauty, attractiveness, compassion, overcoming, and protection. Plc:tl"ls

If you can have 21 varieties of plants in the garden, that's Tara's number, because 21 forms of her have been discovered. Some of the flowers and herbs you might want to include are those known to promote beauty, including avocado, catnip, maidenhair, and heather. Beyond this, gather dew on May Day and transfer it into your garden. This water is said to have strong magickal abilities to make anything more lovely.


~

17S

179

G"'T'c:.leV\.~V\.9 vv~lk lke Gcc:.lc:.less

0 ....1...1.""" O ........I."~,,

1=' ",HeT'V\.s

be West, because that is where the color of white/silver abides along with an inner harmony that is, itself, wholly beautifuL

A star or a boat (the vessel in which she ferry's people from a chaotic world into one that has order and beauty) is suitable. Motifs with three sides or shapes are also a good choice, as Tara has three eyes. SlcV\.es, "V\I\l.V\.eT'",ls, CT'ysl~s, ",V\.c:.l SkeUs

Above and beyond any stones that have strong visual ap­ peal, look to those crystals whose energy matrix accents attractiveness such as amber, cat's-eye and jasper. CclcT's

Green and white are most common but blue and red are also found in Tara's artistic depictions. Note that white often appears on Tara's left side in the form of a lotus, meaning that white flowers might be best put on the left side of your garden. In particular I favor the silver fern for this garden because it reminds me of the silvery-white color of the moon and stars. '"DeccT'",l~ve

e-r c,""ckes

Use 108 border stones for Tara's garden, as 108 is the num­ ber of prayer beads used to invoke her sacred names. Also, play­ ful items are excellent touches for this garden because Tara is often shown as a mischievous youth. Besides these, Hindu art portrays her with a sun in one hand and accompanied by a lion, so these two images would be appropriate accents. '"Di.T'ed.LcV\.

Magickally speaking, beauty is everywhere! To try to limit this attribute to one direction or type of energy would be a terrible disservice to Nature. In feng shui, Tara's region might

Oc:.l"'pl",li.cV\.s

The best place in the house for a Tara planter is next to the mirror where you do most of your primping and fussing. I suggest using a fragrant indoor flower so that the aroma subtly encourages self-confidence and less superficial hangups. OfleT'- .J--t"'T'vesl Oppll.C",li.cV\.s

I use Tara's plants in oils and bath soaks when I need to look and feel my best. Let's face it: There are days when we get up, look in the mirror, and think yuck! This is the ideal time to ask Tara for an attitude adjustment! For example, take a little heather oil and dab it on your heart chakra while saying: I

AM BEAUTIFUL WITHIN AND WITHOUT;

TARA REMOVE LINGERING SELF DOUBTS!


,..-.,. 1"78

1"79

Gc:I..d..eVl.\.VI.'3 ""a.k l:ke God..d..ess

O ....l..l..s'" O ........l.."-,"

"Pc:ll:l:e..Vl.s

be West, because that is where the color of white/silver abides along with an inner harmony that is, itself, wholly beautiful.

A star or a boat (the vessel in which she ferry's people from a chaotic world into one that has order and beauty) is suitable. Motifs with three sides or shapes are also a good choice, as Tara has three eyes. Sl:oVl.es, "VV\\'Vl.e..c:lls, C

..ysl:c:ols. QVl.d.. Skells

Above and beyond any stones that have strong visual ap­ peal, look to those crystals whose energy matrix accents attractiveness such as amber, cat's-eye and jasper. Colo.. s

Green and white are most common but blue and red are also found in Tara's artistic depictions. Note that white often appears on Tara's left side in the form of a lotus, meaning that white flowers might be best put on the left side of your garden. In particular I favor the silver fern for this garden because it reminds me of the silvery-white color of the moon and stars. 1C:)eco"c:ll:\.ve ~o~ckes

Use 108 border stones for Tara's garden, as 108 is thenum­ ber of prayer beads used to invoke her sacred names. Also, play­ ful items are excellent touches for this garden because Tara is often shown as a mischievous youth. Besides these, Hindu art portrays her with a sun in one hand and accompanied by a lion, so these two images would be appropriate accents. 1C:) ~ ..ecl:\.oVl.

Magickally speaking, beauty is everywhere! To try to limit this attribute to one direction or type of energy would be a terrible disservice to Nature. In feng shui, Tara's region might

D

d..Qpl:c:ll:\'OVl.S

The best place in the house for a Tara planter is next to the mirror where you do most of your primping and fussing. I suggest using a fragrant indoor flower so that the aroma subtly encourages self-confidence and less superficial hangups. DRe..- )-lQ..vesl: Dppl\.cc:ll:\.oVl.s I use Tara's plants in oils and bath soaks when I need to look and feel my best. Let's face it: There are days when we get up, look in the mirror, and thinkyuckfThis is the ideal time to ask Tara for an attitude adjustment! For example, take a little heather oil and dab it on your heart chakra while saying: I

AM BEAUTIFUL WITHIN AND WITHOUT;

TARA REMOVE LINGERING SELF DOUBTS!


........

ISO

Ga..-d.e"~"9 vv~lk lke G=d.d.ess

~ Clls'-'tlCl-J.--l"'",-e:

GCl1"d.e",- of lke /~)"'",-d.s Hoist your sail when the wind is fair. -Proverb

O",clcl..",,,, O

..,.cl .......'"

lSI

Palle..-"s

A leaf pattern is one choice. Beyond that, let your whimsy run wild and free as the wind itself (which usually doesn't like to be constrained anyway). Sl="es.\IV\~"e..-als, C..-yslals. a"d. SkeUs

Stones associated with Air include adventurine, jasper, mica, pumice, and sphene .

.J.--l~sl=-C'Ull'U..-al q"f=..-""al~="

Nothing is as invigorating and inspiring as standing and facing a gentle Spring wind. The sensation is cool, stimulating, and yet welcoming. In many ancient traditions the wind is also associated with spirits, because even though you know the wind is there, you cannot see it! Magickally speaking the wind is associated with movement, change, motivation, and life's breath. To create our wind garden we look to Tatsuta-Hime, a goddess from Japan. Each fall this lady would don a kaleidesope-colored tapestry as diverse in hue as the Autumn leaves. Then she would magickally transform into the wind, merrily scattering those leaves to the four corners of creation! Tatsuta-Hime's magickal attributes include the harvest, travel safety especially for sailing, fishing luck, and Wind and Air Magick. ~r='la"l9

Any item that has long, supple leaves or flowers to dance in the wind is one option. Alternatively, look to plants that are associated with the Air Element, such as bean, bergamot, broom, borage, clover, dandelion, eyebright, goldenrod, laven­ der, marjoram, pine, sage, and verbena.

C=l=..-s

Choose pastels for this garden.

"Dec=..-al~ve

c-r ='Uckes

Place wind chimes, flags, and anything that will catch the winds (so you can enjoy them better) everywhere! "D~..-ecl~="

Magickally, the Air Element resides in the East, bringing renewed hope with each breeze. This seems to harmonize nicely with feng shui, which places the attributes of beginnings and awakening in this region.

Cl d.aplal~="s My indoor wind garden is a simple planter placed beneath a favorite wind chime. Note, however, that I looked for a chime that had russets and orange to honor the Fall and this goddess's colors.


ISO

Gc:n¡c::le."-~"-C3 "",a.k lke. Goc::lc::le.ss

G",.l.le"" G ..,..le...."

~f Clt:S"t:CI- J---t,,",-e:

"PoUey"-s

G Cll"d.e",- of t:ke

~"",-d.s

Hoist your sail when the wind is fair. -Proverb

lSI

A leaf pattern is one choice. Beyond that, let your whimsy run wild and free as the wind itself (which usually doesn't like to be constrained anyway). Slo"-es, /¡VV\~"-e ...ols, C

...yslols, o"-c::l 5keUs

Stones associated with Air include adventurine, jasper, mica, pumice, and sphene.

J--t~slo-C "'lb...yol C)"-f=",,,,,"ol~="-

Nothing is as invigorating and inspiring as standing and facing a gentle Spring wind. The sensation is cool, stimulating, and yet welcoming. In many ancient traditions the wind is also associated with spirits, because even though you know the wind is there, you cannot see it! Magickally speaking the wind is associated with movement, change, motivation, and life's breath. To create our wind garden we look to Tatsuta-Hime, a goddess from Japan. Each fall this lady would don a kaleidesope-colored tapestry as diverse in hue as the Autumn leaves. Then she would magickally transform into the wind, merrily scattering those leaves to the four corners of creation! Tatsuta-Hime's magickal attributes include the harvest, travel safety especially for sailing, fishing luck, and Wind and Air Magick. "Plo"-ls

Any item that has long, supple leaves or flowers to dance in the wind is one option. Alternatively, look to plants that are associated with the Air Element, such as bean, bergamot, broom, borage, clover, dandelion, eyebright, goldenrod, laven­ der, marjoram, pine, sage, and verbena.

Colo...s

Choose pastels for this garden. 1C:>e.co...ol~ve c-T=",cke.s

J

Place wind chimes, flags, and anything that will catch the winds (so you can enjoy them better) everywh~re! 1C:>~ ...ecl~o"-

Magickally, the Air Element resides in the East, bringing renewed hope with each breeze. This seems to harmonize nicely with feng shui, which places the attributes of beginnings and awakening in this region. ac::loplol~="-s

My indoor wind garden is a simple planter placed beneath a favorite wind chime. Note, however, that I looked for a chime that had russets and orange to honor the Fall and this goddess's colors.

_..........ouI


182

Ga.. d.e"",i""'9

""ak. l:"'-e God.d.ess

c:::t tl:e .. - J---t c:I..vesl: c:::tppli.cc:lt:.io"",s

The best time to harvest the wind garden is the Fall, which is Tatsuta-Hime's season. Afterward release the harvest to vari­ ous directional winds with your wishes. Use a Southerly wind for wishes associated with love and relationships, a Westerly wind for healing and intuition, a Northerly wind for money and foundations, and an Easterly wind for the conscious mind and learning.

Goc:lc:l.."" G

'\Je"",,"s:

....c:l.."''''

183

Gc::n-c:le"", of ~ove

A heart that loves is always young. -Greek Proverb J---tisl:o-C""lh...c:lt C)"",to..""'c:ll:io"",

If love makes the world go round, then tis' Venus that puts a spin on the whole relationship equation! As the Roman equivalent to Aphrodite, this goddess embodied amazing charm, the compassion of a mother, the sensual energy of a new bride, and the wisdom of a crone in relationship matters. With this in mind, asking Venus for her help in creating a garden of love seems natural. Try to leave a space in this garden where you and your significant other can sit together, literally surrounded by loving energies. Venus's magickal attributes include fruitfulness, sensual­ ity, love, devotion, sagacity, and family and kin.

Plc:l""'t:.s

Plan your Venus garden in Spring, which is her season. Some of the plants sacred to Venus include clover, cypress, love­ oriented herbs, myrtle, pine, rose, strawberry, and sunflower.


~ 182

GCl"c:te"'-~"'-9 vvak lke Goc:tc:te:;;:;;

Dflel"-.)...-tcl"vesl DF'F'l~c;all.o"'-:$

The best time to harvest the wind garden is the Fall, which is Tatsuta-Hime's season. Afterward release the harvest to vari­ ous directional winds with your wishes. Use a Southerly wind for wishes associated with love and relationships, a Westerly wind for healing and intuition, a Northerly wind for money and foundations, and an Easterly wind for the conscious mind and learning.

Goc:lc:less G",,..c:le",s

'\JeV\..\vts:

183

G~l'"c:leV\.. of Love

A heart that loves is always young. -Greek Proverb .)...-t l.:$lo- C

....ll....l"cl

C)",- fOl"w...cl~o",-

If love makes the world go round, then tis' Venus that puts a spin on the whole relationship equation! As the Roman equivalent to Aphrodite, this goddess embodied amazing charm, the compassion of a mother, the sensual energy of a new bride, and the wisdom of a crone in relationship matters. With this in mind, asking Venus for her help in creating a garden of love seems natural. Try to leave a space in this garden where you and your significant other can sit together, literally surrounded by loving energies. Venus's magickal attributes include fruitfulness, sensual­ ity, love, devotion, sagacity, and family and kin.

1='lc",-ls

Plan your Venus garden in Spring, which is her season. Some of the plants sacred to Venus include clover, cypress, love­ oriented herbs, myrtle, pine, rose, strawberry, and sunflower.


A 164

Gc:n·d.e"-~"-., "",Lt;k t:.ke G=d.d.ess

Pc:lt:.t:.ey"-s

Lips, a heart, or the astrological symbol for the planet Venus all have potential. St:.="-e$, r-vv\~"-eYc:ll$, CY'Jst:.c:lts, c:I"-d. SkeUs

Stones preferred by Venus include cat's-eye, topaz, tur­ quoise and any stone that inspires love (including self-love) such as pink quartz. C=I=Y$

Pink, red, and purple are the predominant colors for love. 1::> ec=yat:.~ve ~ =~ckes

Images of sparrows, doves, bulls, lions, and lynx are all sacred to Venus. Additionally, because her imagery often over­ laps Aphrodite, you could get a statue of a goddess standing on a seashell. 1::>i..... ed;~="-

Love's magickal center is due South, where the energy of fire can keep the warmth and passion alive. Its feng shui direc­ tion varies according to the focus: Family is due East, and gen­ eral relationships reside in the Southwest. Dd.aFt:.c:lt:.i..="-s

Aloe, marjoram, parsley, and tea rose all come under Venus's dominion and are ideal indoor plants. Find a container that's a deep red or reddish-purple color or one shaped like a heart for best results. Keep this in a room where you spend the most time with loved ones.

G ...l.t..,." G",,..le,,,,s

~i

~. 165

ClRey_)-tc:l...vest:. ClF~i..cc:lt:.i="-$

The best dates to use anything from your Venus garden are those during which she was customarily venerated (a word, by the way, that takes its root from her name). These dates include March 10; April 1, 14,21,23,28; May 3; June 24; July 19; August 19; and October 9. Also, any Friday is appropriate. Remember that although Venus's components are certainly geared toward love, use them cautiously. Don't try to manipu­ late another's heart. Instead, simply welcome the energy of love into your life and watch the wonders it works.


....

.. . . . . .... . . . . . . . . ···tP tU""

U(1J::~'_i.i"""", :;,."";;iikb,,,,, L;1j;",i"';,jII/\;.,i''';'ld",,.(qfi.llill!l1;40ii1UilJli!l~Il!I~liit:~IIH~'''''i&,""

IS4

0",.1..1..,,,,, 0 ..,..1..,....."

G":Il..d.e"-~"-9 vvLlk I:.ke Ged.d.ess

"P Cll:.l:.el""-s Lips, a heart, or the astrological symbol for the planet Venus all have potential. Sl:.e"-es, rYV\i"-el"Clb, Cl"ysb.als, CI"-d. SkeUs

Stones preferred by Venus include cat's-eye, topaz, tur­ quoise and any stone that inspires love (including self-love) such as pink quartz. Celel"s

Pink, red, and purple are the predominant colors for love. "Decel"al:.ive ",",e,"ckes

Images of sparrows, doves, bulls, lions, and lynx are all sacred to Venus. Additionally, because her imagery often over­ laps Aphrodite, you could get a statue of a goddess standing on a seashell. "Dil"ecl:.ie"­

Love's magickal center is due South, where the energy of fire can keep the warmth and passion alive. Its feng shui direc­ tion varies according to the focus: Family is due East, and gen­ eral relationships reside in the Southwest. Qd.Clpl:.al:.ie"-s

Aloe, marjoram, parsley, and tea rose all come under Venus's dominion and are ideal indoor plants. Find a container that's a deep red or reddish-purple color or one shaped like a heart for best results. Keep this in a room where you spend the most time with loved ones.

o

ISS

fl:.el"- )---!al"vesl:. OpplicCll:.ie"-s

The best dates to use anything from your Venus garden are those during which she was customarily venerated (a word, by the way, that takes its root from her name). These dates include March 10; April 1, 14,21,23,28; May 3; June 24; July 19; August 19; and October 9. Also, any Friday is appropriate. Remember that although Venus's components are certainly geared toward love, use them cautiously. Don't try to manipu­ late another'S heart. Instead, simply welcome the energy of love into your life and watch the wonders it works.


~,

ISS

G t:n·c:le",~ "''!P

""aJ.._ tke G

=c:lc:le:s:s

"D~l"ec::t~=",

Most often health is considered an aspect of Water (that is, West) but more dramatic problems might require Fire (South). The direction in which health resides in feng shui is due East. a

c:lQpt:.Qtt.=",:s

The nicest indoor application for Vila's planters is making them for people who are ailing. Even up to 100 years ago flowers were thought to lift the spirits of sickly people and speed recovery. aHel"-.J-.-!""l"vest appl~c::""tt.=",s

Always harvest Vila's garden at sunrise on a Sunday during the full moon. If you can't combine these three factors, do your best to achieve two. Draw a circle in the dirt around the plant you wish to harvest using a birch twig or broom handle. Leave an offering there for the plant spirit and Vila, whisper your need to her, and then take only what you need of the plant for your spellcraft, potions, or rituals.

Goclcl",s:s G",..cl",,,,"s

IS9

\\Jk~t.e 'B'-'tffalo \\Jo",a~

1-<:' ~t. '-'tal G arcleV\. Form follows function-that has been misunderstood. Form and function should be one, joined in a spiritual union. -Frank Lloyd Wright .J-.-!~:st:.=-C ",lh"l"Ql C)",f=l"~""t:.t.=",

It has been said that the groves were the gods' first temples. This garden is a makeshift outdoor temple for worship and magickal workings with a little help from White Buffalo Woman. As the story goes, aeons ago White Buffalo Woman brought important information to humans. Her first encounter was with two young men. One desired her and the other hon­ ored her apparent power. The first lost his life, and the second helped his village create a sacred space in which White Buffalo Woman imparted the secrets of the pipe and all the rituals that accompanied such a sacred item. She also gently reminded the people to honor the Earth and always live in harmony with it. Her words were well­ spoken and well-received. When her teachings were completed, she turned into a white buffalo and walked out of the village as mysteriously as she came. White Buffalo Woman's magickal attributes include ecol­ ogy, environmentalism, Earth Magick, ritual work and tools, and Shamanism.


ISS

ISS

Gc:n"d.e""i",,'3 '\Nat.. t.:t..e Gcd.d.ess

G",.I..I..,,,,, 0 ......1..,...."

'DiYeclic""

'\AJkeJ.:e "B"ffd.c'\AJ C","-CI'\''':

Most often health is considered an aspect of Water (that is, West) but more dramatic problems might require Fire (South). The direction in which health resides in feng shui is due East. c:ld..,pt.:.,t.:ic""s

The nicest indoor application for Vila's planters is making them for people who are ailing. Even up to 100 years ago flowers were thought to lift the spirits of sickly people and speed recovery. c:lft.:ey-.J-l.,yvest.: c:lpplic;;.,t.:ic""s

Always harvest Vila's garden at sunrise on a Sunday during the full moon. If you can't combine these three factors, do your best to achieve two. Draw a circle in the dirt around the plant you wish to harvest using a birch twig or broom handle. Leave an offering there for the plant spirit and Vila, whisper your need to her, and then take only what you need of the plant for your spellcraft, potions, or rituals.

1---..2. it:"cd G

c:;a-y-cle"足

Form follows function-that has been misunderstood. Form and function should be one, joined in a spiritual union. -Frank Lloyd Wright .J-list.:e-C ulh"y.,t CJ""feY'__.,t.:ie""

It has been said that the groves were the gods' first temples. This garden is a makeshift outdoor temple for worship and magickal workings with a little help from White Buffalo Woman. As the story goes, aeons ago White Buffalo Woman brought important information to humans. Her first encounter was with two young men. One desired her and the other hon足 ored her apparent power. The first lost his life, and the second helped his village create a sacred space in which White Buffalo Woman imparted the secrets of the pipe and all the rituals that accompanied such a sacred item. She also gently reminded the people to honor the Earth and always live in harmony with it. Her words were well足 spoken and well-received. When her teachings were completed, she turned into a white buffalo and walked out of the village as mysteriously as she came. White Buffalo Woman's magickal attributes include ecol足 ogy, environmentalism, Earth Magick, ritual work and tools, and Shamanism.


190

Gcol"d.(n'~"-9 '\Nak tk.e. Gcod.d.ess

"Plco"-ts

G",..t..t...." G .......t.."'"

"Deccol"coti.ve

191

<="J cov.ck.es

There are so many plants that have found their way into ritual that it's nearly impossible to list them all. However, fol­ lowing Shamanic tradition, cedar, lavender, and sage are three good choices that are used to purifY the sacred space.

Porcupine and buffalo are her sacred animals. (She appeared in a porcupine cloak to the two men she met). Alter­ natively, some type of medicine wheel or ritual pipe would be very fitting.

"PcoHel""-s

"D ~l"ect~co"-

A motif of seven parts or points, because White Buffalo Woman walked seven times around the ritual fire as she taught, is a good choice. Note: If you follow this motif, make sure to have a centralized fire source for the garden. Also note that the layout of your garden should reflect the kind of space you traditionally use for ritual (most of us use a circle), but if there's another form or pattern you follow, integrate it into your garden somehow. Stco"-es. rvv\~"-el"cols. Cl"~stQls. co"-d. SkeUs

Found stones are best, as the Native Americans often saw these as a message from Nature spirits or the gods. ecolcol"s

White is the ideal color to use in this garden.

As a goddess/ancestor spirit, White Buffalo Woman resides in the West from a Shamanic point of view. Magickally her space is "center," as that is where magick begins. Alterna­ tively you could see her as the circle's circumference. Qd.Qptcot~co"-s

The greatest honor you can give White Buffalo Woman is to treat your entire living area as a sacred space in which she is welcome. Enact ritual in every room of the house, and recog­ nize that the Great Spirit is part of all things in waking and sleeping, in sounds and silences. This makes life an act of wor­ ship and a very real ritual that commemorates White Buffalo Woman's messages! Qftel"-Hcol"vest QppKcc:oti.co"-s

Dry the herbs and flowers from White Buffalo Woman's garden and burn them prior to ritual to prepare your sacred space. Fan the herbs around the circle clockwise using a natu­ ral feather, which must be found as a gift from nature, not har­ vested in any manner, and properly cleansed. As you move through the space, you may want to add a special chant.


so

GQyd..e",t."'9 ""t.lk. t::.k.e God..d..e".".

G"clcl..,.,. G",,.cl.. ,,,,s

191

PIQ",bs

"DecoYQt::.t.ve ~f Cl>uck.e".

There are so many plants that have found their way into ritual that it's nearly impossible to list them all. However, fol­ lowing Shamanic tradition, cedar, lavender, and sage are three good choices that are used to purify the sacred space.

Porcupine and buffalo are her sacred animals. (She appeared in a porcupine cloak to the two men she met). Alter­ natively, some type of medicine wheel or ritual pipe would be very fitting.

PQt::.t::.eY",,,.

"Dt.Yect::.t.Cl>'"

A motif of seven parts or points, because White Buffalo Woman walked seven times around the ritual fire as she taught, is a good choice. Note: If you follow this motif, make sure to have a centralized fire source for the garden. Also note that the layout of your garden should reflect the kind of space you traditionally use for ritual (most of us use a circle), but if there's another form or pattern you follow, integrate it into your garden somehow.

As a goddess/ancestor spirit, White Buffalo Woman resides in the West from a Shamanic point of view. Magickally her space is "center," as that is where magick begins. Alterna­ tively you could see her as the circle's circumference.

St::.o",e"., '\IV\t.",eYQI"., CY~".t::.QI"., Q"'d.. Sk.eUs

Found stones are best, as the Native Americans often saw these as a message from Nature spirits or the gods. Coloy".

White is the ideal color to use in this garden.

Cl d..Qpt::.Qt::.t.o",,,,

The greatest honor you can give White Buffalo Woman is to treat your entire living area as a sacred space in which she is welcome. Enact ritual in every room of the house, and recog­ nize that the Great Spirit is part of all things in waking and sleeping, in sounds and silences. This makes life an act of wor­ ship and a very real ritual that commemorates White Buffalo Woman's messages! Clft::.ey- .J--tQyvest::. Clpplt.cQt::.t.Cl>"''''

Dry the herbs and flowers from White Buffalo Woman's garden and burn them prior to ritual to prepare your sacred space. Fan the herbs around the circle clockwise using a natu­ ral feather, which must be found as a gift from nature, not har­ vested in any manner, and properly cleansed. As you move through the space, you may want to add a special chant.


....

Gc:n.d.e"-L"-,=, "",a.k t::.ke God.d.ess

G ..clcl.."" G",...cl.."""

~ e,,"-CltCl: ZOc::li.ClC OClyc::le"­

"P c:lt::.t::.eY"-s

192

Recently, someone asked me if I believed in astrology.

He seemed somewhat puzzled when I explained

that the reason I don't is that I'm a Gemini.

-Raymond Smullyan

193

The best type of layout for this garden is that of a circle in which the plants associated with each sign are laid out into 12 sections. Alternatively, use the outline of Cancer's astrological symbol to honor the goddess and welcome her in that space.

J..-tLst::.o-Cult::.UYc:l1 CI"-foY",-c:lt::.LO"-

Yemaja is a goddess from Nigeria whose name means fish mother. Her mother being an earth goddess and sister of the sun god, her name in Brazilian tradition rings with rich impor­ tance. At one point in her mythic cycle Yemaja bears eleven gods and goddesses along with streams of water from her breasts. Symbolically speaking the streams equate to the Milky Way, on which the eleven Beings reside along with Yemaja, who her­ self represents the astrological sign of Cancer (the crab). Yemaja's magickal attributes include fertility, celestial harmony, energy, and any attribute related to the sign of Can­ cer (love of nature, enjoyment of socialization and public work, good memory, and sense of the "odds"). "Plc:l"-t::.s

Plan your Yemaja garden on New Year's, the traditional festival day when she receives offerings. This might be an ideal time to place seeds on your altar and bless them, giving some back to the earth as a gift that honors the goddess. Beyond this, you'll want to gather at least one plant to represent each astro­ logical sign. This can be done by Elemental correspondence, energy attributes, or direct association with the sign itself. See Part 1 for some ideas.

St::.o"-es. "\IV\L"-eYc:lls. CYyst::.c:lls. c:l"-d. Skells

Follow the pattern of birthstones around the astrological wheel. Specifically: Bloodstone or garnet Aries Jade or lapis Taurus Agate or aventurine Gemini Beryl or moonstone Cancer Amber or carnelian Leo Agate or aventurine Virgo Lapis or turquoise Libra Tourmalated quartz Scorpio Sagittarius Amethyst or sugilite Hematite or onyx Capricorn Aquamarine or jet Aquarius Amethyst or sugilite Pisces


~ 192

Gc:ll"'c:le""~""9

""ak. lk.e G=c:lc:less

~e"",QtQ: Zoc::l~QC GQ"Yc::le"­ Recently, someone asked me if I believed in astrology.

He seemed somewhat puzzled when I explained

that the reason I don't is that I'm a Gemini.

-Raymond Smullyan

J-I ~sl=- C

G ...L.Less G .....Le"'-s

19.3

Pc:lHel"'''''s

The best type of layout for this garden is that of a circle in which the plants associated with each sign are laid out into 12 sections. Alternatively, use the outline of Cancer's astrological symbol to honor the goddess and welcome her in that space.

",ll"'l"'c:ll C)"" f=l"'""c:ll~=""

Yemaja is a goddess from Nigeria whose name means fish mother. Her mother being an earth goddess and sister of the sun god, her name in Brazilian tradition rings with rich impor­ tance. At one point in her mythic cycle Yemaja bears eleven gods and goddesses along with streams of water from her breasts. Symbolically speaking the streams equate to the Milky Way, on which the eleven Beings reside along with Yemaja, who her­ self represents the astrological sign of Cancer (the crab). Yemaja's magickal attributes include fertility, celestial harmony, energy, and any attribute related to the sign of Can­ cer (love of nature, enjoyment of socialization and public work, good memory, and sense of the "odds"). Plc:l""t.:s

Plan your Yemaja garden on New Year's, the traditional festival day when she receives offerings. This might be an ideal time to place seeds on your altar and bless them, giving some back to the earth as a gift that honors the goddess. Beyond this, you'll want to gather at least one plant to represent each astro­ logical sign. This can be done by Elemental correspondence, energy attributes, or direct association with the sign itself. See Part 1 for some ideas.

Sl=""es. '\IV\t""el"'c:lls, Cl"'yslc:lls. c:I""c:l Sk.eUs

Follow the pattern of birthstones around the astrological wheel. Specifically: Bloodstone or garnet Aries Jade or lapis Taurus Agate or aventurine Gemini Beryl or moonstone Cancer Amber or carnelian Leo Agate or aventurine Virgo Lapis or turquoise Libra Tourmalated quartz Scorpio Sagittarius Amethyst or sugilite Hematite or onyx Capricorn Aquamarine or jet Aquarius Amethyst or sugilite Pisces


..-...

19.04

Gt::l'l"d..e"'~"'9 ""ak lke God..d..e$$

G ..clcl",,,,,,, G ..'I"cl","-",

Colo'l"$

Clft.e'l"-J-{a'l"ve$l Clppl~cal~o"'$

Blue, which is said to be Yemaja's favorite color, is ideal. -oeco'l"t::ll~ve e"-J o'4cke$

A mermaid, which is how art often depicts Yemaja, is a good choice. Also, a telescope might make a neat centerpiece if you can properly cover it.

-o~'l"ecl~o",

Up. Seriously. Because the stars are up, that's my opin­ ion. You might want to add a mirror to the center of the gar­ den so you can easily see the stars in the center of the greenery at night. Cl d..t::lplt::ll~o"'$

Put a circular pot in a window where it can easily collect the light from evening stars.

195

The zodiac is a gentle reminder of life's wheel and time's motion. Let your garden's growth, life, death, and rebirth throughout the year keep this awareness in the forefront of your mind. When you're having trouble coping with or breaking a cycle, use the harvest from the garden in rituals and spells. Also, when you need to accent the energies of anyone sign in your life, carry a cutting from that part of the garden with you for the day.


~

19~

GC:>Y'c:!e",-"",-" "",at.. It..e Gcc:!c:!ess

0 ...1..1....... 0"''''.1."'''-,,

CclcY's

ClfleY'-)-lC:>Y'vesl Clppli.cc:>li.c",-s

Blue, which is said to be Yemaja's favorite color, is ideal. "Oeccl"c:>l"ve ~J c,~ct..es

A mermaid, which is how art often depicts Yemaja, is a good choice. Also, a telescope might make a neat centerpiece if you can properly cover it.

"0 "l"ecli.c",­ Up. Seriously. Because the stars are up, that's my opin­ ion. You might want to add a mirror to the center of the gar­ den so you can easily see the stars in the center of the greenery at night. Clc:!c:>plc:>li.c",-s

Put a circular pot in a window where it can easily collect the light from evening stars.

19S

The zodiac is a gentle reminder of life's wheel and time's motion. Let your garden's growth, life, death, and rebirth throughout the year keep this awareness in the forefront of your mind. When you're having trouble coping with or breaking a cycle, use the harvest from the garden in rituals and spells. Also, when you need to accent the energies of anyone sign in your life, carry a cutting from that part of the garden with you for the day.


196

G",yc:le"-l."-9 vvi..t.:k lke Gec:lc:less

Ze"",y~Q: G

Ql"c:le~ of ~ el"t:a,-t:y

The mountains are fountains of men as well as

of rivers, of glaciers, of fertile soil. The great poets,

philosophers, prophets, able men whose thought

and deeds have moved the world, have come down

from the mountains.

-John Muir

Go..l..l.,,,,, G .......l.,"""

1=' ",lleY"-s A yoni symbol or an oval, both of which represent the gate of life through which all souls must pass, are good choices for this garden. Sle"-es, "VV\i."-ey",ls, CY'Ysl",ls, ","-c:l Skells

Use any stones that were used as charms to improve physi­ cal fertility, including amber, geode (a womb-like shaped one is best), moonstone, and pearl. Alternatively, look for stones whose shapes represents the vagina and penis to meld male­ female energy together, which results in "creative" power.

.J--ll.sle-C",ll",y",l C)"-fey""-,,,ll.e"­

I can think of no goddess better suited to the task of clos­ ing out this section other than Zemyna. In Lithuanian stories, this earth goddess was remembered and thanked for the gift of life at every birth. Zemyna didn't just preside over human fer­ tility, though. She was the life of Earth itself: Every flower, tree, and weed was watched and cared for by this goddess, whose name means flower-giver. Zemnya's magickal attributes include fertility, Earth Magick, plant spirits and plant lore, gardens, and groves. Pl","-ls

In particular it's important to have at least one tree (even a miniature one) in Zemyna's garden, because it is in the tree tops that she hid the secret of life. Birch, linden, maple, oak, and spruce are her preferred trees. Lilies were also loved by this goddess, as that is where the spirits of young girls resided. The ancestors lived among fruit bearing trees.

197

Celey",

Yellow (pastel) is appropriate. 1:::>ec::ey",li.ve ~ e",c::ke",

Images of young animals or children as well as a preg­ nant goddess statue are good choices. 1:::>i.yec::He"­

Fertility is a function of the East and sometimes of the South in magick. (The East brings the power of creation; the South inspires passion.) In feng shui the Southeast Quadrant would seem to bear similar significance.

a

c:l"'pl",li.e"-s

Inside the home I recommend using a yellow planter shaped like a pregnant goddess' belly or something similarly feminine. The ability to create new life is most definitely a yin quality. Add to this yellow flowers or any herb/plant known to


196

GClyc:le"-L"-9 """Lt;k t::ke Gec:lc:less

Ze",,-y"-c:::I: Gc:::Il"d.e"-

of ~el"t.a~t.y

Goold..",,,, G

197

..,.d.. ",,,

1=' ClHeY"-s A yoni symbol or an oval, both of which represent the gate of life through which all souls must pass, are good choices for this garden.

The mountains are fountains of men as well as

of rivers, of glaciers, of fertile soil. The great poets,

philosophers, prophets, able men whose thought

and deeds have moved the world, have come down

from the mountains.

-John Muir

Use any stones that were used as charms to improve physi­ cal fertility, including amber, geode (a womb-like shaped one is best), moonstone, and pearl. Alternatively, look for stones whose shapes represents the vagina and penis to meld male­ female energy together, which results in "creative" power.

.J-t~st::e-C>.-tlt::>.-tYCll C)"-feY",-Clt::i.e"­

Celeys

I can think of no goddess better suited to the task of clos­ ing out this section other than Zemyna. In Lithuanian stories, this earth goddess was remembered and thanked for the gift of life at every birth. Zemyna didn't just preside over human fer­ tility, though. She was the life of Earth itself: Every flower, tree, and weed was watched and cared for by this goddess, whose name means flower-giver. Zemnya's magickal attributes include fertility, Earth Magick, plant spirits and plant lore, gardens, and groves. PlCl"-t::s

In particular it's important to have at least one tree (even a miniature one) in Zemyna's garden, because it is in the tree tops that she hid the secret of life. Birch, linden, maple, oak, and spruce are her preferred trees. Lilies were also loved by this goddess, as that is where the spirits of young girls resided. The ancestors lived among fruit bearing trees.

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Yellow (pastel) is appropriate. "De<::eYClt::i.ve

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Images of young animals or children as well as a preg­ nant goddess statue are good choices. "DLye<::t::Le"­

Fertility is a function of the East and sometimes of the South in magick. (The East brings the power of creation; the South inspires passion.) In feng shui the Southeast Quadrant would seem to bear similar significance.

D

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Inside the home I recommend using a yellow planter shaped like a pregnant goddess' belly or something similarly feminine. The ability to create new life is most definitely a yin quality. Add to this yellow flowers or any herb/plant known to


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inspire fertility. One option that combines both ideas is the daf­ fodil. (Daffodil requires a planter deep enough for the bulb and roots.) a

ff:;er-..J-I t;lrve$f:; appli.ct;lf:;i.=v\'$

In looking at Zemyna's garden, remember that fertility need not mean just physical or procreative energy. One may have fertile ideas, abundant energy, or even a truly prolific garden! Apply Zemyna's harvest to these goals or simply enjoy her beauty, for hers is the Earth-the garden of the world, all of which is a lesson and a sacred space that we share.

~

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afle~vvo~cl Our spiritual lives need not be kept separate from daily living. In fact, we can cultivate a healthier spirit through gar­ dens and groves, landscaping and leisure hours where we enjoy our handiwork. Remember that the Divine is part of all things and that the energy of life buzzes in each bud and blossom, leaf and lawn (even those you have to mow!). To touch the Earth intimately is to know yourself and the God/dess better. I wish you many blessings in this adventure. -February 2001

lee


198

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inspire fertility. One option that combines both ideas is the daf­ fodil. (Daffodil requires a planter deep enough for the bulb and roots.) aft.el"- ,)-4C1l"vest. aropli..cClt.~",s

In looking at Zemyna's garden, remember that fertility need not mean just physical or procreative energy. One may have fertile ideas, abundant energy, or even a truly prolific garden! Apply Zemyna's harvest to these goals or simply enjoy her beauty, for hers is the Earth-the garden of the world, all of which is a lesson and a sacred space that we share.

1

i ClfleY'''''oY'c:l r¡

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Our spiritual lives need not be kept separate from daily living. In fact, we can cultivate a healthier spirit through gar­ dens and groves, landscaping and leisure hours where we enjoy our handiwork. Remember that the Divine is part of all things and that the energy of life buzzes in each bud and blossom, leaf and lawn (even those you have to mow!). To touch the Earth intimately is to know yourself and the God/dess better. I wish you many blessings in this adventure. -February 2001

199


Earlier in this book I discussed applying the ideas pre­ sented in Part II in theme gardens. For example, Venus's garden becomes simply a love or passion garden. This approach is especially useful for people who may feel a little uncomfort­ able with the religious aspect ofgoddess gardening (or for those who have magickally challenged neighbors!). This appendix expands on this idea, specifically to illus­ trate several theme gardens that don't have goddess-oriented overtones. The types of gardens you can create is limited only by your imagination. Even those with magickal or spiritual themes have amazing potential for diversity. My hope is that this section will inspire many more ideas of your own. Cl1"c"'-c:tt.ke1"c:tFY C1" C)",ce",se Gc:t1"c::le",

With holistics and homeopathy finding a strong foothold in our modern health practices, an aromatherapy garden is one way to create an atmosphere of well-being around your home. Better still, many of the items in an aromatherapy garden have scent-releasing flowers, and therefore it's visually pleasing as well! 201


202

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Historical records indicate that the Egyptians used aro­ matics to treat melancholy, the Greeks considered aromatic herbs as a gift from the gods, Babylonians scented their temples with a variety of herbs and flowers, and lavender appears regu­ larly in Medieval texts as a supportive aroma that helps the healing process along. Even Hippocrates advocated aromatics in his writings. I see no reason why we can't apply these ideas to our modern pursuit of wholeness within and without. Some of the plants that appear in aromatherapy texts, along with their applications, are detailed in the following list. Herb Applications Energy and protection Anise Anxiety and stress relief Bergamot Health and vitality Carnation Chamomile Emotional balance and calmness Communication Clary Decreasing aggravation Coriander Tension relief Dill Overcoming blockage Fennel Accord and health Gardenia Balance and harmony Geranium , Honeysuckle Prosperity Restfulness Hops Meditation and focus Hyacinth Juniper Easing aches and pains Insomnia, inner peace Lavender Psychic awareness Lilac Spirituality Magnolia Decreasing worries Marjoram Refreshed energy, memory Mint improvement

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Pine Rose Geranium Rosemary Sage Sweetpea Thyme Violet

203

Cleansing and purification Love (including self-love) Courage

Mental keenness (especially memory)

Clearing negative energy Strengthening friendship Improving personal wards Self image

After you harvest your aromatherapy garden, carefully dry the leaves and flowers so you can use them in making incense and oils, for strewing around a sacred space, or as part of sachets that scent your entire wardrobe with healthy vibrations!

5e1cyec::l C~yde Gelyc::leV\. In magickal traditions, it's common to create sacred space in the shape of a circle. This shape represents many things: the wheel of time; the wheel of life, death, and rebirth; the sphere where we step out of the mundane into the metaphysical and spiritual; a globe upon which all who stand are of equal importance in the greater scheme of things; and a protective boundary, keeping out negative energies and holding in magickal power until it's ready to be released and guided to its destination. The traditional sacred circle is a kind of mandala that has four distinct parts and a central point. The Northern Quarter of the circle represents Earth, followed by the Air Element in the Eastern Quarter, Fire in the South, and Water in the West. These are the four components that create all energy, and the beings that reside within the Quarters are the Powers that watch over the sacred space.

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Historical records indicate that the Egyptians used aro­ matics to treat melancholy, the Greeks considered aromatic herbs as a gift from the gods, Babylonians scented their temples with a variety of herbs and flowers, and lavender appears regu­ larly in Medieval texts as a supportive aroma that helps the healing process along. Even Hippocrates advocated aromatics in his writings. I see no reason why we can't apply these ideas to our modern pursuit of wholeness within and without. Some of the plants that appear in aromatherapy texts, along with their applications, are detailed in the following list. Herb Applications Anise Energy and protection Anxiety and stress relief Bergamot Health and vitality Carnation Chamomile Emotional balance and calmness Clary Communication Coriander Decreasing aggravation Tension relief Dill Overcoming blockage Fennel Accord and health Gardenia Balance and harmony Geranium , Honeysuckle Prosperity Restfulness Hops Hyacinth Meditation and focus Juniper Easing aches and pains Lavender Insomnia, inner peace Lilac Psychic awareness Magnolia Spirituality Marjoram Decreasing worries Mint Refreshed energy, memory improvement

Pine Rose Geranium Rosemary Sage Sweetpea Thyme Violet

20:3

Cleansing and purification Love (including self-love) Courage Mental keenness (especially memory) Clearing negative energy Strengthening friendship Improving personal wards Self image

After you harvest your aromatherapy garden, carefully dry the leaves and flowers so you can use them in making incense and oils, for strewing around a sacred space, or as part of sachets that scent your entire wardrobe with healthy vibrations!

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In magickal traditions, it's common to create sacred space in the shape of a circle. This shape represents many things: the wheel of time; the wheel of life, death, and rebirth; the sphere where we step out of the mundane into the metaphysical and spiritual; a globe upon which all who stand are of equal importance in the greater scheme of things; and a protective boundary, keeping out negative energies and holding in magickal power until it's ready to be released and guided to its destination. The traditional sacred circle is a kind ofmandala that has four distinct parts and a central point. The Northern Quarter of the circle represents Earth, followed by the Air Element in the Eastern Quarter, Fire in the South, and Water in the West. These are the four components that create all energy, and the beings that reside within the Quarters are the Powers that watch over the sacred space.


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How does this translate into gardening? For those with larger lawns, I envision a huge circular garden where one can hold ritual or cast spells. Even without that amount of land, the idea of having a permanent sacred space anywhere on one's property is really wonderful. It invokes the goddess and all of her magick into your home, into the land, and into your life every moment of every day! To create this effect outdoors you'll first need to decide how wide you want your circle to be. Divide that measurement in half and cut a length of rope to that size plus enough to tie around a steak or stick. Put the stick where you want the center of the circle to be, and then stretch out the string and begin to mark the circle's perimeter with small rocks or by etching it in the dirt. Remember to move clockwise as you do this to attract the most beneficial energy possible. Using a compass, figure out where due North is and mark that location. From that spot, you can divide the circle into four equal Quarters that are aligned correctly to the cardinal points of the compass. At this juncture I place an energized, blessed coin in each of the four Quarters. (I actually use a quar­ ter because of the symbolic value.) If these coins ever work to the surface of the soil, you'll know it's time to reinforce the energy in the soil and surrounding area. Next, begin sowing the garden using each plant's Elemen­ tal correspondence. To give some examples, the North/Earth section might be bordered in fern, have a center of tulips and honeysuckle, and be filled in with honesty. The East/Air sec­ tion might be bordered with mint or parsley and filled out with lavender and lily of the valley. The South/Fire section can be bordered in thistle and snapdragon, centered around sunflower, and filled in with marigold. Finally the West/Water section might be bordered with thyme or tansy, centered around daffo­ dil, and filled out with heather, periwinkle, and tea rose. As you finish planting each Quarter, it's nice to add an invocation to the Element of that Quarter. An invocation

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"invites" the energy into that space. Here is an example for each Quarter: • North/Earth: Hail and welcome guardians of the Earth see here the work of my hands and be pleased. Bless this soil and all that grows herein to be filled with your energy for nurturing, for firm foundations, for prosperity. So be it. • East/ Air: Hail and welcome guardians of the Air see here the work of my hands and be pleased. Bless this soil and all that grows herein to be filled with your energy for inspiration, communication, motivation, and fresh outlooks. So be it. • South/Fire: Hail and welcome guardians of the Fire see here the work of my hands and be

pleased. Bless this soil and all that grows herein to

be filled with your energy for passion, power,

purification, and illumination. So be it.

• West/Water: Hail and welcome guardians of the Water see here the work of my hands and be pleased. Bless this soil and all that grows herein to be filled with your energy for healing, creativity, cleansing, and endurance. So be it. Adapting the sacred circle garden to indoor efforts might be best accomplished by four separate containers, each of which would be placed in the appropriate part of your home. Check the amount of light and space you have available so you can choose the plants that will fit these criteria. Next, find Elemen­ tally colored containers into which to put your chosen flora. For Earth, use green or brown; for Air, yellow or white; for Fire, red or orange; and for Water, blue or purple. Alternatively, find containers that have imagery that pro­ motes each Element. For example, finding a crock with a wave pattern upon it would be ideal for Water and Water-associated plants. Note: You can still put a blessed coin in the bottom of each as with the outdoor version.


20..:::1

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How does this translate into gardening? For those with larger lawns, I envision a huge circular garden where one can hold ritual or cast spells. Even without that amount of land, the idea of having a permanent sacred space anywhere on one's property is really wonderful. It invokes the goddess and all of her magick into your home, into the land, and into your life every moment of every day! To create this effect outdoors you'll first need to decide how wide you want your circle to be. Divide that measurement in half and cut a length of rope to that size plus enough to tie around a steak or stick. Put the stick where you want the center of the circle to be, and then stretch out the string and begin to mark the circle's perimeter with small rocks or by etching it in the dirt. Remember to move clockwise as you do this to attract the most beneficial energy possible. Using a compass, figure out where due North is and mark that location. From that spot, you can divide the circle into four equal Quarters that are aligned correctly to the cardinal points of the compass. At this juncture I place an energized, blessed coin in each of the four Quarters. (I actually use a quar­ ter because of the symbolic value.) If these coins ever work to the surface of the soil, you'll know it's time to reinforce the energy in the soil and surrounding area. Next, begin sowing the garden using each plant's Elemen­ tal correspondence. To give some examples, the North/Earth section might be bordered in fern, have a center of tulips and honeysuckle, and be filled in with honesty. The East/Air sec­ tion might be bordered with mint or parsley and filled out with lavender and lily of the valley. The South/Fire section can be bordered in thistle and snapdragon, centered around sunflower, and filled in with marigold. Finally the West/Water section might be bordered with thyme or tansy, centered around daffo­ dil, and filled out with heather, periwinkle, and tea rose. As you finish planting each Quarter, it's nice to add an invocation to the Element of that Quarter. An invocation

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"invites" the energy into that space. Here is an example for each Quarter: • North/Earth: Hail and welcome guardians of the Earth see here the work of my hands and be pleased. Bless this soil and all that grows herein to be filled with your energy for nurturing, for firm foundations, for prosperity. So be it. • East/Air: Hail and welcome guardians of the Air see here the work of my hands and be pleased. Bless this soil and all that grows herein to be filled with your energy for inspiration, communication, motivation, and fresh outlooks. So be it. • South/Fire: Hail and welcome guardians of the Fire see here the work of my hands and be

pleased. Bless this soil and all that grows herein to

be filled with your energy for passion, power, purification, and illumination. So be it. • West/Water: Hail and welcome guardians of the Water see here the work of my hands and be pleased. Bless this soil and all that grows herein to be filled with your energy for healing, creativity, cleansing, and endurance. So be it. Adapting the sacred circle garden to indoor efforts might be best accomplished by four separate containers, each of which would be placed in the appropriate part of your home. Check the amount of light and space you have available so you can choose the plants that will fit these criteria. Next, find Elemen­ tally colored containers into which to put your chosen flora. For Earth, use green or brown; for Air, yellow or white; for Fire, red or orange; and for Water, blue or purple. Alternatively, find containers that have imagery that pro­ motes each Element. For example, finding a crock with a wave pattern upon it would be ideal for Water and Water-associated plants. Note: You can still put a blessed coin in the bottom of each as with the outdoor version.


206

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After the harvest, carefully mark from which part of the garden each item came. This way you always have Elemental components to use in your magick.

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Wishcraft is a very ancient and simple form of magick based in sympathy and symbolism. A good example comes to us in weather spells. When someone wished for rain, he or she would dip a broom or bundle of herbs in water and then sprinkle it out on the ground (showing the clouds what to do). These types of mini-spells exist around the world, and there are some growable components that have traditionally been used to affect results in wishcraft. Here's a brief list with their applied energies: Plant Wishing Application Amaranth Divine favor Angelica Blessings and health Basil Happiness Bean Prophetic dreams Carrot Joy and luck Chrysanthemum Congeniality and hospitality Clover Luck (esp. 4 leaf variety) Daisy Love Dandelion Manifestation Evergreen Health and sustenance Fern (flowering) Treasure Flower (the one Fulfillment associated with your birth month)

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Flower, red Gooseberry Holly Lavender Lilac (five-petal) Marjoram Onion Potato, new Rose Sage Sunflower Tomato Violet

207

Divine favor Wisdom Manifestation Wish fulfillment Luck Wealth Luck Wish fulfillment Wish expression (to divine) Dream manifestation Simple wishes Prosperity Wishes of the heart

If you have other growable items that you associate with specific forms of wishing, by all means add them to this list and sow them in your garden! You can pattern the garden in any way that's personally pleasing, but it might be neat to add a wishing well to the center where you can drop a coin or two, as is still the tradi­ tion. This supports the wishcraft being established in that area. When the well gets filled, donate the coins to a good cause to spread the blessings! As you harvest the various items, the ways you can apply them to wishcraft are pretty diverse. Float them on waters so your wish goes out to the seas and beyond. Scatter them to the winds so the air and birds can carry the wish further. Burn them so the smoke rises to the heavens with your wish, or bury them back in the soil so wishes grow into manifested form!


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Flower, red Gooseberry Holly Lavender Lilac (five-petal) Marjoram Onion Potato, new Rose Sage Sunflower Tomato Violet

After the harvest, carefully mark from which part of the garden each item came. This way you always have Elemental components to use in your magick.

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Wishcraft is a very ancient and simple form of magick based in sympathy and symbolism. A good example comes to us in weather spells. When someone wished for rain, he or she would dip a broom or bundle of herbs in water and then sprinkle it out on the ground (showing the clouds what to do). These types of mini-spells exist around the world, and there are some growable components that have traditionally been used to affect results in wishcraft. Here's a brief list with their applied energies: Plant Wishing Application Divine favor Amaranth Angelica Blessings and health Happiness Basil Bean Prophetic dreams Carrot Joy and luck Chrysanthemum Congeniality and hospitality Luck (esp. 4 leaf variety) Clover Daisy Love Dandelion Manifestation Evergreen Health and sustenance Fern (flowering) Treasure Flower (the one Fulfillment associated with your birth month)

I'

207

Divine favor Wisdom Manifestation Wish fulfillment Luck Wealth Luck Wish fulfillment Wish expression (to divine) Dream manifestation Simple wishes Prosperity Wishes of the heart

If you have other growable items that you associate with specific forms of wishing, by all means add them to this list and sow them in your garden! You can pattern the garden in any way that's personally pleasing, but it might be neat to add a wishing well to the center where you can drop a coin or two, as is still the tradi­ tion. This supports the wishcraft being established in that area. When the well gets filled, donate the coins to a good cause to spread the blessings! As you harvest the various items, the ways you can apply them to wishcraft are pretty diverse. Float them on waters so your wish goes out to the seas and beyond. Scatter them to the winds so the air and birds can carry the wish further. Burn them so the smoke rises to the heavens with your wish, or bury them back in the soil so wishes grow into manifested form!


208

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Goc:l Gcn"c:le"­ I included this theme garden for those of you who read this book and thought, What about the other side of the coin? The Sacred Parent is neither male nor female alone; rather, it is both and neither. The Goddess offers much to our technologi­ cal, right-brained world, but the God and masculine aspects should not be overlooked. In particular He offers strength, stamina, energy, leadership, vitality, logic, sound judgement, an authoritative demeanor, warrior energy in times of need, protection, and the ability to "hunt" successfully. Some ofthe plants associated with the God aspect include: Deity Plant Dionysus, Apollo, Zeus Apple Woden, Thor, Neptune, Ash Mars Vishnu Basil Apollo Bay Birch Thor Broccoli Jupiter Carnation Jupiter Cypress Mithras, Pluto, Cupid, Jupiter Daisy Thor Dill Horus Elm Odin Fennel Dionysus Fern Puck Fig Dionysus Gorse Thor Grape Bacchus

i

209

Mercury, Thor Hazel Osiris Ivy Saturn Lavender Lily of the valley Apollo Pluto Mint Jupiter Mullein Aesculapius Mustard Hades Narcissus Thor Nettle Dagda, Jupiter, Thor, Pan Oak Cronos Orchid Osiris Orris Pan Peony Ares Pepper Pan, Attis, Dionysus Pine Hypnos Poppy Eros, Cupid, Adonis Rose Thor Rowan Saint-John's-wort Baldur Ganesha Sesame Ganymede Tansy Thor Thistle Mars, Jupiter, Thor Vervain Mercury, Belinus Willow Some type of phallic symbol would be appropriate as an outline for the god garden (bear in mind that it need not be overt if you have nosy or puritanical neighbors). Similarly, any stones with points are considered having masculine symbol­ ism. Finding statues shouldn't be difficult; I've seen stone pieces

.-.


208

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God.. Gcn..d..e"" I included this theme garden for those of you who read this book and thought, What about the other side of the coin? The Sacred Parent is neither male nor female alone; rather, it is both and neither. The Goddess offers much to our technologi­ cal, right-brained world, but the God and masculine aspects should not be overlooked. In particular He offers strength, stamina, energy, leadership, vitality, logic, sound judgement, an authoritative demeanor, warrior energy in times of need, protection, and the ability to "hunt" successfully. Some ofthe plants associated with the God aspect include: Plant Deity Apple Dionysus, Apollo, Zeus Ash Woden, Thor, Neptune, Mars Vishnu Basil Apollo Bay Thor Birch Jupiter Broccoli Carnation Jupiter Cypress Mithras, Pluto, Cupid, Jupiter Daisy Thor Horus Odin Elm Fennel Dionysus Puck Fern Fig Dionysus Gorse Thor Grape Bacchus

I 1)

209

Mercury, Thor Hazel Osiris Ivy Saturn Lavender Lily of the valley Apollo Pluto Mint Jupiter Mullein Aesculapius Mustard Hades Narcissus Thor Nettle Dagda, Jupiter, Thor, Pan Oak Cronos Orchid Osiris Orris Pan Peony Ares Pepper Pan, Attis, Dionysus Pine Hypnos Poppy Eros, Cupid, Adonis Rose Thor Rowan Saint-John's-wort Baldur Ganesha Sesame Ganymede Tansy Thor Thistle Mars, Jupiter, Thor Vervain Mercury, Belinus Willow Some type of phallic symbol would be appropriate as an outline for the god garden (bear in mind that it need not be overt if you have nosy or puritanical neighbors). Similarly, any stones with points are considered having masculine symbol­ ism. Finding statues shouldn't be difficult; I've seen stone pieces


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that depict specific deities (such as Zeus or Mercury) and others that show men doing various tasks that might represent a specific god's area of protection. Plan and work your god garden during bright, daylight hours, as these support the conscious mind. As you reap from your garden, blend its harvest into your spells and rituals for your patron gods, those that focus on attracting traditional masculine attributes into your life or those for rites of passage for men.

• Dandelion. To encourage ghostly visitations in dreams. • Elder. Stand beneath this at midnight to encounter spirits. • Gardenia. To promote peace between humans and spirits. • Heather. To help to conjure ghosts. • Lavender. To be able to see ghosts when they arrive. • Marigold. Sprinkle petals on the walkway to your home to guide a child's spirit home. • Mint. To attract kindly spirits (often ancestral). • Sweetgrass. Dry, bundle, and burn to call on beneficient ghosts and spirits. • Thistle. Harvest and place in hot water. The rising steam attracts positive spirits. • Willow. Burn dried bark as part of conjuring rituals.

210

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A ghost garden is a really fun addition for families who like to celebrate Halloween in a boo-tiful way! For your center­ piece, of course, you'll need a headstone. Put whatever mes­ sage you want on it (or have several with messages you can change to suit the occasion). To keep the nasty ghosts away, plant pumpkin around the garden and carve these at the appropriate times of the year Lammas and Hallows come immediately to mind. Other good deterrents for those mischievous types are juniper and some iron planted in the soil near the perimeter of your magickal space. Traditionally ghosts were communed with or called upon in the safe haven of a sacred circle, so a circle is an ideal shape for either an indoor or outdoor ghost garden effort. As far as what to sow, look to: • Angelica. To attract spirit guides and helpers

specifically.

• Althea. To attract positive spirits and increase

psychic awareness.

• Catnip. Harvest and hang it over the door to

welcome friendly ghosts.

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There will be specific times of the year when your ghost garden may see more use than others, such as New Year's, when the veil between worlds is said to grow thin. The spirits of family members often try to find their way home during holi­ days, so leave a picture of your ancestors in the garden with a small offering of favorite foods. On those occasions when you're holding a ritual to con­ tact spirits, toss some freshly gathered leaves and flowers from your garden near the doorway of your house as a sign of wel­ come. Remember, however, to set up a protected sacred space for any such undertaking or you may get more than for which you hoped!


210

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211

that depict specific deities (such as Zeus or Mercury) and others that show men doing various tasks that might represent a specific god's area of protection. Plan and work your god garden during bright, daylight hours, as these support the conscious mind. As you reap from your garden, blend its harvest into your spells and rituals for your patron gods, those that focus on attracting traditional masculine attributes into your life or those for rites of passage for men.

To encourage ghostly visitations in

• Dandelion. dreams. Stand beneath this at midnight to encounter • Elder. spirits. Gardenia. To promote peace between humans and • spirits.

Gkosl Gc:n·c:le~

To attract kindly spirits (often ancestral).

• Mint. Sweetgrass. Dry, bundle, and burn to call on

• beneficient ghosts and spirits. Harvest and place in hot water. The rising • Thistle. steam attracts positive spirits. Burn dried bark as part of conjuring • Willow. rituals.

A ghost garden is a really fun addition for families who like to celebrate Halloween in a boo-tiful way! For your center­ piece, of course, you'll need a headstone. Put whatever mes­ sage you want on it (or have several with messages you can change to suit the occasion). To keep the nasty ghosts away, plant pumpkin around the garden and carve these at the appropriate times of the year Lammas and Hallows come immediately to mind. Other good deterrents for those mischievous types are juniper and some iron planted in the soil near the perimeter of your magickal space. Traditionally ghosts were communed with or called upon in the safe haven of a sacred circle, so a circle is an ideal shape for either an indoor or outdoor ghost garden effort. As far as what to sow, look to: • Angelica. To attract spirit guides and helpers

specifically.

• Althea. To attract positive spirits and increase

psychic awareness.

• Catnip. Harvest and hang it over the door to

welcome friendly ghosts.

Heather. To help to conjure ghosts.

• Lavender. • arrive. To be able to see ghosts when they

Sprinkle petals on the walkway to your

• Marigold. home to guide a child's spirit home.

I

I

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There will be specific times of the year when your ghost garden may see more use than others, such as New Year's, when the veil between worlds is said to grow thin. The spirits of family members often try to find their way home during holi­ days, so leave a picture of your ancestors in the garden with a small offering of favorite foods. On those occasions when you're holding a ritual to con­ tact spirits, toss some freshly gathered leaves and flowers from your garden near the doorway of your house as a sign of wel­ come. Remember, however, to set up a protected sacred space for any such undertaking or you may get more than for which you hoped!


Callenish, 25

Calliope, 150-151

Celestial Garden, 66-68

Ceres, 20

Cerridwen, 77-80

chemicals, 26

Chia,40

Christianity, 73-74, 137

Clio, 149

Clock Garden, 133-136

companion planting, 26-27

Compassion, Garden of,

105-107

compost, 29

Concordia, 81-83

Creatrix, 12, 18

crystal companion planting,

13

and planetary rulers, 44-45

Balance, Garden of, 127-129 Crystal Goddess, gardening

Bast, 20, 69-72

techniques, 42-50

beating the bounds, 39

crystals, 13

Beauty, Garden of, 177-179 Cybele,20

blessings, garden, 37-38

Bon Dea, 20

"C>

Brigit, 20, 73-76

Dana, 13, 84-87

bug repellents, 28-29

Danae, 84

Butterfly Garden, 164-167

Air, 43-44

Amaterasu, 62-65

Aphrodite, 20, 183-184

arborariums, 25

Aromatherapy Garden,

201-203

Art, Laughter, and Mirth,

Garden of, 149-152

Artemis, 20

Asherah,12

asperging, 36

Astarte garden, 66-68

Athena, 20

Athenic garden, 24

Avalokitesvara, 177

217


219

Gc:n"clev..i.v..9 ~i.t:.k t:ke Goclcless

Danu, 20 decorative touches, 24-25

Delight, 164

Delphi,102

Demeter, 12, 20, 88-91

Diana, 20

Divination Garden, 174-176

Doctrine of Signatures, 53

Drawing Down the Moon,

76, 146

Dream Garden, 120-123

G

Earth energy lines, 35-36

Earth Garden, 59, 102-104

Earth signals, 31

Earth, 43-44

Earth's elements, 30

Edible Flowers from Garden

to Palate, 98

Edible Flowers, Garden of, 95-98

elemental crystal companion

planting, 43-44

energy, banishing unwanted,

36

Ennoia, 92-94

Erato, 149

Euterpe, 149

p

Fairy Garden, 84-87

Family Garden, 137-139

fencing, 23

Fertility, Garden of, 196-198

fertilizers, 23

natural, 29-30

Fey, 13

Fire Element, 65

Fire Garden, 143-145

flavor, plants than enhance,

26

Flora, 12, 20, 95-98

Fortuna Virillis, 100

Fortuna, 99-101

Freya, 20

Frigg, 174

Future Telling, 176

~

~

G

Gaia, 20, 102-104

"Gaia's Built-in Helpers," 23,

25-30

garden blessings, 37-38

garden clubs, 25

Garden of

Art, Laughter, and Mirth, 149-152

Balance, 127-129

Beauty, 177-179

Compassion, 105-107

Edible Flowers, 95-98

Fertility, 196-198

Healing, 186-188

Joyful Dancing, 69-72

Love, 183-185

Magick, 108-110

Peace, 81-83

Pleasures, 168-170

Serendipity, 99-10 1

219

C)......l.'"

the Sun, 62-65

the Winds, 180-182

garden shows, 25

garden, layout of your, 27

Gardener's Garden, 88-91

gardening

and the seasons, 30-35

by moon cycles, 41-42

by moonsigns, 40-42

gardening techniques,

Crystal Goddess, 42-50

Moon Goddess, 40-42

gardening with limited space,

22

gardening, benefits of, 11

gardens, Goddess-themed,

19-21

Gauri, 105-107

Geb,120

Ghost Garden, 210-211

God Garden, 208-210

God, reflection in nature, 12

Goddess gardening, 35

Goddess gardens, 27, 29,

57-198

Goddess land blessings and

protections, 35-39

Goddess movement, 19

Goddess spirituality, 18-19,

21

Goddess, as life partner, 18

Goddess,

bringing together with

gardening, 12-13

honoring with a garden,

13

greenhouses, 25

growing guide, 32-34

Gwion, 77-78

.J-t

hand tools, 23

hands, laying on of, 39

harvesting tips, 34

Healing, Garden of, 186-188

Hecate, 13,20, 108-1

Hera, 20, 117, 130

herbalism, pleasure, 17

herbs, 17

Hestia, 111-113

Hina, 40, 114-116

Hippocrates, 202

C)

incantations, 38

Incense Garden, 201-203

insects, 26

Internet, buying plants via,

24

Io, 20

Iris, 117-119

Isis, 20, 120-123

I wa-su-hime-no-Kami,

124-126

Iznagi,20

..J

Joyful Dancing, Garden of,

69-72

Julunggul, 127-129


218

Danu,20

decorative touches, 24-25

Delight, 164

Delphi, 102

Demeter, 12, 20, 88-91

Diana, 20

Divination Garden, 174-176

Doctrine of Signatures, 53

Drawing Down the Moon,

76, 146

Dream Garden, 120-123

S

Earth energy lines, 35-36

Earth Garden, 59, 102-104

Earth signals, 31

Earth, 43-44

Earth's elements, 30

fertilizers, 23

natural, 29-30

Fey, 13

Fire Element, 65

Fire Garden, 143-145

flavor, plants than enhance,

26

Flora, 12, 20, 95-98

Fortuna Virillis, 100

Fortuna, 99-101

Freya, 20

Frigg, 174

Future Telling, 176

a

Gaia, 20, 102-104

"Gaia's Built-in Helpers," 23,

25-30

Edible Flowers from Garden garden blessings, 37-38

to Palate, 98

garden clubs, 25

Edible Flowers, Garden of, Garden of

95-98

Art, Laughter, and Mirth, elemental crystal companion

149-152

planting, 43-44

Balance, 127-129

energy, banishing unwanted,

Beauty, 177-179

36

Compassion, 105-107

Ennoia, 92-94

Edible Flowers, 95-98

Erato, 149

Fertility, 196-198

Euterpe, 149

Healing, 186-188

Joyful Dancing, 69-72

Love, 183-185

po

Magick, 108-110

Fairy Garden, 84-87

Peace, 81-83

Family Garden, 137-139

Pleasures, 168-170

fencing, 23

Serendipity, 99-101

Fertility, Garden of, 196-198

219

g"".le,.

Ga'l"c:le",i."'9 vvak. t:k.e Gec:lc:less

f

II

the Sun, 62-65

the Winds, 180-182

garden shows, 25

garden, layout of your, 27

Gardener's Garden, 88-91

gardening

and the seasons, 30-35

by moon cycles, 41-42

by moonsigns, 40-42

gardening techniques,

Crystal Goddess, 42-50

Moon Goddess, 40-42

gardening with limited space,

22

gardening, benefits of, 11

gardens, Goddess-themed,

19-21

Gauri, 105-107

Geb,120

Ghost Garden, 210-211

God Garden, 208-210

God, reflection in nature, 12

Goddess gardening, 35

Goddess gardens, 27, 29,

57-198

Goddess land blessings and

protections, 35-39

Goddess movement, 19

Goddess spirituality, 18-19,

21

Goddess, as life partner, 18

Goddess,

bringing together with

gardening, 12-13

honoring with a garden,

13

greenhouses, 25

growing guide, 32-34

Gwion,77-78

J---t

hand tools, 23

hands, laying on of, 39

harvesting tips, 34

Healing, Garden of, 186-188

Hecate, 13,20, 108-110

Hera, 20, 117, 130

herbalism, pleasure, 17

herbs, 17

Hestia, 111-113

Hina, 40, 114-116

Hippocrates, 202

g

incantations, 38

Incense Garden, 201-203

insects, 26

Internet, buying plants via,

24

10,20

Iris, 117-119

Isis, 20, 120-123

I wa-su-hime-no-Kami,

124-126

Iznagi,20

o;;;;...J

Joyful Dancing, Garden of,

69-72

Julunggul, 127-129


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220

Gal"c:levo..i.vo..9 ""i.t;k. lk.e G=c:lc:le55

Juno Regina, 130

Juno, 20, 130-132

Jupiter, 45

K

Kama, 168

Kefa, 133-136

Kitchen Garden, 111-113

Kitchen Witch's Cookbook,

The, 98

Konon-Hana-Sakuya-Hime,

124

Kwan Yin, 20, 137-139

L Lady of Ten Thousand Names, 120-121

Lakshmi, 140-142

language of nature, 50-54

Latiaran, 143-145

Law of Similar, 53

laying on of hands, 39

layout of your garden, 27

light, 31

20

loam, 23

Love, 164

Love, Garden of, 183-185

Lucina, 130

Luna, 40

,'V\

Magick, Garden of, 108-110

magickal correspondence

crystal companion plant­ ing, 46-50

Magickal Sympathy, 53

Magus, Simon, 92

Mari, 146-148

Marriage Garden, 130-132

Mars, 45

Melpomene, 149

Mercury (deity), 210

Mercury, 44-45

Message Garden, 117-119

metaphysical processes,

bringing into gardening, 13

Min, 20

Moneta, 130

Moneta's temple, 131

Money Garden, 140-142

moon cycles, gardening by,

41-42

Moon Garden, 146-148

Moon Goddess, gardening

techniques, 40-42

moon's cycles, 13

moonsigns, gardening by,

40-42

Moses, 156

mulch, 29-30

Muses, the, 149-152

'"

Native Americans, 37

natural cycles, 30

natural fertilizers, 29-30

nature, language of, 50-54

221

C} .... d... ,.

\

Neptune, 45

Niamh ofIreland, 156

Norns, the, 153-155

Nut, 120

o Oto, 156-159

p

Pali Kongju, 160-163

Paracelsus,53

Pax garden, 24

Peace, Garden of, 81-83

Persephone, 20, 88

planetary rulers and crystal

companion planting, 44-45

plant meanings, 50-52

plants than enhance flavor,

26

plants, 23-24

harmonious, 81

pleasure herbalism, 17

Pleasures, Garden of,

168-170

Pluto, 45

pollination, bugs good for, 29

Polyhymnia, 149

Polynesian legend, 114

poppets, 53

porch pots, 22

Potion Garden, 77-80

potions, making, 80

power, words of, 37-38

prayers, 37-38

Pronuba, 130

Psyche, 164-167

1=<Rati, 168-170

repellents, bug, 28-29

resource information, 25

Rhea, 20

Rhiannon, 171-173

Ritual Garden, 189-191

Rock and Sand Garden,

124-126

"rock nest princess,"

124-126

.s Sacred Circle Garden, 203-206

Sacred Parent, 208

sacred stones, 36

Saga, 174-176

sand,23

Sardonyx, 131

Saturn, 45

seasons, gardening and the,

30-35

seed blessings, 39

seeds, 23-24

Selene, 40

Serendipity, Garden of,

99-101

Shamanic Garden, 160-163

Skuld, 153

sleep magick, 126

smudge sticks, 37


220

Gc:n cle"-l."-9 vvl.t:k t:ke Goclcless o

Juno Regina, 130 Juno, 20, 130-132 Jupiter, 45 K

Kama, 168

Kefa, 133-136

Kitchen Garden, 111-113

Kitchen Witch's Cookbook, The, 98

Konon-Rana-Sakuya-Rime, 124

Kwan Yin, 20, 137-139

L Lady of Ten Thousand Names, 120-121 Lakshmi, 140-142 language of nature, 50-54 Latiaran, 143-145 Law of Similar, 53 laying on of hands, 39 layout of your garden, 27 light, 31 Lilith,20 loam, 23 Love, 164 Love, Garden of, 183-185 Lucina, 130

Luna, 40

\IV\ Magick, Garden of, 108-110 magickal correspondence

crystal companion plant-

ing, 46-50

Magickal Sympathy, 53

Magus, Simon, 92

Mari, 146-148

Marriage Garden, 130-132

Mars, 45

Melpomene, 149

Mercury (deity), 210

Mercury, 44-45

Message Garden, 117-119

metaphysical processes, bringing into gardening, 13

Min, 20

Moneta, 130

Moneta's temple, 131

Money Garden, 140-142

moon cycles, gardening by,

41-42

Moon Garden, 146-148

Moon Goddess, gardening

techniques, 40-42

moon's cycles, 13

moonsigns, gardening by,

40-42

Moses, 156

mulch, 29-30

Muses, the, 149-152

\1\

Native Americans, 37

natural cycles, 30

natural fertilizers, 29-30

nature, language of, 50-54

C}",c:lex

Neptune, 45 Niamh of Ireland, 156 Noms, the, 153-155

Nut, 120

o Oto, 156-159 p

Pali Kongju, 160-163

Paracelsus, 53

Pax garden, 24

Peace, Garden of, 81-83

Persephone, 20, 88

planetary rulers and crystal

companion planting, 44-45 plant meanings, 50-52 plants than enhance flavor, 26 plants, 23-24 harmonious, 81 pleasure herbalism, 17 Pleasures, Garden of, 168-170 Pluto, 45 pollination, bugs good for, 29 Polyhymnia, 149 Polynesian legend, 114 poppets, 53 porch pots, 22 Potion Garden, 77-80 potions, making, 80 power, words of, 37-38 prayers, 37-38

221

Pronuba, 130

Psyche, 164-167

'R Rati, 168-170

repellents, bug, 28-29

resource information, 25

Rhea, 20

Rhiannon, 171-173

Ritual Garden, 189-191

Rock and Sand Garden, 124-126

"rock nest princess," 124-126

oS

Sacred Circle Garden,

203-206

Sacred Parent, 208

sacred stones, 36

Saga, 174-176

sand, 23

Sardonyx, 131

Saturn, 45

seasons, gardening and the,

30-35

seed blessings, 39

seeds, 23-24

Selene, 40

Serendipity, Garden of,

99-101

Shamanic Garden, 160-163

Skuld,153

sleep magick, 126

smudge sticks, 37


I

222

G.,....cle~t.~9 "",a.k t::.ke Goclcle,;,;

smudging, 37

soil, 23, 26

solar festival, 65

space, 22-23

limitations, gardening with, 22

Stonehenge, 25

stones, sacred, 36

Summerland Garden,

171-173

Sun, 44, 65

Garden of the, 62-65

~

Tara, 177-179

Tatsuta-Hime, 180-182

Terpsichore, 149

Thalia, 149

theme gardening, 201-211

Thinking Place, 92-94

third eye chakra, 39

Thracian culture, 108

Threefold Goddess Garden,

73-76

tools,

gardening, 22

hand, 23

Tuatha de Danaan, 84

u Urania, 149

Urd, 153-154

Ursa Major, 133, 135

Utto,21 Uzume,62 "\J

Venus,21,45,183-185,201

Verdandi, 153

Victorian era, 111

Victorians, 50

Vila, 186-188

\\J Warrior Garden, 114-116

Water Garden, 156-159

weed block, 29, 30

White Buffalo Woman,

189-191

White Lady, 78

window boxes, 22, 35, 61,

91,139 Winds, Garden of the, 180-182

Wish Garden, 206-207

World Tree, 152-154

;::::J

Yemaja, 192-195

yin-yang, 128

Clbo",l

lke Cl",lkoyr

Patricia Telesco is a mother of to five pets, and full-time author \vitt :TI, cal books on the market. These inc:u.dt Futuretelling, The Herbal Arts. Tho J.. book, Little Book of Love Magic, J"c::<r}; ning Spells: Weaving Wonders, and of which represents a different area or s­ and her readers. Trish maintains a strong presence nals, including Circle Network Xe;~'s ar on the Internet through such popul, vox. com (festival focus) and he: \\ singer. com. Trish considers herself a dm1,'1l-ro-e spoon-wielding Kitchen Witch whox worldwide customs flavor every enecgy

Z Zemyna, 196-198

Zeus, 117, 149,210

Zodiac Garden, 192-195

223

Profile for msmerlinsmagic

Gardening with the Goddess, creating gardens of spirit n magick x patricia telesco  

learn directly from nature's textbook

Gardening with the Goddess, creating gardens of spirit n magick x patricia telesco  

learn directly from nature's textbook

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