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Magnolia heART & CRAFT in Mississippi

AUGUST 2013

Official Magazine of the

Meet The Artisans

Sneak Preview: Who will you meet at the MS Craft Show?

Animal Rescue Fund Moving Forward: Helping the Community One Life at a Time

Audible Delight

Mississippi Sounds: Original Compositions by Guitarist Chas Evans.

Shaw Pit Bull Rescue Pit Bulls: Love Them, Or Leave Them Alone!

State of Mind


Sponsors

mississippi craft show 2013

We would like to acknowledge and thank our sponsors for their involvement in our community; belief in our vision; and their generous support of this project. Without their invaluable support we would still be dreaming, rather than doing. Please patronize our fine sponsors and thank them for their participation. We would also like to thank our supporters who are listed on our website; visit www.mscraftshow.com/sponsors.

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Membership eligibility limited to anyone who works, lives, attends school, worships or volunteers in Hinds, Rankin, Madison, Copiah, Simpson, Leake, or Northern Scott County in Mississippi. All Loans subject to credit approval. Some restrictions may apply.

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The

Mississippi CRAFT SHOW a promise kept

By Jess Delrie

T

he Mississippi Craft Show is in its second year of showcasing the talented works of this great state’s artisans. All items must be hand made by Mississippi residents. Long before the show came to fruition; a five-year-old girl had a dream to help homeless, abandoned, and abused animals. In a perfect world, she would create an animal sanctuary - a place where no animal would go hungry, or suffer and die in the elements. In the real world, she knew it would take an exorbitant amount of money. And while the dream never died, the battle for her life many years later would be the catalyst to helping many animals -- the four-legged AND the two-legged ones.”

waited in the back of her mind for “someday”. Someday may never come. But, she realized, she might have “today”. With intestinal fortitude and a refusal to give up, Miranda did beat the cancer and today remains cancer-free. Now it was time to fulfill her lifelong desire to help the animals, but how? Knowing that her dreams of a high-cost educational animal sanctuary would not come to be, she knew that she had to do something to give back to the homeless animals that she so greatly cared for.

Armed with an immense knowledge of craft shows, both as a vendor and behind the scenes, Mi As an adult, Miranda Jordan battled lymranda pounced on the opportunity to create a show for phoma, enduring eight months of painful chemotherapy. Mississippi artisans: an event our state had never known. Doctors declared her cancer-free, but six weeks later she “Why not have a show that focuses completely on Mississippi? learned the cancer was not gone. When additional, more Shop local, support each other! This creates a boost to the local intensive, rounds of chemotherapy failed, she had little economy as well as all the craftspeople. They are our neighchoice but to undergo a stem cell transplant. It was a bors, our brothers and sisters, our cousins and aunts. The comlast ditch effort to save her life. Sadly, it was unsuccess- munity can shop for quality items, instead of cheap imports. ful. They had exhausted all of their resources to keep We can feel good about supporting our own”, says Miranda. her alive, and there was noth- Her joy comes in seeing her fellow Mississippians enjoy ing more to do; she was told she themselves and showcase their unique crafts, while raiswould not live to see another ing money for the needs of homeless animals. The whole year. She began to think of all experience is immensely rewarding for her. the things she had wanted to do “It is a feeling of achievement to watch the hard with her life, and of her child- hood dreams. Dreams that had work and detailed planning of the craft show come together, and to be able to make that donation after all the hard work is done for the year. Each time it comes together, is successful, and people and animals benefit from it, I’m keeping a promise to myself. And I always keep my promises.”  Photos from the 2012 MS Craft Show by Miranda Jordan

Mississippi Craft Show www.mscraftshow.com /mscraftshow

AUGUST 2013 | Magnolia State of Mind

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Contents 5. A Promise kept 7. The Art of Life 8. Playing in the Mud 9. Junebug Art 10. Windham’s Woodworks 11. Art in Motion 12. Creations in Glass 12. Yazoo Toffee 13. Burlap Boutique 13. ScatterBrained 14. MS Craft Show Exhibitors 17. Connie’s Creations 18. One of a Kind 20. ARF Moving Forward 23. Rescue Stories 26. Discovering Diamonds 27. The Sherminator 28. Mississippi Majesties 29. Simply Stated Jewelry 30. DCZ Designs 31. Eye Candy 32. Naturally North 33. Pink and Blue, and Cute too! 34. MeMaws Cheese Straws 35. Harrison Hollow Designs 36. Audible Delight 38. Best Gifts Come in Small Packages 40. Shaw Pit Bull Rescue 41. Sara Gatlin Photography 42. MS Craft Show Exhibitors 43. MS Craft Show 2013 An electronic version of this magazine can be found online. Visit www.mscraftshow.com for information.

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Magnolia State of Mind | AUGUST 2013

Magnolia

State of Mind

AUGUST 2013

Magnolia State of Mind is the official companion magazine for the Mississippi Craft Show™ published by Mississippi Craft Show, LLC

EXECUTIVE EDITOR DESIGN & LAYOUT CONTRIBUTING WRITER Miranda Jordan CONTRIBUTING WRITERS EDITING & PROOFING Keith Armstrong Jess Delrie Lisa Leight Moni Troth Liz Walker

The Ms Craft Show™ And Magnolia State Of Mind Are Made Possible By The Hard Work And Dedication Of The Following People Who Share A Common Goal. Keith Armstrong April Mitchell Blackwell Jess Delrie Catherine Gunnell Gatlin Miranda Jordan Mandy Kate Myers Susan Britt Roubion Sandra Robinson Slawson Moni Troth Liz Walker

Dedicated in loving memory to all the animals we have loved, and for those we are yet to love.

ON THE COVER: Mississippi Artisan Montage Art by Miranda Jordan. Created with photos of art work from 2013 Mississippi Craft Show exhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Mississippi Craft Show LLC. All rights reserved. Magnolia State of Mind is the official companion magazine for the Mississippi Craft Show™ and is published by Mississippi Craft Show, LLC., PO Box 2291, Ridgeland, MS 39158. 601.790.0654. magnolia@mscraftshow.com. All materials contained in this magazine are protected by copyright law and may not be used without written permission of MS Craft Show, LLC or in the case of third part materials, the owner of that content. Mississippi Craft Show® and distinctive logo are trademarks owned by Mississippi Craft Show, LLC.

mscraftshow.com | magnoliastateofmind.com


THE ART of Life

By Jess Delrie

J

ackson artist Ken Daley is a creator of wonderful pieces of art. “My work is an explosion of color and emotion, indelibly making forever impressions onto the mind of the viewer,” he says. Drawing inspiration from his African-Caribbean roots, music, and life experiences, he explores his art through a wide variety of styles and materials. “Oil, acrylic, ceramic tiles, wood, nails and found materials; each spilling onto and infusing the other,” he reflects. The results are stunning.

Artwork by Ken Daly

Ken taught himself to paint, and to further his knowledge, attended three years of art school to acquire formal training. He enjoys working with acrylics most of all, and admires the work of various artists, including Van Gogh and Charley Palmer. Admiring the mastery of his craft, it’s obvious there is a tremendous amount of God-given-talent. To aspiring artists his advice is, “Continue to explore your artwork, take an art class, and never

Continue to explore your artwork, take an art class and never listen to any naysayers. listen to naysayers. Believe that God has a plan for you and that he will provide the resources and people to help you along the way to being an artist”. From as far back as he can remember Ken Daley was certain of one thing: he would live his life as an artist. He is living his dream and describes himself in these five words, “Art is what I am”. 

The Art of Ken Daley | Jackson Ken Daly ( 601-287-3243 * artofkendaley@gmail.com 8 www.kendaleyart.com

View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/kendaleyart

Artwork by Ken Daly

AUGUST 2013 | Magnolia State of Mind

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Playing

in t h e

Photo supplied by artist.

Mud

By Miranda Jordan

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has the very first pottery cup she made in class. “I thought it was amazing (then), but did not know it would shrink; it holds a whole 3.5 ounces!” The cup sits by her pottery wheel, a reminder of her pottery journey. “It is one of the first things I show to my pottery students, especially if their first mug is bigger.”

estled peacefully in the quiet hills of North Mississippi sits a delightful little pottery studio. The artisans in residence are the mother and daughter team of Lynn Barnwell and Rebecca McCalla. Rebecca’s children, Devin, Raven, and Riley, also lend a hand, making this a truly homegrown family business. Lynn, affectionately known as Mawmaw, and her daughter, Rebecca, started Hinkle Creek Pottery back in 1999 after attending a pottery class; they have been in love with clay ever since.

A self-described military brat, Lynn travelled the world before landing in Corinth, Mississippi. Originally intended as a temporary home while her husband served in Korea, they still reside there today, 32 years later. “We fell in love with Mississippi and are proud to call Corinth our home,” Lynn said. “It has been a great place to raise our family. Both my children and their spouses live within 3 miles of the studio, and all 5 of my grandchildren are around all the time,” she added. Prior to the pottery business, Lynn worked in the electrical supply industry, but the siren song of the clay could not be ignored, “I decided to quit my job to stay home and play in the “mud” and watch my grandchildren grow,” Lynn said. It was 1974 when Lynn bought her very first piece of pottery, a hanging planter with a macramé holder. “[I] could not afford it but had to have it. It sits in my showroom still.”, she said. Lynn also 8

Magnolia State of Mind | AUGUST 2013

Since being converted from a garage, the studio boasts double doors and windows to let in the natural light. The main area houses multiple pottery wheels, tools, and supplies, while the glazing room houses the kilns. “I can open the doors in the front and back and have natural air conditioning as it acts as an old-fashioned dog run, which my two dogs take full advantage of,” she explains. The studio’s canine advisors are Sarge, an Australian cattle dog, and his partner is Lola, a black lab. “Living in the country, all the strays seem to migrate to my door.”

Photo by Sa

ra Gatlin

The biggest challenge of the pottery business for Lynn is the critical timing. There is an optimum time for each step of the process which requires some juggling. “If handles need to be put on at midnight, you put them on at midnight,” she said. Lynn’s favorite time to work is after her husband “starts snoring in front of the TV at night, until about midnight.” The very best part of her work, however, is being in business with her daughter and working with her grandchildren. “That, and being able to work in


H

my pajamas.” she admits! inkle Creek Pottery focuses on functional pieces for everyday use for food service and storage, including dinnerware plates, bowls, mugs, bathroom sets, and more. Supporting the work of The Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary in Tupelo, Lynn has donated bowls to their annual Empty Bowls fund-raiser for the past 10 years.

Pottery is not just a business for Lynn; she takes great care and pride in her work, creating a lasting pieces of quality, functional art, designed to be passed from her hands to yours. “I hope when a customer buys one of our pots that they can feel the passion that went in to each item,” says Lynn, noting that in hard times people have more of an attachment to something created by hand than to a mass-produced item. “I guess it is because they have to limit what they spend and each purchase has to mean something,” she reasons. “I hope each piece of Hinkle Creek Pottery has a special meaning for the next recipient.” Hinkle Creek Pottery | Corinth Lynn Barnwell ( 662-462-8341 * hinklecreekpottery@frontier.com 8 www.hinklecreekpottery.com

The pottery studio, attached to Lynn’s home in a rural area of Alcorn County, Mississippi, lies just below the house on the east side. If you’re ever in the area, Lynn invites you to “Come see what we create just up the hill from the creek.”  View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/hinklecreek

Junebug Art

S

Photo Supplied by Artist

he is a lover of all animals, and her earliest childhood memory is playing outside with her numerous pets. So it shouldn’t have been a huge surprise when at the age of four, Julia Eves’s mom pulled back the top sheet of her bed and found a herd of galloping horses that she had drawn on the bottom sheet. Since that early discovery, Julia has become well known as a mixed media artisan, who uses vintage and reclaimed materials to create modern folk art. Some of her

By Jess Delrie

favorite themes include animals, mermaids, childhood memories, flowers, and birds.

“The hardest step in the creation process is getting started. I recently caught some beautiful sunfish that spoke to me in an innovative way. Other sources of joy and inspiration include bright red tomatoes and beautiful sunflowers planted by my own hands and watching nearby goats lounge on top of old, rusty cars. I enjoy the feeling of accomplishment that comes from planning and executing a piece of art.”  Junebug Art | Columbia Julia Eves ( 601-674-6789 * evesjulia12@yahoo.com View full profile at:

8 mscraftshow.com/junebugart

AUGUST 2013 | Magnolia State of Mind

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F

By Monique Troth

WOODWORKS

or most campers, when you’re in the woods and realize you didn’t bring a necessity, it may be time to panic. Not if you’re Steve Windham, of Brandon. “I have been working with wood for 48 years and counting! My dad got me started when I was about 9 years old. We would go camping and never take a cooking spoon because we would make them at the camp.” Years later, Steve began wood-turning and making furniture. Windham’s Woodworks is a collection of wooden art that is beautiful and useful, focusing on furniture, fine art pieces, and cooking spoons.

When it comes to his favorite pieces, the “bizarre series” dominates. Steve remembers, “There was a little face carving I did when I was a kid, and recently, I created a piece of furniture that was 80” high and 24” wide. Made of cherry, with glass doors and dove tail drawers, it had eagle claw feet and was fun to work on.” He goes on to describe how, in 2008, he turned a piece to get people to notice his work. Aptly named the Southwestern Eye Catcher, it is an urn of southwestern design with an opening in the front, filled with eye balls. Like many creative souls, Windham doesn’t really describe himself as having a particular style, but likes to create “whatever comes”. He designs around the size of wood that he has on hand, and prefers wood because there are so many beautiful types. He has been influenced by (and doesn’t mind being compared to) Thomas Benton, Rick Anderson, and David Nagel. So, what are his goals for the future? “Build a rocker for my wife, Ella, and die happy”. 

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Magnolia State of Mind | AUGUST 2013

Windham’s Woodworks | Brandon Steve Windham ( 601-862-8615 * steve@windhamswoodworks.com 8 www.windhamswoodworks.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/windhamswood

Photo by Miranda Jordan

Windham's


Born in San Francisco and raised in Los Angeles, Carolyn was a professional outdoor skater in the 70’s and 80’s. She specialized in a technique known as side surfing, and skated for Pepsi at one time. Later, she was a professional kite flyer for 13 years, travelling the world as an individual, and team member, performing shows and demonstrations. Upon her husband‘s military retire-

ment in 2008, they settled in Natchez, and Carolyn began showcasing her jewelry creations at craft shows. She created a necklace for a friend who commented that it “was kind of kinetic”. Upon researching the term she became fascinated, and unleashed her creativity and talent. In 2009 the concept of creating mobiles with original watercolor paintings was born, yet she had never picked up a paint brush. A mini-grant from the Mississippi Arts Commission allowed her to enroll in watercolor classes, focusing on color theory and the technical aspects of using watercolor on paper. “Craftsmanship is integral to my work. It is really important to me to create quality art that is unique to my own style and will stand the test of

Photo Supplied by Artist

L

ong known for it’s unique place in the history of Mississippi, Natchez is becoming known as the home to another history in the making, Skysetter Designs. As the owner and artist of Skysetter, Carolyn Weir’s journey is as fascinating as her craft.

ART IN M o t i o n By Liz Walker

time,” says Carolyn.

Photo Supplied by Artist

Finding her work unique and innovative, the Lincoln Center Theatre in New York asked her to create a custom mobile for a theatrical performance. Carolyn says her favorite piece of work, is a 7 ft. wide mobile comprised of 14 original abstract water color paintings, and her dream project is to create a 100 mobile sculpture for the atrium of a museum. Skysetter Designs | Natchez Carolyn Weir (601-870-7717 * skysetter@skysetter.com 8 www.skysetter.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/skysetter

“Get an education that enhances and builds your craft or art skills. If you are creative and have some original ideas, go for it! It is true…if you love what you do, you will never work another day in your life!” she commented.

Skysetter Designs specializes in custom, hand painted, kinetic mobile sculptures to match your home or décor. Her original designs are spontaneous, and will last a lifetime - or beyond. Carolyn is currently working on a line of wood mobiles, utilizing wood that was harvested from a red cedar tree on her own Natchez property a few years ago. She is also developing a line of mobiles for the porch or garden. This amazing Mississippi artist is truly gifted!

AUGUST 2013 | Magnolia State of Mind

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CREATIONS IN GLASS

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Photo by Miranda Jordan

Creations in Glass | Bogue Chitto Jeri Smith (601-734-2923 * jjsmith480@bellsouth.net

By Jess Delrie

or Jeri Ann Smith of Bogue Chitto, it all started with taking a class. That first, simple stained glass panel burst into her own venture known as Creations in Glass. “When designing a piece, I really enjoy the process of choosing the glass. I like to use wire, glass paint, nuggets, and whatever else to bring my design to life. From the inspiration to the completion, I handle each piece of glass so many times that I feel we have a personal relationship. It’s great knowing that a little piece of me is in each one and they will be around long after I’m gone.”

J

eri has had a lifelong love of arts and crafts, and as a teenager, she sewed her own clothes using her grandmother’s treadle sewing machine. She has infused her love of stained glass into her 10 grandchildren, and spends as much time as possible with them. She and her husband, John, enjoy riding their Harley and cuddling with Lula Belle, the beloved pot-bellied house pig.  View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/creationsinglass

YAZOO TOFFEE Co. By Monique Troth

Yazoo Toffee Co., LLC | Yazoo City Terry Vandevere ( 662-571-1032 * yazootoffee@yahoo.com

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Magnolia State of Mind | AUGUST 2013

Photo by Miranda Jordan

If you are travelling through Yazoo City and your nose catches an amazing aroma in the air, you may be passing Yazoo Toffee Company, LLC. The mother/daughter duo of Terry Vandevere and Brittany Ketchum are the creators and owners and tell us the new business started out as “just another item” in their local booth space. “Brittany wanted to add something different, and after tossing around a variety of ideas, we eventually came up with toffee.” They started with the original recipe of Terry’s mother (Brittany’s grandmother), and came up with a version they really liked, after refining it through many trial and error batches. The delicious toffee was added to their booth in November 2011 and became an instant hit. So much so, that although these two industrious women already worked full-time jobs, their first December in business brought many long nights of cooking and wrapping to keep up with the demand. With the holidays successfully behind them, they realized it was time to get their license and an approved commercial kitchen. In April 2012, they were ready to start marketing, and attended their first Mississippi Market Show. We are happy to say that their customer base has been expanding ever since.  View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/yazootoffee


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By Jess Delrie

orn and raised in West Virginia, April Rigsby of Burlap Boutique is a recent transplant to Mississippi. Here since March, she finds time to craft in between raising her young son and playing the part of taxi driver/stay at home mom. Her drive to craft started as a young girl on her grandparents’ farm in West Virginia, where she made Christmas ornaments from the barbed wire her grandparents used. Now she sells her crafts at local craft shows and festivals and hopes to open her own store sometime soon.

April describes herself as resourceful, efficient, organized, creative, and sentimental, these attributes come across in her art. Inspired by farm, family, and life, she uses old farm pieces to create her work. April is currently working on her Spring/Summer line of work that includes bees, garden décor, and burlap items. 

Burlap Boutique

Burlap Boutique | Brandon April Rigsby ( 304 921-6134 * info@burlapboutique.biz 8 www.burlapboutique.biz

What does

Mississippi mean to you?

“M

ississippi is the unexpected warmth in January, the prayed-for rain in July, the glow of azaleas in the spring, the burgundy sweet gums of autumn, the bullfrogs’ song, a cold glass of sweet tea, corn bread hot from the skillet, laughter and tears shared around a table, children’s bare feet stained green in the summer, the ping of peas shelled into a pan, honeysuckle thick and strong, slapping mosquitoes on the porch, the perfume of fresh cut hay.... Mississippi is home.” -- Beth Barnhill Goodin Louisville, MS

“Rich history, friendly, and caring!”

View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/burlapboutique

--Debra East Canoy Baker Florence, MS

ScatterBrained Collars

F Photo by Miranda Jordan

n

ScatterBrained | Southaven Jordan Clark (901-334-7144 * ScatterBrainedCollars@gmail.com 8 www.ScatterBrainedCollars.com

By Monique Troth

She is living proof that tiny thoughts give birth to some ingenious products. After taking her very first sewing class, Jordan Clark’s craft was born “on a whim”. “I made some collars for my two Pit bull mixes and posted a picture of them playing in the yard, without giving it any thought. I received my first ‘order’ the next day and Scatter Brained Collars was in business!” Jordan makes all of her pet accessories, all the way down to choosing the materials to be used, and she has never worked from a pattern. Jordan is a self-proclaimed sewing/fabric addict who will put off everything else to make a new pet accessory when a wonderful fabric inspires her. She says, “I like to make products affordable for anyone who likes to spoil their fur babies.” She is currently making collars from donated ties and shirts for a Boxer rescue, and donates as much as she can to local shelters. Hoping to encourage future generations of creative people, she shares the best advice she ever received. “Step out of your own box and try something new. It opens up new doors and ways for you to create things. If it is your passion, and you love to do it, don’t listen to what others say. Always believe in yourself.”  View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/scatterbrained

AUGUST 2013 | Magnolia State of Mind

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M i ss i ss i pp i C r a f t S h o w E x h i b i t o r s 2 0 1 3

Jewelry by Jamie Lyn ( 662-378-6371 8 View full profile at:

Bekart Studios ( 901-230-7911 8 View full profile at:

mscraftshow.com/jamielyn

mscraftshow.com/smmosaics

JH Artwear & Designs

mscraftshow.com/jhartwear

mscraftshow.com/janicedowns

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Paintin’ Divas ( 662-401-6407 8 View full profile at:

Painted Oyster

mscraftshow.com/artbychelle

7 ( 662-415-8378 8 View full profile at:

( 662-588-3830 8 View full profile at:

4 ( 601-672-8520 8 View full profile at:

Janice’s Upcycled Vintage

mscraftshow.com/bekartstudio

Simply “More” Mosaics

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2

1

( 601-259-4215 8 View full profile at:

mscraftshow.com/paintedoyster

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8

Baxter & Me ( 662-872-0616 8 View full profile at:

The Muddy Mushroom

mscraftshow.com/baxterandme

( 662-453-6127 8 View full profile at:

mscraftshow.com/mudshroom


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Jamie Brewer

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Rebecca Cupples

Greenville

Jackson

Janice Downs Indianola

Jamie, a stay at home mother with 2 children, has a passion for making Jewelry. Believing that a woman’s choice of personal adornment provides a window into her personality, Jamie makes unique and custom pieces which appeal to a broad audience with diverse tastes. Her items are made with genuine crystals and beads of all colors. Jewelry by Jamie Lyn offers stylish designs with sparkle and shine that are sure to make an impression.

Rebecca Cupples, from Bekart Studio in Jackson, Mississippi, produces handmade and hand-painted throw pillows and tote bags as well as acrylic and watercolor paintings on both canvas and paper. The subject of her paintings include such things as landscapes, cityscapes, tropical scenes, and more. Rebecca also offers realistic and detailed pet portraits for animal lovers who wish to preserve the memory of their beloved companions.

Janice Downs hails from the Mississippi Delta. Bringing the treasures of yesterday into the hearts of today by upcycling vintage jewelry into one of a kind rings, earrings, necklaces, and bracelets. Janice loves going to estate sales, yard sales, and flea markets in search of vintage jewelry. Taking unwanted pieces and reworking them into her unique handcrafted jewelry designs, she brings these vintage pieces to life once more.

* jamiebrewer81@yahoo.com

* bc@bekartstudio.com

* janice.downs@yahoo.com

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Susan Farris

Michelle Goolsby

Brandon

Belden

Caroline Hobbs Madison

Susan Farris of Simply “More” Mosaics in Brandon, Mississippi, uses hand-cut glass tile, each piece placed on natural stone to create simply “more” mosaics. Crafted with love and care, the pieces are individually hand- cut with careful attention and placed on natural stone which creates an individual awareness on its own. These little works of art are perfect as gifts or simply for your own enjoyment.

A self-taught mixed media artist, Michelle had been painting, off & on, for years. After losing her best friend of 23 years, Tommie Sue, to breast cancer, she picked up the brush once again. Michelle credits her friend, a constant source of encourangement, as the reason she is able to continue developing her art. Many of Michelle’s pieces contain reminders of her cherished friend. Butterflies, birds, best friend sayings, all pay homage to the friendship they shared.

Caroline Hobbs, from Madison, Mississippi, is devoted to recycling clothing into fun, creative clothes that women of all ages can wear and enjoy! Caroline operates Painted Oyster, offering original, contemporary women’s and children’s upcycled clothing. From sundresses to totes, the entire line is made from upcycled menswear and vintage fabrics that are donated to her or come from local charity thrift stores.

* farris135@gmail.com

* michelle@paintindivas.com

* paintedoyster@yahoo.com

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Jessica Humphreys Corinth

Channing Lewis Corinth

Susan Sheridan Greenwood

Specializing in handcrafted wire and mixed-metal jewelry, vintageinspired fabric accessories, and whimsical canvas artwork - mainly acrylic-based - Jessica creates all items by hand, crafted with materials that are carefully hand picked and designed. Jessica paints on both wood and canvas. Her artwork can be described as whimsical and inspirational, interweaving movement and color. Within the designs she often includes inspirational, up-beat sayings within the piece.

Channing Lewis of Baxter & Me, located in Corinth, Mississippi, offers unique art items and gifts. Specializing in reclaimed wood artwork, including painted windows, painted barn wood, cabinets, etc. Included in her collection you will find inspirational artwork and more. Her work is vibrant, colorful, and cheerful. You will find Channing and Jessica, of JH Artwear & Designs together at the MS Craft Show as they often display their wares together.

Susan Sheridan, from Greenwood, Mississippi, produces stoneware pottery at The Muddy Mushroom Pottery in Greenwood, Mississippi. Susan’s main focus is to produce unique, functional stoneware items with nature overtones. Her work includes items such as mugs, platters, bowls, and trays using food-safe glazes. In addition to her functional ware, she also creates sculptures of angels, birds, frogs, turtles, and Nativity sets.

* jhartwearanddesigns@gmail.com

* shopbaxterandme@gmail.com

* themuddymushroom@yahoo.com


MISSISSIPPI CRAFT SHOW EXHIBITORS 2013

Corinth

Madison

Brandon

Carriere

2-DYE-4

Musee Bath

WYNE CHYME

Jonah’s Sign

Lauren Autin

Libby Bradberry

( 601-876-4274

( 769-300-0485 * lauren2dye4@yahoo.com * info@museebath.com 8 Full profile at: 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/2dye4 mscraftshow.com/musee

Hattiesburg

Sassy Paisley Janet Lashley

( 601-434-6919

* sassypaisley@gmail.com 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/sassy

Scott Davidson

( 601-259-1857

* jsdavid1@bellsouth.net 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/wyne

Jackson

Angelic Artwork

Matrick Frames

Bangles & Baubles

Angel Martin

( 601-310-7363

* artangelicm123@aol.com 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/angelic

Pam Matrick

( 601-942-9720

* pam@matrickframes.com 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/matrick

Brandon

Two Peas In A Pod

Kristie Seal

Jewelry By Randy

* rvstwopeas@aol.com 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/twopeas

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* jonahssign@aol.com 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/jonahs

Brandon

Carriere

( 601-259-8554

( 601-590-0956

Starkville

Madison

Jessica Rives

Don Holland

Kristie Seal

( 601-347-8285

* kristeeseal@yahoo.com 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/tstees

Magnolia State of Mind | AUGUST 2013

Randy Walker

( 601-613-0581

* wiretwister7@aol.com 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/randyw

Betty Ramsey

( 601-506-1982

* delta12339@aol.com 8 Full profile at: mscraftshow.com/ramsey


Connie’s Creations Photos Supp lie

d by Artist

When Hurricane Katrina tore through Mississippi, countless homes were obliterated. One of those destroyed in that devastating storm was the home of Connie Bowman’s mother. By Miranda Jordan In the true sense of “finding the silver lining,” Connie counted it as a blessing that her mother subsequently moved in with her family.

charging the huge prices found in most retail stores,” Connie said. Connie recalls the first time she made soap; although she enjoyed that initial experience, it was when she tried the Cold Process of soap making (from scratch) that she knew she was hooked! After mastering soap, she then learned to make lotions and scrubs. Completely self-taught, she would spend hours researching methods and supplies.

Connie was always partial to bath and body products, but found quality lacking and the prices often too high. In response to this, Connie began to research how to make her own bath and body products. It wasn’t long before she was using her friends, family and, neighbors as product testers. As Connie continued to develop more products, her “product testers” began asking to purchase them as gifts for others; and so, Connie’s Creations was born. When Connie’s mother’s health began to deteriorate, Connie quit her teaching job to be where she was most needed. This also provided the opportunity to focus on her new business. Connie’s mother often sat with her while she worked, constantly reminding her that she could do anything she put her mind to.

Connie’s Creations | Petal Connie Bowman ( 601-606-8874 * conniescreationsonline@yahoo.com 8 www.conniescreationsonline.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/conniescreations

In 2009 Connie’s mother, aged 81, suddenly passed away. At first Connie’s grief prevented her from continuing on, but soon she realized that her biggest cheerleader, the one who always told her she could do anything, would always be there, cheering her on. So, with her mother’s lasting words echoing in her mind, and determined to prove her right, Connie continued. Connie’s Creations offers handmade bath and body products and hand poured soy candles. “I believe in providing good quality without

Connie tries to educate people about bath and body products, so they will understand what they are buying. For example, the typical store-bought soap contains more detergent than any other ingredient. “It cleans but it also dries,” she explains. “The [products] that advertise they don’t leave a ring in your tub are the ones that have the most detergent. They also strip the natural oils from your skin. My soap is a natural product that will leave your skin feeling clean and moisturized, not dried out. I think the product speaks for itself: once someone uses handmade soap vs. store-bought they will know which is better for their skin.” Months of trial and error and testing goes into Connie’s creative process, where patience is definitely a requirement. “It’s a challenge for me to wait for soap to be ready [as] it takes 6 weeks or more to cure, and I get so impatient waiting for it to be done. I always slice it as soon as I possibly can because I love to see what each bar will look like.” Connie attributes her success and dedicates her business to her mother, whom she misses dreadfully. “When I work, I feel her there with me still cheering me on.” 

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One of a

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Photo by Miranda Jordan

Kind By Liz Walker

o you remember the last time you met someone you will never forget? The last person that made you “lean in” during a conversation so you wouldn’t miss a word? The last person that made your brain do cardio, and you were happy about it? I do. I remember. It was the day I met her…

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Randam Art, LLC | Ridgeland Miranda Jordan ( 601-208-0880 * saygday@randam-art.com 8 www.randam-art.com www.handmadegifts.us View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/randamart

iranda Jordan grew up on her grandparent’s farm in Tasmania, Australia, where her artistic ingenuity blossomed.

“I was born with an innate love of, and fascination for, color! As a young girl, I learned about primary colors, and knew precisely how to create secondary colors using the liquid magic tucked away in my grandmother’s baking cupboard. I can still picture the cupboard that held the food dye, and the green step stool I used to drag to it in order to reach them. I’d play with that amazing stuff for hours, filling several glasses with water and watching as each droplet of dye hit the water. One by one, they instantly formed a tiny abstract work of art as it broke through the surface before dissipating, turning it from clear into a beautiful shade of some delightful transparency. I was also especially fond of the pretty colored foils and cellophane my grandmother’s Quality

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Magnolia State of Mind | AUGUST 2013

Photo by Miranda Jordan


Street chocolates were wrapped in. I used to love looking through the transparent pieces and seeing how the world looked bathed in each color. I glued them onto pictures and paintings, and I guess that means I have always been interested in mixed media!”

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s an inventive and introspective 13-year-old girl, she chose the name “Randam Art” for her extensive line of original, one-of-a kind, painted Art on Glass, Specialty Jewelry, and numerous other flights of fancy. “I love so many things, so many mediums, and so many colors (ergo ‘random’), and chose an anagram of my first name, making it Randam, with an ‘a’. The “I”, I concluded, was that part of myself I put into every piece I create. It made sense then, and essentially it still suits. Randam Art’s purpose has basically stayed the same: to create

was breathtaking, as well. It completely enthralled me, and I could have stared at it for days. I imagined Michelangelo suspended upon his scaffold, working an inch at a time, to complete the entire image that his mind held. It took him 5 years to complete it, and he was truly a magnificent artist.” When it comes to her own craft, she approaches her designs with reckless abandon, optimism, and trust. “I trust that whatever is in my mind will find its way out in the manner that it was

cars. She can recite the alphabet backwards. Oh, and she’s a cancer survivor.

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he also has an intense love for animals. “My fur-kids are my world, and they come first. It is my sweet responsibility to care for them, a promise I have made, and they rely on me to keep that promise. In return they offer completely unconditional love and devotion, and unless you have had that kind of bond with an animal you won’t understand what I mean. If you have experienced it, you will know why there are no words to describe it.” She works tirelessly with numer-

“I was born with an innate love of, and fascination for, color! fun, colorful, and captivating creations to ignite your imagination!”

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iranda is an admirer of the works of Van Gogh but vividly recalls an unforgettable trip to Italy to see Michelangelo’s work. “The statue of David is amazing,” she says. “The detail is stunning, impeccable, and I lost track of time as I stared at every detail, down to the veins in his hands. The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel

supposed to. My mantra is if I enjoy creating it, then it is what it was supposed to be.” And at the very essence of this exceptional woman, there is an innate appreciation for all creations. “My favorite pieces of painted glassware are the damaged ones that I have kept,” she says. “I won’t sell them damaged, but I don’t throw them away either. I keep them as a reminder that there is still beauty and value in something that has imperfections.”

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t should come as no surprise that this fearless female is much diversified. She loves music, her husband, music, photography, music, travel, and reading. I have never known anyone who loves tea more than she does. Did I mention she loves music? She has always wanted to race

ous rescue organizations in various capacities. “Animal charities and no-kill shelters are dear to my heart. Animal lovers are my kind of people, and my goal is to someday be the person my pets believe I am.” Her desire is to contribute to finding loving, forever homes for animals that have been lost, abandoned, rescued, or surrendered. Some have been abused, neglected, and scarred. And just like her painted glassware that has been damaged but lovingly kept, she knows there is always something to treasure in the imperfections. 

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ARF Moving Forward

Helping the community one life at a time The By Lisa Leight

Mississippi Craft Show and Animal Rescue Fund of Mississippi is a match made in heaven as ultimately the messages are the same: think global, act local and help support this wonderful community of ours. It can be frustrating when the only stories from Mississippi that make the national news are negative, when we know that there are so many fantastic things right here, but sadly overlooked. The MS Craft Show is showcasing the extraordinary talent of local artists and the work done at the Miriam Wilson Weems Kennel run by ARF of MS; the focus being educating the community about responsible pet ownership.

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ow, I am not originally from Mississippi, nor was I involved in the start up of ARF but have been lured into both by the friendliness, genuine personalities and quiet beauty that is Mississippi. Last year dur-

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ing the St Paddy’s Day festivities in downtown Jackson, I was strolling through the lovely Art Garden at the Mississippi Museum of Art with my husband and then two year old daughter, when we saw several smiling faces walking up, with an adorable prancing puppy. We were not there to look at dogs and had actually never even heard of ARF. We could not take our eyes off of the puppy and made our way over to them. A happy, energetic pup, full of life and spark in her eyes, pranced around us and gently played with my daughter. She was definitely not some unsocialized “shelter” dog. I started to talk to them and found out more about this rescue group. We of course adopted Lucy

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who is one of the best dogs I’ve ever had. Through the summer I started to volunteer with ARF, doing everything from walking dogs at the shelter, to helping out with events.

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he more I learned about ARF the more I fell in love and knew that I had to be a part of this organization and this group of amazing people. I now help out with events, act as administrator for their Facebook page and I am a member of the board. The genuine kindness, compassion, generosity and intelligence of this group sets it apart from any other, and I know great things are in store for ARF in the future.

Intro & Mission

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he Miriam Wilson Weems Sanctuary operated by the Animal Rescue Fund of Mississippi, more commonly known as


ARF, is a haven for rescued animals. It is the mission of ARF to provide shelter and sanctuary to abandoned, abused and neglected companion animals awaiting adoption in Mississippi, focusing on the metropolitan tri-county area. Once an animal is rescued and brought in, the real work starts. ARF is not just a warehouse to keep the animals, but a true home before their “furever” home is found. The overall wellbeing of each animal is looked after, not just making sure they are fed, watered, and housed. Each animal is an individual whose individual needs are met through an array of care done at a high standard that we hope will soon become the new standard. The vision of Elizabeth Jackson is an enormous one, but it is a vision that through great support has started to take shape. So much has been done, but so much more is still in the works. Of course it has always been work. There have been lows and highs, but always work. Hard, blood-sweat-tears kind of work but oh so rewarding.

History

ARF

was formed in 2005 by Elizabeth (Pippa) Jackson through her driving passion to provide safe rescue, shelter, rehabilitation and adoption for the Jackson metropolitan area homeless dogs and cats. She found like-minded individuals willing and wishing to help in her endeavors and the Animal Rescue Fund of MS was formed: a no-kill animal rescue organization. Shortly thereafter, Hurricane Katrina hit and Pippa was “baptized by fire” in animal rescue work with the United Animal Nations’ Emergency Animal Rescue Service program (EARS) at the Mississippi State Fairgrounds shelter. When this national organization discovered Ms. Jackson’s passion and talent for working with these animals, EARS endorsed ARF and invaluably assisted in her start-up education of rescue and sheltering.

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n October 2005, ARF assumed the care for approximately 35 dogs and 2 birds that came from the Waveland, MS shelter with the approval of the State Board of Animal Health. This was the beginning of a phoenix rising from the ashes of the destruction and heartbreak of that terrible disaster. Providing a ray of hope for a brighter tomorrow for these animals, Pippa, with the assistance

1000. With the new location, the awareness of our organization and mission has already grown and ARF’s adoptions have increased. The number of neglected and hree years later ARF purchased 22 acres unwanted companion animals is very high. in Rankin County for their facility. The abundance of these lost souls needs to They had originally chosen Rankin County be addressed. Every animal’s life has value, because it had no private shelter/rescue oreach dog and cat is a unique, irreplaceable ganization. They hoped that by becoming creature of God with needs and feelings. part of the community, they could provide The fact that most are healthy and affectionpositive change for the animals and the citiof a few friends and family, began the arduous task of helping these poor survivors regain strength and trust.

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Left: Front of the Miriam Wilson Weems Kennel operated by Animal Rescue Fund of Mississippi. ARF’s new building on Mayes Street, Jackson, Mississippi. Above: Inside the new building. Funds are needed to continue to build the permanent enclosures and other much needed renovations. zens of Rankin County. However, attitudes changed and they were pressured to leave. This could have ended ARF but instead it brought strength and optimism. In a very short amount of time and with almost no money, a new property was found and ARF’s future became even brighter. All of the stress and turmoil from having to relocate was a blessing in disguise. The new ARF property in Jackson, MS is a much better location and provides greater ease of access on many levels. This property allows for uninterrupted operation of our mission along with providing a safe and welcoming atmosphere for visitors, volunteers, employees and rescues.

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ate when they die (in kill shelters, on the streets or from abuse or neglect) makes their death all the more unnecessary and poignant. Such is the seemingly never-ending tragedy and heart wrenching reality of the companion animal overpopulation crisis. ARF strives to create a shift in knowledge, attitude and resources we hope to end this crisis and better the community.

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oday ARF operates the Miriam Weems Sanctuary, currently caring for over 350 dogs and 50 cats awaiting adoption. There are some awesome things going on right now that set ARF apart and make it unique. One that we are really proud of is our Military Boarding Program. People being deployed can board their pet with ARF for as long as they need to, free of charge. Instead of having to find someone to take their pet or surrender them to a shelter we take and care for them. While they are away serving our country they can rest assured that their pet is being cared for

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hrough a short 8 years, Animal Rescue Fund of MS has achieved many great accomplishments; from coming to the aid of a community in need during a crisis to taking on each rescue on an individual basis and saving one life at a time. ARF has adopted out more than 700 dogs and cats and has rescued more than

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in a safe environment and will be there waiting for them. Another new feature at ARF is the play yard. A large grassy fenced area for dogs to run, play or even take a cool dip in a kiddy pool! This yard also serves as a place for adoptive families to visit with and get to know dogs they may add to

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a with Buddy’s Buddies to get some of the dogs trained as therapy dogs. Another plan for ARF that has already started to take shape is just the layout of the facility and opportunities for the ani-

The next big project is our puppy space. It is a room in the back, separated from everyone else, which will have individual kennels and a puppy play yard with runs, separate from the rest. This is good for the puppies because it provides a place that they can be safe, isolated from anything, possible ill-

very animal’s life has value, each dog and cat is a unique, irreplaceable creature of God with needs and feelings.

their family.

mals within. For the overall well-being of the animals here are many long there are sections for senior range plans for the fadogs, puppies, kittens, adocility. When one plan is lescent cats, adult cats and so completed, another begins. on. ARF is part of the MP3 Soon ARF hopes to increase community involvement project for shelters. The with responsible pet own- MP3 program is done by ership programs including: playing a set list of calming therapy dog training, agil- music at set times throughity course training, behav- out the entire building. ioral/obedience courses This helps lower stress levand assistance with spay/ els, provides a calmer, hapneuter programs. ARF has pier atmosphere and helps already started working in developmental learning.

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ness and help in their development through socializing and play.

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f you are interested in adopting, fostering, volunteering, or info on upcoming events, you can visit our website www.arfms.org or join us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/ arfms. Donations can be made on our website and or at http://www.globalgiving. org/projects/give-me-shelter/ 

Reese

was rescued as a pup and put in one of ARF’s awesome foster homes. He had been with them for a while when one day they noticed how quick he started picking up on hand signals. He was one smart pup! Soon after that they were at an adoption event when in comes a man and his daughter, not looking for a dog though. Of course fate had other plans and they were instantly drawn to him. Reese found his ‘furever’ home and that home happened to be of the Brandon Nursing Home’s activity director. Reese was brought to work and it was a match made in heaven! He is so smart, so compassionate and destined to fulfill this job. He now has his very own office and even an expense account! We always see the potential in our dogs but it’s superb when others do as well and turn that potential into a reality and give back to the community. 

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ANIMAL RESCUE FUND

Stories Bare BOB

It is amazing what a little bit of love and medicine can do for a dog. In 2009 he was a puppy living on the streets. He had mange, was full of worms and no one wanted to even touch him he looked so bad. Bob didn’t let that get to him though, and he continued to try to find some caring person to help him. That caring person came along, our wonderful volunteer Kim saw him, called us crying asking if we could help. We all thought he was going to have to be put down he was in such dreadful shape, but again Bob didn’t let that get to him. He was determined to live and love. When we got him to the vet he said one more day on the streets and he would have been dead from starvation. Now, Bob is no longer bare, is healthy, loving and looking for a home that will truly appreciate him for his survivorship and will never allow him to be forgotten or mistreated again. 

Bob Before

Bob Now

Tucker

was found tied to the gate of ARF one morning.

His

be-

fore picture is actually one week after we already had him. Through nothing more than the care and love of ARF workers and volunteers Tucker looks like a completely different dog! He is so sweet and loving. By the looks of him now you would never be able to guess his past. It is amazing what the right kind of care can do!  Tucker After

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ANIMAL RESCUE FUND

Stories By Lisa Leight

Maybelle

is an extremely sweet pit mix who came to us in September of 2012 in absolutely horrific shape. She was in some of the worst shape that ARF had ever rescued a dog in. The very first pictures of her are too graphic to even show. It took us several days to capture this emaciated dog and we were not sure if she would make it. She was extremely sick and weighted in at a mere 32 pounds when she should have weighted about 75 pounds. The poor dear had pressure wounds on her where there was no muscle or fat to protect her skin, which then got infected. She was extremely weak from anemia and starvation. When she was taken to the vet she collapsed on the floor with her last bit of energy. However, thanks to a strong willed pup, wonderful love and care, and great donations from our supporters, we were able to get this dog the help she needed She is a laid back girl that simply wants to explore her surroundings. A favorite of many of the staff and volunteers, she loves spending time in the play yard and going out on walks. She loves people and prefers to hang out with people and just get loved on. At 5-8 years old, she still has many years to ahead of her- but it is also her age, coupled with her breed, that makes us wonder if her perfect family will ever come and find her. If they do, they will truly have an amazing friend and forever smiley companion.  After

After

Before

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Before

After

After he attitude about dogs needs to change. It happens much too often that people are “done” with a dog and either let it loose or worse, throw it away like the daily trash. Someone not only put this poor pup in the trash, but put him in a cage then in the trash, with no hope of survival. Luckily someone spotted him, called ARF and we rescued him. He had a badly broken leg, bite marks and scars all over and was severely malnourished. He was so skinny and weak that he could barely walk or hold himself up. Despite all that, he is an amazing dog. , the name he earned because every time he saw someone his tail would start thumping like crazy. He has always been as friendly and sweet as can be. He was taken to the vet, checked out then put in a foster home. Even while he had his cast on, he was still a bouncy, happy pup. The cast never slowed him down once! The love that this little dog has to give, especially considering everything he went through is just heartwarming. He is extremely intelligent, great with other dogs and loves kids. He is a friendly and well behaved dog that is just looking for that special someone to find his forever home. 

Thumper

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Adopt One. Rescue One. When you adopt a shelter pet you help to save two lives: the one you bring home and the one who takes its place. Contact your local animal rescue today!

What does

Mississippi mean to you?

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ississippi is where folks can relax beneath mammoth oaks pondering the past and guessing the future with a glass of lemonade in one hand and a funeral home fan in the other. Mississippi is where one contemplates the profoundness of a name beginning with M and followed by i’s, crooked letters and humpbacks. Mississippi is where one is never far from friend or kin and sweet tea and cornbread are a delicacy. Mississippi is where when ones days have ended the soil envelops them as a warm blanket beneath which they sleep the long sleep.” -- Rick Algood.

w o n K u o Y d i D this about Dogs. & Cats?

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A dog’s normal temperature is between 101 and 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit. The normal body temperature of a cat is between 100.5 ° and 102.5 °F. A cat is sick if its temperature goes below 100 ° or above 103 °F.. Small quantities of grapes and raisins can cause renal failure in dogs. Chocolate, macadamia nuts, cooked onions, or anything with caffeine can also be harmful.. Foods that should not be given to cats include onions, garlic, green tomatoes, raw potatoes, chocolate, grapes, and raisins. Though milk is not toxic, it can cause an upset stomach and gas. Tylenol and aspirin are extremely toxic to cats, as are many common houseplants..

From Louisville, MS

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Discovering

Diamonds By Lisa Leight

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or several years Diamond had a great life. She had a home, a yard and the most important thing in a dog’s life: a person that loved her with all of his heart. One day, Diamond’s dad left the house to go to the grocery story. When an hour turned into two, and two into three, Diamond must have realized something was wrong... after all, her dad never took this long to bring her a treat. That night, Diamond slept alone in the backyard, patiently waiting for her dad to return from the grocery store. Her dad never came home that night. On his way to the grocery store he was in a horrific car accident which sent him straight to the hospital. Much to Diamond’s relief, her dad survived the accident, but suffered damage that would ultimately make for a very long, painful, recovery.

was longing to be back at her house with her dad. We made sure she was comfortable at the shelter, continued to tell her that, one day, everything would be OK again.

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eanwhile, Diamond’s dad was struggling to recuperate. From the hospital he moved to a nursing home, where he could learn how to deal with his disability and eventually return home. We frequently sought updates on his progress, but from the small amount of information we received from the nursing home, we knew that is wasn’t going well. He was sad, alone, unable to share his burden with anyone else. He had no one to cheer him on as he made progress, or to sit and talk with him. All he had was Diamond and he fought on because he knew

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ANIMAL RESCUE FUND

Stories With no family, no wife and no kids, this man had only one thing he really worried about: Diamond. In the following months, through the kindness of neighbors, Diamond was looked after and fed. Diamond wanted to stay in her backyard, sleeping there at night, perhaps confused as to why her dad had still not come home. When the weather turned cold, the neighbors knew Diamond could no longer stay outside. That’s when Ashley Hill of Lucky Dog stepped in and agreed to take in Diamond. It was Diamond’s story that connected Pippa and Ashley, the solemn foundation to their long lasting friendship. With that, Diamond made the trip to Jackson, Mississippi to stay at ARF until her dad recovered. Diamond was happy in her new environment, but behind those sweet eyes and the friendly disposition you could tell that she 26

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his dog was waiting on him. But his lack of progress made it more and more likely that he would never see her again.

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bout a year after the accident, we were serendipitously presented with an opportunity to test several of the ARF rescue dogs to become therapy dogs for nursing homes. We couldn’t believe the coincidence, and immediately had Diamond tested. Her scores were off the charts and a plan was hatched. We decided to place Diamond in this training program with the goal of surprising Diamond’s dad at his nursing home; if he couldn’t return home to see his dog, we were going to bring his dog to him. Three weeks into our plan, we received heart-wrenching news about Diamond’s dad from the nursing home: he had died. He had passed at the far-too-

young age of 42, just weeks away from Diamond completing her training and surprising him with a visit.

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write this story and cry. I cry because I wonder if he died of a broken heart. I wonder if knowing Diamond was coming would have kept him alive. I cry because death is worth crying about, and because Diamond will never get to say goodbye. When I look at Diamond’s face I want to let her know that her dad never forgot about her, that he wanted to come back to her and that she will see her dad someday again.

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owever, this is not where Diamond’s story ends! She was adopted by an amazing doctor in Jackson, MS. She lives in a gorgeous mansion and has a new best friend; a little boy. Her days are filled with playing and swimming, going on daily runs, and being surrounded by pure love. Diamond’s past is full of tremendous happiness and terrible sadness… but her story is not yet over, not by a long shot. Diamond will live a very long and healthy life.

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or those of you who have dogs, please remember to think of them and to have a plan if something were to happen to you physically or financially. If you have family, talk with them. No one ever wants an extended hospital stay or to be laid off from a job, but these things do happen, and we all need to have a plan for our pets. 


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s we were coming home from dinner one night a few days before Christmas, I saw a dog cross the intersection that we were approaching. I am not one to chase an animal for fear of getting them off their path but I always “ask” them if they would like to be rescued. One of us got out at the stop light while the other one pulled the car around. The one who got out said “hey buddy” and Sherman put his head down and walked straight into her belly (something he still does every time he sees anyone). He had a very large gash on the top of his head so we loaded him up and got him to safety and he went to the vet the next day. He seemed to be doing well, was happy and playing. He was about to be neutered and treated for heartworm when he began vomiting. We took him to the Emergency Clinic where he stayed for a couple of days. After they got him to pass what they thought was gas, he was discharged. No need to need to follow up with the vet as he was considered to be in good health. My gut told differently, so I took him to another vet that afternoon. Someone was watching over Sherman (and me), because within 30 minutes of getting him there, Sherman was in complete kidney failure. We were heartbroken and in shock. You see, Sherman has the magnetic personality, EVERYONE falls in love with him the moment they meet him. He is a big bundle of love and affection, it only takes a minute for him to capture your heart. We said our “good-byes” and left him in the hands of the vet and his team, but knew to prepare for the worst; the vet had explained how extreme Sherman’s condition was. However, By Lisa Leight

the

Sherman is a fighter and to the shock and disbelief of everyone he pulled through; it was a medical mystery. Many tests were done, it took weeks to get back the results. Sherman was quarantined at the house. We had to bleach everything, and only one of us was allowed to handle him. After about a month, we received the test results which indicated that he had been infected with a rare disease. A disease dogs are annually vaccinated for. Another month went by, this time Sherman’s test results came back completely normal. Heartworm treatment was then started, which meant another three months of no activity. Yet again, Sherman handled it like a champboth heartworm treatment and isolation.

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After heartworm treatment, he again had good test results, so we went ahead with his neuter. Sherman’s disease is similar to mono; he will always have it, he will always test positive for it, but the chances of it becoming active again are slim. A few days after his neuter, he was doing, but then he vomited. As I watched him I began seeing very familiar symptoms. I took him to the vet as soon as they opened, and yet again, Sherman was in kidney failure. I thought we would be ready for it because we had been through it before, but we were not.

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he vet staff say “only Sherman” quite frequently. Like the time he split his nail in half (while on bed rest), or the time he was limping and we took an x-ray and found a bullet in his wrist. We were warned about

Shermanator

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a story of survival

how the kidneys might not bounce back this time and to be prepared. In typical Sherman fashion, however, he pulled through once more and proved everyone wrong, again. When we took him for a re-check, the vet walked into the room, holding a copy of Sherman’s lab work, and started laughing. He was could scarcely believe that he was looking at Sherman’s blood test results, and not another patients. The test results were completely normal, he was amazed at the lack of damage, it just didn’t make sense. The diagnosis was that stress caused the dormant disease to surface; attacking when the body was focused on healing from the neuter. So, now we know that Sherman needs a low stress lifestyle. There are certain medicines that he will have to be on regularly, or at least have prior and during expected stressful situations.

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he Shermanantor has a will to live and a love that is never ending. He may be considered a special needs animal because he needs medication for his underlying medical issues, but you would not think of him as ‘special needs’. He is an incredibly happy and playful dog, full of life. After all, he sort of rescued himself and has fought so hard to live and be healthy. The Shermanator needs a loving home who understands his issue; someone who wants the crazy unconditional love and affection that he gives, someone who is ready for a lap dog who prefers to sleep belly to belly with his arms wrapped around you! 

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Mississippi Majesties

Photographer: Kim Hunt By Liz Walker

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right lights and cameras are no stranger to Kim Hunt, the 5th winner on the television show “’Who Wants To Be A Millionaire”. Only now, Kim is the one holding the camera.

“My father loved to photograph our family trips and I gained that love from him. I remember my ninth grade Spanish class trip to Mexico with my father’s camera, which had a handheld light meter. He taught me how to use it and I enjoyed capturing images of my first solo trip out of the U.S.,” he says. As a self taught photographer, he continued to pursue photography for fun through high school and college. Originally from Jackson, Kim would relocate many times (including Romania) before returning to Mississippi in 2009. His photography hobby had already blossomed into a career when he decided to focus exclusively on Mississippi. “I want to capture the natural scenery, manmade beauty, ruins, flora, and fauna of the state. I want to share the beauty of God’s creation here in Mississippi, not only with my fellow residents, but with others in the United States and around the world,” he commented. Kim is currently working on a project to produce a Mississippi calendar for 2014. His breathtaking photos of Mississippi can be seen and purchased via his website. 

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Light Grafix | Brandon Kim Hunt ( 601-260-2021 * kimhunt@lightgrafix.com 8 www.lightgrafix.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/lightgrafix


Simply Stated

jewelry

my girls inspire me... By Jess Delrie

I

n 2012, Elizabeth Byars was sic, and timeless. “Most of my searching for a way to conjewelry is custom, and designed tribute to the family into the client’s specifications”, she come, while raising her shares. “I primarily use sterling two young daughters at silver and copper to create hand home. Simply Stated Jewelry is stamped jewelry with names, Bible her brain child, and she doesn’t verses, favorite sayings, etc.” have to look farther than the Born in Jackson and a graduate of dinner table for inspiration for Jackson Academy and Mississippi her unique jewelry creations. State, Liz and her family currently “My girls inspire me, and I have been reside in Oxford, but remain Bullblessed in the fact that I get to stay at home dogs to the core! Any given weekend, you with them, and not work a traditional job. will find the Byars clan attending and/or folKnowing that the money I earn goes to prolowing MSU sporting events. Her love of vide them with the opportunity to go to a Mississippi has inspired the design of a new Christian school keeps me motivated!” line of Mississippi necklaces which have Liz describes her artistic style as simple, clas- quickly become very popular. 

Simply Stated Jewelry | Oxford Elizabeth Byars ( 662-816-6613 * liz@simplystatedjewelry.com 8 www.simplystatedjewelry.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/simplystated

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Photos Supplied by Artist

DCZ Designs | Jackson Marek & Shelagh Dlouhy ( 601-421-0808 * info@dczdesigns.com 8 www.dczdesigns.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/dczdesigns

DCZ DESIGNS

m

By Monique Troth

There are three classes of people: Those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.” ~Leonardo da Vinci

M

arek Dlouhy, 33, is originally from the Czech Republic. His wife Shelagh, is from Texas. They met thirteen years ago after their respective careers led them to settle in Jackson, Mississippi. Three years later, they started DCZ Designs with a focus on designing original, artisan jewelry. Both discovered their creative talents in early childhood. Shelagh paints, sculpts, and designs interiors. Marek wood-carves. They personally hand-sculpt each piece of their remarkable jewelry using chisels, hammers, pliers, and soldering techniques, combining classical and contemporary styles. “Nature is our theme”, they tell us. “People motivate us when they love our work, wear it with pride, or critique it. We make it a habit to observe the world

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around us, God’s beautiful creations and our interpretations of those observations go into every piece we create. There is so much beauty to seen around us, and we must choose to see the good in this world.” Their signature piece is the Natchez Traceinspired tree necklace, which can be customized with different birth stones and various metals. They also create unique, one of a kind designs (including wedding pieces) that reflect people’s personalities and suit their lifestyles. “Creativity is very personal. It is an individual interpretation and expression of who you are and how you see the world around you. If our work sparks creativity in others, then we have certainly created something special.” 


A

lifelong love of arts and crafts has evolved into a very specialized artistic venture for one Mississippi couple. Carla and Roger Sturdivant are the owners and creators of Fused Glass, located in Florence. Surprisingly, they are completely self taught, and draw their inspiration from all types of artists and media. The Sturdivants enjoyed working in woodcrafts for over 25 years, winning numerous ribbons from shows throughout

While the artistic process may seem laborious to most, it is truly a labor of love for the Sturdivants. Every color in a finished piece was an individual piece of glass before the first firing in a kiln at 1450 degrees. That first step in the process takes 12 hours to heat up, melt the numerous pieces into one solid piece, and then cool down. After that, the new pieces of glass can be made into different forms by firing the glass again, to 1250 degrees, for 10 hours. In addition to using two kilns, a propane torch is also used to add unique twists to the thin pieces of glass. Each piece is unique.

Photo Supplied by Artist

da Jordan

Photo by Miran

Roger shares, “One of the hardest steps in creating the line, is cutting the glass without cutting myself. Using hand cutters and a diamond blade ring saw can also be challenging, and requires strict concentration.”

EYE Candy

Photo by Sara Gatlin

By Liz Walker

Mississippi. Deciding to venture out, Roger enrolled in a stained glass course but wasn’t really inspired by it. Unbeknownst to them, they were very close to discovering their true passion. During a cruise to New England, they were exposed to fused glass products for the first time, and fell in love. After intensive research, they produced their first creation, a ruffled bowl with flowers in the bottom of it. For Roger, his studio is somewhat of a sanctuary. “When Roger steps through the doors of his studio at 6:00 a.m., he transforms into a truly different person. His manner is very calm, and very creative”, says Carla.

The finished pieces are bright, colorful, functional, and downright fun! Appealing to all age groups, it has been described as a “party for the eyes”. The Fused Glass line is very diversified, from home accessories to serving dishes, yard art to business card holders, and even repurposed window frames with fused glass inserts. The couple is currently working on Pot melts, a new fused glass concept. During their down time, you will find them pursuing their other passions; travelling, camping, and junkteaking.  Fused Glass by Roger and Carla | Florence Roger and Carla Sturdivant ( 601-845-2645 * 1946carla@gmail.com 8 www.fusedglassrogerandcarla.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/sturdivantglass

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Naturally North By Liz Walker

With a discerning eye and a keen ability to isolate a small slice of any scene, yet tell its entire story, Alex North continues to draw praise for his photography of Mississippi’s gulf coast. In a little over 3 years, he has not only educated himself, but launched a hobby into nothing less than a visual feast for the eyes. “The difference between a snap shot and photo art is our expression in the photo. Own your photos by putting your heart into capturing the essence of why you pushed the shutter button.”, muses North. He also believes that leading lines are a key element in creating good photographic composition. “Did you tell your story by using the available natural lines to bring your primary subject in to the main view?”. Savvy words and sage advice from a man who purchased his first “good” camera to capture his son’s high school graduation. They have been inseparable ever since. And, just like a woman who can’t live without great accessories, Alex can’t live without his favorites. “I shoot with a couple of Nikon DLSR’s”, he says, “and my tripod is a necessity. I shoot 90% of my photos from this tool.” North feels that his work is improving, as he continues to learn and employ new techniques that define who he is as an artist. He strives for movement and drama in his photos, and relishes the actual hunt for an image, as he tries to find something unique and interesting in every day. “I try to capture things you don’t see, be it a stunning sunrise, Osprey fishing, or a bloom opening. My goal is to capture it as it is happening and share it with you through photography.“ You could also call him something of a perfectionist. “I always challenge myself to get the best image I can. Every year I go back to the same place to try and reproduce a better image than the year before.” Alex reveals that he takes thousands of photos, to get a few. He strongly believes that his camera is a tool, and if you use the tool correctly there won’t be much post processing left to do. And that is one of many elements that speak to the genius of his skill. Alex North is color blind. 

Photographer: Alex North

Naturally North | Gulfport Alex North ( 228-860-4419 * alex@naturallynorth.net 8 www.naturallynorth.net View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/naturallynorth


Pink and lue B Cute, Too! and

We have all heard the old adage ‘Pink for girls, blue for boys’. But did you know that pink and blue arrived as colors for babies in the mid-19th century, yet these colors were not promoted as gender indicators until just prior to World War I? By Miranda Jordan

E

ven then, pink hasn’t always been a color for girls, or blue for boys. Today’s typical color dictate with which we are more familiar was not established until the 1940s. Of course, color symbolism is highly culture-specific and variable; most American’s today do not necessarily subscribe to this as a rule; but it does provide the basis of one very clever business name! Following the birth of her daughter, Kylee, in 2002, Emily Thomas became a stay- at- home mom. While at home, she needed a creative outlet; she dusted off her grandmother’s sewing machine and went to work. Emily began by making tiny tote bags and ribbon dresses. When her son was born in 2006, she added boy outfits and baby items to her growing collection. Since Emily was now sewing for both girls and boys, she conceived of word play based on the saying we are all familiar with, to develop her company name, thus Sew Pink and Blue was born. Originally from Leakesville, MS , Emily now lives in Ridgeland with her husband of over 13 years, Jason, and their two children, Kylee (10) and Brent (6). Emily is both owner and designer of her children’s clothing business, specializing in boutique clothing and baby specialty items. Emily’s daily routine usually consists of working on her business by day, but at night, its family time. “However, if there is a deadline approaching, I will

work late after family has gone to bed,” she said. Emily’s own children have always been a great test audience for new pieces, but like all children they continue to grow. “They have now out grown my sizes! So now, they assist me with choosing the fabric prints.”

Photo by Miranda Jordan

Emily travels to Markets to find and purchase various fabrics, notions, and other supplies. Her favorite fabric to work with, however, is cotton. “I LOVE working with cotton! I spend a little extra on good quality designer fabrics. They tend to hold up better through the hand-me-down stage”, she explained. Emily also describes selecting fabrics as the most challenging part of her work, because she says, “I want it ALL!” Having always been a creative person, Emily says that it is not hard to stay motivated, everything inspires her, “I love challenging myself by working with unique patterns and fabrics to complete a garment.” The most rewarding thing, at the end of all that hard work, is when she sees her finished garments being worn by a little one or hanging from a store window. While Emily makes it seem effortless to successfully juggle her business and her family life, it does take hard work and dedication. So I asked her, if you could have one superpower, what would it be? Her reply, “I would LOVE to be Elastigirl from the movie “The Incredibles”! She could multitask and accomplish it ALL AT ONCE!”  Sew Pink and Blue | Ridgeland Emily Thomas ( 601-606-6174 * emily@sewpinkandblue.com 8 www.sewpinkandblue.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/sewpinkandblue

Photo by Miranda Jordan

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Photo by Miranda Jordan

MeMaw’s Cheese Straws

A

By Monique Troth ngie Edgar is a full time Junior High and Senior High School computer teacher, yet she still manages to operate a business that has grown in leaps and bounds. As she was preparing for the Mississippi Craft Show, we asked her to share her journey with us.

How did this all begin?

My mama (known as MeMaw to her grandchildren) was the best cook I’ve ever known. For as long as I can remember, she made cheese straws at Christmas, for church socials, baby and wedding showers, parties, and receptions. She passed her recipe on to me, and I prepared them as she had, for lots of occasions, as well as friends and family. I was constantly being told I needed to somehow market her cheese straws. In 2006, mama suffered a major stroke. The neurologists said she only had a few days to live, but, I always knew she was a fighter! I spent the majority of my free time with mama at the nursing home, and continued to make her recipe. Two of my mentors owned gift shops that sold specialty food products, and they agreed to sell the cheese straws during the Christmas holidays. So I went to work, really burning the midnight oil to keep just two gift shops supplied. After the holidays customers were still asking for them, and I felt the urge to keep cooking. This was my first sign that God was opening a new door in my life.

Photo b

y Sara G

atlin

I nervously decided to share a booth at the Mississippi Market wholesale show. I prayed day and night about this decision and remember feeling so sick the first morning of the market. I finally just said, “OK, God, I’m going to do this but if I don’t write any orders I know that it’s not meant to be.” I wrote 23 orders in that two-day show and cried all the way home, knowing God had said “Yes!”. That was a really busy summer, cooking and filling orders. Mama had proven the doctor’s wrong by living four more years, but her health was deteriorating. She had suffered so much, and I knew that she had hung on for me. When I kissed her for the last time here on earth, I felt it was time for me to devote my time to MeMaw’s Cheese Straws.

MeMaw’s Cheese Straws | Yazoo City Angie Edgar ( 662-571-6805 * memawscheesestraws@yahoo.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/memaws

How do you bridge the gap of the business side of designing?

The designing part of my business comes with the packaging of my products. In addition to cheese straws, I have added mama’s recipes for butter sugar cookies and an old trash mix, so there are now three products under the brand. I think it’s very important for a great product to be packaged attractively, so I change it seasonally, which requires time and thought. We continually hear that people love our packaging, and that makes it all worthwhile. What else would you like people to know about you and your work?

I love my time in MeMaw’s Cheese Straws’ kitchen where I am my own boss and the only employee. I talk to myself and my mother a lot when I’m cooking, and I really feel her presence with me all the time. Sometimes I can even hear her advising me like when I was invited to take the business to an international level, and she said, “No”. To this day, mama still inspires me and keeps me motivated. 

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Harrison Hollow Designs

A

By Miranda Jordan

bout seven miles south of Florence, Mississippi, just off Highway 49, lays the sleepy little town of Star. Faith Hill fans worldwide might recognize the name as the place where the successful country singer was raised. Ms. Hill is not, however, the only creative and talented Mississippian to be raised in this quiet little community.

Arlene Harrison, a polymer clay artist, was born in central Mississippi and settled in Star before starting school. Later, Arlene moved to the Jackson metro area where she raised her daughters. Arlene explains, “A twist of fate landed me back in Star and although it has its challenges, I love living in the country.” Arlene painted for over 30 years before arthritis began to cause painful cramping in her hands, and she was forced to seek out a different creative outlet. Realizing that she needed something that would keep her fingers moving, she decided to give polymer clay a try. “It turned out to be more challenging than I originally thought but it did give my hands the workout that they needed.” She said, “I found that many of the skills and techniques I learned with the decorative painting transferred from one medium to the other.” Juggling full time work and a home life, her creative projects began around 8:30 in the evening, but had to cease by midnight. “Now that I’ve retired that is not a problem,” she said. Arlene now dedicates her time to her creative business, Harrison Hollow Designs. During the day she can be found in her workshop building the wooden frames her mosaics are built on or in her studio making more tiles. At night she can often be found in front of the TV, working on her mosaics, the midnight hour no longer her curfew. The best past of her work, according to Arlene, is the satisfaction she feels when a piece is completed. But she also believes that for her, the creative process also provides therapy. “When I go for more than a few days without getting into my studio, I get cranky! I used to say that I couldn’t go too long without paint under my fingernails, now it’s clay!” Aside from art Arlene is passionate about the causes she supports. An avid dog lover, she has two dogs, both are rescues. She is also a cancer survivor who understands what it is like to be not only the patient, but also the caregiver, having lost both her husband and brother to the disease. “I’ve lost friends and family to cancer so this is a cause that I support.” Arlene’s designs are captivating and delightful. Each piece lovingly created by hand, they are not only beautiful, but infused with colorful joy. 

Harrison Hollow Designs | Star Arlene Harrison ( 601-954-5485 * arlene.harison@gmail.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/harrisonhollow

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Audible Delight

By Miranda Jordan

If you attended the Mississippi Craft Show last year, you were probably fortunate enough to hear the enchanting sounds of Chas Evans as he played for us live throughout the weekend. Chas, a Mississippi native, is a guitarist specializing in finger style guitar. Chas is also a composer and has written several pieces featuring the classical guitar which were inspired by his life in Mississippi. Originally from the small town of Chunky, he currently resides in Brandon with his wife Laura, and their two children, Katie and Chas Michael. At the tender age of 9, Chas found a curiosity for the guitar. “I come from a very musical family, everyone plays something. I took to the instrument very well and began playing in my Grandfather’s bluegrass band “The Melody Messengers”, he said. His interest never wavered and Chas went on to earn a Master’s degree from the University of Southern Mississippi in Music Performance/Guitar.

When asked how long it takes for him to write a new piece of music, Chas commented that it depended entirely on the complexity of the piece. Citing his piece titled “Father Of Rivers”, Chas commented,

Did you know?

T

he Mississippi Delta is the birthplace of the Blues, which preceded the birth of Jazz, the only other original American art form.

P

eavey Electronics, in Meridian, is the world’s largest manufacturer of musical amplification equipment

Photos supplied by artist.

To Chas, music is a form of self expression. “My music makes me unique. It is a reflection of who I am, and it is very fulfilling to be able to share myself through music.”, He said. Although he is careful not to put a label on it, he does describe his musical style as a cross between classical, bluegrass and folk music. “I use the music I grew up with as a base for many of my compositions.”, Chas remarks.


chas evans guitarist “I started writing that back when I was in college at Southern Miss. I started writing the end first. The last lick you hear in the song is the first thing I wrote. The piece just came to me over time. Additionally, Chas has a piece for a 12 string guitar he has been working on for several years, “I’m hoping to finish it someday,” he quipped, with fingers crossed. When asked if he could pick a personal favorite from his own compositions, Chas explained, “My personal favorite would definitely have to be “Father Of Rivers”. For sure, the piece I have poured all of my life experiences into as well as some complex and challenging music.” Since the move from a structured environment in college to the creative setting he now enjoys, Chas has been able to take what he has learned and use it to develop his own musical path, unrestricted. “During college, my curriculum dictated that I focus on learning the instrument and specific pieces of music. Having mastered those styles, I now enjoy using that knowledge to structure my own, locally inspired pieces of music”. Chas believes that originality, along with experimentation with new sounds and progressions is the key element to creating good musical composition. Inspiration comes from a variety of places, but for Chas, the most challenging part about his work is trying to retain those new ideas that frequently strike without warning. “I have to keep a notepad, pencil, cell phone and a guitar nearby just in case I need to play and record an idea for later use.” he remarked. The best part about his work, (other than his favorite Esteve guitar, straight from Madrid, Spain), is simply the art itself. “At the end of the day I enjoy writing things for others to enjoy, as well as myself. Performers love to entertain, and I do enjoy the thrill of a good performance.”. As for current projects or goals, Chas is currently focusing on his new website, www.musicformylyrics.com, which is a music composition service for lyricists

who can not write music. “People from all over the world send me lyrics which I put to music. I then create and record a quality demo for them to use to pitch their songs to major artists.” Chas is a member of the Mississippi Army National Guard and proudly served in Operation Noble Eagle in Washington, D.C. and Operation New Dawn in Baghdad, Iraq. He performs extensively in the Jackson area and beyond at a variety of musical settings including clubs, restaurants, weddings and other private events, regional arts festivals and more. Chas recently released his debut CD “Mississippi Sounds”. The original compositions on Mississippi Sounds are influenced by his home state, Mississippi. Having grown up listening to southern Gospel Hymns at church, as well as his Grandfather’s Bluegrass Band, the flavor of Mississippi is evident in his music. Listen closely and you will hear the essence of the Magnolia state; the lazy Autumn days, the sunrise in the Delta, and of course, the long, hot summer nights. So, what would Chas be if he could not pursue a musical career? Not surprisingly, he believes he would just be a starving artist. “I cannot run from the music in my blood.” And for that, we should all be very grateful. 

Chas Evans, Guitarist | Brandon Chas Evans ( 601-383-2738 * chas@chasevansguitarist.com 8 www.chasevensguitarist.com

View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/chasevans

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THE

A

Best Gifts COME

second grade girl gleefully embellished a simple, plastic box with beads and pretty stones. She presented it as a gift to her elementary school principal, explaining it was the box that held Snow White’s heart. This was to be a mere glimpse into the imagination and creativity that lives in the extraordinary talent of Elaine Maisel.

IN SMALL PACKAGES By Liz Walker

From childhood to college, Elaine devoured art classes. “I’ve always been a visual artist, but I couldn’t see how anyone could make a living at it,” she says, “I had plans to go to medical school, but orchestra was so fulfilling I ended up getting all of my degrees in music performance.” She has a doctoral degree in bassoon performance, and after serving 9 years as a music professor at MSU, she is now painting again. And while she has studied the works of other feather painters to develop her own technique, she is completely self-taught. The beauty of Mississippi’s natural resources serves as the backdrop for a craft that is nothing less than spectacular. FeatherMore specializes in painted feathers, which are mounted and framed behind glass or displayed inside glass bulbs as ornaments. Elaine does all of her own framing, repurposing and recycling old frames that are also transformed into shadowboxes.

FeatherMore | Ridgeland Elaine Maisel ( 662-722-2776 * feathermoremail@gmail.com 8 www.feathermore.me View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/feathermore

Photo supplied by artist.

Elaine explains, “I paint feathers with the intention of highlighting their natural shape and beauty. My aim is to never compete with or cover the feather, but to compliment it by allowing its shape, texture and color to guide my design choices. I personally know the names of many of the birds that provide canvases for my acrylic paint.

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The feathers are framed and mounted in a way that does not damage them, so they may be reframed later, if you choose.” Parrot, peacock, guinea fowl, and turkey are the birds she regularly uses. All of the feathers come from Mississippi and Alabama sources, and most are purchased from small family farms that raise free-range fowl, specifically for collecting feathers that the birds have naturally dropped. They are all legal to own, and all feathers have been cleaned and sterilized before the painting process begins.

E

Photo supplied by artist.

laine draws her inspiration from many areas, including things in her daily life, Mississippi themes, and ideas from her “dream world”. She prefers to work in large devoted blocks of time doing similar tasks, and says, “One day I will only paint. The next day I will make only shadowboxes. The following day I will spend my time framing. I find this focused approach to be more efficient and more fun. Once I get in the groove of something I like to keep going uninterrupted.” This Mississippi artist shares the best advice she ever received, “The only time that exists is now, and so do it right now. Carpe diem.” And her advice to others is, “If you want to be successful, find the thing that brings you flow (as defined by the psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi) and devote yourself to it.”

The only time that exists is now, and so do it right now.” Inspiring words from a woman who purchased a small painted feather in Puerto Rico as a souvenir, that would inspire her to create the clever, fanciful, genius that is FeatherMore.

Did you know this about Mississippi? largest national cemetery in the country. ArlingThe Vicksburg National Cemetery is the second-

ton National Cemetery is the largest.

claimed to make the very best snow sled in the Blazon-Flexible Flyer, Inc. in West Point is pro-

United States, which became an American tradition. It is called The Flexible Flyer.

World. Mississippi is the largest producer of Belzoni is called the Catfish Capital of the

pond catfish in the world.

in pairs (right foot and left foot) occurred in In 1884 the concept of selling shoes in boxes

Vicksburg at Phil Gilbert’s Shoe Parlor on Washington Street.

What does

Mississippi “M

mean to you?

y ancestors came to Mississippi and stayed without knowing the things I know about. I’m thinking that seed that William Daniel Wright planted in this soil and in his heart has kept growing these generations later. No matter where I have lived or travelled, it was these Red Hills and tall pines that created a yearning in my soul to get back home. I am home now and relive everyday the things that I grew up around. The fields planted and worked and the smell of fresh earth, the finding of little rabbits in a freshly plowed field and daddy bringing them for me to take care of. Then the little streams and springs on every other hill gave me cool fresh water when I got thirsty and a leaf used for my cup. Growing up in this State gave me warm days of sunshine and taught me how to make do with whatever was available. These lessons of life contribute to my love of ‘All things Outside’ now and enable me to be content in the Sunset of my life. I have been there and done that and love being able to sit on my deck in the country, sniffing honeysuckle and chinaberry blossoms, and listening to the mournful call of a Chuck Will’s Widow or a Whippoorwill. Love My Mississippi!

~~Dale Wright Green Jackson, MS

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Pit Bulls, Love Them, or leave them alone! The message

is straightforward and simple: Pit Bulls, Love Them, or leave them alone!

That’s the slogan of Shaw Pit Bull rescue, a registered 501(c)3 non-profit organization in Columbus, Mississippi, dedicated to saving abused, abandoned or neglected American Pit Bull Terriers. Their goal is to provide abused, abandoned or homeless pit bull dogs with the medical attention they need; as well as the love and attention they deserve to heal - both emotionally, and physically. All dogs that arrive at Shaw Pit Bull Rescue are given appropriate vaccinations and preventatives for worms/fleas, receive medical care as needed, are spayed/neutered and micro-chipped before being adopted out. Prospective owners are screened via telephone, adoption questionnaire, and/or home checks. Shaw works tirelessly to facilitate the rescue and placement of abused or abandoned pit bulls into responsible, loving homes. They participate in fund-raising events to help provide pit bull owners with the means to seek veterinary treatment; spay or neuter veterinary services; and to provide food and shelter. Dedicated to fostering responsible pit bull ownership through low-cost veterinary spay/neuter, education, adoption, and breed advocacy, this small, but vital charity struggle on, relentlessly, against the daily challenges they face as they continue to strive for their mission. To help fund the rescue, the group rely on donations, fund-raising, and merchandise sales. ď ś

The Mississippi Craft Show is pleased to welcome Shaw Pit Bull Rescue as our guests at the 2013 show. Shaw PBR will be offering their hand painted piggy banks, as well as other items they sell, in order to help fund their cause. Please come by their booth at the show, visit them on Facebook, or browse their website for more information and to learn how you can help.

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Aimee Shaw | Columbus Shaw Pit Bull Rescue, Inc. ( 662-386-1012 * aimeeshaw@gmail.com 8 www.shawpitbullrescue.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/shawrescue


Sara Gatlin Photography S

ara Gatlin is a young, creative and talented photographer from Jackson, Mississippi. Specializing in natural light, lifestyle portraiture for people seeking a modern & creative look for the memories they preserve. Sara has loved being behind the camera for as long as she can remember. Creating tangible memories that last for generations, Sara can help you capture every special event in your life.

S

Sara Gatlin is the official photographer for the 2013 Mississippi Craft Show.

Sara Gatlin Photography| Madison Sara Gatlin ( 601-213-7278 * sgat610@yhoo.com 8 www.saragatlinphoto.com View full profile at: mscraftshow.com/saragatlin

What does

Mississippi mean to you?

“I

t’s fishin’ holes and swimmin’ ponds. It’s good food, good fun, shade trees and hot sun. It’s shoeless summers and slushy winters. It’s porches for pickin’ guitars and shellin’ peas. It’s good people. Dang good folks who ask “hows your momanem” and really want to know. It’s old folk who knew you when you were “just this big” and younguns who still say yessum and yessir, please and thanky ma’am. It’s an invite to supper because Momma got a heap of meatloaf and some roastin’ ears and if you don’t get seconds she’ll pile em on your plate anyway. It’s a place where we may not know you but by God we gonna treat you like family. It’s who we are... It’s Mississippi...it’s home.” -- Samuel Dickinson.

w o n K u o Y d i D this about Mississippi? Pine Sol was invented in 1929 by Jackson native Harry Until 2009, Pine Sol was only produced in Pearl, MS.

A. Cole, Sr. 

First human heart, lung, and kidney transplats performed at UMMC Jackson, MS. H.T. Merrill from Iuka performed the world’s first round

trip trans-oceanic flight in 1928.

Mississippi was the first state in the nation to have a

planned system of junior colleges.

Jackson, MS

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MISSISSIPPI CRAFT SHOW EXHIBITORS 2013 Artisans from across the great state of Mississippi will come together for a weekend of shopping, fun and community giving. Hailing from 33 cities, from Corinth to Tylertown; in 24 counties, from Washington to Lowndes and everywhere in between. This show is truly representative of the quality and variety of hand made items created right here in the Magnolia state.

Patriot Penworks | Brookhaven Brian Anderson Hand Turned Wood Pens ( 601-466-0312 * livinbycalvary@aol.com 8 mscraftshow.com/penworks Southern Scentsations | Jackson Tiffany Carroll Candles ( 601-316-1328 * tw030449@aol.com 8 mscraftshow.com/tcarroll Beautiful Feet Mission | Waynesboro Ernie Clark Canvas Wraps ( 601-671-0735 * ernie@beautifulfeetmission.org 8 mscraftshow.com/eclark

Make Mine Fabulous | Ridgeland Frances Anthony Cupcakes, Cookies etc. ( 601-792-7251 * makeminefabulous@yahoo.com 8 mscraftshow.com/makefab Lil Audries Creations | Enterprise Charlotte Cates Children’s Clothes, Accessories ( 601-480-9494 * lilaudries@live.com 8 mscraftshow.com/lilaudries DeDe’s Jewelry Box | Plantersville Debora DeGraw-Hernandez Jewlery (Artistic /Metal) ( 662-346-9416 * Dhernandez@ms.metrocast.net 8 mscraftshow.com/degraw

Gen’s Gourmet Goodies | Ellisville Jess Delrie Home Made Breads ( 601-323-0599 * gendorleans@gmail.com 8 mscraftshow.com/gensgifts Art by the Griffin’s | Natchez Loraine C. Griffin Paintings & Wood Turning ( 601-807-3290 * lcggraphics1@aol.com 8 mscraftshow.com/artbygriffins Kreations | Louisville Barbara Hall Jewelry (wire, monogrammed, etc) ( 662-803-9855 * monogramkreations@yahoo.com 8 mscraftshow.com/kreations

Hardwood Logic | Madison Chris Hunt Wood Cutting Boards, Puzzles ( 601-946-7722 * chris@cghunt.com 8 mscraftshow.com/woodlogic

My Heavenly Creations | Olive Branch Shalene McLaughlin Bath and Body Products ( 901-626-9478 * smclaughlin@myheavenlycreations.net 8 mscraftshow.com/heavenly

Wonderful Works | Brandon Chantalle McWilliams Wood (Frames and Signs) ( 601-968-7233 * Wonderfulworksms@gmail.com 8 mscraftshow.com/wonderworks

J&T Wood Works | Byram Jasper Orr Woodwork (Banks and Boxes) ( 601-209-1376 * jas_woodworks@yahoo.com 8 mscraftshow.com/jtwood

Ineke Pearson | Clinton Ineke Pearson Clothing (Knitted & Crochet) ( 601-924-8618 * pearsonceramics@bellsouth.net 8 mscraftshow.com/ipearson

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Magnolia State of Mind | AUGUST 2013

416 Designs | Madison Wesley Spooner Woodworking (Furniture) ( 601-405-9391 * wspooner@phsa-ms.com 8 mscraftshow.com/416designs


Saturday August 24th

Sunday August 25th

Super Shopping Day

Shopping Day & Family Day of Giving

(Returning & new exhibitors!)

(Returning and new exhibitors!)

Entertainment

(Chas Evans performs)

Register for Door Prizes Food

(Eat lunch & take home treats)

Entry Fee & Hours Entry Fee

$5, Children 12 and under FREE

Hours

Saturday 9am - 6pm Sunday 11am - 4pm

August 2013

Entertainment

(Chas Evans performs; Also Special Guests perform at 11:30; 12:30; 1:30 & 2:30).

Register for Door Prizes Food (Eat lunch & take home treats.)

Adoption Drive (ARF will have pets on site)

Blood Drive (MS Blood Services mobile blood drive)

Pet Food Drive ARF gratefully accept all donations on both days of the show

Volunteer At The Show Volunteers needed. Email for info volunteer@mscraftshow.com

2014 Show Save the date! Mississippi Craft Show 2014 August 23-24 Don’t Miss it!

Blood Drive MS Blood Services blood drive. Come to shop on Saturday, keep your ticket! Return Sunday to donate blood. All donors who donate at the show on Sunday and present their ticket from Saturday will receive free re-entry.

Connect With Us Join our mailing list on our website, and like us on Facebook to stay connected! www.mscraftshow.com

AUGUST 2013 | Magnolia State of Mind

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There is no greater legacy to leave than a beating heart that would not have had a chance had it not been for

you.

Save a Life

Rescue. Adopt. Foster. Donate. Volunteer. Contact Your Local Animal Rescue TODAY!

Magnolia State of Mind 2013  
Magnolia State of Mind 2013  

Magnolia State of Mind is the official companion magazine for the Mississippi Craft Show™ published by Mississippi Craft Show, LLC.

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