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ICRHKenya International Centre for Reproductive Health - Mombasa

ANNUAL REPORT

2009


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S 1. INTRODUCTION ................................................................. 2 2. THE BOARD ....................................................................... 3 Composition ............................................................................. 3 Board Meetings ........................................................................ 5 3. THE MANAGEMENT ........................................................... 4 4. ICRH - K PROJECTS .......................................................... 5

5. ABSTRACTS, PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS ............ 15 Publications .............................................................................. 15 Oral and Poster Presentations .................................................... 16 6. SPECIAL EVENTS .............................................................. 17 Dissemination of Kesho Bora Study Preliminary Results ................ 17 The Belgian Minister of Defence visits ICRH Mombasa .................. 18

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CONTENTS

ICRHK009 Kesho Bora Study...................................................... 5 ICRHK017 APHIA II..................................................................... 6 ICRHK020 GBVRC...................................................................... 7 ICRHK023 PASER-M...................………………………………..…. 8 ICRHK030 PASER-S.................................................................... 9 ICRHK031 Biomarkers Study....................................................... 10 ICRHK036 Dapivirine Ring Study.................................................. 11 ICRHK037 PLACE Study.............................................................. 12 ICRHK041 PwP II Study.............................................................. 13 ICRHK042 GSVP Study............................................................... 14

ICRH Kenya

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ICRH Kenya 1 . A N I N T R O D U C T I O N The International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH) was established in 1994 in response to the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD, Cairo, 1994) as a multidisciplinary centre of excellence aiming at contributing to sexual and reproductive health and to promote it as a human right. Activities in Kenya began as a member of the University of Nairobi collaborative HIV/STI research group. ICRH started activities in Mombasa in 1996 and works closely with the Ministry of Health at national and provincial level. ICRH currently employs over 90 staff, involved in interventions and research and has strong administrative and data management capabilities. ICRH operates a research clinic, lab and office at Coast Provincial General Hospital. ICRH strongly respects the human rights of every human being within our ecological environment. This is reflected in a strong adherence to values such as tolerance and impartiality in the main political, philosophical and religious arenas, freedom of expression, non-discrimination on the basis of gender, colour, economic or social status, respect and promotion of individual and collective human, social and economic rights. More particularly, it is the purpose of ICRH to strive for the promotion of reproductive health as a basic human right: ICRH fully adheres to the recognition of reproductive health as a basic human right of all men and women. Through its research, training, interventions and advocacy, ICRH aims to contribute to the promotion, protection and fulfilment of these rights. ICRH further holds that the achievement of the (ICPD) goal of universal access to sexual and reproductive health services is a determining factor in the fights against poverty. ICRH recognizes and employs a multidisciplinary approach in tackling problems related to sexual and reproductive health, by integrating medical analysis with political, legal, social, cultural and economic considerations. ICRH also seeks to contribute to the improved accessibility of a wide range of sexual and reproductive health services by integrating family planning, safe motherhood, sexually transmitted infections including HIV and AIDS, discouragement of harmful practices such as female genital mutilation or sexual and gender based violence. In its activities ICRH pays particular attention to the impact of gender equality on individual’s sexual and reproductive health, especially with regard to the limited access of certain groups to sexual and reproductive health services. ICRH therefore seeks to improve the contribution of men and women in the defense of their sexual and reproductive health rights by involving men in finding solution to problems for which they often do not feel responsible and by empowering women in making their own decisions. ICRH is committed to the empowerment of disadvantaged groups such as the poor, women, adolescents, sex workers, migrants and refugee populations by providing them with the means of making informed and responsible decisions concerning their sexual and reproductive health. ICRH ensures excellence in its field by using standardized and innovative methodologies for achieving its goals in the most efficient way without compromising the quality of the work. This requires planning resource utilization and the systematic development at both individual and institutional levels. Commitment implies a singular determination to achieve set objectives. Teamwork is the corner stone for achieving common health goals and requires recognition of the individual’s contributions of all team members. Development of each team member’s talents is an essential ingredient of team building.

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2.THE BOARD Composition

As at 31st December 2009 ICRH board members were: 1. Marleen Temmerman 2. Walter Jaoko 3. Esther Getambu 4. Marcel Reyners (ex officio, non voting) 5. Shahnaaz Sharif 6. Peter Gichangi 7. Jennifer Othigo 8. Stanley Luchters 9. David Kiragu

Board Meetings

THE

The board members perform their duties under the following three committees: 1. The executive committee 2. The finance committee 3. The strategic plan review committee/public affairs committee

The Board members attended five meetings in 2009; on 29th January 2009, 27th May 2009, 8th June 2009, 29th July 2009 and 20th September 2009.

BOARD ICRH chair of the Board Prof. Marleen Temmerman addresses ICRH Kenya staff during a past visit to Mombasa.

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ICRH Kenya 3 . T H E M A N A G M E N T ICRH Kenya was managed by 4 Directors headed by the Country Director Dr. Marcel Reyners. The different units were: 1. Director Interventions: Mr. Nzioki Kingola has been with ICRH since 2004 and is the head of the Interven tion Department. 2. Director Science and Research: Dr. Fiona Mbai joined ICRH in June 2009 as the Director Science and Research. 3. Director Social Science and Policy: Dr. Catherine Maternowska was the Director of Social Science and Policy since July 2008. 4. Director Finance and Administration: Mr. Hendrik Dierick became Director of Finance and Administration in later, around November 2009 after Mrs. Irene Kibara stepped down in order to pursue a Masters in Business Administration (MBA). Mrs. Kibara stays on as the chief finan- cial officer (CFO).

Dr. Marcel Reyners

Dr. Fiona Mbai

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Dr. Catherine Maternowska

Mr. Nzioki Kingola

Mr. Hendrik Dierick

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3.ICRH-K PROJECTS Impact of triple ART during pregnancy and Breastfeeding on Mother-to-child transmission of HIV and Mother’s Health: “The Kesho Bora study”: ICRHK009 The overall goal of the study was to optimize the use of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs during the ante-partum, intrapartum and postpartum periods to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV) and preserve the health of the mother in settings where the majority of HIV-positive women breast-feed. The primary objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a triple-ARV MTCTprophylaxis regimen compared with the short-course MTCT-prophylaxis regimen among women with CD4+ cell counts between 200 and 500 cells/mm3.

Triple-ARV MTCT prophylaxis given to HIV-positive mothers with CD4 200-500 cells/ mm3 during pregnancy and continued during breastfeeding significantly reduced the risk of HIV transmission to infants compared with standard recommended short course regimen (42% reduction at 12 months; P=0.039). The largest effect (infections averted) was seen between 6 wks and 6 months when maternal CD4 cell count was 200 - 350 cells/mm3, although some reduction in infections was also seen among women with CD4 cell count between 350 and 500 cells/mm3. Triple-ARV MTCT prophylaxis given to the mother and prolonged during breastfeeding period had low toxicity on mothers and children over the 12 months follow-up. Additional analyses are currently ongoing. Initial efficacy results were presented during the International AIDS Conference (IAS) on 21 July 2009 in South Africa. Dissemination of study results to Kenyan national and local stakeholders was done in July 2009, and October 2009 respectively. A similar successful dissemination to the former study participants was held on 30th Sep 09. A total of 126 mothers and 110 children attended the function.

The Kesho Bora Study Funding Agencies World Health Organization (WHO); Agence Nationale de Recherche contre le SIDA (ANRS); The Thrasher Research Fund and European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP)

PROJECTS

The study started in January 2005 with the Mombasa (Kenya) site located within the Coast Provincial General Hospital. As the second largest site, Mombasa enrolled 309 mother-infant pairs. A total of 882 women were enrolled and 805 live births occurred in all the sites combined.

Contact Project Coordinator: Mrs. Eunice Irungu (eunice.irungu@icrhk.org) Principal Investigator: Dr Marcel Reyners (marcel.reyners@icrhk.org)

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ICRH Kenya AIDS, Population and Health Integrated Assistance Program (APHIA II) : ICRHK017 The AIDS, Population and Health Integrated Assistance Program (APHIA II) is a prevention, care and treatment project based in the Coast and Rift Valley regions. The project is funded by USAID and implemented by the APHIA II Coast consortium coordinated by Family Health International (FHI). The International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH) is one of the agencies sub-contracted to implement various components of the project in the Coast province. The program began in July 2006 and builds upon the extensive achievements of the IMPACT project that came to a close in June 2006. The role of ICRH in the greater APHIA II project is to expand prevention interventions to hard-to-reach and most at risk populations through strategic behavior change communication. Within Coast Province ICRH implements the following activities for the project: • Female Sex Workers (FSW) Peer Education Programme • Men who have sex with men (MSM) Peer Education Programme • Matatu operators Peer Education Programme • Technical assistance in ART data monitoring and management and conducting in novative surveys. • Alcohol study among FSW • Size estimation of female sex workers – Coast province • Behavioral monitoring survey to assess HIV, AIDS, STI, TB, RH, FP and malaria health seeking needs of In and out-of-school youth, Men in workplaces, Uniform services, Matatu Touts,Truckers, Female sex workers and Women in households

ICRH is implementing three major components of the project targeting, female sex workers, men who have sex with men and matatu drivers/conductors. Female sex work (FSW) program covers nine sites namely; Island, Kisauni, Bombolulu, Chaani, Maporomokoni, Bangladesh, Shanzu, Kisumu Ndogo and Likoni in Mombasa District. The male sex work (MSM) program covers the larger Mombasa District, Ukunda in Kwale District, and Lamu Island in Lamu District. Both programs include peer education, community education outreaches, basic FP services, access to CT services and STI treatment, care and support activities targeting sex workers and sex work clients. In addition, the MSM program includes anti-stigma and sensitivity training for health care providers. The matatu intervention focuses on major matatu termini where matatu drivers/conductors congregate. The intervention, like those of the FSW and MSM/MSW, aims to increase knowledge, skills and self-efficacy in HIV and STI prevention and improve access to quality HIV, AIDS, TB, Malaria, RH, FP and MCH services in addition to alcohol and other drugs risk reduction.

APHIA II Contact Mr. Nzioki Kingola, Project Manager nzioki.kingola@icrhk.org +254 41 249 48 66

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Gender Based Violence and Recovery Centre: ICRHK020 Sexual violence and rape in Kenya, once shrouded in secrecy and shame by victims as well as health care providers, is now an essential public health issue with guidelines for comprehensive care developed by the Ministry of Health, Division of Reproductive Health. The Coast Provincial General Hospital (CPGH) in Mombasa receives on average six survivors of rape/defilement and other forms of sexual abuse daily. There is an urgent need for appropriate resources and the ability to effectively triage such victims as well as provide follow-up care addressing the physical, psychological and legal consequences of abuse.

The CPGH Gender Based Violence and Recovery Centre fill an important need: • to provide comprehensive, quality and continuous care for survivors of sexual and gender - based violence as outlined in the Kenyan national guidelines for rape and sexual violence; • to offer improved physical and psychological services in a confidential and support ive environment; • to assist with legal and social counseling to victims and their families who have expe rienced violence; • to monitor and evaluate the follow-up care of survivors; • to create evidence-based outcomes promoting public health care alongside legal advocacy; • to raise awareness around the physical, social, and legal implications of sexual and gender - based violence at the individual, community, hospital and regional and na tional levels.

Gender Based Violence and Recovery Centre Funding Agency International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH)

PROJECTS

Standards of care at CPGH were previously focused on treating survivors of abuse and violence with acute care: treatment of injuries, forensic evidence collection and findings recorded, and medical provisions made for the prevention of STIs (including postexposure prophylaxis for HIV) and unwanted pregnancy. Follow-up to post rape care is patient-depended and typically, incapacitated survivors were more likely to avoid seeking services.

Contact Dr Christine Katingima christine.katingima@icrhk.org +254 734 466 466 +254 722 208 652

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ICRH Kenya PharmAccess African Studies to Evaluate Resistance (PASER) on Monitoring of HIV drug resistance in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (PASER-M) Study: ICRHK023 In Africa the emergence of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) may be increased by insufficient health care infrastructure and inadequately trained medical personnel, both due to lack of funds. Unless an effort is undertaken to support the needed infrastructure, treatment programmes may fail due to widespread HIVDR, thus limiting future therapy options. HIVDR is one of the most important determinants of long term treatment success. It is vital to increase knowledge on HIVDR and its patterns, over time. However, few countries in Africa have either the technical expertise or the financial resources to undertake the required monitoring and surveillance to provide this essential information. PASER-M is a prospective, multi-centre, observational cohort study in up to 15 geographic settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. Each clinical centre will enroll 240 HIV infected adults starting first-line or switching to second-line (Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy) HAART. Cross-sectional genotypic HIVDR testing will be performed at baseline, 12 and 24 months follow-up, when switching HAART regimen due to treatment failure, and at endline. Follow-up period for participants was extended to 96 months from 24 months due to the fact that HIV drug resistance testing is best interpreted on long term followup schedules. Within the first 24 months, HIV drug resistance for 1st line therapy is not significant and a long term follow-up will give a more credible and reliable results for long term HIV patient management, especially when there is need to switch therapy to 2nd, 3rd line and salvage therapy. The study also aims to build capacity on monitoring and surveillance of HIVDR in Sub-Saharan Africa. Two clinical centres are running the PASER M study in Kenya; Coast Provincial General Hospital (CPGH), Mombasa and Mater Hospital, Nairobi. Currently ICRH provides technical support and implementation of the study in CPGH, Mombasa and Mater Hospital, Nairobi. PASER-M CPGH Mombasa initiated the study in October 2007. All of the 240 participants had been enrolled by July 2008. The study enrolled 220 participants on first line regimen and 20 on second line regimen.

PASER - M Study Funding Agency PharmAccess Foundation, the Netherlands ICRH Project Manager Irene Muhache Jao (irene.jao@icrhk.org) ICRH PI Dr Kishor Mandaliya (kishor.mandaliya@icrhk.org )

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PharmAccess African Studies to Evaluate Resistance (PASER) on Surveillance of transmitted HIV drug resistance (PASER-S): ICRHK030 In Africa the emergence of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) may be increased by insufficient health care infrastructure and inadequately trained medical personnel, both due to lack of funds. Unless an effort is undertaken to support the needed infrastructure, treatment programmes may fail due to widespread HIVDR, thus limiting future therapy options. HIVDR is one of the most important determinants of long term treatment success. It is vital to increase knowledge on HIVDR and its patterns, over time. However, few countries in Africa have either the technical expertise or the financial resources to undertake the required monitoring and surveillance to provide this essential information.

The program is running in Uganda and Mombasa, Kenya, is included as one of the geographic settings in the program, with International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH) as the local coordinator. PASER-S is being implemented in 4 VCT sites within Mombasa. This includes; Magongo health center, Kisauni health center, Likoni sub district hospital and Coast Provincial General Hospital. Screening and enrollment is in progress in all the 4 sites.

PASER - S Study Funding Agency PharmAccess Foundation, the Netherlands ICRH Project Manager Irene Muhache Jao (irene.jao@icrhk.org) ICRH PI Dr Kishor Mandaliya (kishor.mandaliya@icrhk.org)

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PROJECTS

The PASER-S protocol is a cross-sectional survey performed in selected geographic settings in Africa where ART programs are being scaled up. Selected VCT sites will consecutively enroll 85 recently infected; treatment na誰ve HIV infected adults per geographic setting. One-time genotypic HIVDR testing will be performed in each person enrolled. The survey will be repeated in each geographic setting after two years.

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ICRH Kenya Characterisation of novel microbicide safety biomarkers in East and South Africa (Biomarkers Study): ICRHK031 Products used in a number of recent microbicide trials have turned up unexpected safety results. There is a need for more reliable safety biomarkers for phase I and II vaginal microbicide trials. Better understanding and measurement is needed of the effect of substances introduced in the vaginal environment. The project will study a variety of African female target populations in four African settings to identify and improve both clinical and laboratory methods and findings in search of more reliable safety biomarkers. The consortium offers the combination of multidisciplinary experience and cuttingedge technology to make this possible. The main objective of the study is to characterize biomarkers of inflammation, epithelial integrity, immune activation, and antimicrobial activity in the cervicovaginal environment of healthy HIV-negative adult women at low risk for HIV, healthy HIV-negative adult women at high risk for HIV, HIV-negative adult women with BV, HIV-negative adult women using traditional vaginal practices, HIV-negative adult pregnant women, HIV-negative adolescents, healthy HIV-positive adult women, and microbicide and placebo gel users in Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and South Africa. Partners include ICRH – Kenya (Project Coordination), Projet Ubuzima – Rwanda, MITU/ NIMR – Tanzania, RHRU – South Africa, Institute for Tropical Medicine Antwerp and Ghent University – Belgium, AMC-CPCD – The Netherlands, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and MRC – United Kingdom.

Biomarkers Study Funding Agency EDCTP, with UK and Belgian Co-funding Contact Dr Kishor Mandaliya Kishor.mandaliya@icrhk.org Dr Mary Mwaura PI mary.mwaura@icrhk.org

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A Double-blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Phase I/II Study to Evaluate the Safety of an Intravaginal Matrix Ring with Dapivirine in Healthy HIVNegative Women: ICRHK036 It is important that a microbicide is acceptable to users, and it is likely that products that can be applied less frequently will be more acceptable and will achieve better user compliance. Intravaginal rings that need only be replaced every 28 days may therefore have benefits over dosage forms that need to be used more frequently. The main objective of this study is to assess the safety of a silicone elastomer intravaginal matrix ring containing 25mg of dapivirine inserted once every 28 days over a 12-week period among healthy, sexually active, HIV-negative women as compared with a placebo intravaginal ring.

Upon enrolment at each research centre, participants will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to one of two study arms: Arm 1: A silicone elastomer intravaginal matrix ring containing 25 mg of dapivirine to be inserted every 28 days for a 12 week period. Arm 2: A placebo intravaginal ring containing no dapivirine to be inserted once every 28 days for a 12 week period. Once enrolled, both groups will participate in the study for a period of 16 weeks, with a 12 week treatment period and a follow-up visit 4 weeks post ring discontinuation. By the end of 2009, the study was still in the preparatory phase, subject to national review boards approval.

PROJECTS

The dapivirine ring study (IPM 015) is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I/II safety study proposed for up to 17 research centers in Africa including 2 sites in Kenya, and, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania and Zambia. The study participants will be approximately 280 healthy, sexually active, HIV-negative women aged 18-40 years old.

The Dapivirine Ring Study Funding Agency International Partnership for Microbicides ICRH Contact Dr. Christine Katingima, Principal Investigator Christine.katingima@icrhk.org Wilkister Bosire, Project Manager bosire.wikister@icrhk.org +254 41 249 48 66

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ICRH Kenya Priorities for local AIDS control Efforts (PLACE) Study- Kenya: ICRHK037 HIV remains a global health problem of unprecedented dimension. Everyday another 12,000 people aged 15 and older become newly infected with HIV. But why are so many people infected daily when most people know how to prevent the transmission? There are no easy answers to this question but epidemiological data has often shown geographic clustering of HIV infections suggesting that HIV transmission is more likely in some areas than in others. Therefore PLACE method is a rapid assessment tool to monitor and improve HIV/AIDS program coverage in areas where HIV transmission is most likely to occur. Its approach is explicitly geographical (targeting most - at - risk places rather than most - at - risk populations). The main objective of PLACE study is to focus, inform and monitor HIV/AIDS prevention activities. PLACE method has the five 5 steps: 1. Convening of steering committee that identifies and decides which areas the study will be implemented, 2. Interview with community informants to identify venues and events where people meet new sexual and needle sharing partners. 3. Verification of venues mentioned by community informants. 4. Interviews with venue workers and patrons socializing in the mentioned venues. 5. Dissemination of findings to intervention stakeholders. The steering committee identified four Priority Prevention Areas (PPA). These are Rachounyo, Malindi, Nanyuki and Nakuru. Protocol decisions were made and application for ethical approval to conduct the study made. By the end of 2009, implementation plans were underway.

PLACE Study Funding Agency University of North Carolina Contact Principal Investigator Agnes Rinyiru agnes.rinyiru@icrhk.org

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ICRHK041 Prevention with Positives in Mombasa, Kenya: A Community-based Intervention Study (PwP II) Although global effort to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic has brought promising development including access to effective treatment and prevention programs, the number of people living with HIV has continued to grow, so has the number of deaths due to AIDS. Previous studies in Mombasa with HIV positive people showed a continued risky sexual behavior among the group. Until recently prevention efforts have been focused almost entirely on uninfected most-at- risk persons forgetting that people with HIV have always had an essential role to play in preventing new infections because every new infection involves HIV infected as well as HIV uninfected. Therefore, from an epidemiological and public health perspective, the most important group to address with HIV/STI prevention strategies are people already living with HIV.

Baseline and end line quantitative data collection will be undertaken. In-depth interviews (IDIs) will be conducted with 24 men and women at end line.

PwP II Study

PROJECTS

The overall objective of the study is to implement and evaluate a community-based risk reduction strategy for HIV positive individuals not receiving ART. A two arm cohort study will be carried out with an intervention and a control group. Participants in both arms will be followed for 6 months.

Funding Agency Population Council Contact Principal Investigator Nzioki Kingola nzioki.kingola@icrhk.org Study Coordinator Agnes Rinyiru. agnes.rinyiru@icrhk.org

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ICRH Kenya Gender Sexuality and Vaginal Practices: ICRHK042 In 2000, the department of Reproductive Health and Research in WHO held a Technical Consultation on Sexual health to update the definitions of sex, sexuality, sexual health and sexual rights; to review key sexual health issues and concerns; and summarize the important entry points for promotion of sexual health in countries. In this WHO prioritization exercise, research on harmful sexual practices such as “dry sex” were given high priority given the potential correlation between such practices and increased incidence of reproductive tract infections, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV. This multi-country study is the department’s response to that recommendation. This multi-country study has been carried out in Indonesia, Mozambique, South Africa, and Thailand, and the revised protocol includes Kenya. In Kenya, the study is being conducted by the International Centre for Reproductive (ICRH) in urban Mombasa (Chaani and Majengo) and in the rural areas of Kilifi/Msambweni Districts. The objectives of the study are to identify, better understand, and document vaginal practices related to women’s sexuality and sexual health. Describe the broader social context in which these practices are carried out. Understand the motivations, intent, perceptions and experiences (beneficial and detrimental) of individual women who have undertaken the vaginal practices. Obtain reliable estimates of prevalence of specific vaginal practices among a specific major social group in each country. Explore the potential and likely impact of the sexual practices on women’s health and well-being, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to vaginal infections, and any sexual or genital dysfunction. And to help inform health promotion and health prevention messages.

GSVP Study Funding Agency AusAID and WHO Contact Dr Kishor Mandaliya Principal Investigator kishor.mandaliya@icrhk.org wilkister Ombidi Project Manager wilkister.ombidi@icrhk.org

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5.ABSTRACTS, PUBLICATIONS & PRESENTATIONS Publications

2. Social context, sexual risk perceptions, and stigma: HIV vulnerability among male sex workers in Mombasa, Kenya. Jerry Okal, Stanley Luchters, Scott Geibel, Matthew F Chersich, Daniel Lango and Marleen Temmerman. Cult Health Sex. 2009 May 29:1

3. Effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy and development of drug resistance in HIV-1 infected patients in Mombasa, Kenya. Kim Steegen, Stanley Luchters, Kenny Dauwe, Jacqueline Reyaerts, Kishor Mandaliya, Jaoko Walter, Jean Plum, Marleen Temmerman and Chris Verhofstede. AIDS Res Ther. 2009 Jun 16;6:12. 4. Changes in sexual risk taking with antiretroviral treatment: influence of context and gender norms in Mombasa, Kenya. Sarna A, Chersich M, Okal J, Luchters SM, Mandaliya KN, Rutenberg N, Temmerman M. Cult Health Sex. 2009 Jun 25:1. 5. Maternal morbidity in the first year after childbirth in Mombasa Kenya; a needs assessment. Matthew F. Chersich, Nicole. Kley, Stanley M.F. Luchters, Carol Njeru, Elodie Yard, Mary J. Othigo and Marleen Temmerman. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2009 Nov 5;9:51 6. Sex work and the 2010 FIFA World Cup: time for public health imperatives to pre vail. Marlise Richter, Matthew Chersich, Fiona Scorgie, Stanley Luchters, Marleen Temmerman, and Richard Steen. BMC Globalization and Health. Accepted 7. Association of HIV infection with distribution and viral load of HPV types in Kenya: a survey with 820 female sex workers. S. Luchters, D. Vanden Broeck, M.F. Chersich, A. Nel, W. Delva, K. Mandaliya, C.E. Depuydt, P. Claeys, JP. Bogers, M. Temmerman BMC Infectious Diseases. Accepted

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ABSRACTS, PUBLICATIONS & PRESENTAIONS

1. Comparison of the Generic HIV Viral Load® assay with the AmplicorTM HIV-1Monitor v1.5 and Nuclisens HIV-1 EasyQ® v1.2 techniques for plasma HIV-1RNA quantita- tion of non-B subtypes: The Kesho Bora preparatory study. Franc¸ ois Rouet, Vincent Foulongne, Johannes Viljoen, Kim Steegen, Pierre Becquart, Diane Valéa, Sivapra gashini Danaviah, Michel Segondy, Chris Verhofstede, Philippe Van de Perre, for the WHO/ANRS 1289 Kesho Bora Study Group. Journal of Virological Methods163 (2010) 253–257

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ICRH Kenya Oral and Poster Presentations 1. Impact of male sex worker peer education on condom use in Mombasa, Kenya. S. Geibel, N. King’ola, S. Luchters. Oral presentation. IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, Cape Town, South Africa,19-22 July 2009 2. Association between intravaginal practices and HIV acquisition in women: individual patient data meta-analysis of cohort studies in sub-Saharan Africa. Chersich M, Martin Hilber A, Schmidlin K, Egger M, Francis S, Baeten J, Brown J, Delany-Moretlwe S, Hayes R, Kaul R, Luchters S, McGrath N, Myer L, Rees H, Temmerman M, Van der Straten A, Van de Wijgert J, WatsonJones D, Zwahlen M, Low N. Oral presentation. IAS Conference on HIV Pathogen- esis, Treatment and Prevention, Cape Town, South Africa, 19-22 July 2009 3. Triple-antiretroviral (ARV) Prophylaxis during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding Compared to Short-ARV Prophylaxis to Prevent Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV-1 (MTCT): The Kesho Bora Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial in Five Sites in Burkina Faso, Kenya and South Africa (Trial registration number ISRCTN71468401). The Kesho Bora Study Group. Late Breaker Poster. IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, Cape Town, South Africa, 19-22 July 2009 4. Harmful and hazardous alcohol use is associated with unsafe sex among male sex workers in Mombasa, Kenya. M. Syengo, D. Lango, N. Kingola, S.Geibel, S. Luchters. Poster number WEPEC109. 5th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, Cape Town, South Africa, 19-22 July 2009. 5. Challenges of Integrating Family Planning and HIV services in Kenya´s Coast Province. Irene Jao, Jerry Okal, Saade Abdallah, Marcel Reyners, Stephen Okeyo, Marleen Temmerman, Stanley Luchters. Poster number A-155-014403465. IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, Cape Town, South Africa, 19-22 July 2009.

6. High Rates of Unwanted Pregnancies in a Prospective Microbicide Prepared ness Study in Mombasa, Kenya. Wilkister Bosire, Jerry Okal, Saade Abdal lah, Jacqueline Chokwe, Mariam Kassim, Matthew Chersich, Annalene Nel, Marleen Temmerman, Stanley Luchters. Poster number A-155-0148-02992. IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, Cape Town, South Africa, 19-22 July 2009. 7. Sexual risk behaviours of HIV-positive persons not receiving HIV treatment in Mombasa. Avina Sarna, Matthew Chersich, Stanley Luchters, Melissa Picket, Waimar Tun, Jerry Okal, Naomi Rutenberg, and Marleen Temmerman. IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, Cape Town, South Africa, 19-22 July 2009.

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6.SPECIAL EVENTS Dissemination of Kesho Bora Study Preliminary Results Dissemination of the Kesho Bora study results to Kenyan national and local stakeholders was done in July 2009, and October 2009 respectively. A similar successful dissemination to the former study participants was held on 30th Sep 2009.

SPECIAL

Dissemination of preliminary study results to study staff.

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EVENTS

Dissemination of preliminary study findings to the Coast Provincial General Hospital (CPGH) staff and hospital leadership.

Dissemination of preliminary study findings to local stakeholders.

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ICRH Kenya

The Belgian Minister of Defence Visits ICRH Mombasa The Belgian Minister of Defence Mr Pieter De Crem visited ICRH on 17th October 2009. He was accompanied by the Army’s chiefs of staff and naval officers from the Belgian Frigate Louise-Marie which had docked at Mombasa Port. Prof. Marleen Temmerman joined the delegation in her capacity of Chair of the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs, Development Assistance and Defence.

The Belgian Minister for Defence Mr. Pieter De Crem being welcomed by Mr. Nzioki Kingola of ICRH Kenya.

The Belgian Defence delegation is taken through a presentaion of ICRH - Kenya activities.

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ICRHKenya International Centre for Reproductive Health - Mombasa

P.O. Box 91109, 80103 Mombasa, Kenya Tel: +254 41 249 4866 Fax: +254 41 249 5025 Email: info@icrhk.org http://www.icrhk.org

ICRH-Kenya Annual Report 2009  

A review of year 2009

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